Podcasts about databases

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Best podcasts about databases

Show all podcasts related to databases

Latest podcast episodes about databases

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 187- An Honest Conversation, Pt4

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 46:09


Part 4 of @pahowdy's conversation with Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) from the Dynasty Dummies podcast. An honest conversation, about dynasty fantasy football, how trying to “be right” or content” differed from trying to “play right” in your own leagues lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 187- An Honest Conversation, Pt4"

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast
No Database? Here's Where To Start So You Can Hit The Ground Running w/Brad McDaniel

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:44


Having a great database is essential to success in real estate, but putting one together takes time. For the seasoned pros who have spent years building rapport in their markets, this isn't too much of a problem, but what about newbie agents?    How can new agents build a database from scratch? Who should they be reaching out to, and how should they go about those conversations?   In this episode, Founder of Likely.Ai, Brad McDaniel returns to discuss how newbies can build databases that supersize their careers.    Three Things You'll Learn in This Episode    The key to staying in touch with our spheres no matter what How can we stay in contact with our databases in the event of another Facebook outage or similar event? Is it even possible to have total control over our communications platforms?    How to build connections with anyone (and EVERYONE!) From the dog park to the grocery store, we're interacting with a ton of people on a daily basis. What's stopping us from getting them into our databases?    Where to start when we're just getting started Who should be the very first people we include in our databases?   Guest Bio   Brad McDaniel is the co-founder and CEO of Likely.Ai, artificial intelligence geared towards helping real estate professionals sift through bad data to make low-quality leads a thing of the past. A highly sought-after Director of Business Strategy, Brad is passionate about problem-solving and developing successful web and mobile products.   To find out more, visit:https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradjmcdaniel/ https://likely.ai/ likely.ai/freshstart app.likely.ai

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 186- An Honest Conversation, Pt3

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


Part 3 of @pahowdy’s conversation with Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) from the Dynasty Dummies podcast. An honest conversation, about dynasty fantasy football, how trying to “be right” or content” differed from trying to “play right” in your own leagues lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 186- An Honest Conversation, Pt3"

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 186- An Honest Conversation, Pt3

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 31:10


Part 3 of @pahowdy's conversation with Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) from the Dynasty Dummies podcast. An honest conversation, about dynasty fantasy football, how trying to “be right” or content” differed from trying to “play right” in your own leagues lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 186- An Honest Conversation, Pt3"

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 185- An Honest Conversation, Pt2

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021


Part 2 of @pahowdy’s conversation with Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) from the Dynasty Dummies podcast. An honest conversation, about dynasty fantasy football, how trying to “be right” or content” differed from trying to “play right” in your own leagues lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 185- An Honest Conversation, Pt2"

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 185- An Honest Conversation, Pt2

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 37:52


Part 2 of @pahowdy's conversation with Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) from the Dynasty Dummies podcast. An honest conversation, about dynasty fantasy football, how trying to “be right” or content” differed from trying to “play right” in your own leagues lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 185- An Honest Conversation, Pt2"

Real Talk JavaScript
Episode 156: Cloud DBs with Natalia Venditto

Real Talk JavaScript

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:33


Recording date: 10/01/2021John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerNatalia Venditto @anfibiacreativaBrought to you byAG GridIonicResources:MongoDBCloud databaseACID Database PrinciplesRelational databaseDocument-Model databaseSQL (Structured Query Language)Referential integrity in databasesData localizationPostgreSQLThe Price of PeaceHemingway appHemingway's “Shortest story” contestTimejumps01:43 Guest introduction03:36 How do you think about databases in 2021?09:27 Sponsor: Ag Grid10:30 How do you break out various databases and when to use them?17:41 Databases in the cloud20:26 Stories of successful database decisions25:03 Sponsor: Ionic25:48 What kinds of issues did you have?28:51 Do we evolve past data schemas?36:01 What about relational integrity?38:33 When should I choose to go with MongoDB?41:16 Final thoughtsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

IGeometry
the cost of long-running database transaction (postgres/mysql)

IGeometry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 9:25


The cost of a long-running update transaction that eventually failed in Postgres (or any other database for that matter. In Postgres, any DML transaction touching a row creates a new version of that row. if the row is referenced in indexes, those need to be updated with the new tuple id as well. There are exceptions with optimization such as heap only tuples (HOT) where the index doesn't need to be updated but that doesn't always happens. If the transaction rolls back, then the new row versions created by this transaction (millions in my case) are now invalid and should NOT be read by any new transaction. You have two solutions to address this, do you clean all dead rows eagerly on transaction rollback? Or do you do it lazily as a post process? Postgres does the lazy approach, a command called vacuum which is called periodically Postgres attempts to remove those dead rows and free up space in the page. Whats the harm of leaving those dead rows in? Its not really correctness issues at all, in fact transactions know not to read those dead rows by checking the state of the transaction that created them. This is however expensive, the check to see of the transaction that created this row is committed or rolled-back. Also the fact that those dead rows live in disk pages with alive rows makes an IO not efficient as the database has to filter out dead rows. For example, a page may have contained 1000 rows, but only 1 live row and 999 dead rows, the database will make that IO but only will get a single row of it. Repeat that and you end up making more IOs. More IOs = slower performance. Other databases do the eager approach and won't let you even start the database before rolling back is successfully complete, using undo logs. Which one is right and which one is wrong? Here is the fun part! Nothing is wrong or right, its all decisions that we engineers make. Its all fundamentals. Its up to you to understand and pick. Anything can work. You can make anything work if you know what you are dealing with. If you want to learn about the fundamentals of databases and demystify it check out my udemy course https://database.husseinnasser.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hnasr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hnasr/support

The REAL David Knight Show
Wed 20Oct21 Mandated Firings Hit Top Nuclear Scientists — Religious Exemption Nukes Tyranny, IMPORTANT TIPS

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 181:36


TOPICS by TIMECODE 2:03 MANDATED FIRINGS hit top nuclear scientists with highest security clearance. Biden's become like Emperor Nero, burning down the nation — and he will shift the blame to the unvaxed 6:03 Dr. Seiler, MD points out how unvaxed are looking smarter and smarter 31:07 Listener — Personal story about God's provision 40:14 University threatens to charge students with trespass and arrest if not vaxed.  They will keep the tuition. 43:38  DO NOT MISS DEADLINE for Religious Exemption. Religious Exemption is VERY POWERFUL against these mandates.  Here's some tips.  But Washington State University fired its head football coach after he missed the deadline for filing religious exemption by 5 days.  59:10 What? New narrative — Christian author & pastor, John Piper, urges Christians to “resist right wing pressure” and get vaccinated.  Does he know ANYTHING about the medical, ethical issues involved here? 1:08:46 Listeners: celebrities & sports figures refusing vaccines and VaxPassports at concerts (like Travis Tritt & Eric Clapton) might turn more people; and listener's 16 yo daughter given jab at CVS & they refuse to cancel 2nd appointment 1:17:34 Medical Director: VaxPassport is ONLY to “Incentivize” Getting Jab. Says it doesn't have anything to do with transmission, unvaxed present no risk.  So — it's not about “health” just getting everyone vaxed 1:21:15 VaccinePassport FOR SALE: Hackers Will Put YOU in the Database. Actually, it's a bargain.  And In-N-Out Burger says it “refuses to be vaccination police for any government” as San Francisco closes them temporarily for NOT checking VaxPassports 1:29:16 Listener's letters, origami, figurines … and questions 1:37:01 Australian Cop's Personal Vax Tragedy. And the latest on the burgeoning dystopian police state there as Ted Cruz gets into a Twitter spat with an Oz politician 1:51:19 $93 BILLION in Vax Sales Buys A LOT of Media.  Evidently the adverse effects disclaimer doesn't apply when you “sponsor” the whole show without an ad.  OHSA tells companies to NOT keep records of vax injuries until May 2022 1:56:21 WATCH: Empty UK Parliament voting on lockdown measures by voice vote typical of the death of democracy by apathy just like the USA 2:00:20  America's idols — GOP fundraiser accuse people of being traitors because they haven't given enough money, Christian nationalists don't like jab, abortion or LGBT agenda but think “Trump is a miracle”; Jim Darlington's column is a prayer for 2022 that “Truth, Justice and Trump May Return” 2:17:15 Nolte/Breitbart claims there's a leftwing conspiracy to keep conservatives from getting “Trump Coronavirus Vaccine” which he calls a miracle.  The responses of Breitbart readers are hilarious 2:27:47 Listener's friend doesn't believe Trump Exec Order of National Emergency did anything 583 days ago 2:50:10 Are ports an unavoidable bottleneck, lazy crane operators, deliberate work stoppage — or something more sinister?   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Wed 20Oct21 Mandated Firings Hit Top Nuclear Scientists — Religious Exemption Nukes Tyranny, IMPORTANT TIPS

