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Best podcasts about Io

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Latest podcast episodes about Io

Educare con calma
99. Competizione a scuola? NO, dovremmo insegnare la cooperazione

Educare con calma

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 24:27


In questo episodio di Educare con Calma vi parlo di 6 fattori che a scuola sviluppano una competizione malsana e come questi stessi fattori vengono approcciati nella pedagogia montessoriana. Se volete continuare la conversazione o scrivermi la vostra opinione (sempre in maniera gentile, costruttiva e rispettosa), vi invito a farlo nei commenti dell'episodio sul mio sito: www.latela.com. :: Come appoggiare il podcast: Io non faccio pubblicità e non accetto sponsor, perché le pubblicità alimentano il consumismo e mi danno fastidio (quindi non voglio sottoporre voi una cosa che dà fastidio a me). Se vi piace il mio podcast e volete aiutarmi a mantenerlo vivo, potete aiutarmi a diffonderlo lasciando una recensione sulla piattaforma dove lo ascoltate e/o acquistare uno dei miei corsi o prodotti: Educare a lungo termine – un corso online su un'educazione più consapevole (che educa noi prima dei nostri figli). Tanti genitori mi dicono gli ha cambiato la vita. Co-schooling: educare a casa – un corso online su come giocare con i figli in maniera produttiva e affiancare il percorso scolastico per mantenere vivo il loro naturale amore per il sapere. Come si fa un bebè – una guida per il genitore + libro stampabile per i bambini per avviare l'educazione sessuale in casa. Storie Arcobaleno – una guida per il genitore + libro stampabile per bambini per abbattere i tabù sulla diversità sessuale e di genere. È il tuo coccodrillo – una guida per il genitore + libro stampabile per bambini per capire i capricci e affrontarli con calma. La Tela Shop – qui trovate attività per bambini stampabili (chiamarle attività è riduttivo), libricini per prime letture in stile montessori, audiolibri di favole reali per bambini, storie illustrate per le mamme… e presto molto altro!

The Cloud Pod
170: The Cloud Pod Is Also Intentionally Paranoid

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 53:24


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team discusses Jonathan's penance for his failures. Plus: Microsoft makes moves on non-competes, NDAs, salary disclosures, and a civil rights audit; AWS modernizes mainframe applications for cloud deployment; and AWS CEO Adam Selipsky chooses to be intentionally paranoid. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

Fragmented - Android Developer Podcast
233: UI Screenshot Testing with Paparazzi and John Rodriguez

Fragmented - Android Developer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 49:29


In this episode, Donn and Kaushik talk to John Rodriguez (jrod) about the Paparazzi library which allows you to perform UI screenshot testing on Android without an emulator or physical device.They talk to John about what screenshot testing is, why it's important, advantages and it's disadvantages as well. You'll learn how to use Paparazzi and how it can test various different screen configurations without having to run an emulator. You read that correct ... without an emulator.If you're looking to incorporate screenshot testing into your app, this is the episode for you.LinksPaparazzi Project websiteGitHub RepoJohn's TwitterCashapp GitHubTestParameterInjectorFragmented Episode 52Donn's Git CourseNeed to learn Git? Donn has the course for you. In this FREE course you'll learn everything you need to know in order to start working with Git everyday. Watch it here.AndroidJobs.IOJob postings are FREE on AndroidJobs.IO during the early release phase (at the time of this recording).Sign up to get notified of new jobs on a weekly basis as well.AndroidJobs.IOSoftware FreelancingDonn's Freelance Faction CommunityFreelance Tactics BookDonn's Freelancing Content on YouTubeContact@fragmentedcast or our Youtube channel@donnfelker and donnfelker (on Instagram)Freelancing for Mobile Developers (Donn's YouTube)kaushikgopal (on YouTube) or jkl.gg/b or @kaushikgopalDisclaimer: Many of the links we share to products are affiliate links. They help support the production of Fragmented. Thank you for your support.

Inside Outside
Designing Resilient Remote Teams: IO2020 Replay with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / Hubspot