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 181:37


TOPICS by TIMECODE2:03 MANDATED FIRINGS hit top nuclear scientists with highest security clearance. Biden's become like Emperor Nero, burning down the nation — and he will shift the blame to the unvaxed6:03 Dr. Seiler, MD points out how unvaxed are looking smarter and smarter31:07 Listener — Personal story about God's provision40:14 University threatens to charge students with trespass and arrest if not vaxed. They will keep the tuition.43:38 DO NOT MISS DEADLINE for Religious Exemption. Religious Exemption is VERY POWERFUL against these mandates. Here's some tips. But Washington State University fired its head football coach after he missed the deadline for filing religious exemption by 5 days. 59:10 What? New narrative — Christian author & pastor, John Piper, urges Christians to “resist right wing pressure” and get vaccinated. Does he know ANYTHING about the medical, ethical issues involved here?1:08:46 Listeners: celebrities & sports figures refusing vaccines and VaxPassports at concerts (like Travis Tritt & Eric Clapton) might turn more people; and listener's 16 yo daughter given jab at CVS & they refuse to cancel 2nd appointment1:17:34 Medical Director: VaxPassport is ONLY to “Incentivize” Getting Jab. Says it doesn't have anything to do with transmission, unvaxed present no risk. So — it's not about “health” just getting everyone vaxed1:21:15 VaccinePassport FOR SALE: Hackers Will Put YOU in the Database. Actually, it's a bargain. And In-N-Out Burger says it “refuses to be vaccination police for any government” as San Francisco closes them temporarily for NOT checking VaxPassports1:29:16 Listener's letters, origami, figurines … and questions1:37:01 Australian Cop's Personal Vax Tragedy. And the latest on the burgeoning dystopian police state there as Ted Cruz gets into a Twitter spat with an Oz politician1:51:19 $93 BILLION in Vax Sales Buys A LOT of Media. Evidently the adverse effects disclaimer doesn't apply when you “sponsor” the whole show without an ad. OHSA tells companies to NOT keep records of vax injuries until May 20221:56:21 WATCH: Empty UK Parliament voting on lockdown measures by voice vote typical of the death of democracy by apathy just like the USA2:00:20 America's idols — GOP fundraiser accuse people of being traitors because they haven't given enough money, Christian nationalists don't like jab, abortion or LGBT agenda but think “Trump is a miracle”; Jim Darlington's column is a prayer for 2022 that “Truth, Justice and Trump May Return”2:17:15 Nolte/Breitbart claims there's a leftwing conspiracy to keep conservatives from getting “Trump Coronavirus Vaccine” which he calls a miracle. The responses of Breitbart readers are hilarious2:27:47 Listener's friend doesn't believe Trump Exec Order of National Emergency did anything 583 days ago 2:50:10 Are ports an unavoidable bottleneck, lazy crane operators, deliberate work stoppage — or something more sinister?Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Community Signal
Building a Database of CSAM for AOL, One Image at a Time

Community Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:52


If you work in content moderation or with a team that specializes in content moderation, then you know that the fight against child sexual abuse material (CSAM) is a challenging one. The New York Times reported that in 2018, technology companies reported a record 45 million online photos and videos of child sexual abuse. Ralph Spencer, our guest for this episode, has been working to make online spaces safer and combatting CSAM for more than 20 years, including as a technical investigator at AOL. Ralph describes how when he first started at AOL, in the mid-'90s, the work of finding and reviewing CSAM was largely manual. His team depended on community reports and all of the content was manually reviewed. Eventually, this manual review led to the creation of AOL's Image Detection Filtering Process (IDFP), which reduced the need to manually review the actual content of CSAM. Working with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), law enforcement, and a coalition of other companies, Ralph shares how he saw his own team's work evolve, what he considered his own metrics of success when it comes to this work, and the challenges that he sees for today's platforms. The tools, vocabulary, and affordances for professionals working to make the internet safer have all improved greatly, but in this episode, Patrick and Ralph discuss the areas that need continued improvement. They discuss Section 230 and what considerations should be made if it were to be amended. Ralph explains that when he worked at AOL, the service surpassed six million users. As of last year, Facebook had 2.8 billion monthly active users. With a user base that large and a monopoly on how many people communicate, what will the future hold for how children, workers, and others that use them are kept safe on such platforms? Ralph and Patrick also discuss: Ralph's history fighting CSAM at AOL, both manually and with detection tools Apple's announcement to scan iCloud photos for NCMEC database matches How Ralph and other professionals dealing with CSAM protect their own health and well-being Why Facebook is calling for new or revised internet laws to govern its own platform Our Podcast is Made Possible By… If you enjoy our show, please know that it's only possible with the generous support of our sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop shop for online community. Big Quotes How Ralph fell into trust and safety work (20:23): “[Living in the same apartment building as a little girl who was abused] was a motivational factor [in doing trust and safety work]. I felt it was a situation where, while I did basically all I could in that situation, I [also] didn't do enough. When this [job] came along … I saw it as an opportunity. If I couldn't make the situation that I was dealing with in real life correct, then maybe I can do something to make a situation for one of these kids in these [CSAM] pictures a little bit better.” –Ralph Spencer Coping with having to routinely view CSAM (21:07): “I developed a way of dealing with [having to view CSAM]. I'd leave work and try not to think about it. When we were still doing this as a team … everybody at AOL generally got 45 minutes to an hour for lunch. We'd take two-hour lunches, go out, walk around. We did team days before people really started doing them. We went downtown in DC one day and went to the art gallery. The logic for that was like, you see ugly stuff every day, let's go look at some stuff that has cultural value or has some beauty to it, and we'll stop and have lunch at a nice restaurant.” –Ralph Spencer How organizations work with NCMEC and law enforcement to report CSAM (28:32): “[When our filtering tech] catches something that it sees in the [CSAM] database, it packages a report which includes the image, the email that the image was attached to, and a very small amount of identifying information. The report is then automatically sent to [the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children]. NCMEC looks at it, decides if it's something that they can run with, and if it is … they send the report to law enforcement in [the correct] jurisdiction.” –Ralph Spencer When “Ralph caught a fed” (37:37): “We caught the guy who was running the Miami office of [Immigration and Customs Enforcement]. He was sending [CSAM]. … That one set me back a little bit. … I remember asking the guy who started the team that I was on, who went on to become an expert witness. He worked in the legal department, and his job basically was to go around the country and testify at all the trials explaining how the technology that caught these images worked. I said, ‘I got an email about this guy from ICE down in Florida, was that us?' He's like, ‘Yes, that was you.'” –Ralph Spencer Facebook's multiple lines of communication offer multiple avenues for content violations (45:08): “Zuckerberg is running around talking about how he's trying to get the world closer together by communicating and increasing the lines of communication. A lot of these lines just lead to destructive ends.” –Ralph Spencer About Ralph Spencer Ralph Spencer has been working to make online spaces safer for more than 20 years, starting with his time as a club editorial specialist (message board editor) at Prodigy and then graduating to America Online. He's wrestled with some of the most challenging material on the internet. During his time at AOL, Ralph was a terms of service representative, a graphic analyst, and a case investigator before landing his final position as a technical investigator. In that position, he was in charge of dealing with all issues involving child sexual abuse material (CSAM), then referred to as “illegal images” by the company. Ralph oversaw the daily operation of the automated processes used to scan AOL member email for these images and the reporting pf these incidents to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) which, ultimately, sent these reports to the appropriate law enforcement agencies. The evidence that Ralph, and the team he worked with in AOL's legal department, compiled contributed to numerous arrests and convictions of individuals for the possession and distribution of CSAM. He currently lives in the Washington, DC area and works as a freelance trust and safety consultant. Related Links Sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop-shop for online community Ralph Spencer on LinkedIn National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) Andrew Vachss Apple's extended protections for children Derek Powazek on Community Signal Derek's thread regarding Apple's announcement The Internet Is Overrun With Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong? (the New York Times) The Facebook Files (the Wall Street Journal) Jeff Horwitz on Community Signal Sophie Zhang on Community Signal The Facebook Whistleblower, Frances Haugen, Says She Wants to Fix the Company, Not Harm It (the Wall Street Journal) Facebook's Zuckerberg defends encryption, despite child safety concerns (Reuters) aol.com by Kara Swisher Transcript View transcript on our website Your Thoughts If you have any thoughts on this episode that you'd like to share, please leave me a comment, send me an email or a tweet. If you enjoy the show, we would be so grateful if you spread the word and supported Community Signal on Patreon.

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 183 – QB or Not a QB

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:10


@pahowdy does a quick performance check on 2021 rookies and then tries to justify his “maybe Jalen Hurts isn't dead yet” Taek lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 183 – QB or Not a QB"

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 183 – QB or Not a QB

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


@pahowdy does a quick performance check on 2021 rookies and then tries to justify his “maybe Jalen Hurts isn’t dead yet” Taek lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 183 – QB or Not a QB"

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: New Database Documents Campus Cancel Culture

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Cancel culture is endemic on college campuses. Every day come stories of professors, speakers, and students who run afoul of the radical left and suffer the consequences. With the frequency of these incidents, it can be difficult to keep track. The College Fix, the news site dedicated to providing a conservative perspective on news from […]

Daily Signal News
New Database Documents Campus Cancel Culture

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:11


Cancel culture is endemic on college campuses. Every day come stories of professors, speakers, and students who run afoul of the radical left and suffer the consequences. With the frequency of these incidents, it can be difficult to keep track.The College Fix, the news site dedicated to providing a conservative perspective on news from campuses across the nation, now offers what it calls the Campus Cancel Culture Database to document many examples."If you want to know the truth, if you want to know how America really used to be ... come to the database and we'll list everything that used to be there," says Jennifer Kabbany, editor-in-chief of The College Fix.Kabbany joins "The Daily Signal Podcast" to talk about the database as well as offer solutions for those getting canceled at their universities. We also cover these stories:The number of Americans quitting their jobs has reached record levels, the Labor Department says.To address bottlenecks in the global supply chain, the Biden administration announces that Walmart, FedEx, and UPS will operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.The drugstore chain Walgreens announces the closing of five more stores in San Francisco because of organized shoplifting. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
A database built for a firehose

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:26


HarperDB is a startup that focuses on highly scalable databases that handle real-time data. Harper is built on Node.js and Express with a little help from Fastify. They know where they excel and where they don't. High data throughput like  gaming and vision, great! High data resolution and transactional software like financial applications, not so great. It's speed over accuracy. Instead of a Lifeboat badge today, we shared a relevant question: Q: How to create HarperDB table with lambda.