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:37


In honor of our upcoming IO2022 innovation Accelerated Summit, which is happening September 19th and 20th in Lincoln Nebraska. Thought it'd be nice to pull some of the best interviews and sessions from our IO2020 virtual event. So, over the next few weeks, check out some of our amazing speakers and grab a ticket for the upcoming event. We'd love to see you there. Tickets and more information can be found at io2022.com. And now back to the show. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / HubspotBrian Ardinger: We are excited to have Steph Smith here with the Hustle and Trends to talk about one of these amazing new trends that we're seeing. It's the whole move to remote work. Steph is the Head of Trends and Product Manager at the Hustle, which is a great newsletter, if you don't subscribe to that. Trends is their exclusive group. And I I've got to say it's, it's one of the best groups out there to talk about new things that are happening out there, new business leaders, things along those lines. She's got a new book out called Standing Out in 2020. Doing Content Right. And I know she's been doing a series of sessions on that. It's an eBook. You can check it out at stephsmith.io. She's been blogging for a ton of time. And she's also been in this world of remote work. Been a digital nomad for a while. So, with that, I'm going to just turn over to Steph. And we'll talk the trend of remote working. Steph Smith: Sweet. Thanks so much. That was a great intro, Brian. Today, I'm going to be talking about something that I care a lot about. I saw some other people in the chat mention that they've been working remotely for a long time. Two, I'm going to be talking about thinking past the office and designing what I call resilient, remote teams. And I do this in a little bit of a different way than I think most presentations on this topic are, which give you a lot of super, super concrete, like you must do this. I like to think of this more so as how do we think about what has changed? What does that mean? And what can we learn from this? So, I use three books and I'll get into that in a second to actually convey some of these points. But just quickly, I don't want to talk about myself very much. Brian gave me a great intro. All you need to know is that I have been working remotely for the last four or five years now. And I did that originally at a company called Top Tell, which was one of those kind of remote first companies built from the ground up to be remote. Now I work at a company called The Hustle and I've done some remote training for different companies. And in general, have been nomadding around for the last couple years as I work remotely. So that's enough about me. Let's talk about where we are in this world. As I mentioned before COVID there was a series of companies I'd say only a couple dozen of scale that were built up to be remote. From the ground up, they said, you know what, we're never going to have any offices. Or if we do, we're going to be remote first. Companies like Zapier Basecamp, Web Flow. All these companies were built from the ground up to facilitate positive remote working environment. Now, as we all know, you saw this kind of trend, the slow trickle of people that were searching for remote work overtime. This is Google trends from 2004 to present. Then as we all know, 2020. crazy year. We see this big spike and we're all remote, whether we want to be or not. And this includes huge companies like Google, Cora, Coinbase. Shopify that at least are either going to be remote for several, several years or in some cases like Shopify have just claimed that they are now remote first from here forward. The question then becomes with all of these companies with now millions, if not billions of people that are kind of thrown into this new environment, what happens. What happens to these organizations that weren't built from the ground up? Like Zapier, Base Camp, or Buffer. Some of the questions that I have here, allude to what I'll be talking about in this presentation. So how does remote work or the shift influence how people interact with one another? How does it influence the social fabric or culture of the company? How does this change how potentially leaders should or can operate at these organizations?And in general, this all brings me back to the title of this presentation. How do we build resilient teams? And resiliency in this case means teams that thrive in the environment that they're put in, right. It doesn't feel like they're kind of pushing against walls. It doesn't feel like there's friction to achieve certain things.It feels like they're put in an environment where they're put in a place to succeed by nature, by the nature of the environment that they're in. So, as I said, this presentation is really based on three books that I've read and, and I think are excellent. It's Give and Take, Algorithms to Live By and The Four Tendencies.And I like using books like this to really frame these conversations because these books are actually not based on remote work at all. They're based on human psychology. They're based on how people interact in given situations or environments. And then I just layer on a question. Is this still true with remote work or how does this change as people go from an in-person environment to remote. And so, we'll talk specifically about how giving and taking behavior may change with remote work. We'll talk about how we can design systems. So, using something From Algorithms to Live By, Game Theory. How do we incentivize people to actually act in their best interest? Because they don't always do that on their own. And how do we in general make remote work sustainable. And then I'll talk about the potential archetype of remote worker using this four tendencies framework. To preface the three books and the three things that we'll talk about, I want to jump back to summarize where we are.So, we as a society had a majority of people working in offices. And now we have a majority of people working remotely. And I like to kind of facetiously say that when you work in an office, you work in a box. And that box is predefined for you. And even though it's a little facetious in terms of the analogy, a lot of that is true in the sense that you have a lot of things, whether it's, you know, where you're physically working, how you're working exactly, when you're working. A lot of that is super predefined for you. And for some people that's actually better. Some people that's worse. I'm not trying to ascertain whether one is better or worse, but the idea is that before you had a lot of things mapped out for you, right? And now when you're working remotely, the way, the analogy that I like to give is that box is kind of like stripped clean.So, you get rid of the walls, you get rid of exactly when, how you work. And now a lot of people are left to figure out how to build their own box. And what I see a lot of people doing, whether it's individuals or companies is they basically do this Control C Control V where they basically say, you know, we had all these things, these processes, these systems, these frameworks that worked in our office. So, let's just take all those and let's paste them into our new environment. And that can work. But what I think we have a unique opportunity to do is in fact, rethink the box. So, build our new box from the ground up. So instead of just copying everything and saying, oh, this worked there. It should work here. Let's just rethink what are the things that we should operate by in this new environment? How do we rebuild our box? And something more important than that is instead of giving our employees a new box saying, hey, this is your box. Please take it. And again, abide by these rules or operations or logistics. Let's actually just give them the tools to build their own box. And this kind of summarizes part of what I'm, I'm getting to at least to preface three examples is, is a quote from Amir. Who's a CEO of Doist one of those kind of remote first and companies. And he says, basically, remote. Isn't just a different way to work. It's a different way to live. We have to acknowledge that we're kind of blurring these lines and people, you know, experience isolation, anxiety, depression. And in general, we need to figure out ways in systems to resolve this new, almost more complex issue where you have people, people's work and their lives just meshing into this continuous system.All right. So, what are the cornerstones of remote work? I mentioned this because this bleeds into some of the examples. So remote work overall, at least prior to COVID, when people weren't forced into it, really prioritized three things over three other things. Meaning output trumped input, which meant that didn't matter exactly how many hours you were working or exactly what you did to get to the impact that you're driving for a company.What mattered was the impact, the output. Similarly, remote work tended to favor autonomy over administration. Again, this idea that didn't matter exactly how you got from Point A to Point B. You had the autonomy to figure that out. And similarly, flexibility over rigidity. So, let's keep these cornerstones in mind throughout the presentation. And consider that even those cornerstones sound kind of resoundingly positive, all of us at face value are like, yes, I love being graded on my output. I love being graded or given the autonomy to figure out how I deliver that output. And I love being given flexibility. But let's just keep those in mind and consider that they're not always strictly positive. All right, so let's dive into the first example in the book, Give and Take. Obviously, these books are very in depth and I only covered one small sliver of them in this presentation. But the key takeaway from Give and Take is that Adam Grant, he's a professor at Wharton, amazing writer as well. He talks about three different types of individuals. So, Givers, Takers, and Matchers. All you need to know about them for the purpose of this presentation is that givers basically believe in this world as a positive sum game. Meaning they believe in mutually beneficial situations. They're willing to give without expecting anything in return. Takers are kind of the opposite of that. They think zero sum game. I'm sure you can imagine or conceptualize people in your life that you've encountered that really are trying to get ahead at the expense of other people.Now matchers fall somewhere in the middle. They basically believe, or kind of function off of this idea of reciprocity and fairness. All right. So with that in mind, the question or sorry, before I even get to the question, something I want to mention is that the whole premise of Adam Grant's book is a little surprising in that most people would expect that given Takers and Matchers and Takers in particular, their approach to life in terms of kind of utilizing other people to get ahead or prioritizing their own growth over other people, you would expect those people to be the most successful.Now, interestingly enough, he found that Givers were both at the very top of the spectrum of success, and the very bottom. You can notice two different types of Givers here. One is selfless. One is, is otherish. All you need to know here is that Otherish Givers are Givers but have found a way to prioritize their own needs.So really interesting that Givers not only elevate other people, but they are actually the most successful on their own. So, this is kind of a summary or a quote from Adams, which basically says they succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of others around them. You'll see that the difference lies in how Giver success creates value instead of just claiming it.So, in general, I think the obvious takeaway here is that we want more Givers at our organizations. Now the question becomes, and this will be a repetitive question throughout, is this the same with remote work. Or how does this change with remote work? Some of the sections here are based on actual data sources.This one, not so much. This is me more hypothesizing. And what I've come to in terms of my many years leading teams, interacting with teams, being individual contributors on teams is that because if we remember the cornerstones of remote work, we prioritize output. We prioritize impact. That which in remote, all that matters is that impact, right?Are you delivering value? Are you worth your salary? Are you hitting your KPIs. In person when you're in an office? All that stuff matters. But it's also weighed against certain unspoken things, unspoken rules, like the amount of time you're spending in the office. Whether you're on time for things, whether you stay late to help another employee in general, everyone knows who the team players are in an office.That's not always true when you work remotely. I think if you've worked remotely over the last couple months, especially if you were in an office before, you can probably resonate with this idea. In remote, there's a couple thing, other things that I want to know. This idea of staying on longer to, you know, as a Giver, let's say you're helping other people.That's super difficult to quantify because when you're working remotely again, our work life and our lifeline blend together. So, it's actually hard, if I were to ask anyone on this call, how many hours did you spend this week working remotely? I think a lot of people would struggle to actually quantify that.So then layering on, am I working extra? Am I not working enough? It's really hard to kind of parse that out. Additionally, if you support someone. Let's say I have a friend and her name is Sally at work. And she says, Hey Steph, can you help me with this project? And it actually takes like, you know, five hours out of my day.I end up helping her. All of that work for better or for worse is hidden online. Sally knows about it. But everyone else at work, didn't see me stay late to help Sally. They didn't see the output of that work. They didn't see the Giving behavior. And so, in addition to this, KPIs in general, when you work remotely by nature of trying to ascertain that output of people, tends to be more individual. You even hear people use terms like manager of one when they're working remotely.And in general, the idea that I'm trying to get across here is that by nature, when you're working remotely, because there are so much emphasis on output and impact, which has many positives, basically takes away the recognition that you typically get in an in-person environment of these Givers, and what happens is these Givers end up burning out, they become more of those selfless givers that you saw at the tail end. Instead of the Otherish givers that were the most successful individual. And something I want to call out here is that regardless of intentions, morals, or values, and what I'm saying here is it doesn't matter if someone's a good person or bad person. That's not what I'm trying to ascertain. Bad incentive structures result in bad behavior, no matter how good of a person you think you are. So, what's the takeaway here? Again, I'm trying to go through this quickly, so I won't go through everything. But the idea here is that you still won't have a water cooler. In the office, which almost acted like, you know, animals in the wild. There's like a certain hierarchy and there's a kingdom and, and it kind of regulates things, right. You just subtly, but it does. You don't have that anymore with remote, or at least it's not created without intentionality. And so, there are a couple quick things that you can do. The first thing is just ask your team very simply who helped you this week? Who did you work with? Where did you put in extra hours? Where did someone else put in extra hours for you? You must ask this because it will not be surfaced as naturally as in the office. The second thing is build KPIs to incentivize teamwork. This is a little harder to do because again, when you work remotely, you're trying to ascertain output. But think about how you can do this to incentivize teamwork. So, you're not kind of encouraging people to act more as Takers versus Givers. And then finally create an environment where you're not just recognizing good behavior or giving behavior, but you're actually rewarding it.So, some companies like GitLab have actually started things like micro bonuses, where in addition to the bonus structures or the compensation structures that you get from your boss, other people around you can actually reward you based on your giving behavior. Because that's really important. You're not just recognizing it in like kind of shout outs or things like that, but you're actually rewarding this behavior. So, you're incentivizing people to continue doing it. The final thing I want to call out is that you can do as much as you can once you have people at an organization to incentivize giving behavior. But you can also kind of integrate this into your hiring process. Which means bringing in people who are more naturally Givers.So, Adam Grant mentions in his book. This is directly from Give and Take where he, during the hiring process asks this question, can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved? And the idea here is that people who are Givers tend to mention either people at the same level as them or below them in terms of the people that they've helped.And it's a natural response. Of course, this is again, not quite scientific versus Takers, tend to mention people that are above them. That they've helped, because again, there's this nature of people who are Takers, trying to get ahead and using things like status to get ahead. So, something to keep in mind as well as you're hiring.So, the second example that I want to go through is from Algorithms to Live By. Again, excellent book. This is a book where basically they take principles from software development or software engineering and use it to help us think through problems that are outside of that scope. So, things like Cashing Theory or Kneeling or making intractable problems tractable.The one that I want to talk about today is Game Theory. So, in Game Theory, I'm not going to go into depth, but it's this idea that within a game, there are certain rules. And within those rules, they incentivize people to act a certain way. And once a game is predefined, you tend to get to this equilibrium where all the players individually are acting their own best interest.But sometimes the kind of aggregate of those actions actually may result in outcomes that are worse for everyone. Again, depending on the rules that were set for that game. And this equilibrium that I'm specifically talking about is called the Nash Equilibrium. And it's this idea again, there's this kind of long definition and talks about a stable state.The idea here is the Nash Equilibrium is within an environment within a game. It's the outcome or the optimal state, where there's no incentive for any individual to deviate. Now, this may not sound super actionable. So let me give you a precise example of what I'm talking about. So, with remote work, a lot of remote first companies tend to go with unlimited vacation.And I think this is something that probably more companies will end up moving towards as well. But something you keep in mind here is the Nash Equilibrium of unlimited vacation approaches, zero days. And the reason for this it's a little counterintuitive because you think unlimited vacation sounds amazing. Sounds like a great perk. Well, what happens with unlimited vacation is that people look to be perceived as more loyal, more committed, more dedicated than their peers. And therefore, they look to take just slightly less vacation than their peers. And what happens is a cascading effect, which approaches zero.This is actual data from Buffer's Data Remote Report from 2019, where you can see in blue, the amount of vacation offered, and then in orange, the amount of vacation that was actually taken. So, you can see around 30, 35% of people had unlimited vacation. And if you look at how that's actually distributed, most of the people who had unlimited vacation took anywhere from no vacation to two weeks' vacation. Versus the people who had, you know, six weeks, five weeks, four weeks were likely to actually take that amount of vacation.So, what is my point here? Well, in Game Theory is this idea where basically you have a game and then those rules are set for the game. And then you just see what behaviors actually emerge from those given set of rules. Well, I think with remote work, we have to be a lot more intentional about not just kind of throwing rules out there, again, kind of redefining our box and, and not just taking a box that already exists. And you can do that through Mechanism Design, which is kind of flipping that script and saying, what are the behaviors that we actually want and what rules do we need to establish to actually generate those behaviors? So kind of again, reversing the question and figuring out what behaviors you want to incentivize. And then figuring out what rules need to be in place to actually achieve that.As I mentioned, the box has changed, the game has changed. So, here's a couple examples of things that people struggle with from the same report, when they're working remotely. It's things like unplugging, loneliness, distractions, culture, and communication. If you were to ask the same question to people who are working in an, in an office, these would not be the case, which shows us the game has changed. The problems have changed. The things that we're solving for have changed and therefore you must come up with rules or incentives so that people act in their own best interest. So again, you're thinking backwards. You're asking the question, what are the KPIs that you need to actively design to encourage people to, for example, have a work life balance outside of just the freedom to define their own. And this is really important because it sounds counterintuitive to say a I'm actually going to define more rules. Because flexibility sounds like a great perk or sounds like a great thing to have. But actually, you can help your employees in certain situations to actually help them again, this idea of building their own box.Something I want to call out here is again, is Wall Street, which is again, the most like capitalist type environment there is, has mandatory off hours. So that brokers don't push themselves to their Nash Equilibrium, which would be the sleepless equilibrium, where they're constantly trading. So, you have to think backwards and figure out how to design an environment that people succeed in.Quick couple examples before we move on to the third example. The third book are things like a minimum vacation policy, mandatory days that they must take off, allowing people to take back their calendars and actually block off significant parts so that they're not encountering what people call Calendar Tetris. I like this example from Keith, I don't know Keith personally, and this was pre COVID.But basically, he decided to close his office on Friday. Simple things like this, where he basically said it's a mandatory weekend. You are not allowed to work, even though it seems strange in a digital environment. And I'm giving you 50 bucks to go eat at your favorite restaurant. So, think about how you are intentionally designing systems for your employees.Finally, third example that I'll breeze through is the Four Tendencies. And I'll caveat this example with this quote directly from Gretchen Rubin, the author that says the happiest, healthiest, most productive people aren't those from a particular tendency, but rather the people who have figured out how to harness the strengths of their tendency, counteract the weaknesses, and build lives that work for them.So, what is the Four Tendencies? It's this idea that there as it sounds like four tendencies. Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. Now these two highlighted in green are not highlighted, because they're the best. As Gretchen said in that quote, it's just that they're they are the most common. Now the Four Tendencies is basically a two-by-two framework, which identifies how people respond to expectations or accountability.So, do they readily meet outer expectations? Do they readily meet inner expectations? Do they resist both of them or do they kind of fluctuate towards or air towards one or the other? So, I personally am a Questioner. I resist outer expectations and I meet inner expectations. To give a quick example, if I wanted to get fit, having a gym buddy as an outer expectation expecting me to show up that actually wouldn't help me. And that actually is something that I've tried to do throughout my life. Hasn't worked. Meanwhile, something like actually understanding the science behind why I should be fit or kind of convincing myself that my identity, or I want to be the type of person who, you know, respects their health. That works for me. So as a Questioner, I meet inner expectations. I resist outer expectations.Now I did a poll on Twitter a while ago, got around 400 votes from people who had been working remotely again, pre COVID. And it was interesting to see that the most popular tendencies among this again, non-scientific poll were Questioners and Rebels, and I thought, huh, that's interesting.If you remember questioners and obligers for the most common in the overall population with remote workers, or at least those who sought out remote work. Where questioners and rebels with the, the familiarity or the common thread here is that they both resist outer expectations. I thought that was really interesting.And I think that relates to this idea that there's a level of self-selection or misalignment with outer expectations of society, of people trying to at least identify their own work norms, identify their own vision or how they can actually build something, build their own box. And this isn't again, mean that they're more successful or less successful.It's just perhaps that they actively sought out this type of environment. Now, what's the takeaway here. This is a brief section compared to the other two, but it's the idea that people actually respond differently to inner and outer accountability. We used to have everyone in an office and that didn't necessarily work with everyone.Now we have everyone remote that doesn't necessarily work for everyone. So, I think the idea here is that leaders need to actually learn past, just the high level this person is good at these skills. This person is good at these skills. This is my top player. This is my, you know, less valuable player. And more so think about how to tailor their leadership stylers to figure out how to motivate their employees. Whether they're in a remote environment or not. But especially if you're in a remote environment, how do you incentivize, if we just quickly go back, how do you incentivize Upholders and Obligers when Questioners and Rebels tend to naturally seek out this environment?And on the flip side, if you're in an office, how do you naturally incentivize Questioners and Rebels so that they're motivated when Upholders and Obligers may more naturally fit into those traditional environments. So just something to consider. Right. This is the final slide I have, and I know we're running out of times, but the idea here is just, again, there are certain things or certain ways that humans tend to interact in, in an person environment.And they don't necessarily act the same ways in a remote environment. And in particular, they may not even act in ways that benefit themselves all the time. So, we must as leaders, if you're leading a team, if you're leading a company, It's good to consider some of these things and figure out A: How do I encourage Giving through discovering, hiring, promoting, and acknowledging and rewarding as I said before Givers. How do I select incentives or develop the right systems so that we're using Mechanism Design and not just throwing people into a game and hoping that they choose the best outcomes that are best for them or best for everyone?And then finally, how do we actually learn about our people past the face value in terms of their skills and figure out how to harness their unique strengths, whether they're in an in-person environment or a remote environment. If you want to find me, or if you have questions, happy to answer them now, but you're also welcome to email me or DM me on Twitter and that is it.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

Screaming in the Cloud
TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. 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My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

StarDate Podcast
Pillan Patera

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:18


One of the biggest volcanic eruptions in the solar system yet seen was at its hottest 25 years ago today. The peak temperature reached almost 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit — far hotter than any eruption ever seen on Earth. Pillan Patera is on Io, a moon of Jupiter. Io is about the same size as our own moon. But while the Moon is pretty much dead, Io is the most active body in the solar system, with hundreds of active volcanoes. They're powered by a gravitational tug-of-war between Jupiter and some of its other moons, which melts the rock below Io's surface. The molten rock forces its way out through giant volcanoes. Pillan Patera is one of Io's bigger volcanoes — 45 miles wide. And from about May to September of 1997, it staged a massive eruption. The plume of ash climbed about 90 miles high. As the ash fell back, it covered an area as big as Iowa. Pillan Patera also belched hot lava — enough every minute to fill the Empire State Building. The lava eventually covered an area twice the size of Rhode Island, creating a huge dark spot. The volcano hasn't done much since then. In fact, the lava field has just about disappeared — paved over by other volcanoes on this active moon. Jupiter is high in the southeast at dawn, and looks like a bright star. Binoculars reveal its four largest moons, which look like tiny stars near the planet. The quartet includes Io — a small world with a volcanic attitude.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Calendario Parole di Vita 2022
CAMMINARE NELLA LUCE • 28 Giugno 2022

Calendario Parole di Vita 2022

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:42


Meditazione dal Calendario Parole di Vita 2022.Or Gesù parlò loro di nuovo, dicendo: Io son la luce del mondo; chi mi seguita non camminerà nelle tenebre, ma avrà la luce della vita(Giovanni 8:12)

LawNext
Ep 167: Thine Founder Sang Lee on How Algorithm-based Assessments Help Law Firms Make Better and Less-Biased Hiring Decisions

LawNext

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 56:10


Sang Lee believes that algorithm-based assessments can help law firms make better, more ethical and less-biased decisions when hiring associates and laterals. The SaaS company she founded in 2019, Thine, leverages custom hiring algorithms and industrial and organizational (IO) psychology to create assessments that it says can reduce inconsistencies in how law firms evaluate candidates, promote equity, and create pathways to greater diversity. A research report commissioned by Thine last year found that there is a widely held belief among legal professionals that traditional recruiting processes are stale and limiting. Having spent more than 20 years working in legal recruiting and coaching, Lee has clear ideas about why that is so, how assessments can help reimagine the recruiting process, and what else law firms should do to improve their hiring and retention and achieve a more diverse workforce.  Lee was an associate at LeBoeuf Lamb in 1998 when she pivoted into recruiting. In 2004, she founded her own attorney search firm, and then in 2013, founded Volta Talent Strategies, where she continues to provide talent-related coaching, training, and consulting to law firms. A first-generation Korean-American, Lee was named to the Fastcase 50 in 2021 and to the Global Top 100 Leaders in Legal Strategy and Consulting by Lawdragon in 2021. In 2019, she was honored by the Girls Scouts Council of Greater New York as a Woman of Distinction.   Thank You To Our Sponsors This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.  Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote. If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

Le interviste di Radio Number One
Iva Zanicchi: «"Un altro giorno verrà" è un libro di sentimenti e religiosità»

Le interviste di Radio Number One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:56


Una grande ospite nel PN1 di lunedì 27 giugno con i nostri Miky Boselli e Marco Vignoletti: Iva Zanicchi. Non solo una leggenda della musica, ma anche autrice di diversi libri: Iva, infatti, ci ha parlato del suo ultimo romanzo Un altro giorno verrà, una saga familiare che attraversa tutto il secolo. Iva ci ha raccontato che il libro è figlio del Covid, nato durante il suo ricovero in ospedale: «È una storia di amore, sentimenti e religiosità che mi ha appassionato molto». Ci ha poi spiegato come è nata la sua passione per la scrittura: «Scrivere è la mia evasione, la mia fiamma. Io vivo intensamente la storia e i personaggi che scrivo».LA CARRIERA E SANREMO - Iva Zanicchi vanta undici partecipazioni al Festival di Sanremo con ben tre vittorie, si è esibita su palchi celebri come il Madison Square Garden, l'Olympia di Parigi e il Teatro dell'opera di Sydney; ma il palco sanremese mantiene sempre per lei un fascino e un significato speciale. Ci ha inoltre spiegato, secondo lei, come e quando una canzone rimane impressa nella storia della musica diventando eterna e ha concluso dando dei preziosi e sinceri consigli a tutti coloro che vogliono intraprendere il percorso di artista. 