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 182 – Vacated Targets Revisited

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


@pahowdy revisits vacated targets and how “missing opportunity” worked out looking at 4 examples of players missing and breaking out in 2021 lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 182 – Vacated Targets Revisited"

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 182 – Vacated Targets Revisited

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:25


@pahowdy revisits vacated targets and how “missing opportunity” worked out looking at 4 examples of players missing and breaking out in 2021 lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 182 – Vacated Targets Revisited"

The SCP Foundation Database
SCP Tales, Episode 9 - "Revised Entry" [SCP-173]

The SCP Foundation Database

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:33


An SCP Tale by FullHazard: www.scp-wiki.net/revised-entry Features SCP-173 - The Statue: www.scp-wiki.net/scp-173 License: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ ---- The voice of the Narrator was provided by Oktober Crow. The voice of John was provided by Joshua Alan Lindsay. The voice of the Other D-Class was provided by Breck Wilhite. The voice of the Database was provided by Joshua Alan Lindsay. The voice of Dr. Bright was this time provided by Christian Jasper. ---- Sound Credits "Abstract Ambiences 05-Layer 01 Deep-Drone.wav" by SoundBits / PSE "Alert4.mp3" by RICHERlandTV of Freesound.org [CC BY 3.0] "ATM Insert Card.wav" by engreitz of Freesound.org [Sampling Plus 1.0], altered "BodyFall-BodyFallsOnWoodS_2.wav" by SoundStorm / PSE "Bone Break Snap Crack Gore.wav" by SoundStorm / PSE "concrete blocks moving2.wav" by FreqMan of Freesound.org [CC BY 3.0] "Concrete,Drag,Smooth,Med 10.wav" by JR Fountain / PSE "Concrete,Drags,Mvs,Hits,Low 2.wav" by JR Fountain / PSE "HEAD CHOPPED OFF 01 CS.wav" by Clack / PSE ---- Enjoy the podcast? Consider supporting us on Patreon! Patrons get access to bonus Joke episodes, outtakes, exclusive merch, and can even request episodes on specific SCP objects. www.patreon.com/thescpfoundationdatabase Listen and read along in one place on our website: www.scpdatapodcast.com/episodes/revised-entry Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/SCPDataPodcast Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/scpdatapodcast Questions or comments? Email us at SCPDataPodcast@gmail.com

PurePerformance
OpenTelemetry for Databases: Empowering DevOps through sqlcommenter with Nimesh Bhagat

PurePerformance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 38:15


Optimizing or debugging database calls has to become as easy as optimizing your application code based on logs, metrics or traces your observability platform provides to developers. It has to be doable by the development and DevOps teams who are becoming more end-2-end responsible which includes new database services that are running in some managed cloud service.In this episode we hear from Nimesh Bhagat, Product Manager at Google, how modern database observability supports development and DevOps teams to better understand, optimize and operate their end-2-end service flow. A great project Nimesh has been working on is sqlcommenter which uses OpenTelemetry to continue distributed traces started in the application into the internals of the database engine.If you want to learn more check out the sqlcommenter documentation or the Google Podcast on Cloud SQL Insights.Show LinksNimesh on Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/nimesh-bhagat-b062354/SQLCommenterhttps://cloud.google.com/blog/products/databases/sqlcommenter-merges-with-opentelemetrySQLCommenter Documentationhttps://google.github.io/sqlcommenter/Google Podcast on Cloud SQL Insightshttps://www.gcppodcast.com/post/episode-247-cloud-sql-insights-with-nimesh-bhagat/

IGeometry
On Graph Databases | The Backend Engineering Show

IGeometry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 22:27


I get a lot of emails asking me to talk about graph databases, so I want to start researching them, but I wanted to give you guys the framework of how I think about any databases to defuse any “magic” that might be there. In this video, I discuss what constrains a database and how the use cases try to work around them. 0:00 Intro 1:50 What constrains a database? 4:00 Indexing Techniques 5:30 Storage Engines - Row-Store 9:00 Columnar Databases 12:00 Graph use cases 16:00 Graph Storage Engines Learn the fundamentals of databases, grab my my Introduction to Database Engineering udemy course here for a discount coupon https://database.husseinnasser.com

The Dana & Parks Podcast
Prosecutors: KCPD officer made "unauthorized" search in database. Hour 1 10/8/2021

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:05


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

REAL Talk with Brendan Bartic
Buyer Seller Investor Seminar [THE BEST Database Engagement Tactic]

REAL Talk with Brendan Bartic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:50


The Buyer Seller Investor Seminar is one of THE BEST database engagement tactics in real estate. Have a reason to call your database and past clients and know exactly what to say when you call. Learn to host a buyer/seller/investor seminar every 90 days and learn to leverage this opportunity to stay top of mind with your database and offer additional value with this tactic and strategy.  SUBSCRIBE & RING THE BELL to receive notifications on new videos dropping EVERY WEEK! Share the love! If this video helped you, please LIKE, COMMENT & SHARE.CONNECT WITH BRENDAN ON SOCIAL MEDIA:WEBSITE: https://www.brendanbartic.com/ FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/OfficialBBCFacebookPage INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/brendanbarticcoaching/PODCAST: https://bit.ly/REALTalkBrendanBartic LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendanjbartic/TWITTER: https://twitter.com/BarticRealEMAIL: info@brendanbartic.comLEARN MORE about all of Brendan's secrets and strategies to getting more clients and selling more real estate at https://www.brendanbartic.com/. GET MY FREE SCRIPT BOOK HERE: https://www.brendanbartic.com/ Knowing WHAT to say and HOW to say it determines your success with a prospect. When you know both, your confidence will skyrocket!TURN PROSPECTS INTO CLIENTS, OVERCOME INSPECTION OBJECTIONS and BECOME A BETTER NEGOTIATOR with Brendan's FREE Script Book. A complete collection of over 70+ SCRIPTS and OBJECTION HANDLERS that Brendan has personally used to sell thousands of homes.ARE YOU LOOKING FOR REAL ESTATE COACHING? https://www.brendanbartic.com/ LIKE FREE RESOURCES?WANT MORE TIPS, TRICKS, RESOURCES, and RE BUSINESS TOOLS? Join our Private FB Group, Brendan Bartic Real Estate Coaching: https://www.facebook.com/groups/584389598727184/WHO IS BRENDAN BARTIC?With $98 dollars to his name, a bus ticket, and a duffle bag fresh out of the United States Army, Brendan Bartic started out as an assistant to a top-producing agent making $8 per hour. With his sights set high and a long road ahead of him, Brendan carved his own path towards success one cold call and client relationship at a time. Now, a real estate titan, an elite coach, and national trainer with over two decades of incredible success in the real estate industry, Brendan has SOLD OVER ONE BILLION DOLLARS IN RESIDENTIAL VOLUME over the course of his career. As the owner of the #1 Real Estate Team in Denver, a top listing agent, and the Operating Principal of a brokerage serving over 200 agents, he ranks in the Top 1% of all Realtors in the Nation. Brendan is a United States Army Infantry Veteran. Growing up in an abusive home, Brendan left and moved from group home to group home until he was referred to Third Way Center, a place of hope to high-risk and disadvantaged youth until he was emancipated and joined the Army.  Now, giving back to the community that provided him so much, Brendan has helped raise over $1 Million for Denver's disadvantaged youth as the Vice President of the Board of Directors for Third Way Center. He's now sharing the secrets to his unrivaled success in real estate.

Channel 9
Migrating to SQL: Introduction to Database Schema Conversion Toolkit (DSCT) (Ep. 9) | Data Exposed

Channel 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 14:00


Looking for a cross-platform Oracle schema conversion solution? Join Alexandra Ciortea, Alexander Ivanov, and Anna Hoffman to learn about the new experience we are building in Azure Data Studio. This feature is currently available in Insiders build of Azure Data Studio and will soon be available in the mainstream as well.[00:25] Introduction[01:15] What is DSCT[02:41] Demo[10:09] What to know when getting started[11:39] Scenarios[12:38] Roadmap Resources:Azure Data Studio – InsidersMigrating to SQL series playlist

Stacks and Stories
Old News with Tracy

Stacks and Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:04


On today's episode, Tracy takes us into the world of old newspaper stories. Learn about banana crimes, a train accident, and a monkey who gets a bit of a shock!

Dynasty Crossroads
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 181 – Players to Target, Now

Dynasty Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:23


@pahowdy explains his process for finding “player to target now” in dynasty in season lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe Geering (@FFmanbun) made the “Chicken or Crow” theme … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 181 – Players to Target, Now"

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 181 – Players to Target, Now

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


@pahowdy explains his process for finding “player to target now” in dynasty in season lit Links: – 2021 data: https://twitter.com/pahowdy/status/1437874368445665288?s=20 – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe Geering (@FFmanbun) made the “Chicken or Crow” theme … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 181 – Players to Target, Now"

Turn the Dial
Episode 90: A Fresh Perspective on Building A Database

Turn the Dial

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 27:33


Episode 90:  In this episode Scott & Renee share on a hot topic....Database Building.  They offer a fresh perspective, and slightly different way to understand WHY you should have one and truly how to get started properly building it.1)  Why have a database?  To provide value to those people who have previously used your real estate services.  And, to build a network of advocates based on you demonstrating competency as a real estate professional.2)  You must have a proper mindset.  Eliminate limiting beliefs that STOP you from adding people to your database.  They cover several examples on this episode.3)  Where do I meet people to add?  They share real examples of who to add and how to build trust to eventually ask them.4)  You should have a solid system once you capture the information.    