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
228. We don't need MORE NFT projects we need more NFT projects that do this!

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 20:52


Why do most communities fail when scaling? What are they doing wrong that successful projects are getting right? In a time when everyone is looking to create their own projects, is the better play to bring your talents to Web3 and work across multiple projects?  In this episode, we discuss answers to these questions and more! We talk through connecting the dots for new community members and making sure they feel welcome when joining your project. Pressing the Damn Button and putting your project out there is a lot tougher than most think. There are A LOT of components of entrepreneurship one needs to launch a project and even more involved with building a community from scratch in Web3.  Having empathy for your holders, asking for feedback, and then listening when that feedback is provided are basic steps to ensuring your community feels heard. Failing to implement these steps not only limits the scalability of your project but could severely impact your overall success of in the Web3 space. As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

Ascolta la Notizia
M5S, Sileri passa con Di Maio ma annuncia: «Nel 2023 tornerò alla mia professione: la medicina»

Ascolta la Notizia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:08


«La politica è bellissima, ma il mio amore è la ricerca. Nel 2023 tornerò alla mia professione: la medicina». Così il sottosegretario alla Salute, Pierpaolo Sileri, in un'intervista al 'Corriere della Sera' Sileri, che ha deciso di aderire al nuovo gruppo Insieme per il Futuro guidato da Luigi Di Maio, ha raccontato: «Io e Luigi parliamo sempre. Non c’è stata alcuna pressione da parte sua. La mia è stata una scelta naturale: governista e atlantista. Draghi ha un’autorevolezza che dà lustro all’Italia». Quanto agli errori commessi dal Movimento 5 Stelle, il sottosegretario ha detto: «Ho espresso il mio disagio su alcune posizioni. Il punto è il seguente: non stiamo discutendo del vaccino contro il morbillo sul piano nazionale, stiamo discutendo a livello planetario di come arginare una pandemia, e di come contrastare un invasore, ovvero la Russia. Mi sembra chiaro, no?». Scarica l’app di Ascolta la Notizia per Android: https://bit.ly/2F3ptXR o iPhone: https://apple.co/2F8zEdU Attiva la skill di Ascolta la Notizia nel tuo dispositivo Alexa: https://amzn.to/3K7RTfU

Pass ACLS Tip of the Day
Administration of ACLS Medications Via IO & ETT Route

Pass ACLS Tip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 5:07


Establishing a large-bore IV is near the top of every ACLS algorithm. But, what should we do if an IV can't be started? As an alternative to an IV, medications may be administered via intraosseous (IO) or endotracheal tube (ETT) route. Advantages and placement of IO for fluids and medication administration when an IV cannot be established. The use of endotracheal tube as an alternative when IV and IO access has not yet been established. Using NAVEL to remember the ACLS medications that can be administered down the ET tube. Disadvantages of ETT as a route for medication administration. Connect with me: Website:  https://passacls.com (https://passacls.com) https://twitter.com/PassACLS (@PassACLS) on Twitter https://www.linkedin.com/company/pass-acls-podcast/ (@Pass-ACLS-Podcast) on LinkedIn Good luck with your ACLS class!

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
227. What NFT Projects Can Learn from IRL Events

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 22:36


There were lots of people at NFT NYC almost bragging that they never picked up their badge or that they never attended a single panel or talk as they were too busy at side events or meetups.   The thing is even as a full-time professional speaker I understand this while at the same time believe we must rethink how we do offline events in this current world.   Beyond rethinking offline events I also feel its important to take lessons from IRL events and integrate them into NFT projects as the "value" we provide our NFT owners must be our focus and if our NFT owners aren't attending our main utility aspects then what does that say about our utility and even the future of our project.     As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

Promuovere e raccontare i libri
È in arrivo la quarta stagione di Promuovere e raccontare i libri

Promuovere e raccontare i libri

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 1:03


Ogni giorno in Italia sono pubblicati più di 200 libri.I lettori forti ne leggono in media 17 in un anno.Come possiamo far sì che uno dei 17 sia proprio il nostro libro?Io sono Davide Giansoldati e dal 2008 mi occupo di digital e innovazione in editoria.Questa è la quarta stagione del podcast “Promuovere e raccontare i libri” e, puntata dopo puntata, racconto la mia esperienza e le mie letture e condivido le mie riflessioni per aiutarti a trovare nuovi lettori e persone interessate ai tuoi contenuti.Se stai scrivendo un libro o se pensi di iniziare nei prossimi giorni, se hai già pubblicato il tuo testo e non hai raggiunto i risultati sperati, qui troverai le risposte a tante domande e potrai mandarmi anche le tue.Cosa aspetti? Iscriviti adesso questo podcast, troverai una nuova puntata ogni mercoledì mattina.Buon ascolto!

Marketing for Good
The Secret Life of Self Talk

Marketing for Good

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 27:08


Erica shakes things up by making I/O stand for Inner and Outer communication for the purpose of this episode. She talks about the ripple effect that inner communication can have on outer communication and shares real-life examples of this. Erica urges listeners to simply notice their thoughts and to find power in the word ‘nope'. Resources Referenced Recharge EBook: https://claxon-communication.com/recharge/Body Talk by Katie Sturino https://amzn.to/3QHK6c0Therapist Uncensored Podcast ep 169 with Sue Marriot and Dr. Ann Kelley https://bit.ly/3NhLRcZSelf Compassion Resources from Dr. Kristin Neff https://self-compassion.org/ Connect with Erica:Website: https://claxon-communication.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/EricaMillsBarnLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericamillsbarnhart/Email: info@claxon-communication.com  

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
226. Travie.eth: Spreading One Love as NFT Ambassador by Being Himself

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 43:00


He's been called the FUD Whisperer and the FUD Squisher, but one thing is for sure, this guy loves all things Web3 and has a ton of love for everyone he meets! You've seen him across Twitter and Discord servers as Travie.eth and now you can hear him in his own episode. An amazing conversation with an even better human, all sparked by a hotel lobby conversation. Fellow girl dad and NFT365 community member Travie tells us about his Web2 life, and his transition to the Web3 space. From helping his community teach children with learning disabilities to becoming a community manager for NFT projects, hosting twitter spaces, and partnering with his wife to help folks buy houses with crypto, this guy has consistently delivered value with everything he does. We talk through how holding NFTs leads to amazing experiences IRL and how betting on yourself is the first step to success in this space.  Hear his advice for those trying to find their way in the Web3 and how finding what you connect with and simply being yourself is the secret sauce to success.  ONE LOVE! Follow Travie:  https://twitter.com/MrTravisTho Curious how to research founders and NFT projects to investigate the validity of FUD yourself?  I share the tools, tips and even creative things to look for when researching founders.  As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

The Azure Podcast
Episode 428 - Java and Spring Apps

The Azure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


Our resident expert on all things Java on Azure, Asir Vedamuthu Selvasingh, gives us all the latest updates on running your Java workloads on various Azure services. He also dives into the newly renamed Azure Spring Apps service which now has more SKUs to address various use-cases.   Media file: https://azpodcast.blob.core.windows.net/episodes/Episode428.mp3 YouTube: https://youtu.be/PaMaWij21N0 Resources: Start Enterprise - https://aka.ms/spring-apps-EnterpriseDevelop your first Spring Boot app - https://aka.ms/Start-SpringLearn using a self-paced workshop - https://aka.ms/Learn-SpringWatch bite-size demos - https://aka.ms/Spring-PlaylistLeverage best practices - https://aka.ms/Spring-BootBuild and deploy Java apps on Azure - https://aka.ms/LearnJavaInteract with Azure services using Spring - https://aka.ms/Spring-Cloud-Azure   Technical Case StoriesFedEx - https://aka.ms/FedExNational Life Group - https://aka.ms/National-LifeDigital Realty Trust - https://aka.ms/DLRSwiss Re - https://aka.ms/Swiss-ReRaley's - https://aka.ms/Raley'Liantis - https://aka.ms/LiantisKroger - https://aka.ms/Kroger-on-AzureMorgan Stanley - https://aka.ms/Morgan-StanleyBosch - https://aka.ms/Bosch.IO   Other Updates: See how 3 industry-leading companies are driving innovation in a new episode of Inside Azure for IT https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/see-how-3-industryleading-companies-are-driving-innovation-in-a-new-episode-of-inside-azure-for-it/   Responsible AI investments and safeguards for facial recognition https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/responsible-ai-investments-and-safeguards-for-facial-recognition/   Azure IoT increases enterprise-level intelligent edge and cloud capabilities https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-iot-increases-enterpriselevel-intelligent-edge-and-cloud-capabilities/   https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/general-availability-azure-databricks-available-in-new-regions/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/general-availability-azure-sdk-for-go/   Various Load Testing updates: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-supports-splitting-input-data-across-test-engines/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-user-specified-jmeter-properties/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-customermanaged-keys/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-userassigned-managed-identities/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-supports-quick-start-tests-with-web-url/   General availability: Azure Data Explorer connector for Power Automate, Logic Apps, and Power Apps   https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/power-platform-connector-ga/

LerniLango, Podcast Italiano
#113: Intervista | Come studiare la lingua italiana su Instagram: benefici e tecniche

LerniLango, Podcast Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 36:06


Le opinioni su instagram sono contrastante, c'è chi lo ama, chi lo odia e chi non lo usa affatto. Io e la mia ospite di questo mese pensiamo che possa essere uno strumento potentissimo per l'apprendimento della lingua italiana online. In questa intervista chicchiererò con Caterina di @learnitalianwithcaterina sui benefici di Instagram per l'apprendimento dell'italiano e sulle tecniche di studio da utilizzare per trasformare la fruizione dei contenuti didattici su Instagram in apprendimento duraturo e significativo.

Screaming in the Cloud
Google Cloud Run, Satisfaction, and Scalability with Steren Giannini