SolarWinds TechPod
The Disappearing DBA: Career Advice From a Data Janitor

SolarWinds TechPod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 56:57


The DBA role is complex. Pitfalls exist everywhere you turn, and it can be difficult to survive and thrive. On this episode of TechPod, we'll help accidental DBAs become a DBA survivors with career advice from SolarWinds Head Geeks Thomas LaRock and Kevin Kline as well as Denny Cherry, CEO and founder, Denny Cherry & Associates. This podcast is provided for informational purposes only. © 2021 SolarWinds Worldwide, LLC. All rights reserved.

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 180 – Bounce Back Players

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021


@pahowdy’s lit Links: – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson (@NFLdrafttalker) made most of my graphics – Zac Reed (@tacitassassin13) made the intro and some fo the background music – Gabe Geering (@FFmanbun) made the “Chicken or Crow” theme song for @dynastycrossroads You can support pahowdy and find more content in the places and links below…if … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 180 – Bounce Back Players"

The Changelog
Fauna is rethinking the database

The Changelog

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 65:33


This week we're talking with Evan Weaver about Fauna — the database for a new generation of applications. Fauna is a transactional database delivered as a secure and scalable cloud API with native GraphQL. It's the first implementation of its kind based on the Calvin paper as opposed to Spanner. We cover Evan's history leading up to Fauna, deep details on the Calvin algorithm, the CAP theorem for databases, what it means for Fauna to be temporal native, applications well suited for Fauna, and what's to come in the near future.

Changelog Master Feed
Fauna is rethinking the database (The Changelog #461)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 65:33


This week we're talking with Evan Weaver about Fauna — the database for a new generation of applications. Fauna is a transactional database delivered as a secure and scalable cloud API with native GraphQL. It's the first implementation of its kind based on the Calvin paper as opposed to Spanner. We cover Evan's history leading up to Fauna, deep details on the Calvin algorithm, the CAP theorem for databases, what it means for Fauna to be temporal native, applications well suited for Fauna, and what's to come in the near future.

JAMstack Radio
Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura

JAMstack Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 31:20


In episode 87 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura. They explore the variables that come with running multiple databases including new security risks, authorization considerations, and problems around caching. The post Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura appeared first on Heavybit.

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 31:20


In episode 87 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura. They explore the variables that come with running multiple databases including new security risks, authorization considerations, and problems around caching. The post Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura appeared first on Heavybit.

The SCP Foundation Database
SCP-173 - The Sculpture

The SCP Foundation Database

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 3:09


This episode was requested by Patreon patron, Von Bright. To join him in his support of the show, and to gain access to a number of patron-exclusive benefits, visit www.patreon.com/thescpfoundationdatabase. ---- CLEARANCE GRANTED... WELCOME, AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL... SCRIPT BASED ON ORIGINAL ENTRY BY Moto42: scp-int.wikidot.com/scp-173 License: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ ---- The voice of the Database was provided by Joshua Alan Lindsay. ---- Sound Credits "Alert4.mp3” by RICHERlandTV of Freesound.org [CC BY 3.0] ---- Enjoy the podcast? Consider supporting us on Patreon! Patrons get access to bonus Joke episodes, outtakes, exclusive merch, and can even request episodes on specific SCP objects. www.patreon.com/thescpfoundationdatabase Listen and read along in one place on our website: www.scpdatapodcast.com/episodes/scp-173 Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/SCPDataPodcast Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/scpdatapodcast Questions or comments? Email us at SCPDataPodcast@gmail.com

Top Listing Agent Show - Real Estate Coaching & Training with Chadi Bazzi
eal Estate database management system with Brad Korn

Top Listing Agent Show - Real Estate Coaching & Training with Chadi Bazzi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:21


In this episode of The Top Listing Agent with Chadi Bazzi,  Realtor, Business strategist and the co-author of  the book E-Myth Real Estate Agent Brad Korn will show us the systems you need to put in place in order to take your real estate business to the next level. He will teach us the system to boost and grow your database.    Key Contents: + Who is brad Korn + Common mistake of real estate agents + How to clean up database + 4 step re-connect plan + How to  grow database + How to to develope relationship within the data base + How to lead generate using your database  + The 4 laws of lead generation and more    Quote from the episode:  "Database is the real goldmine." - Chadi Bazzi  "If your business isn't growing it's dying." - Brad Korn    Check out http://emythrealestateagent.com Subscribe for more real estate agent coaching videos: https://bit.ly/3h7Rpsz   ▶ ▶ ▶ WANT CHADI AS YOUR COACH ?  Schedule 1:1 Coaching Strategy Session:: https://bit.ly/3wowZlG    ▶ REAL ESTATE LEAD GENERATION   Download Top Listing Agent Black book: https://bit.ly/35k8bzm RedX: https://bit.ly/35j6YrX    ▶ FOLLOW CHADI  Youtube: https://bit.ly/2RQLRtW Instagram: https://bit.ly/3vtmoVq Facebook: https://bit.ly/3iBpRON  Website: https://www.chadibazzi.com/   Podcast: https://apple.co/3zpqrF8    ▶ ABOUT CHADI BAZZI Chadi is a Top Real Estate Coach and Trainer who has been on over 30,000 one on one coaching calls teaching real estate agents how to become top listing agents using his one of a kind unique 6 on one listings on demand coaching model.    ▶ FOLLOW BRAD  Youtube: https://bit.ly/3o0K6YI  Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XRT1kH  Facebook: https://bit.ly/2W3ozmI  Website: http://bradkorn.com/   ▶ ABOUT BRAD KORN  Brad has become one of the real estate industries most entertaining and sought after business development strategist. He just finished co-authoring a book E-Myth Real Estate Agent with Michael E Gerber. Brad has been continually learning, tweaking and perfecting the real estate transaction for his clients over the past 29+ years.  

JAMstack Radio
Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura

JAMstack Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


In episode 87 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura. They explore the variables that come with running multiple databases including new security risks, authorization considerations, and problems around caching.

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
Ep. #87, Multiple Databases with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


In episode 87 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Tanmai Gopal of Hasura. They explore the variables that come with running multiple databases including new security risks, authorization considerations, and problems around caching.

Complete Developer Podcast
Database Network Performance

Complete Developer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:36


In this episode, we're going to discuss several of the common performance problems that can occur when accessing a database over the network, as well as how to fix them. Read more › The post Database Network Performance appeared first on Complete Developer Podcast.

Screaming in the Cloud
Yugabyte and Database Innovations with Karthik Ranganathan