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:01


Full Description / Show Notes Steren and Corey talk about how Google Cloud Run got its name (00:49) Corey talks about his experiences using Google Cloud (2:42) Corey and Steven discuss Google Cloud's cloud run custom domains (10:01) Steren talks about Cloud Run's high developer satisfaction and scalability (15:54) Corey and Steven talk about Cloud Run releases at Google I/O (23:21) Steren discusses the majority of developer and customer interest in Google's cloud product (25:33) Steren talks about his 20% projects around sustainability (29:00) About SterenSteren is a Senior Product Manager at Google Cloud. He is part of the serverless team, leading Cloud Run. He is also working on sustainability, leading the Google Cloud Carbon Footprint product.Steren is an engineer from École Centrale (France). Prior to joining Google, he was CTO of a startup building connected objects and multi device solutions.Links Referenced: Google Cloud Run: https://cloud.run sheets-url-shortener: https://github.com/ahmetb/sheets-url-shortener snark.cloud/run: https://snark.cloud/run Twitter: https://twitter.com/steren TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Steren Giannini, who is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, specifically on something called Google Cloud Run. Steren, thank you for joining me today.Steren: Thanks for inviting me, Corey.Corey: So, I want to start at the very beginning of, “Oh, a cloud service. What are we going to call it?” “Well, let's put the word cloud in it.” “Okay, great. Now, it is cloud, so we have to give it a vague and unassuming name. What does it do?” “It runs things.” “Genius. Let's break and go for work.” Now, it's easy to imagine that you spent all of 30 seconds on a name, but it never works that way. How easy was it to get to Cloud Run as a name for the service?Steren: [laugh]. Such a good question because originally it was not named Cloud Run at all. The original name was Google Serverless Engine. But a few people know that because they've been helping us since the beginning, but originally it was Google Serverless Engine. Nobody liked the name internally, and I think at one point, we wondered, “Hey, can we drop the engine structure and let's just think about the name. And what does this thing do?” “It runs things.”We already have Cloud Build. Well, wouldn't it be great to have Cloud Run to pair with Cloud Build so that after you've built your containers, you can run them? And that's how we ended up with this very simple Cloud Run, which today seems so obvious, but it took us a long time to get to that name, and we actually had a lot of renaming to do because we were about to ship with Google Serverless Engine.Corey: That seems like a very interesting last-minute change because it's not just a find and replace at that point, it's—Steren: No.Corey: —“Well, okay, if we call it Cloud Run, which can also be a verb or a noun, depending, is that going to change the meaning of some sentences?” And just doing a find and replace without a proofread pass as well, well, that's how you wind up with funny things on Twitter.Steren: API endpoints needed to be changed, adding weeks of delays to the launch. That is why we—you know, [laugh] announced in 2018 and publicly launched in 2019.Corey: I've been doing a fair bit of work in cloud for a while, and I wound up going down a very interesting path. So, the first native Google Cloud service—not things like WP Engine that ride on top of GCP—but my first native Google Cloud Service was done in service of this podcast, and it is built on Google Cloud Run. I don't think I've told you part of this story yet, but it's one of the reasons I reached out to invite you onto the show. Let me set the stage here with a little bit of backstory that might explain what the hell I'm talking about.As listeners of this show are probably aware, we have sponsors whom we love and adore. In the early days of this show, they would say, “Great, we want to tell people about our product”—which is the point of a sponsorship—“And then send them to a URL.” “Great. What's the URL?” And they would give me something that was three layers deep, then with a bunch of UTM tracking parameters at the end.And it's, “You do realize that no one is going to be sitting there typing all of that into a web browser?” At best, you're going to get three words or so. So, I built myself a URL redirector, snark.cloud. I can wind up redirecting things in there anywhere it needs to go.And for a long time, I did this on top of S3 and then put CloudFront in front of it. And this was all well and good until, you know, things happened in the fullness of time. And now holy crap, I have an operations team involved in things, and maybe I shouldn't be the only person that knows how to work on all of these bits and bobs. So, it was time to come up with something that had a business user-friendly interface that had some level of security, so I don't wind up automatically building out a spam redirect service for anything that wants to, and it needs to be something that's easy to work with. So, I went on an exploration.So, at first it showed that there were—like, I have an article out that I've spoken about before that there are, “17 Ways to Run Containers on AWS,” and then I wrote the sequel, “17 More Ways to Run Containers on AWS.” And I'm keeping a list, I'm almost to the third installation of that series, which is awful. So, great. There's got to be some ways to build some URL redirect stuff with an interface that has an admin panel. And I spent three days on this trying a bunch of different things, and some were running on deprecated versions of Node that wouldn't build properly and others were just such complex nonsense things that had got really bad. I was starting to consider something like just paying for Bitly or whatnot and making it someone else's problem.And then I stumbled upon something on GitHub that really was probably one of the formative things that changed my opinion of Google Cloud for the better. And within half an hour of discovering this thing, it was up and running. I did the entire thing, start to finish, from my iPad in a web browser, and it just worked. It was written by—let me make sure I get his name correct; you know, messing up someone's name is a great way to say that we don't care about them—Ahmet Balkan used to work at Google Cloud; now he's over at Twitter. And he has something up on GitHub that is just absolutely phenomenal about this, called sheets-url-shortener.And this is going to sound wild, but stick with me. The interface is simply a Google Sheet, where you have one column that has the shorthand slug—for example, run; if you go to snark.cloud/run, it will redirect to Google Cloud Run's website. And the second column is where you want it to go. The end.And whenever that gets updated, there's of course some caching issues, which means it can take up to five seconds from finishing that before it will actually work across the entire internet. And as best I can tell, that is fundamentally magic. But what made it particularly useful and magic, from my perspective, was how easy it was to get up and running. There was none of this oh, but then you have to integrate it with Google Sheets and that's a whole ‘nother team so there's no way you're going to be able to figure that out from our Docs. Go talk to them and then come back in the day.They were the get started, click here to proceed. It just worked. And it really brought back some of the magic of cloud for me in a way that I hadn't seen in quite a while. So, all which is to say, amazing service, I continue to use it for all of these sponsored links, and I am still waiting for you folks to bill me, but it fits comfortably in the free tier because it turns out that I don't have hundreds of thousands of people typing it in every week.Steren: I'm glad it went well. And you know, we measure tasks success for Cloud Run. And we do know that most new users are able to deploy their apps very quickly. And that was the case for you. Just so you know, we've put a lot of effort to make sure it was true, and I'll be glad to tell you more about all that.But for that particular service, yes, I suppose Ahmet—who I really enjoyed working with on Cloud Run, he was really helpful designing Cloud Run with us—has open-sourced this side project. And basically, you might even have clicked on a deploy to Cloud Run button on GitHub, right, to deploy it?Corey: That is exactly what I did and it somehow just worked and—Steren: Exactly.Corey: And it knew, even logging into the Google Cloud Console because it understands who I am because I use Google Docs and things, I'm already logged in. None of this, “Oh, which one of these 85 credential sets is it going to be?” Like certain other clouds. It was, “Oh, wow. Wait, cloud can be easy and fun? When did that happen?”Steren: So, what has happened when you click that deploy to Google Cloud button, basically, the GitHub repository was built into a container with Cloud Build and then was deployed to Cloud Run. And once on Cloud Run, well, hopefully, you have forgotten about it because that's what we do, right? We—give us your code, in a container if you know containers if you don't just—we support, you know, many popular languages, and we know how to build them, so don't worry about that. And then we run it. And as you said, when there is low traffic or no traffic, it scales to zero.When there is low traffic, you're likely going to stay under the generous free tier. And if you have more traffic for, you know, Screaming in the Cloud suddenly becoming a high destination URL redirects, well, Cloud Run will scale the number of instances of this container to be able to handle the load. Cloud Run scales automatically and very well, but only—as always—charging you when you are processing some requests.Corey: I had to fork and make a couple of changes myself after I wound up doing some testing. The first was to make the entire thing case insensitive, which is—you know, makes obvious sense. And the other was to change the permanent redirect to a temporary redirect because believe it or not, in the fullness of time, sometimes sponsors want to change the landing page in different ways for different campaigns and that's fine by me. I just wanted to make sure people's browser cache didn't remember it into perpetuity. But it was easy enough to run—that was back in the early days of my exploring Go, which I've been doing this quarter—and in the couple of months this thing has been running it has been effectively flawless.It's set it; it's forget it. The only challenges I had with it are it was a little opaque getting a custom domain set up that—which is still in beta, to be clear—and I've heard some horror stories of people saying it got wedged. In my case, no, I deployed it and I started refreshing it and suddenly, it start throwing an SSL error. And it's like, “Oh, that's not good, but I'm going to break my own lifestyle here and be patient for ten minutes.” And sure enough, it cleared itself and everything started working. And that was the last time I had to think about any of this. And it just worked.Steren: So first, Cloud Run is HTTPS only. Why? Because it's 2020, right? It's 2022, but—Corey: [laugh].Steren: —it's launched in 2020. And so basically, we have made a decision that let's just not accept HTTP traffic; it's only HTTPS. As a consequence, we need to provision a cert for your custom domain. That is something that can take some time. And as you said, we keep it in beta or in preview because we are not yet satisfied with the experience or even the performance of Cloud Run custom domains, so we are actively working on fixing that with a different approach. So, expect some changes, hopefully, this year.Corey: I will say it does take a few seconds when people go to a snark.cloud URL for it to finish resolving, and it feels on some level like it's almost like a cold start problem. But subsequent visits, the same thing also feel a little on the slow and pokey side. And I don't know if that's just me being wildly impatient, if there's an optimization opportunity, or if that's just inherent to the platform that is not under current significant load.Steren: So, it depends. If the Cloud Run service has scaled down to zero, well of course, your service will need to be started. But what we do know, if it's a small Go binary, like something that you mentioned, it should really take less than, let's say, 500 milliseconds to go from zero to one of your container instance. Latency can also be due to the way the code is running. If it occurred is fetching things from Google Sheets at every startup, that is something that could add to the startup latency.So, I would need to take a look, but in general, we are not spinning up a virtual machine anytime we need to scale horizontally. Like, our infrastructure is a multi-tenant, rapidly scalable infrastructure that can materialize a container in literally 300 milliseconds. The rest of the latency comes from what does the container do at startup time?Corey: Yeah, I just ran a quick test of putting time in front of a curl command. It looks like it took 4.83 seconds. So, enough to be perceptive. But again, for just a quick redirect, it's generally not the end of the world and there's probably something I'm doing that is interesting and odd. Again, I did not invite you on the show to file a—Steren: [laugh].Corey: Bug report. Let's be very clear here.Steren: Seems on the very high end of startup latencies. I mean, I would definitely expect under the second. We should deep-dive into the code to take a look. And by the way, building stuff on top of spreadsheets. I've done that a ton in my previous lives as a CTO of a startup because well, that's the best administration interface, right? You just have a CRUD UI—Corey: [unintelligible 00:12:29] world and all business users understand it. If people in Microsoft decided they were going to change Microsoft Excel interface, even a bit, they would revert the change before noon of the same day after an army of business users grabbed pitchforks and torches and marched on their headquarters. It's one of those things that is how the world runs; it is the world's most common IDE. And it's great, but I still think of databases through the lens of thinking about it as a spreadsheet as my default approach to things. I also think of databases as DNS, but that's neither here nor there.Steren: You know, if you have maybe 100 redirects, that's totally fine. And by the way, the beauty of Cloud Run in a spreadsheet, as you mentioned is that Cloud Run services run with a certain identity. And this identity, you can grant it permissions. And in that case, what I would recommend if you haven't done so yet, is to give an identity to your Cloud Run service that has the permission to read that particular spreadsheet. And how you do that you invite the email of the service account as a reader of your spreadsheet, and that's probably what you did.Corey: The click button to the workflow on Google Cloud automatically did that—Steren: Oh, wow.Corey: —and taught me how to do it. “Here's the thing that look at. The end.” It was a flawless user-onboarding experience.Steren: Very nicely done. But indeed, you know, there is this built-in security which is the principle of minimal permission, like each of your Cloud Run service should basically only be able to read and write to the backing resources that they should. And by default, we give you a service account which has a lot of permissions, but our recommendation is to narrow those permissions to basically only look at the cloud storage buckets that the service is supposed to look at. And the same for a spreadsheet.Corey: Yes, on some level, I feel like I'm going to write an analysis of my own security approach. It would be titled, “My God, It's Full Of Stars” as I look at the IAM policies of everything that I've configured. The idea of least privilege is great. What I like about this approach is that it made it easy to do it so I don't have to worry about it. At one point, I want to go back and wind up instrumenting it a bit further, just so I can wind up getting aggregate numbers of all right, how many times if someone visited this particular link? It'll be good to know.And I don't know… if I have to change permissions to do that yet, but that's okay. It's the best kind of problem: future Corey. So, we'll deal with that when the time comes. But across the board, this has just been a phenomenal experience and it's clear that when you were building Google Cloud Run, you understood the assignment. Because I was looking for people saying negative things about it and by and large, all of its seem to come from a perspective of, “Well, this isn't going to be the most cost-effective or best way to run something that is hyperscale, globe-spanning.”It's yes, that's the thing that Kubernetes was originally built to run and for some godforsaken reason people run their blog on it instead now. Okay. For something that is small, scales to zero, and has long periods where no one is visiting it, great, this is a terrific answer and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's clear that you understood who you were aiming at, and the migration strategy to something that is a bit more, I want to say robust, but let's be clear what I mean when I'm saying that if you want something that's a little bit more impressive on your SRE resume as you're trying a multi-year project to get hired by Google or pretend you got hired by Google, yeah, you can migrate to something else in a relatively straightforward way. But that this is up, running, and works without having to think about it, and that is no small thing.Steren: So, there are two things to say here. The first is yes, indeed, we know we have high developer satisfaction. You know, we measure this—in Google Cloud, you might have seen those small satisfaction surveys popping up sometimes on the user interface, and you know, we are above 90% satisfaction score. We hire third parties to help us understand how usable and what satisfaction score would users get out of Cloud Run, and we are constantly getting very, very good results, in absolute but also compared to the competition.Now, the other thing that you said is that, you know, Cloud Run is for small things, and here while it is definitely something that allows you to be productive, something that strives for simplicity, but it also scales a lot. And contrary to other systems, you do not have any pre-provisioning to make. So, we have done demos where we go from zero to 10,000 container instances in ten seconds because of the infrastructure on which Cloud Run runs, which is fully managed and multi-tenant, we can offer you this scale on demand. And many of our biggest customers have actually not switched to something like Kubernetes after starting with Cloud Run because they value the low maintenance, the no infrastructure management that Cloud Run brings them.So, we have like Ikea, ecobee… for example ecobee, you know, the smart thermostats are using Cloud Run to ingest events from the thermostat. I think Ikea is using Cloud Run more and more for more of their websites. You know, those companies scale, right? This is not, like, scale to zero hobby project. This is actually production e-commerce and connected smart objects production systems that have made the choice of being on a fully-managed platform in order to reduce their operational overhead.