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 38:53


About KarthikKarthik was one of the original database engineers at Facebook responsible for building distributed databases including Cassandra and HBase. He is an Apache HBase committer, and also an early contributor to Cassandra, before it was open-sourced by Facebook. He is currently the co-founder and CTO of the company behind YugabyteDB, a fully open-source distributed SQL database for building cloud-native and geo-distributed applications.Links: Yugabyte community Slack channel: https://yugabyte-db.slack.com/ Distributed SQL Summit: https://distributedsql.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/YugaByte TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's promoted episode comes from the place where a lot of my episodes do: I loudly and stridently insist that Route 53—or DNS in general—is the world's greatest database, and then what happens is a whole bunch of people who work at database companies get upset with what I've said. Now, please don't misunderstand me; they're wrong, but I'm thrilled to have them come on and demonstrate that, which is what's happening today. My guest is CTO and co-founder of Yugabyte. Karthik Ranganathan, thank you so much for spending the time to speak with me today. How are you?Karthik: I'm doing great. Thanks for having me, Corey. We'll just go for YugabyteDB being the second-best database. Let's just keep the first [crosstalk 00:01:13]—Corey: Okay. We're all fighting for number two, there. And besides, number two tries harder. It's like that whole branding thing from years past. So, you were one of the original database engineers at Facebook, responsible for building a bunch of nonsense, like Cassandra and HBase. You were an HBase committer, early contributor to Cassandra, even before it was open-sourced.And then you look around and said, “All right, I'm going to go start a company”—roughly around 2016, if memory serves—“And I'm going to go and build a database and bring it to the world.” Let's start at the beginning. Why on God's flat earth do we need another database?Karthik: Yeah, that's the question. That's the million-dollar question isn't it, Corey? So, this is one, fortunately, that we've had to answer so many times from 2016, that I guess we've gotten a little good at it. So, here's the learning that a lot of us had from Facebook: we were the original team, like, all three of us founders, we met at Facebook, and we not only build databases, we also ran them. And let me paint a picture.Back in 2007, the public cloud really wasn't very common, and people were just going into multi-region, multi-datacenter deployments, and Facebook was just starting to take off, to really scale. Now, forward to 2013—I was there through the entire journey—a number of things happened in Facebook: we saw the rise of the equivalent of Kubernetes which was internally built; we saw, for example, microservice—Corey: Yeah, the Tupperware equivalent, there.Karthik: Tupperware, exactly. You know the name. Yeah, exactly. And we saw how we went from two data centers to multiple data centers, and nearby and faraway data centers—zones and regions, what do you know as today—and a number of such technologies come up. And I was on the database side, and we saw how existing databases wouldn't work to distribute data across nodes, failover, et cetera, et cetera.So, we had to build a new class of databases, what we now know is NoSQL. Now, back in Facebook, I mean, the typical difference between Facebook and an enterprise at large is Facebook has a few really massive applications. For example, you do a set of interactions, you view profiles, you add friends, you talk with them, et cetera, right? These are supermassive in their usage, but they were very few in their access patterns. At Facebook, we were mostly interested in dealing with scale and availability.Existing databases couldn't do it, so we built NoSQL. Now, forward a number of years, I can't tell you how many times I've had conversations with other people building applications that will say, “Hey, can I get a secondary index on the SQL database?” Or, “How about that transaction? I only need it a couple of times; I don't need it all the time, but could you, for example, do multi-row transactions?” And the answer was always, “Not,” because it was never built for that.So today, what we're seeing is that transactional data and transactional applications are all going cloud-native, and they all need to deal with scale and availability. And so the existing databases don't quite cut it. So, the simple answer to why we need it is we need a relational database that can run in the cloud to satisfy just three properties: it needs to be highly available, failures or no, upgrades or no, it needs to be available; it needs to scale on demand, so simply add or remove nodes and scale up or down; and it needs to be able to replicate data across zones, across regions, and a variety of different topologies. So availability, scale, and geographic distribution, along with retaining most of the RDBMS features, the SQL features. That's really what the gap we're trying to solve.Corey: I don't know that I've ever told this story on the podcast, but I want to say it was back in 2009. I flew up to Palo Alto and interviewed at Facebook, and it was a different time, a different era; it turns out that I'm not as good on the whiteboard as I am at running my mouth, so all right, I did not receive an offer, but I think everyone can agree at this point that was for the best. But I saw one of the most impressive things I've ever seen, during a part of that interview process. My interview is scheduled for a conference room for must have been 11 o'clock or something like that, and at 10:59, they're looking at their watch, like, “Hang on ten seconds.” And then the person I was with reached out to knock on the door to let the person know that their meeting was over and the door opened.So, it's very clear that even in large companies, which Facebook very much was at the time, people had synchronized clocks. This seems to be a thing, as I've learned from reading the parts that I could understand of the Google Spanner paper: when you're doing distributed databases, clocks are super important. At places like Facebook, that is, I'm not going to say it's easy, let's be clear here. Nothing is easy, particularly at scale, but Facebook has advantages in that they can mandate how clocks are going to be handled throughout every piece of their infrastructure. You're building an open-source database and you can't guarantee in what environment and on what hardware that's going to run, and, “You must have an atomic clock hooked up,” is not something you're generally allowed to tell people. How do you get around that?Karthik: That's a great question. Very insightful, cutting right to the chase. So, the reality is, we cannot rely on atomic clocks, we cannot mandate our users to use them, or, you know, we'd not be very popularly used in a variety of different deployments. In fact, we also work in on-prem private clouds and hybrid deployments where you really cannot get these atomic clocks. So, the way we do this is we come up with other algorithms to make sure that we're able to get the clocks as synchronized as we can.So, think about at a higher level; the reason Google uses atomic clocks is to make sure that they can wait to make sure every other machine is synchronized with them, and the wait time is about seven milliseconds. So, the atomic clock service, or the true time service, says no two machines are farther apart than about seven milliseconds. So, you just wait for seven milliseconds, you know everybody else has caught up with you. And the reason you need this is you don't want to write on a machine, you don't want to write some data, and then go to a machine that has a future or an older time and get inconsistent results. So, just by waiting seven milliseconds, they can ensure that no one is going to be older and therefore serve an older version of the data, so every write that was written on the other machine see it.Now, the way we do this is we only have NTP, the Network Time Protocol, which does synchronization of time across machines, except it takes 150 to 200 milliseconds. Now, we wouldn't be a very good database, if we said, “Look, every operation is going to take 150 milliseconds.” So, within these 150 milliseconds, we actually do the synchronization in software. So, we replaced the notion of an atomic clock with what is called a hybrid logical clock. So, one part using NTP and physical time, and another part using counters and logical time and keep exchanging RPCs—which are needed in the course of the database functioning anyway—to make sure we start normalizing time very quickly.This in fact has some advantages—and disadvantages, everything was a trade-offs—but the advantage it has over a true time-style deployment is you don't even have to wait that seven milliseconds in a number of scenarios, you can just instantly respond. So, that means you get even lower latencies in some cases. Of course, the trade-off is there are other cases where you have to do more work, and therefore more latency.Corey: The idea absolutely makes sense. You started this as an open-source project, and it's thriving. Who's using it and for what purposes?Karthik: Okay, so one of the fundamental tenets of building this database—I think back to your question of why does the world need another database—is that the hypothesis is not so much the world needs another database API; that's really what users complain against, right? You create a new API and—even if it's SQL—and you tell people, “Look. Here's a new database. It does everything for you,” it'll take them two years to figure out what the hell it does, and build an app, and then put it in production, and then they'll build a second and a third, and then by the time they hit the tenth app, they find out, “Okay, this database cannot do the following things.” But you're five years in; you're stuck, you can only add another database.That's really the story of how NoSQL evolved. And it wasn't built as a general-purpose database, right? So, in the meanwhile, databases like Postgres, for example, have been around for so long that they absorb and have such a large ecosystem, and usage, and people who know how to use Postgres and so on. So, we made the decision that we're going to keep the database API compatible with known things, so people really know how to use them from the get-go and enhance it at a lower level to make a cloud-native. So, what is YugabyteDB do for people?It is the same as Postgres and Postgres features of the upper half—it reuses the code—but it is built on the lower half to be [shared nothing 00:09:10], scalable, resilient, and geographically distributed. So, we're using the public cloud managed database context, the upper half is built like Amazon Aurora, the lower half is built like Google Spanner. Now, when you think about workloads that can benefit from this, we're a transactional database that can serve user-facing applications and real-time applications that have lower latency. So, the best way to think about it is, people that are building transactional applications on top of, say, a database like Postgres, but the application itself is cloud-native. You'd have to do a lot of work to make this Postgres piece be highly available, and scalable, and replicate data, and so on in the cloud.Well, with YugabyteDB, we've done all that work for you and it's as open-source as Postgres, so if you're building a cloud-native app on Postgres that's user-facing or transactional, YugabyteDB takes care of making the database layer behave like Postgres but become cloud-native.Corey: Do you find that your users are using the same database instance, for lack of a better term? I know that instance is sort of a nebulous term; we're talking about something that's distributed. But are they having database instances that span multiple cloud providers, or is that something that is more talk than you're actually seeing in the wild?Karthik: So, I'd probably replace the word ‘instance' with ‘cluster', just for clarity, right?Corey: Excellent. Okay.Karthik: So, a cluster has a bunch—Corey: I concede the point, absolutely.Karthik: Okay. [laugh]. Okay. So, we'll still keep Route 53 on top, though, so it's good. [laugh].Corey: At that point, the replication strategy is called a zone transfer, but that's neither here nor there. Please, by all means, continue.Karthik: [laugh]. Okay. So, a cluster database like YugabyteDB has a number of instances. Now, I think the question is, is it theoretical or real? What we're seeing is, it is real, and it is real perhaps in slightly different ways than people imagine it to be.So, I'll explain what I mean by that. Now, there's one notion of being multi-cloud where you can imagine there's like, say, the same cluster that spans multiple different clouds, and you have your data being written in one cloud and being read from another. This is not a common pattern, although we have had one or two deployments that are attempting to do this. Now, a second deployment shifted once over from there is where you have your multiple instances in a single public cloud, and a bunch of other instances in a private cloud. So, it stretches the database across public and private—you would call this a hybrid deployment topology—that is more common.So, one of the unique things about YugabyteDB is we support asynchronous replication of data, just like your RDBMSs do, the traditional RDBMSs. In fact, we're the only one that straddles both synchronous replication of data as well as asynchronous replication of data. We do both. So, once