[midroll 00:17:54]Corey: Let me be clear. When I say scale—I think we might be talking past each other on a small point here. When I say scale, I'm talking less about oh tens or hundreds of thousands of containers running concurrently. I'm talking in a more complicated way of, okay, now we have a whole bunch of different microservices talking to one another and affinity as far as location to each other for data transfer reasons. And as you start beginning to service discovery style areas of things, where we build a really complicated applications because we hired engineers and failed to properly supervise them, and that type of convoluted complex architecture.That's where it feels like Cloud Run increasingly, as you move in that direction, starts to look a little bit less like the tool of choice. Which is fine, I want to be clear on that point. The sense that I've gotten of it is a great way to get started, it's a great way to continue running a thing you don't have to think about because you have a day job that isn't infrastructure management. And it is clear to—as your needs change—to either remain with the service or pivot to a very close service without a whole lot of retooling, which is key. There's not much of a lock-in story to this, which I love.Steren: That was one of the key principles when we started to design Cloud Run was, you know, we realized the industry had agreed that the container image was the standard for the deployment artifact of software. And so, we just made the early choice of focusing on deploying containers. Of course, we are helping users build those containers, you know, we have things called build packs, we can continuously deploy from GitHub, but at the end of the day, the thing that gets auto-scaled on Cloud Run is a container. And that enables portability.As you said. You can literally run the same container, nothing proprietary in it, I want to be clear. Like, you're just listening on a port for some incoming requests. Those requests can be HTTP requests, events, you know, we have products that can push events to Cloud Run like Eventarc or Pub/Sub. And this same container, you can run it on your local machine, you can run it on Kubernetes, you can run it on another cloud. You're not locked in, in terms of API of the compute.We even went even above and beyond by having the Cloud Run API looks like a Kubernetes API. I think that was an extra effort that we made. I'm not sure people care that much, but if you look at the Cloud Run API, it is actually exactly looking like Kubernetes, Even if there is no Kubernetes at all under the hood; we just made it for portability. Because we wanted to address this concern of serverless which was lock-in. Like, when you use a Function as a Service product, you are worried that the architecture that you are going to develop around this product is going to be only working in this particular cloud provider, and you're not in control of the language, the version that this provider has decided to offer you, you're not in control of more of the complexity that can come as you want to scan this code, as you want to move this code between staging and production or test this code.So, containers are really helping with that. So, I think we made the right choice of this new artifact that to build Cloud Run around the container artifact. And you know, at the time when we launched, it was a little bit controversial because back in the day, you know, 2018, 2019, serverless really meant Functions as a Service. So, when we launched, we little bit redefined serverless. And we basically said serverless containers. Which at the time were two worlds that in the same sentence were incompatible. Like, many people, including internally, had concerns around—Corey: Oh, the serverless versus container war was a big thing for a while. Everyone was on a different side of that divide. It's… containers are effectively increasingly—and I know, I'll get email for this, and I don't even slightly care, they're a packaging format—Steren: Exactly.Corey: —where it solves the problem of how do I build this thing to deploy on Debian instances? And Ubuntu instances, and other instances, God forbid, Windows somewhere, you throw a container over the wall. The end. Its DevOps is about breaking down the walls between Dev and Ops. That's why containers are here to make them silos that don't have to talk to each other.Steren: A container image is a glorified zip file. Literally. You have a set of layers with files in them, and basically, we decided to adopt that artifact standard, but not the perceived complexity that existed at the time around containers. And so, we basically merged containers with serverless to make something as easy to use as a Function as a Service product but with the power of bringing your own container. And today, we are seeing—you mentioned, what kind of architecture would you use Cloud Run for?So, I would say now there are three big buckets. The obvious one is anything that is a website or an API, serving public internet traffic, like your URL redirect service, right? This is, you have an API, takes a request and returns a response. It can be a REST API, GraphQL API. We recently added support for WebSockets, which is pretty unique for a service offering to support natively WebSockets.So, what I mean natively is, my client can open a socket connection—a bi-directional socket connection—with a given instance, for up to one hour. This is pretty unique for something that is as fully managed as Cloud Run.Corey: Right. As we're recording this, we are just coming off of Google I/O, and there were a number of announcements around Cloud Run that were touching it because of, you know, strange marketing issues. I only found out that Google I/O was a thing and featured cloud stuff via Twitter at the time it was happening. What did you folks release around Cloud Run?Steren: Good question, actually. Part of the Google I/O Developer keynote, I pitched a story around how Cloud Run helps developers, and the I/O team liked the story, so we decided to include that story as part of the live developer keynote. So, on stage, we announced Cloud Run jobs. So now, I talked to you about Cloud Run services, which can be used to expose an API, but also to do, like, private microservice-to-microservice communication—because cloud services don't have to be public—and in that case, we support GRPC and, you know, a very strong security mechanism where only Service A can invoke Service B, for example, but Cloud Run jobs are about non-request-driven containers. So, today—I mean, before Google I/O a few days ago, the only requirement that we imposed on your container image was that it started to listen for requests, or events, or GRPC—Corey: Web requests—Steren: Exactly—Corey: It speaks [unintelligible 00:24:35] you want as long as it's HTTP. Yes.Steren: That was the only requirement we asked you to have on your container image. And now we've changed that. Now, if you have a container that basically starts and executes to completion, you can deploy it on a Cloud Run job. So, you will use Cloud Run jobs for, like, daily batch jobs. And you have the same infrastructure, so on-demand, you can go from zero to, I think for now, the maximum is a hundred tasks in parallel, for—of course, you can run many tasks in sequence, but in parallel, you can go from zero to a hundred, right away to run your daily batch job, daily admin job, data processing.But this is more in the batch mode than in streaming mode. If you would like to use a more, like, streaming data processing, than a Cloud Run service would still be the best fit because you can literally push events to it, and it will auto-scale to handle any number of events that it receives.Corey: Do you find that the majority of customers are using Cloud Run for one-off jobs that barely will get more than a single container, like my thing, or do you find that they're doing massively parallel jobs? Where's the lion's share of developer and customer interest?Steren: It's both actually. We have both individual developers, small startups—which really value the scale to zero and pay per use model of Cloud Run. Your URL redirect service probably is staying below the free tier, and there are many, many, many users in your case. But at the same time, we have big, big, big customers who value the on-demand scalability of Cloud Run. And for these customers, of course, they will probably very likely not scale to zero, but they value the fact that—you know, we have a media company who uses Cloud Run for TV streaming, and when there is a soccer game somewhere in the world, they have a big spike of usage of requests coming in to their Cloud Run service, and here they can trust the rapid scaling of Cloud Run so they don't have to pre-provision things in advance to be able to serve that sudden traffic spike.But for those customers, Cloud Run is priced in a way so that if you know that you're going to consume a lot of Cloud Run CPU and memory, you can purchase Committed Use Discounts, which will lower your bill overall because you know you are going to spend one dollar per hour on Cloud Run, well purchase a Committed Use Discount because you will only spend 83 cents instead of one dollar. And also, Cloud Run and comes with two pricing model, one which is the default, which is the request-based pricing model, which is basically you only have CPU allocated to your container instances if you are processing at least one request. But as a consequence of that, you are not paying outside of the processing of those requests. Those containers might stay up for you, one, ready to receive new requests, but you're not paying for them. And so, that is—you know, your URL redirect service is probably in that mode where yes when you haven't used it for a while, it will scale down to zero, but if you send one request to it, it will serve that request and then it will stay up for a while until it decides to scale down. But you the user only pays when you are processing these specific requests, a little bit like a Function as a Service product.Corey: Scales to zero is one of the fundamental tenets of serverless that I think that companies calling something serverless, but it always charges you per hour anyway. Yeah, that doesn't work. Storage, let's be clear, is a separate matter entirely. I'm talking about compute. Even if your workflow doesn't scale down to zero ever as a workload, that's fine, but if the workload does, you don't get to keep charging me for it.Steren: Exactly. And so, in that other mode where you decide to always have CPU allocated to your Cloud Run container instances, then you pay for the entire lifecycle of this container instances. You still benefit from the auto-scaling of Cloud Run, but you will pay for the lifecycle and in that case, the price points are lower because you pay for a longer period of time. But that's more the price model that those bigger customers will take because at their scale, they basically always receive requests, so they already to pay always, basically.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to chat with me. Before you go, one last question that we'll be using as a teaser for the next episode that we record together. It seems like this is a full-time job being the product manager on Cloud Run, but no Google, contrary to popular opinion, does in fact, still support 20% projects. What's yours?Steren: So, I've been looking to work on Cloud Run since it was a prototype, and you know, for a long time, we've been iterating privately on Cloud Run, launching it, seeing it grow, seeing it adopted, it's great. It's my full-time job. But on Fridays, I still find the time to have a 20% project, which also had quite a bit of impact. And I work on some sustainability efforts for Google Cloud. And notably, we've released two things last year.The first one is that we are sharing some carbon characteristics of Google Cloud regions. So, if you have seen those small leaves in the Cloud Console next to the regions that are emitting the less carbon, that's something that I helped bring to life. And the second one, which is something quite big, is we are helping customers report and reduce their gross carbon emissions of their Google Cloud usage by providing an out of the box reporting tool called Google Cloud Carbon Footprint. So, that's something that I was able to bootstrap with a team a little bit on the side of my Cloud Run project, but I was very glad to see it launched by our CEO at the last Cloud Next Conference. And now it is a fully-funded project, so we are very glad that we are able to help our customers better meet their sustainability goals themselves.Corey: And we will be talking about it significantly on the next episode. We're giving a teaser, not telling the whole story.Steren: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you are. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Steren: Well, if they want to learn more about Cloud Run, we talked about how simple was that name. It was obviously not simple to find this simple name, but the domain is https://cloud.run.Corey: We will also accept snark.cloud/run, I will take credit for that service, too.Steren: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: There we are.Steren: And then, people can find me on Twitter at @steren, S-T-E-R-E-N. I'll be happy—I'm always happy to help developers get started or answer questions about Cloud Run. And, yeah, thank you for having me. As I said, you successfully deployed something in just a few minutes to Cloud Run. I would encourage the audience to—Corey: In spite of myself. I know, I'm as surprised as anyone.Steren: [laugh].Corey: The only snag I really hit was the fact that I was riding shotgun when we picked up my daughter from school and went through a dead zone. It's like, why is this thing not loading in the Google Cloud Console? Yeah, fix the cell network in my area, please.Steren: I'm impressed that you did all of that from an iPad. But yeah, to the audience give Cloud Run the try. You can really get started connecting your GitHub repository or deploy your favorite container image. And we've worked very hard to ensure that usability was here, and we know we have pretty strong usability scores. Because that was a lot of work to simplicity, and product excellence and developer experience is a lot of work to get right, and we are very proud of what we've achieved with Cloud Run and proud to see that the developer community has been very supportive and likes this product.Corey: I'm a big fan of what you've built. And well, of course, it links to all of that in the show notes. I just want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. And thanks again for building something that I think in many ways showcases the best of what Google Cloud has to offer.Steren: Thanks for the invite.Corey: We'll talk again soon. Steren Giannini is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, on Cloud Run. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. If it's on YouTube, put the thumbs up and the subscribe buttons as well, but in the event that you hated it also include an angry comment explaining why your 20% project is being a shithead on the internet.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Marta On The Move Podcast- Hosted by Marta Napoleone Mazzoni
#161 Improv Comedy Classes an Avenue to More Playfulness, Creativity, and Better Communication.

Marta On The Move Podcast- Hosted by Marta Napoleone Mazzoni

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:09


Welcome back all! Today I am going to be exploring more into my new found passion of Improv comedy classes and why I am here to tell all of you, to try one out in your own hometown. On episode 158 I delved into some deep content about facing your fears and sitting with discomfort. I directly referenced Phil and I pushing past our awkwardness and joining Improv classes. It turns out I wasn't quite done with the subject, and in fact will probably record another podcast about how to make meaningful relationships as you age, which Improv will be involved in that discussion as well. What can I say... When I am into something... I am INTO it. :) Aside from being a fun activity to participate in, Improv has helped me personally communicate better with others, and myself. My brain feels sharper than it has in years, and Phil and I's communication has improved A LOT. We always considered ourselves great at talking, but have realized over the years that you can be great at talking, but NOT at communicating. We talk over one another. We blame and judge. We get defensive. We assume and project. I am sure we are not the only ones. When you are with someone for a long period of time you develop habits, and patterns. These habits became apparent to me when we started taking Improv together and began working through some practices and games. We weren't listening outside of class as well as we could have been. Improv helped us pause and instead of waiting for our turn to speak, to really listen to what the other was saying. It also revealed long standing patterns of blame. If we were in a scene together, we instantly fell into "Well, you didn't do this." or "Why are you blaming me? You weren't there either!." Sort of scenario. Those negative emotions were easy to access as we built our pretend world for a scene. For example- A married couple at a furniture store that can't agree on a couch. Normal, right? Let me be clear here in saying that Improv comedy classes didn't entirely solve our problems. I am not saying it is therapy or a replacement for therapy. It just offered a lovely way of actually PRACTICING how to communicate better. You learn from therapy and discover how to better communicate. You may notice your own patterns or you might read concepts from books on how to shift the way you communicate. You read it, but to actually put these good habits into practice in a fun way allows you to shine light on where they pop up and strengthen better communication muscles so that you deeply know it. It was shortly after our Phil and I's first few classes that we began to unfold. The blame game disappeared. We were listening to one another AND then most beautiful thing happened naturally... We were playing again. Truly playing. This past year with the death of my sister Nina has been a rough one, and I have actively been rediscovering how to play and find joy. Life is hard. It is dark, and it can sometimes be easy to stay dark. It is hard to be playful after tragedy, but man is it needed. We began being lighter and not just in class. The affects lingered on throughout the week and seeped into our days and evenings, and we could not wait until the following week to play again with our new found friends! At least for us Improv classes are pure childlike joy. It is like camp for adults! Wanna try it? Let's chat with a veteran on the show! I am excited to announce that I have a guest for today's show, something I haven't had in over a year and a half! Feels good to speak to another human on MOTM. On today's episode I bring on Justin Borak. Justin is an Improv teacher and actor, and has worked in Chicago for several years performing in shows at Second City, iO, and the Annoyance. Some popular and prestigious Improv hot spots around the country. I am so excited to chat with him about how he thinks Improv spurs creativity and playfulness, how he thinks Dungeons and Dragons blends so well with Improv Comedy, and how inclusive it is in different cities. We also discuss how diverse of a crew you get when you join a class. Age, race, all walks of life join in these classes and it is a delightful way to expand your perspective and friend group. We also walk you into your first improv class and tells you what to expect, so you don't have to be nervous. This is me trying to break down what happens in a typical class for all those who are curious but are really scared to walk into something crazy. It is harder to write, so listen to the episode to get a better idea. A Typical First Improv Class- You sit in the chairs waiting for everyone to arrive. Maybe you say hi to someone, maybe you don't. The instructor introduces him/herself and they have everyone then stand in a circle and play some games. Most of these games are typical icebreaker games. Remembering people's names, passing the red ball around, Zip, Zap, Zop. They are games that are played and learned very quickly and intended to warm you up, to allow you to get comfortable so that you soon realize you are just having fun like you used to do when you were a kid. No pressure or expectation, only fun. After that they may explain how Improv works, you might do some quick short practices with others. One of my most favorite practices the instructor lead early on - It was myself and another classmate on stage. The instructions were that we were making a bed together, and we couldn't talk until the instructor tells us to. We start and just begin to act out making a bed. Folding sheets, fluffing pillows, etc. The real subject of this scene isn't the bed though it is the relationship between the characters and what is going on. What is their relationship to each other. Is the body language angry, happy, sad? I liked the exercise because when you begin Improv it is hard to find words. Silence is easier and it relaxed me. It allowed me to use my body to express how I was feeling. On your first class you may also start to delve into something called Monologue Deconstruction. I like to think of this as basically storytelling time. The audience throws out a word. Say "Beach." and one person comes forward to tell a story that relates somehow to a beach. Trying to add in as much detail as possible. Then from this story and the details, the classmates start to create scenes. That is about it, folks. Sound scary? It shouldn't. I have honestly found the most easy going people to be in my Improv classes. Everyone there is showing up to have a good time and learn some fun and funky new skill. Creativity sparks because everyone is showing up for one another to build the best scene possible. It is the ultimate co-op game where everyone wins. You ready to try it? YOU SHOULD! Better yet, bring your partner, friend or family member along with you and watch your communication start to evolve and your playfulness ignite!   Yoga Sailing Retreats for 2023 Registration is OPEN!!! Thailand- April 8th to the 15th Croatia August 26th to the 2nd Sardinia and Corsica- Sept 2nd to the 9th. - 2 spots left! Don't miss out on your chance to sail with me next year because I am not sure if I will be hosting sailing retreats in 2024 or 2025. ALSO if you can't roll with me overseas this year, stay local! My friend Elizabeth Craig and I are hosting a women onlyTransformation Retreat near Pittsburgh. Sept 8-11th. Registration is now open and Early Birds Registration ends on June 30th. This retreat is for the awakening woman, and we want you with us. Choose from a 2 or 3 day retreat for your busy schedule. This episode is sponsored by Steel City Improv. "Steel City Improv Theater teaches and performs Long-Form improv comedy. In long-form improvisation, a group of improvisers take one suggestion from the audience and perform an entirely made-up show, complete with multiple scenes, characters, and ridiculous spectacles, bound only by its creators' imaginations. Steel City Improv Theater (a.k.a. the SCIT), teaches Applied Improvisation. The SCIT knows that improv classes make you more than just funny.  By applying the principles of improv to your life,  you can become a better parent, mentor, entrepreneur, employee and friend.  Improv teaches you to deal with the unexpected in life. You become a better listener, more positive person, and improve your ability to truly live in the moment. Steel City Improv Theater's philosophy is best summed up in three words: “Listen. Commit. Play.” The SCIT combined the best practices from improv training found at New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles improv theaters into the SCIT Philosophy. Listening can be a hard skill to master, but, by staying in the moment can open up a world of possibilities. Accepting others' ideas is difficult, but committing to our own ideas can be an even bigger challenge. With improv training, we learn to break through the inner critic that normally stops us. With a sense of play, we find an endless sense of possibility and inspiration. When our teammates have that same sense of imagination, it makes the word “failure” seem less scary and more exciting. For a safe space to step out of your comfort zone, come listen, commit, and play at Steel City Improv Theater!"        

Walkabout the Galaxy
Noxious Fumes from Stars and Moons

Walkabout the Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:27


What does Jupiter's volcanic moon Io have in common with one of the largest stars in the galaxy? Both are belching sulfur compounds, though for very different reasons. We learn about sulfuric outgassing on Io and the incredible hypergiant star VY Canis Majoris and its huge stellar eruptions. Plus, the European Space Agency is building a probe to hideout in space hoping to catch a passing rogue or long period comet. Join us for all that, plus space news and trivia.

Master Your Coaching Biz Podcast
46: HOW TO GROW AND EVOLVE IN BUSINESS WITH NIKKI GOLDMAN OF I/O COACHING

Master Your Coaching Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 22:14


Nikki Goldman helps leaders to unlock their potential and forward their thinking. She is the CEO of I/O Coaching, a leadership development company that specializes in executive coaching. The I/O (input/output) Method is executive coaching done differently. She acts as a thought partner to CEO's and executives helping them to grow, shift, and evolve. Nikki has worked with companies such as Peloton, Warby Parker, Goldman Sachs, American Express, and many more. With an undergrad degree from the University of Pennsylvania and an Executive Coaching Certification from Columbia University, Nikki combines academic research and real-life experience to create impactful programs. Nikki is a lifelong learner and is constantly seeking more ways to enhance her coaching practice. Tune in today to hear how Nikki began her boutique agency, how she grew her business without social media, and why she believes in people over projects. Nikki also shares more on authenticity, abundance and scarcity mindset, accountability structures, as well as LinkedIn. All this and more on today's show. Did you love today's episode? Let us know by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts today. Don't forget to screenshot and tag us so we can share your post. Want to join the conversation after the show? Head to the Master Your Coaching Biz Facebook Group. Link below in show notes. CONNECT WITH NIKKI Website: https://www.iocoaching.co/ CONNECT WITH CHERYL Website: http://successfulcoaches.com/ Show Notes: https://masteryourcoachingbiz.blubrry.net/listen/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cherylthacker/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/successfulcoach/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coachcherylthacker/ Brands I Love:  https://masteryourcoachingbiz.blubrry.net/brands-i

The Resus Room
Intraosseous Access; Roadside to Resus

The Resus Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 63:31


So, as we all know, there are loads of presentations that we see in Emergency Medicine that require us to gain rapid access to the circulation. Either to administer medicines around the body or to get fluids into the circulation. Now there's a number of different ways we can get them into the circulatory system for them then to get to their sites of action, each of which comes with its pros and cons. There's buccal, inhaled, intramuscular, sublingual, intranasal etc etc…. But, in the vast majority of cases we gain this access to the vasculature through intravenous access and a peripheral cannula. That means that iv access is a very common procedure in emergency care. The great news is that the equipment is cheap, there are multiple sites for insertion and it's often feasible regardless of the patients age or presenting complaint. Compared to all the other options for drug administration, iv access and administration of drugs via the IV route, results in 100% bioavailability of all medicines because it avoids the first pass metabolism in the liver, and distribution around the body is rapid because it bypasses the need for absorption into the vasculature. So that's all good, so why are we doing an episode on intraosseous access then? Well, iv access and we as clinicians, are not infallible. And as we're all too aware, gaining IV access can be challenging. There are other patient factors to like iv drug use, the morbidly obese and paediatric patients when everything is just smaller and more unfamiliar. So all of these factors increase the technical difficulty of iv cannulation. If we add to that some of the environmental issues we might find in the prehospital setting - so poor lighting or difficult patient access, it's not a huge leap to realise that it would be great to have an alternative vascular access option available to a broad range of emergency care providers. And this is where IO access comes in. So what will we be covering in this episode; -A recap on the anatomy of bones -Indications for IO access -The evidence on IO access and administration -Insertion site -Needle selection -Contraindications -Case examples Once again we'd love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom. Enjoy! Simon, Rob & James

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
221. NYC 365 Live from #NFTNYC Recording in Time Square

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:41


With 5 members of the NFT 365 team in New York for NFT NYC event where I am speaking, we took the opportunity to record an episode from the heart of Time Square on top of the iconic red stairs...   With current market conditions and the overall rollercoaster of web 3.0 it's important to stop and realize what amazing times we are living in and all the great things and people continuing to build, empower and celebrate across every aspect of Web 3.0.  Make sure to follow the team this week at #NFTNYC on the following social handles:  http://Discord.gg/ADHDcoin https://twitter.com/NFT365Podcast https://www.facebook.com/groups/nft365/ _________________________________________________________________ Connect with NFT365 Podcast Host Brian Fanzo! https://twitter.com/iSocialFanz https://www.instagram.com/brianfanzospeaker https://www.facebook.com/brianfanzospeaker https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianfanzo https://www.amazon.com/shop/isocialfanz https://www.tiktok.com/@isocialfanz https://www.clubhouse.com/@isocialfanz As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

Ascolta la Notizia
Ucraina, Foa: «Ritengo che la posizione del M5S sia plausibile in democrazia: risponde a un sentimento di profondo smarrimento nella popolazione»

Ascolta la Notizia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 1:29


«L'ambasciatore Razov tende a strumentalizzare qualunque frase polemica che sorge nel panorama politico italiano e non solo. È abbastanza normale in un contesto di guerra di comunicazione». Così Marcello Foa, giornalista ed ex presidente della Rai, intervenendo a "Controcorrente", programma condotto da Veronica Gentili su Rete 4. «Io ritengo che la posizione del M5s sia plausibile in democrazia, debba essere esaminata correttamente e per altro risponde a un sentimento di profondo smarrimento nella popolazione, che continua a non capire perché bisogna mandare queste armi e continua a non capire quale sia l'obiettivo finale del fronte occidentale», ha aggiunto Foa. «Che cosa vuole l'Occidente e in particolare Biden? Vuole arrivare a un ritiro di tutti i russi dall'Ucraina? Vuole arrivare a rovesciare il governo Putin? Non si sa, ritengo che la storia insegna che qualunque operazione di politica internazionale debba avere ben chiaro quale sia l'obiettivo finale, e io l'obiettivo finale dell'Occidente non lo vedo. Ricordo le dichiarazioni di Kissinger, che saggiamente diceva: 'attenzione, prolungando una guerra senza aver chiaro l'obiettivo finale rischiamo di fare il gioco della Cina'», ha detto ancora il giornalista. Scarica l’app di Ascolta la Notizia per Android: https://bit.ly/2F3ptXR o iPhone: https://apple.co/2F8zEdU Attiva la skill di Ascolta la Notizia nel tuo dispositivo Alexa: https://amzn.to/3K7RTfU

Ascolta la Notizia
Renzi: «Il voto passerà e Draghi va avanti: Conte non fa un nuovo Papeete»

Ascolta la Notizia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 0:56


«Una crisi adesso? No, sarebbe come il Papeete e Conte non fa un nuovo Papeete. Il voto passerà e Draghi va avanti». Lo ha detto Matteo Renzi a Mezz’ora in più, su RaiTre. Sulla questione Ucraina Renzi ha affermato: «Il peggior di tutti è Conte: se fosse stato su quel treno» con Draghi, Macron e Scholz «non l’avrebbero messo nemmeno nella cuccetta». «Tutti siamo per l’Ucraina. Io ho votato per l’invio di armi in Ucraina e voterò nella stessa direzione martedì ma la situazione è complicatissima». «Nel M5S stanno utilizzando l’Ucraina per regolare i loro conti. Non gliene frega niente della geopolitica, ma se la Taverna e Toninelli devono rimanere in parlamento. Lo trovo avvilente», ha concluso Renzi. Scarica l’app di Ascolta la Notizia per Android: https://bit.ly/2F3ptXR o iPhone: https://apple.co/2F8zEdU Attiva la skill di Ascolta la Notizia nel tuo dispositivo Alexa: https://amzn.to/3K7RTfU

Workplace Psychology with Martha Grajdek
117 Happiness Is A Choice

Workplace Psychology with Martha Grajdek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 8:04


Whether you're an optimist by nature, or see the world as a half-empty glass, the lens through which you experience everything around you is your choice. Considering how much time we spend at work, it makes sense that we make the best of our time at the office. Tune in to learn more.