shifted over would be a cluster that's deployed in one of the clouds but an asynchronous replica of the data going to another cloud, and so you can keep your reads and writes—even though they're a little stale, you can serve it from a different cloud. And then once again, you can make it an on-prem private cloud, and another public cloud.And we see all of those deployments, those are massively common. And then the last one over would be the same instance of an app, or perhaps even different applications, some of them running on one public cloud and some of them running on a different public cloud, and you want the same database underneath to have characteristics of scale and failover. Like for example, if you built an app on Spanner, what would you do if you went to Amazon and wanted to run it for a different set of users?Corey: That is part of the reason I tend to avoid the idea of picking a database that does not have at least theoretical exit path because reimagining your entire application's data model in order to migrate is not going to happen, so—Karthik: Exactly.Corey: —come hell or high water, you're stuck with something like that where it lives. So, even though I'm a big proponent as a best practice—and again, there are exceptions where this does not make sense, but as a general piece of guidance—I always suggest, pick a provider—I don't care which one—and go all-in. But that also should be shaded with the nuance of, but also, at least have an eye toward theoretically, if you had to leave, consider that if there's a viable alternative. And in some cases in the early days of Spanner, there really wasn't. So, if you needed that functionality, okay, go ahead and use it, but understand the trade-off you're making.Now, this really comes down to, from my perspective, understand the trade-offs. But the reason I'm interested in your perspective on this is because you are providing an open-source database to people who are actually doing things in the wild. There's not much agenda there, in the same way, among a user community of people reporting what they're doing. So, you have in many ways, one of the least biased perspectives on the entire enterprise.Karthik: Oh, yeah, absolutely. And like I said, I started from the least common to the most common; maybe I should have gone the other way. But we absolutely see people that want to run the same application stack in multiple different clouds for a variety of reasons.Corey: Oh, if you're a SaaS vendor, for example, it's, “Oh, we're only in this one cloud,” potential customers who in other clouds say, “Well, if that changes, we'll give you money.” “Oh, money. Did you say ‘other cloud?' I thought you said something completely different. Here you go.” Yeah, you've got to at some point. But the core of what you do, beyond what it takes to get that application present somewhere else, you usually keep in your primary cloud provider.Karthik: Exactly. Yep, exactly. Crazy things sometimes dictate or have to dictate architectural decisions. For example, you're seeing the rise of compliance. Different countries have different regulatory reasons to say, “Keep my data local,” or, “Keep some subset of data are local.”And you simply may not find the right cloud providers present in those countries; you may be a PaaS or an API provider that's helping other people build applications, and the applications that the API provider's customers are running could be across different clouds. And so they would want the data local, otherwise, the transfer costs would be really high. So, a number of reasons dictate—or like a large company may acquire another company that was operating in yet another cloud; everything else is great, but they're in another cloud; they're not going to say, “No because you're operating on another cloud.” It still does what they want, but they still need to be able to have a common base of expertise for their app builders, and so on. So, a number of things dictate why people started looking at cross-cloud databases with common performance and operational characteristics and security characteristics, but don't compromise on the feature set, right?That's starting to become super important, from our perspective. I think what's most important is the ability to run the database with ease while not compromising on your developer agility or the ability to build your application. That's the most important thing.Corey: When you founded the company back in 2016, you are VC-backed, so I imagine your investor pitch meetings must have been something a little bit surreal. They ask hard questions such as, “Why do you think that in 2016, starting a company to go and sell databases to people is a viable business model?” At which point you obviously corrected them and said, “Oh, you misunderstand. We're building an open-source database. We're not charging for it; we're giving it away.”And they apparently said, “Oh, that's more like it.” And then invested, as of the time of this recording, over $100 million in your company. Let me to be the first to say there are aspects of money that I don't fully understand and this is one of those. But what is the plan here? How do you wind up building a business case around effectively giving something away for free?And I want to be clear here, Yugabyte is open-source, and I don't have an asterisk next to that. It is not one of those ‘source available' licenses, or ‘anyone can do anything they want with it except Amazon' or ‘you're not allowed to host it and offer it as a paid service to other people.' So, how do you have a business, I guess is really my question here?Karthik: You're right, Corey. We're 100% open-source under Apache 2.0—I mean the database. So, our theory on day one—I mean, of course, this was a hard question and people did ask us this, and then I'll take you guys back to 2016. It was unclear, even as of 2016, if open-source companies were going to succeed. It was just unclear.And people were like, “Hey, look at Snowflake; it's a completely managed service. They're not open-source; they're doing a great job. Do you really need open-source to succeed?” There were a lot of such questions. And every company, every project, every space has to follow its own path, just applying learnings.Like for example, Red Hat was open-source and that really succeeded, but there's a number of others that may or may not have succeeded. So, our plan back then was to tread the waters carefully in the sense we really had to make sure open-source was the business model we wanted to go for. So, under the advisement from our VCs, we said we'd take it slowly; we want to open-source on day one. We've talked to a number of our users and customers and make sure that is indeed the path we've wanted to go. The conversations pretty clearly told us people wanted an open database that was very easy for them to understand because if they are trusting their crown jewels, their most critical data, their systems of record—this is what the business depends on—into a database, they sure as hell want to have some control over it and some transparency as to what goes on, what's planned, what's on the roadmap. “Look, if you don't have time, I will hire my people to go build for it.” They want it to be able to invest in the database.So, open-source was absolutely non-negotiable for us. We tried the traditional technique for a couple of years of keeping a small portion of the features of the database itself closed, so it's what you'd call ‘open core.' But on day one, we were pretty clear that the world was headed towards DBaaS—Database as a Service—and make it really easy to consume.Corey: At least the bad patterns as well, like, “Oh, if you want security, that's a paid feature.”Karthik: Exactly.Corey: No. That is not optional. And the list then of what you can wind up adding as paid versus not gets murky, and you're effectively fighting your community when they try and merge some of those features in and it just turns into a mess.Karthik: Exactly. So, it did for us for a couple of years, and then we said, “Look, we're not doing this nonsense. We're just going to make everything open and just make it simple.” Because our promise to the users was, we're building everything that looks like Postgres, so it's as valuable as Postgres, and it'll work in the cloud. And people said, “Look, Postgres is completely open and you guys are keeping a few features not open. What gives?”And so after that, we had to concede the point and just do that. But one of the other founding pieces of a company, the business side, was that DBaaS and ability to consume the database is actually far more critical than whether the database itself is open-source or not. I would compare this to, for example, MySQL and Postgres being completely open-source, but you know, Amazon's Aurora being actually a big business, and similarly, it happens all over the place. So, it is really the ability to consume and run business-critical workloads that seem to be more important for our customers and enterprises that paid us. So, the day-one thesis was, look, the world is headed towards DBaaS.We saw that already happen with inside Facebook; everybody was automated operations, simplified operations, and so on. But the reality is, we're a startup, we're a new database, no one's going to trust everything to us: the database, the operations, the data, “Hey, why don't we put it on this tiny company. And oh, it's just my most business-critical data, so what could go wrong?” So, we said we're going to build a version of our DBaaS that is in software. So, we call this Yugabyte Platform, and it actually understands public clouds: it can spin up machines, it can completely orchestrate software installs, rolling upgrades, turnkey encryption, alerting, the whole nine yards.That's a completely different offering from the database. It's not the database, it's just on top of the database and helps you run your own private cloud. So, effectively if you install it on your Amazon account or your Google account, it will convert it into what looks like a DynamoDB, or a Spanner, or what have you with you, with Yugabyte as DB as the database inside. So, that is our commercial product; that's source available and that's what we charge for. The database itself, completely open.Again, the other piece of the thinking is, if we ever charge too much, our customers have the option to say, “Look, I don't want your DBaaS thing; I'm going to the open-source database and we're fine with that.” So, we really want to charge for value. And obviously, we have a completely managed version of our database as well. So, we reuse this platform for our managed version, so you can kind of think of it as portability, not just of the database but also of the control plane, the DBaaS plane.They can run it themselves, we can run it for them, they could take it to a different cloud, so on and so forth.Corey: I like that monetization model a lot better than a couple of others. I mean, let's be clear here, you've spent a lot of time developing some of these concepts for the industry when you were at Facebook. And because at Facebook, the other monetization models are kind of terrifying, like, “Okay. We're going to just monetize the data you store in the open-source database,” is terrifying. Only slightly less would be the Google approach of, “Ah, every time you wind up running a SQL query, we're going to insert ads.”So, I like the model of being able to offer features that only folks who already have expensive problems with money to burn on those problems to solve them will gravitate towards. You're not disadvantaging the community or the small startup who wants it but can't afford it. I like that model.Karthik: Actually, the funny thing is, we are seeing a lot of startups also consume our product a lot. And the reason is because we only charge for the value we bring. Typically the problems that a startup faces are actually much simpler than the complex requirements of an enterprise at scale. They are different. So, the value is also proportional to what they want and how much they want to consume, and that takes care of itself.So, for us, we see that startups, equally so as enterprises, have only limited amount of bandwidth. They don't really want to spend time on operationalizing the database, especially if they have an out to say, “Look, tomorrow, this gets expensive; I can actually put in the time and money to move out and go run this myself. Why don't I just get started because the budget seems fine, and I couldn't have done it better myself anyway because I'd have to put people on it and that's more expensive at this point.” So, it doesn't change the fundamentals of the model; I just want to point out, both sides are actually gravitating to this model.