Chiesa Cristiana Evangelica  della Vera Vite
Perle, maiali e feste: le parabole di Gesù - Parte 2: Immagini del quotidiano |19 Giugno 2022 |

Chiesa Cristiana Evangelica della Vera Vite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


Le immagini  che Gesù usa nelle parabole sono tratte sempre dal quotidiano di chi ascolta... ma spingono sempre chi ascolta a pensare oltre quelle immagini della quotidianità, per divenire esempi di vita. --- Predicatrice: Jean Guest CLICCA SUL TITOLO PER ASCOLTARE IL MESSAGGIO Tempo di lettura: 10 minuti Tempo di ascolto audio/visione video: 36 minuti Uno dei miei romanzi preferiti  è “Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore” di Italo Calvino. È un capolavoro della narrazione e non posso che consigliarvelo fortemente. Ma attenzione! È anche la lettura più frustrante, perché lo scopo del romanzo è quello di iniziare ogni capitolo con un primo verso ben noto, sulla falsariga di "Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore bussasse alla tua porta", catturare l'attenzione con metafore familiari, tessere una trama intrigante, presentare personaggi affascinanti, inserire un colpo di scena o una svolta inaspettata nel racconto e poi terminare senza concludere la storia, passando direttamente a quella successiva. Accidenti! Cosa succede dopo? La genialità del romanzo sta nel fatto che si pensa di sapere cosa si sta leggendo, ma non si riesce ad anticipare mai il colpo di scena che sta per arrivare.  Sapete - È un po' come quando leggiamo le parabole. Sono così familiari, spesso sono le prime storie della Bibbia che raccontiamo ai nostri figli, e pensiamo di conoscerle così bene da dimenticare che potrebbe esserci un colpo di scena. Ma cos'è una parabola? La definizione che userò è quella più ampia - cioè, una parabola è un insegnamento che utilizza un'immagine per trasmettere una verità spirituale.  Anche se mi piace molto questa definizione del filosofo Kierkegaard.  Una comunicazione indiretta che “inganna” l'uditore  portandolo alla verità - Soren Kierkegaard Non lasciatevi ingannare dalla parola “inganna”, non significa ingannare o imbrogliare, ma piuttosto è una storia così ordinaria nella sua normalità che vi coglie di sorpresa - è di nuovo il colpo di scena della storia. La definizione ampia che useremo comprende anche quegli insegnamenti di Gesù di una sola riga, come "Io sono il pane della vita", o "Io sono la vite, voi i tralci". Se includiamo queste brevi frasi illustrate, Gesù ha raccontato circa 60 parabole - che noi conosciamo! “Tutte queste cose disse Gesù in parabole alla folla e senza parabole non diceva loro nulla.” (Matteo 13:34) È chiaro che le parabole sono importanti negli insegnamenti di Gesù, ma non sono un'esclusiva sua, si trovano in tutti gli scritti e gli insegnamenti del mondo antico e di tutte le culture, ed è un modo particolarmente rabbinico di insegnare la Torah.  Ma ciò che colpisce è la frequenza con cui Gesù insegnava in parabole e la varietà delle immagini che utilizzava; egli sfrutta un modo di insegnare riconoscibile e cattura l'attenzione dei suoi ascoltatori con immagini tratte dalla loro vita quotidiana.  Le immagini che utilizza possono essere suddivise in quattro categorie Come vivevano i suoi ascoltatori: l'agricoltura, gli oggetti domestici di tutti i giorni.Come funziona la società: matrimoni, banchetti, relazioni, giudici. Il denaro: averlo o non averloAltro Le immagini sono fondamentali, le parabole sono visive, non concettuali. Quando ascoltiamo la parabola del seminatore abbiamo un'immagine in testa, per questo le frasi che iniziano con  "Io sono" possono essere considerate parabole;  "Io sono il buon pastore", possiamo capire cosa intende. C'è anche una varietà nel tipo di narrazione che utilizza. Si va dalle lunghe e complesse parabole allegoriche come la parabola del Seminatore, dove l'allegoria è la chiave per comprenderla, ai ricchi racconti narrativi come la parabola del Figliol Prodigo e la parabola del Buon Samaritano, alle brevi istantanee illustrative come il lievito nel pane.  E proprio come Italo Calvino, Gesù era ben felice di lasciare i suoi ascoltatori e noi in sospeso senza un vero e proprio finale: cosa ne sarà del fratello maggiore nella parabola del Figliol Prodigo? A volte è assolutamente chiaro il significato di una parabola, mentre altre volte ci si gratta la testa dicendo: "Cosa vorrà dire?". Ma non preoccupatevi troppo di questo, i discepoli erano esattamente come noi. “I suoi discepoli gli si avvicinarono, dicendo: «Spiegaci la parabola della zizzania nel campo».” (Matteo 13:36 b)  Le parabole avevano lo scopo di far riflettere chi le ascoltava: cosa intendeva dire? Vediamo quando i discepoli hanno frainteso in modo comico. “E Gesù disse loro: «Guardatevi bene dal lievito dei farisei e dei sadducei». Ed essi ragionavano tra di loro e dicevano: «È perché non abbiamo preso dei pani».  Ma Gesù se ne accorse e disse [loro]: «Gente di poca fede, perché discutete tra di voi del fatto di non aver pane?  Non capite ancora? Non vi ricordate dei cinque pani dei cinquemila uomini e quante ceste ne portaste via?  Né dei sette pani dei quattromila uomini e quanti panieri ne portaste via?  Come mai non capite che non è di pani che io vi parlavo? Ma guardatevi dal lievito dei farisei e dei sadducei».  Allora capirono che non aveva loro detto di guardarsi dal lievito dei pani, ma dall'insegnamento dei farisei e dei sadducei.” (Matteo 16:6:12) Per essere corretti nei confronti dei discepoli, avevano già sentito Gesù dire anche questo: “Disse loro un'altra parabola: «Il regno dei cieli è simile al lievito che una donna prende e nasconde in tre misure di farina, finché la pasta sia tutta lievitata».” (Matteo 13:33) Quindi, a volte l'immagine del lievito era positiva, altre no. Ma il punto di entrambi è il lievito stesso, così piccolo eppure in grado di avere un effetto significativo. L'ascoltatore deve riflettere e capire qual'è lo scopo dell'immagine. Dobbiamo impegnarci ancora di più perché non viviamo nella Palestina del I secolo. Il teologo Kenneth Bailey dice che la parabola che illustra meglio questo aspetto è quella delle due persone che costruiscono la loro casa una sulla roccia, l'altra sulla sabbia. “Perciò chiunque ascolta queste mie parole e le mette in pratica sarà paragonato a un uomo avveduto che ha costruito la sua casa sopra la roccia. La pioggia è caduta, sono venuti i torrenti, i venti hanno soffiato e hanno investito quella casa; ma essa non è caduta, perché era fondata sulla roccia. E chiunque ascolta queste mie parole e non le mette in pratica sarà paragonato a un uomo stolto che ha costruito la sua casa sulla sabbia. La pioggia è caduta, sono venuti i torrenti, i venti hanno soffiato e hanno fatto impeto contro quella casa, ed essa è caduta e la sua rovina è stata grande”. (Matteo 7:24-27)  Nel XXI secolo, con le nostre conoscenze scientifiche, ascoltiamo questa parabola e scartiamo immediatamente la persona stolta che costruisce la sua casa sulla sabbia, perché è palesemente sciocco farlo. Siamo quindi pronti subito a concludere che il senso della storia è: costruisci la tua casa (la vita) sulla roccia (Dio). Ma nell'arido paesaggio del deserto in cui viveva Gesù la terra sabbiosa s'indurisce al sole, diventando dura come la roccia , e non è immediatamente evidente quale sia roccia e quale sabbia,  e l'unico modo per essere certi di essere sulla roccia è scavare molto in profondità e questo richiede un duro lavoro.  Solo quando arrivano le piogge la sabbia torna ad essere sabbia e le fondamenta sprofondano.  Quindi sì, la parabola parla di costruire la propria vita su Dio, ma tu, credente, dovrai lavorare duramente per gettare solide fondamenta, costruendo la tua fede nella conoscenza e nella verità, in modo che, quando arriva la pioggia, tu possa reggere in piedi.  Lo stolto non sembra più così evidentemente stolto, e forse ci assomiglia un po' di più? Come diceva sempre Gesù alla fine di una parabola, chi ha orecchie per udire dovrebbe ascoltare e intendere! Come ascoltatori del XXI secolo, dobbiamo anche controllare la nostra comprensione rispetto alla saggezza percepita e alle interpretazioni precedenti. So che continuo a sollevare la questione del patriarcato con voi, ma per buoni motivi. Guardate il capitolo 15 di Luca.  Luca capitolo 15 “La parabola della pecora smarrita”“La parabola della dramma perduta”“La parabola del figlio prodigo” Gesù racconta intenzionalmente una serie di tre parabole che trattano della condizione umana di essere perduti e di come Dio ci ritrova - tutte e tre sono bellissime immagini di redenzione.  Vi garantisco che a tutti noi è stato detto che la parabola della pecora riguarda Dio come buon pastore e la parabola del figlio prodigo riguarda Dio come padre amorevole, ma la parabola della moneta perduta? Dio come donna diligente che restaura le ricchezze della famiglia e dà una festa? No, è solo una donna. Perché? Per quale motivo Gesù avrebbe insegnato queste parabole in successione, ma solo due di esse dovrebbero indicare il carattere e la natura di Dio? Non ha senso.  Le diverse interpretazioni ci aprono nuove idee. L'interpretazione tradizionale del seme di senape è che il seme è così piccolo eppure cresce fino a diventare un albero così grande da offrire riparo agli uccelli: il punto della parabola è che il Regno di Dio inizia in piccolo, ma cresce fino a diventare qualcosa di significativo.  Ma uno scrittore contemporaneo all'epoca di Gesù parla del seme di senape in questo modo: “Estremamente benefico per la salute. Cresce soprattutto allo stato selvatico, anche se viene migliorata quando trapiantato; ma d'altra parte, una volta seminato è difficile liberarsene, perché il seme, una volta caduto, germoglia subito". (Plinio il Vecchio) Cresce come un'erbaccia che, per quanto ci si sforzi, non si riesce a eliminare, e diventa un albero così grande che gli uccelli vi si posano: è la rovina dell'agricoltore!  Quindi, forse, come dice la teologa Paula Gooder: "È possibile che, anziché presentare l'immagine di un idillio pastorale, questa parabola suggerisca qualcosa di sovversivo e molto meno gradito: il Regno dei cieli è come un'erbaccia perniciosa che, una volta piantata, non può essere sradicata. Cresce e cresce fino a diventare così grande che coloro che sono meno desiderati nei nostri campi ordinati e ben pianificati trovano una casa e vi riposano." (Paula Gooder) La seconda interpretazione è più dirompente della prima, pone più domande a noi come Chiesa. Entrambe sono possibili, entrambe sono plausibili.  Chi ha orecchie per udire dovrebbe ascoltare e intendere! E va bene che si discuta sul significato delle parabole. Viviamo in tempi, culture e contesti diversi, ma esse avranno al centro una verità spirituale che è pertinente per noi oggi. E a volte la nostra mancanza di comprensione potrebbe indicare qualcos'altro. Torniamo a Marco 4 e alla parabola del seminatore. “«Ascoltate: il seminatore uscì a seminare. Mentre seminava, una parte del seme cadde lungo la strada; e gli uccelli [del cielo] vennero e lo mangiarono. Un'altra cadde in un suolo roccioso dove non aveva molta terra; e subito spuntò, perché non aveva terreno profondo; ma quando il sole si levò, fu bruciata e, non avendo radice, inaridì. Un'altra cadde fra le spine; le spine crebbero e la soffocarono, ed essa non fece frutto. Altre parti caddero nella buona terra; portarono frutto, che venne su e crebbe, e giunsero a dare il trenta, il sessanta e il cento per uno». Poi disse: «Chi ha orecchi per udire oda». Quando egli fu solo, quelli che gli stavano intorno con i dodici lo interrogarono sulle parabole. Egli disse loro: «A voi è dato [di conoscere] il mistero del regno di Dio; ma a quelli che sono di fuori tutto viene esposto in parabole…” (Marco 4:3-11) Ci sono “intenditori” che comprendono il mistero del regno di Dio e persone estranee o “di fuori” che non lo comprendono.  Per i quattro capitoli successivi i discepoli sono gli “intenditori” e poi, nel capitolo 8, diventano di nuovo “di fuori”, estranei quando non capiscono cosa Gesù intenda con il lievito dei farisei. Egli ripete loro esattamente la stessa cosa: “ Ma egli, accortosene, disse loro: «Perché state a discutere del non aver pane? Non riflettete e non capite ancora? Avete [ancora] il cuore indurito?  Avete occhi e non vedete, avete orecchi e non udite? E non vi ricordate?” (Marco 8:17-18) E dobbiamo ricordare che molti "estranei" hanno riconosciuto e capito chi era Gesù e che cosa era: la donna al pozzo, la donna con l'emorragia, l'uomo posseduto. Fondamentale per comprendere il regno di Dio è  un incontro con Gesù e il modo in cui gli rispondiamo.  Le parabole non sono state usate da Gesù per nascondere la verità del regno di Dio, ma per vedere chi dei suoi ascoltatori era pronto ad affrontarle e a trovarlo. Volevano, vogliamo diventare degli "intenditori"?  Oppure erano, siamo, come il giovane che dopo aver ascoltato la parabola del Buon Samaritano era contento di andarsene deluso perché è troppo difficile da mettere in pratica?  Le Scritture, e in particolare le parabole, hanno lo scopo di farci cambiare, cambiare il nostro modo di pensare, cambiare il nostro modo di agire. Ho un detto preferito riguardo alle Scritture: "Sconvolge chi si sente a proprio agio e conforta chi è sconvolto". Non dovremmo essere come il giovane, ma come questo: “Il regno dei cieli è anche simile a un mercante che va in cerca di belle perle; e, trovata una perla di gran valore, se n'è andato, ha venduto tutto quello che aveva e l'ha comprata.” (Matteo 13:45-46) Amen.GUARDA LE DIAPOSITIVE DEL MESSAGGIOGUARDA IL MESSAGGIO IN BASSA RISOLUZIONE SU FACEBOOKGUARDA IL MESSAGGIO IN BASSA RISOLUZIONE SU INSTAGRAM---GUARDA IL VIDEO DEL MESSAGGIO IN HD  (Visita il nostro sito per ascoltare la registrazione audio, vedere il video del messaggio, per scaricare gli appunti e per vedere le diapositive del messaggio)

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
220. Can NFT Project's Recover From Zero? Building an NFT rebound strategy!