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: A number of different surveys have come out that say overwhelmingly companies prefer open-source databases, and this is waved around as a banner of victory by a lot of—well, let's be honest—open-source database companies. I posit that is in fact crap and also bad data because what the open-source purists—of which I admit, I used to be one, and now I solve business problems instead—believe that people are talking about freedom, and choice, and the rest. In practice, in my experience, what people are really distilling that down to is they don't want a commercial database. And it's not even about they're not willing to pay money for it, but they don't want to have a per-core licensing challenge, or even having to track licensing of where it is installed and how, and wind up having to cut checks for folks. For example, I'm going to dunk on someone because why not?Azure for a while has had this campaign that it is five times cheaper to run some Microsoft SQL workloads in Azure than it is on AWS as if this was some magic engineering feat of strength or something. It's absolutely not, it's that it is really expensive licensing-wise to run it on things that aren't Azure. And that doesn't make customers feel good. That's the thing they want to get away from, and what open-source license it is, and in many cases, until the source-available stuff starts trending towards, “Oh, you're going to pay us or you're not going to run it at all,” that scares the living hell out of people, then they don't actually care about it being open. So, at the risk of alienating, I'm sure, some of the more vocal parts of your constituency, where do you fall on that?Karthik: We are completely open, but for a few reasons right? Like, multiple different reasons. The debate of whether it purely is open or is completely permissible, to me, I tend to think a little more where people care about the openness more so than just the ability to consume at will without worrying about the license, but for a few different reasons, and it depends on which segment of the market you look at. If you're talking about small and medium businesses and startups, you're absolutely right; it doesn't matter. But if you're looking at larger companies, they actually care that, like for example, if they want a feature, they are able to control their destiny because you don't want to be half-wedded to a database that cannot solve everything, especially when the time pressure comes or you need to do something.So, you want to be able to control or to influence the roadmap of the project. You want to know how the product is built—the good and the bad—you want a lot of people testing the product and their feedback to come out in the open, so you at least know what's wrong. Many times people often feel like, “Hey, my product doesn't work in these areas,” is actually a bad thing. It's actually a good thing because at least those people won't try it and [laugh] they'll be safe. Customer satisfaction is more important than just the apparent whatever it is that you want to project about the product.At least that's what I've learned in all these years working with databases. But there's a number of reasons why open-source is actually good. There's also a very subtle reason that people may not understand which is that legal teams—engineering teams that want to build products don't want to get caught up in a legal review that takes many months to really make sure, look, this may be a unique version of a license, but it's not a license the legal team as seen before, and there's going to be a back and forth for many months, and it's just going to derail their product and their timelines, not because the database didn't do its job or because the team wasn't ready, but because the company doesn't know what the risk it'll face in the future is. There's a number of these aspects where open-source starts to matter for real. I'm not a purist, I would say.I'm a pragmatist, and I have always been, but I would say that a number of reasons why–you know, I might be sounding like a purist, but a number of reasons why a true open-source is actually useful, right? And at the end of the day, if we have already established, at least at Yugabyte, we're pretty clear about that, the value is in the consumption and is not in the tech if we're pretty clear about that. Because if you want to run a tier-two workload or a hobbyist app at home, would you want to pay for a database? Probably not. I just want to do something for a while and then shut it down and go do my thing. I don't care if the database is commercial or open-source. In that case, being open-source doesn't really take away. But if you're a large company betting, it does take away. So.Corey: Oh, it goes beyond that because it's not even, in the large company story, whether it costs money because regardless, I assure you, open-source is not free; the most expensive thing that we see in all of our customer accounts—again, our consultancy fixes AWS bills, an expensive problem that hits everyone—the environment in AWS is always less expensive than the people who are working on the environment. Payroll is an expense that dwarfs the AWS bill for anyone that is not a tiny startup that is still not paying a market-rate salary to its founders. It doesn't work that way. And the idea, for those folks is, not about the money, it's about the predictability. And if there's a 5x price hike from their database manager that suddenly completely disrupts their unit economic model, and they're in trouble. That's the value of open-source in that it can go anywhere. It's a form of not being locked into any vendor where it's hosted, as well as, now, no one company that has put it out there into the world.Karthik: Yeah, and the source-available license, we considered that also. The reason to vote against that was you can get into scenarios where the company gets competitive with his open-source site where the open-source wants a couple other features to really make it work for their own use case, like you know, case in point is the startup, but the company wants to hold those features for the commercial side, and now the startup has that 5x price jump anyway. So, at this point, it comes to a head-on where the company—the startup—is being charged not for value, but because of the monetization model or the business model. So, we said, “You know what? The best way to do this is to truly compete against open-source. If someone wants to operationalize the database, great. But we've already done it for you.” If you think that you can operationalize it at a lower cost than what we've done, great. That's fine.Corey: I have to ask, there has to have been a question somewhere along the way, during the investment process of, what if AWS moves into your market? And I can already say part of the problem with that line of reasoning is, okay, let's assume that AWS turns Yugabyte into a managed database offering. First, they're not going to be able to articulate for crap why you should use that over anything else because they tend to mumble when it comes time to explain what it is that they do. But it has to be perceived as a competitive threat. How do you think about that?Karthik: Yeah, this absolutely came up quite a bit. And like I said, in 2016, this wasn't news back then; this is something that was happening in the world already. So, I'll give you a couple of different points of view on this. The reason why AWS got so successful in building a cloud is not because they wanted to get into the database space; they simply wanted their cloud to be super successful and required value-added services like these databases. Now, every time a new technology shift happens, it gives some set of people an unfair advantage.In this case, database vendors probably didn't recognize how important the cloud was and how important it was to build a first-class experience on the cloud on day one, as the cloud came up because it wasn't proven, and they had twenty other things to do, and it's rightfully so. Now, AWS comes up, and they're trying to prove a point that the cloud is really useful and absolutely valuable for their customers, and so they start putting value-added services, and now suddenly you're in this open-source battle. At least that's how I would view that it kind of developed. With Yugabyte, obviously, the cloud's already here; we know on day one, so we're kind of putting out our managed service so we'll be as good as AWS or better. The database has its value, but the managed service has its own value, and so we'd want to make sure we provide at least as much value as AWS, but on any cloud, anywhere.So, that's the other part. And we also talked about the mobility of the DBaaS itself, the moving it to your private account and running the same thing, as well as for public. So, these are some of the things that we have built that we believe makes us super valuable.Corey: It's a better approach than a lot of your predecessor companies who decided, “Oh, well, we built the thing; obviously, we're going to be the best at running it. The end.” Because they dramatically sold AWS's operational excellence short. And it turns out, they're very good at running things at scale. So, that's a challenging thing to beat them on.And even if you're able to, it's hard to differentiate among the differences because at that caliber of operational rigor, it's one of those, you can only tell in the very niche cases; it's a hard thing to differentiate on. I like your approach a lot better. Before we go, I have one last question for you, and normally, it's one of those positive uplifting ones of what workloads are best for Yugabyte, but I think that's boring; let's be more cynical and negative. What workloads would run like absolute crap on YugabyteDB?Karthik: [laugh]. Okay, we do have a thing for this because we don't want to take on workloads and, you know, everybody have a bad experience around. So, we're a transactional database built for user-facing applications, real-time, and so on, right? We're not good at warehousing and analytic workloads. So, for example, if you were using a Snowflake or a Redshift, those workloads are not going to work very well on top of Yugabyte.Now, we do work with other external systems like Spark, and Presto, which are real-time analytic systems, but they translate the queries that the end-user have into a more operational type of query pattern. However, if you're using it straight-up for analytics, we're not a good bet. Similarly, there's cases where people want very high number of IOPS by reusing a cache or even a persistent cache. Amazon just came out with a [number of 00:31:04] persistent cache that does very high throughput and low-latency serving. We're not good at that.We can do reasonably low-latency serving and reasonably high IOPS at scale, but we're not the use case where you want to hit that same lookup over and over and over, millions of times in a second; that's not the use case for us. The third thing I'd say is, we're a system of record, so people care about the data they put, and they don't absolutely don't want to lose it and they want to show that it's transactional. So, if there's a workload where there's a lot of data and you're okay if you want to lose, and it's just some sensor data, and your reasoning is like, “Okay, if I lose a few data points, it's fine.” I mean, you could still use us, but at that point you'd really have to be a fanboy or something for Yugabyte. I mean, there's other databases that probably do it better.Corey: Yeah, that's the problem is whenever someone says, “Oh, yeah. Database”—or any tool that they've built—“Like, this is great.” “What workloads is it not a fit for?” And their answer is, “Oh, nothing. It's perfect for everything.”Yeah, I want to believe you, but my inner bullshit sense is tingling on that one because nothing's fit for all purposes; it doesn't work that way. Honestly, this is going to be, I guess, heresy in the engineering world, but even computers aren't always the right answer for things. Who knew?Karthik: As a founder, I struggled with this answer a lot, initially. I think the problem is, when you're thinking about a problem space, that's all you're thinking about, you don't know what other problem spaces exist, and when you are asked the question, “What workloads is it a fit for?” At least I used to say, initially, “Everything,” because I'm only thinking about that problem space as the world, and it's fit for everything in that problem space, except I don't know how to articulate the problem space—Corey: Right—Karthik: —[crosstalk 00:32:33]. [laugh].Corey: —and at some point, too, you get so locked into one particular way of thinking that the world that people ask about other cases like, “Oh, that wouldn't count.” And then your follow-up question is, “Wait, what's a bank?” And it becomes a different story. It's, how do you wind up reasoning about these things? I want to thank you for taking all the time you have today to speak with me. If people want to learn more about Yugabyte—either the company or the DB—how can they do that?Karthik: Yeah, thank you as well for having me. I think to learn about Yugabyte, just come join our community Slack channel. There's a lot of people; there's, like, over 3000 people. They're all talking interesting questions. There's a lot of interesting chatter on there, so that's one way.We have an industry-wide event, it's called the Distributed SQL Summit. It's coming up September 22nd, 23rd, I think a couple of days; it's a two-day event. That would be a great place to actually learn from practitioners, and people building applications, and people in the general space and its adjacencies. And it's not necessarily just about Yugabyte; it's generally about distributed SQL databases, in general, hence it's called the Distributed SQL Summit. And then you can ask us on Twitter or any of the usual social channels as well. So, we love interaction, so we are pretty open and transparent company. We love to talk to you guys.Corey: Well, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. Well, of course, throw links to that into the [show notes 00:33:43]. Thank you again.Karthik: Awesome. Thanks a lot for having me. It was really fun. Thank you.Corey: Likewise. Karthik Ranganathan, CTO, and co-founder of YugabyteDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, halfway through realizing that I'm not charging you anything for this podcast and converting the angry comment into a term sheet for $100 million investment.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast
Database Marketing 101: The BEST Place to Look for Leads Is Right Under Your Nose

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 56:28


For those of us who have spent years curating our databases, we're sitting on absolute GOLDMINES. The question is, why are so few of us tapping into them?   Why is it that so many agents are more comfortable making cold calls to absolute strangers than to the people who already know, like and trust us?   In this episode, we're diving deep into mining our databases and capitalizing off of the connections we've already made.    Three Things You'll Learn in This Episode    How to strike up a conversation with old contacts Is it possible (and advisable!) to reconnect with the people in our spheres if we haven't touched base with them for years?    What NOT to do when reaching out to our spheres Is there anything we want to avoid entirely when it comes to communicating with our databases?   The FORD framework for effective reconnections How can we guarantee a successful conversation with the people in our databases?

Rising Laterally
Be the Node: Graph Databases and Dunbar's Number

Rising Laterally

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 20:13


In this episode, we reflect on the significance of human networks in the context of graph databases, Dunbar's number, and the shifting social landscape amid the pandemic. We also share some stories about the great connectors throughout history.====================0:00 Graph databases3:25 Dunbar's number 4:28 Social brain hypothesis6:44 Jordan Peterson and how our actions have ripple effects 8:11 What the pandemic has changed about our friendships12:53 The story of how The Beatles were formed15:03 Go to Market Grit podcast recommendation15:50 How is Quentin Tarantino a node?18:17 What's the big idea?====================LinkTree to support us (thank you!)Let's get in touch!Join the discussion in the episode comments on our YouTube channel or social media pages...InstagramTwitter

Montana Murder Mysteries
Consumer DNA Databases: Montana Set to Restrict Police Access

Montana Murder Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 21:02


Within the last year alone, Montana has seen major breaks in cold cases. And it's due in large part to a relatively new technology called forensic genetic genealogy testing, commonly known as consumer DNA testing. However, come October 1, 2021, Montana will become one of only two states in the nation set to restrict law enforcement from gathering vital clues from these consumer DNA databases, like 23andMe and Ancestry.com. Hosts Angela Marshall and Blake Simonson look at some of the cases that have been solved using forensic genetic genealogy testing. Plus, they break down this first-of-its-kind legislation to find out how it could complicate matters for law enforcement and family members in trying to solve cold cases.

DLF Family of Podcasts
Dynasty Crossroads Episode 179 – Living the Flex

DLF Family of Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


@pahowdy talks about trying to improve his flex decisions and converting narrative into a better process Top 36 WRs finish with 12 pts or more more often the RBs inside the top 24, and he honestly didn’t know, or forgot to incorporate that into his decision procces lit Links: – Database: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46218140 – Jake Anderson … Continue reading "Dynasty Crossroads Episode 179 – Living the Flex"

Keeping It Real
How to Reconnect with Your Database w/ Frank Klesitz

Keeping It Real

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:07


Join us for this Keeping it Real where you'll learn how to reconnect with your neglected past clients, sphere, and lead nurtures so more people call you without spending a lot of money. You'll learn a simple process to export all your contacts into one file - properly de-duplicated and scrubbed - so you can email them a re-connect message about the latest local real estate news. You'll get a copy of this message on the show. Then, you'll put everyone on a “36 touch” plan so you're top of mind as their go-to real estate agent. You'll even be able to track who engaging with you so you can follow up. The strategies you'll learn to do this are inexpensive and simple. As a bonus, not only can you reconnect with your database, but you can also work the databases of other agents in your market for a referral fee – a low-risk way of generating high-quality leads for yourself. Join Frank Klesitz this week to learn everything you wanted to know about how to get the most business from your #1 asset – all those emails, phone numbers, and mailing addresses sitting in your Gmail, Outlook, mobile phone, and CRM(s).

Keeping It Real
How to Reconnect with Your Database w/ Frank Klesitz

Keeping It Real

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:07


Join us for this Keeping it Real where you'll learn how to reconnect with your neglected past clients, sphere, and lead nurtures so more people call you without spending a lot of money. You'll learn a simple process to export all your contacts into one file - properly de-duplicated and scrubbed - so you can email them a re-connect message about the latest local real estate news. You'll get a copy of this message on the show. Then, you'll put everyone on a “36 touch” plan so you're top of mind as their go-to real estate agent. You'll even be able to track who engaging with you so you can follow up. The strategies you'll learn to do this are inexpensive and simple. As a bonus, not only can you reconnect with your database, but you can also work the databases of other agents in your market for a referral fee – a low-risk way of generating high-quality leads for yourself. Join Frank Klesitz this week to learn everything you wanted to know about how to get the most business from your #1 asset – all those emails, phone numbers, and mailing addresses sitting in your Gmail, Outlook, mobile phone, and CRM(s).

Wholesaling Inc
WIP 778: A Surefire Way to Close More Deals Just Sitting in Your Database

Wholesaling Inc

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 15:06


If you're an agent (or you know someone who is), is the REI Revive program right for you? The answer is, of course, YES! One of the most common misconceptions about real estate agents/brokers is that they can easily sell or purchase a house. The reality is that you need to be in the right mindset to understand the type of investor you're talking with and to look out for their best interest so that you can gain their trust and successfully close deals. Joining Chris Craddock on the show today is Kelly Sanabria, who has been a licensed real estate agent in the DC metro area for over 3 years. She will discuss how the REI Revive course helped her team fill in the gaps in their business, resulting in a $4,000 deal in just a month with a few more contracts in the pipeline. She will also talk about the importance of having an experienced mentor who can shorten the learning curve and help you start making a lot of deals. RESOURCES: REI Revive Program REI Radio Program with Chris Arnold Flip the Script by Oren Klaff Kelly on Instagram Email Address: kellysanabria@kw.com

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast
Generating SQL [Database Queries] from Natural Language with Yanshuai Cao - #519

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:28


Today we're joined by Yanshuai Cao, a senior research team lead at Borealis AI. In our conversation with Yanshuai, we explore his work on Turing, their natural language to SQL engine that allows users to get insights from relational databases without having to write code. We do a bit of compare and contrast with the recently released Codex Model from OpenAI, the role that reasoning plays in solving this problem, and how it is implemented in the model. We also talk through various challenges like data augmentation, the complexity of the queries that Turing can produce, and a paper that explores the explainability of this model. The complete show notes for this episode can be found at twimlai.com/go/519.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck - Sass × Houdini × No JS? × Solid Project × First Dev Job Tips × Bartering × DRM × Dev Laptops × Databases × Frontity × More!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 53:01


It's another Potluck! In this episode, Scott and Wes answer your questions about Sass, Houdini, JS requirements, tips for your first dev job, dev laptops, databases, Frontity, and more! Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Auth0 - Sponsor Auth0 is the easiest way for developers to add authentication and secure their applications. They provide features like user management, multi-factor authentication, and you can even enable users to login with device biometrics with something like their fingerprint. Not to mention, Auth0 has SDKs for your favorite frameworks like React, Next.js, and Node/Express. Make sure to sign up for a free account and give Auth0 a try with the link below. https://a0.to/syntax Show Notes 02:35 - What are the use cases of SASS/SCSS in 2021? Would you still choose it over CSS (or something else?) in a new project? 05:26 - What ever happened to CSS Houdini? 08:49 - With all these JS being transferred, have you ever tried to challenge yourself to build a project that doesn't involve any JS (in the front end alone); (e.g. just HTML+CSS)? I find it funny how I can pretty much use amazon.com with JS disabled, but I literally cannot view the angular docs if I disable it. 11:40 - As we all know, Tim Berners-Lee made the web. Apparently, after seeing everyone's data getting harvested by tech companies, he decided to make a project called Solid (https://solidproject.org/) that allows people to own their data and control all permissions to it. So if a user logs into your app with Solid, rather than storing their info on your server, you'd store it in their Solid Pod. Do you think this could save both Web developers' conscience and disk space in the cloud? 15:47 - I am about to start my first developer job. What practices can I start to really get off on the right foot and lay down a foundation for a successful career? 18:57 - Have you guys ever used your dev skills to trade for other goods or services? For instance, helping out an auto mechanic with their website in exchange for brake service on your car or creating a site for a barbershop traded for free haircuts for a year. If so, how do you go about starting that conversation? 22:14 - What's your take on DRM? Have you implemented/integrated something like Widevine in any of your platforms/projects? How does one go about doing such a thing? I can't seem to find any good docs on that. I personally can relate as to why it's there, but end up hating it anyways. I recently found out that Prime Video only allows SD(sub HD) content on Linux and it had something to do with the Widevine DRM they employ. I got outraged and eventually canceled my subscription! 29:35 - Have you seen the Framework laptop and, if so, what are your thoughts for web development? I'm a lifelong Mac user but the idea of a higher repairable laptop running Linux (I personally can't do Windows) sounds like an amazing step forward for consumers. 32:53 - I know that you both like MongoDB and so do I. But sometimes all these queries to database, especially aggregations gets messy, aren't they? Prisma has now support for MongoDB. What do you think? Is it a tool that will make requesting MongoDB much easier? 37:02 - Hey guys, been diving into Svelte a bit recently and had a question about using it with GraphQL. As I recall Scott once deemed React Typescript GraphQL CodeGen “the promised land” and since then I tried it out and have found it awesome. However, I've been debating moving a larger personal project from React to Svelte. I see that there is plugin for graphql-codegen-svelte-apollo but with my limited knowledge of Svelte find it hard to decipher if the development experience would be as streamlined. I am wondering if you could shed some light on the developer experience of working with GraphQL in Svelte in Typescript. 40:58 - Do y'all have any thoughts about Frontity for WordPress? I swear I'm not a plant for Frontity, but I stumbled upon it today and I'm trying to evaluate it vs. other solutions like Next.js for use in a headless WordPress setup. Would love your thoughts if you have any! 43:40 - Call me weird, but I kind of like fiddling around with webpack configs. I just like the level of control I have here. That being said, is webpack going to die now that the “better” tools out there mature? Or do you think we might see a webpack v6 with esbuild under the hood that makes it compete with Parcel, Vite, Snowpack in terms of speed? Links https://sass-lang.com/ https://postcss.org/ https://ishoudinireadyyet.com/ https://astro.build/ https://kit.svelte.dev/ https://www.widevine.com/ https://frame.work/ https://www.prisma.io/ https://www.mongodb.com/ https://www.postgresql.org/ https://mongoosejs.com/ https://keystonejs.com/ https://frontity.org/ https://webpack.js.org/ ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Hot App Wes: Pet Food Mat Shameless Plugs Scott: Web Components Course - Sign up for the year and save 25%! Wes: All Courses - Use the coupon code ‘Syntax' for $10 off! Tweet us your tasty treats! Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Software Engineering Daily
Distributed Open Source Databases with Jonathan Ellis and Spencer Kimball

Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 52:48


By most accounts, the first databases came on line in the 1960s. This class of software has continued to evolve alongside the technology it runs on and the applications it supports. In the early days, databases were typically closed source commercial products. Today, databases run in the cloud on distributed systems. Increasingly, the leading tools The post Distributed Open Source Databases with Jonathan Ellis and Spencer Kimball appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.