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 35:04


Simple question...  Can NFT Projects Recover from falling to a floor price of close to zero and/or zero activity on secondary sales? I dive deep into this idea, some ways I think project founders can change the tide and what we as NFT owners can do to empower our favorite NFT projects to recover and thrive in the future!  s always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

Manawaker Studio's Flash Fiction Podcast
A Lady of Ganymede, a Sparrow of Io – FFP 0720

Manawaker Studio's Flash Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 8:16


“A Lady of Ganymede, a Sparrow of Io” by Dafydd McKimmManawaker Studio’s Flash Fiction Podcast is supported by patrons on Patreon: http://patreon.com/manawaker/ Contributor Bios: http://www.manawaker.com/flash-fiction-podcast-contributors/ Please consider supporting Manawaker Studio with a purchase of one of our books or games: http://www.manawaker.com Have a piece of fiction to submit to FFP? Check guidelines here: http://www.manawaker.com/ffp-submissions/

Nessuna è perfetta
Donne e dipendenze

Nessuna è perfetta

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


Da alcol, da psicofarmaci. Un numero crescente di donne si rivolge alle strutture sanitarie ma in tante non chiedono aiuto.Ne parliamo questa domenica a Nessuna è perfetta in una lunga intervista con Asia Argento. "Sin da bambina ho visto attorno a me persone dipendenti da alcol o da altro. Mia madre beveva. Io ho cominciato con le canne, a 14 anni ed è vero quel che si dice, dopo le canne ho infilato tutta una serie di dipendenze. L'alcol il più insidioso"Nell'intervista a Maria Latella, Asia Argento parla del suo compagno Anthony Burden e del suo suicidio nel quale l'alcol potrebbe aver giocato un ruolo non secondario. Di donne dipendenti da psicofarmaci ma anche vittime di ludopatie parlano anche due esperte, la direttrice di una comunità di recupero e una psicoterapeuta

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
219. Why We Must #DYODR On Sustainability and Energy Innovation around Crypto and NFTS

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 17:51


How much energy does the blockchain use and is their sustainability innovations within crypto and nfts technology??  There have been lots of rumors and myths with missing data and testing floating around online for years around the sustainability of blockchain technology.  I firmly believe this topic falls into the DO YOUR OWN DAMN RESEARCH category but I also wanted to share my opinion and how I address this concern for the brands and projects that want to work with us.  In this episode I reference the following posts in combination with some of the podcast episodes I've bene listening to: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4125499#:~:text=We%20demonstrate%20that%20Bitcoin%20consumes,5%20times%20more%20energy%20efficient. https://www.invenglobal.com/articles/16462/mythbusting-nfts-whats-true-and-whats-fake-about-the-controversial-tech https://youtu.be/X7JbcbSXS58 As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

Babble POP!
Διακόσια ογδόντα τρία – τρἐχει και δεν φτἀνει

Babble POP!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 58:26


[Greek: Two hundred and eighty-three – Very busy] There's so much music to share but not enough time to get through it all. Michael and Io have been busy finding... LEARN MORE The post Διακόσια ογδόντα τρία – τρἐχει και δεν φτἀνει appeared first on babble POP!.

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
218. Why the NFT Words We Use Matter So We Can Moon!

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 17:51


I pride myself on being a "translator of geek-speak" but even more so working really hard to be the best communicator I can, possibly when on stage, behind the podcast microphone, or even at the dinner team with friends. So you might be thinking we know Brian using phrases like "Wen Lambo" or "Eth Maxi" or "Dgens" make things confusing but it's part of the culture...   And you would be right and I think those things are actually important aspects for the culture to continue to embrace and use.  Although when it comes to marketing to Web 2.0 frens or trying to onboard those who have yet to buy an NFT we must move away from saying things like "utility and roadmap" and instead say benefits and business plan.  We must also take it a step further and be strategic with what order we use certain words and what variables exist with those we are talking to so we can adjust on the fly which sounds a bit crazy but I promise I explain and give some examples...  As always: DO YOU OWN DAMN RESEARCH and we hope you enjoy coming on this Mint 365 journey as we buy an NFT every day for 365 days: https://www.nft365podcast.com/mint365 The 1st DAILY Podcast buying an NFT mint every day for a year! SuperPOWERED $ADHD Creator Coins on Rally.IO  The NFT365 Podcast is Hosted by digital futurist Brian Fanzo.  ------- Learn more about the NFT365 Podcast

ASCO Daily News
Advances in Lung Cancer at ASCO22

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 18:22


Guest host Dr. Vamsi Velcheti, of the NYU Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center, and Dr. Brian Henick, of the Columbia University Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, discuss advances in KRAS-mutated lung cancer in the KRYSTAL-1 trial, and the association of ctDNA with overall survival in the NADIM trial, as well as other key advances in lung cancer presented at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting.   TRANSCRIPT   Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Hello, everyone! This is Dr. Vamsi Velcheti, I'm your guest host for the ASCO Daily News podcast, today. I'm an associate professor and medical director for the Thoracic Oncology Program at Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health. My guest today is Dr. Brian Henick, an associate director of the Experimental Therapeutics Program, and assistant professor of Medicine at Columbia University's Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center. We'll be discussing key abstracts in lung cancer that were featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. Our full disclosures are available in the notes and disclosures of all guests on the podcast can be found on the transcripts at asco.org/podcasts. Brian, it's great to speak with you today. Dr. Brain Henick: Thank you so much, Vamsi, and ASCO Daily News for letting me join you to discuss these abstracts. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: So, let's dive in. So, it's an exciting ASCO Annual Meeting. And I hope you had a great time at the Meeting. So, let's start off with the LBA9009 and KRYSTAL-1 clinical trial. The study showed the activity of adagrasib in patients with KRAS-G12C mutant non-small cell lung cancer and active untreated brain mets. So, what is the key takeaway from this trial? Dr. Brain Henick: Well, Dr. Sabari presented some encouraging data on this important population. As we know, patients with active central nervous system (CNS) metastases represent a population of unmet medical need who are often excluded from clinical trials. So, it's a credit to the investigators for including this cohort. As Dr. Sabari noted, and as Dr. Goldberg emphasized in her discussion of the abstract, the measured CNS penetration of adagrasib compares favorably with other CNS active compounds from other settings. The overall response rate was 35%, with a disease control rate of 80%. But impressively, the median duration of intracranial response and progression-free survival (PFS) wasn't reached. This certainly seems to be a CNS active compound, and we'll need to see how sotorasib stacks up in their comparable cohort. Ideally, we'd have randomized data to prove superiority over the standard of care, but we may be a few steps away from that. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: So, Brian, in terms of CNS mets, how big of a problem is it in patients with KRAS G12C mutant lung cancers? Dr. Brian Henick: We know that CNS metastases are a big problem for G12C mutant lung cancer. The rates have been quoted as high as up to 42% of patients. And in particular, as you know, Vamsi, a lot of times trials often don't include, specifically, cohorts with active untreated brain metastases. And so, this is a very unique cohort in that sense. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: I just want to highlight that we really don't know the differential efficacy of sotorasib and adagrasib in the CNS met population because the trials were CodeBreak 100 and other trials and data readouts from sotorasib did not include patients with untreated brain mets. We did, however, [see] CNS progression-free survival data that go in line with sotorasib. So, it's really important to see that data from sotorasib. Dr. Brain Henick: I definitely look forward to seeing that. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: So, let's talk about Abstract 8501. The primary endpoint that was presented at ASCO [Annual Meeting] was the pathologic complete response to chemotherapy and nivo vs. chemotherapy as a new adjuvant treatment for resectable stage 3, a non-small cell lung cancer. This was the phase 2 NADIM trial. So, what do you think about this study? And what's your key takeaway from the study? Dr. Brain Henick: Dr. Provencio from Spain presented data from this randomized study as you said, of nivo plus carbo taxol compared to carbo taxol as neoadjuvant therapy for potentially resectable stage 3-A and B non-small cell lung cancer. So, I did want to compare this to the randomized data that we have from Checkmate 816, which interestingly allowed for earlier-stage disease as low as 1-B. And they also allowed for more flexibility in the choice of platinum doublet regimens. This study, NADIM 2, employs 2:1 versus 1:1 randomization, which we saw in Checkmate 816. Another important difference was that NADIM 2 required adjuvant nivolumab for 6 months in the study arm, whereas Checkmate 816 didn't include any immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting, but they allowed for a standard of care chemotherapy. In NADIM 2, the control arm didn't include any adjuvant therapy. In keeping with the impressive improvements over historical pathologic complete response rates of about 5%, this chemotherapy-IO regimen yielded a path complete response (CR) rate of 36.8%. It also showed a major pathological response, which again is defined as less than 10% viable tumor of 52.6%, and an overall response rate of 75.4%. So, it looks like there's a benefit that's happening upfront with the immunotherapy and chemotherapy as opposed to this just being an adjuvant phenomenon. This is also in keeping with data that we saw with Checkmate 816, as well as neoadjuvant atezo plus chemotherapy in the phase 2 study that was led by Catherine Shu and colleagues here at Columbia a few years ago. Overall, this is more encouraging data for the neoadjuvant use of immunotherapy. The earlier immunotherapy marches into the treatment course of patients with lung cancer, the greater the cost of toxicity. So, I think an important thing for us to focus on going forward is trying to develop strategies to better identify the patients that are most likely to benefit. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: So, Brian, I think from a practical standpoint, now that we have approval for neoadjuvant immunotherapy and adjuvant immunotherapy, we have some practical challenges in terms of how we manage our patients. Of course, the new adjuvant is very appealing because it's only 3 cycles of chemoimmunotherapy, but the challenge though, is a majority of the patients don't have a CR, or a significant proportion of the patients have an ongoing response or significant residual disease at the time of surgery. So, the question then would be what do you do after surgery if they're having an ongoing response? Do you think 3 cycles of immunotherapy are inadequate systemic therapy for these patients? Dr. Brian Henick: It's a really important question, Vamsi. I think until the data is mature, we're just kind of limited by the extent of what the data tells us so far, and then we have to kind of do our best as the treating doctor to navigate the patient's situation. So, tools that we'd still have available to us in the adjuvant setting that are approved are things like chemotherapy and radiation, leveraging things like circulating tumor DNA, I think maybe a promising path forward, as well to help guide strategies there, but I think until the data is mature, it has to be highly patient-focused to figure out what seems to be most appropriate there. How are you navigating those situations, Vamsi? Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Yeah, as you said, it is very challenging. I think we need more data. And of course, the challenge now is like, if you use immunotherapy in the new adjuvant setting, it's very likely you're not going to get insurance authorization for 1 year of adjuvant atezolizumab. So, we really need studies to optimize treatment paradigms here. As you suggested, maybe circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA)-based approaches to look at residual disease, I think, that would be one great way to do it. Let's move on to the next abstract, Brian. I found Abstract 9001 really interesting. It's a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pooled analysis that looked at outcomes of first-line immune checkpoint inhibitors, with or without chemotherapy based on the KRAS mutation status and PD-L1 expression. So, what is your take on this abstract and how do you think this is going to impact our practice? Dr. Brian Henick: So, Dr. Nakajima and colleagues explored the observation from individual trials that patients with KRAS-mutant lung cancer seem to have better responses than wild type with immunotherapy (IO) alone. But the favorability of these responses seems to be abrogated with chemotherapy-IO. We know that KRAS accounts for 25% of oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer predominantly at amino acid 12. And with the emergence of direct inhibitors of G12C, understanding the clinical features of these tumors may be critical to inform optimal integration of this new class of drugs and also to make sure that we've optimized treatment algorithms for KRAS patients in general. So, this study's authors at the FDA pulled data from 12 registrational clinical trials that were investigating first-line checkpoint inhibitor-containing regimens and they found no significant difference between KRAS wild type and mutant for overall survival regardless of the regimen used. The best outcomes were seen with chemoimmunotherapy regardless of KRAS status. This retrospective analysis does suggest that the notion of there being lesser benefit from chemoimmunotherapy from Dr. Gadgeel's study might not hold up in the overall population, but I think it raises important questions, like, are all KRAS mutations alike? The absence of KRAS mutation status for a majority of patients included in these studies limits the interpretation of the data. And also, the absence of commutation status makes it a little harder to interpret. And other important questions remain such as how G12C inhibitors will factor in? What were your thoughts, Vamsi? Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: No, I completely agree with you, Brian. I think we need more data and we know that commutation status is a very important aspect in terms of KRAS-directed therapies. And of course, with a lot of promising data from these KRAS inhibitors, there's an interest in moving these drugs into the front-line therapy for patients with KRAS mutations. But I think it's going to be quite challenging to incorporate them into the front-line therapies and we clearly will need better characterization of these patients with KRAS mutant [lung cancer] to further personalize treatment in the frontline setting for these patients. So, let's move on to the next abstract. This is the lung map study, Abstract 9004. This is a study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the lung map study, looking at overall survival from a phase 2 randomized study of ramucirumab and pembrolizumab, what's the standard of care in patients with advanced non—small cell lung cancer previously treated with immunotherapy. So, what were your key takeaway points here from this study? Dr. Brian Henick: So first of all, it's very exciting to see data from this very ambitious long map sub-study yield a positive result. Whereas many of the arms of this study were biomarker-guided, Dr. Reckamp presented the results from pembro plus ramucirumab as compared to the standard of care in unmarked patients with non-small cell lung cancer who had progressed after prior treatment with chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The data seems to suggest that pembro plus ramucirumab may be better tolerated than the standard of care chemo-containing regimens, as the experimental regimen had fewer serious adverse events. Pembro plus ramucirumab had a median overall survival of 14.6 months as compared to 11.6 months in the control arm and this was statistically significant. The PFS difference wasn't significant, but there was a late divergence in the curves. Dr. Bestvina nicely summarized some of the study's limitations such as the mixture of control regimens used, and there were really interesting signals that were found on subgroup analysis, such as benefit in those with mixed histology tumors, STK11 mutant tumors, and those who received chemotherapy prior to immunotherapy. The subgroups deserve further attention in the future. For now, this regimen may be an appealing option as an alternative to chemotherapy for the right patients. What do you think? Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Yeah, I agree, Brian. I think it's a really promising combination. We've always seen some synergy with VEGF inhibitors and immunotherapy in multiple studies and multiple tumor types. So, we really need to develop better ways to select patients for VEGF combination-based approaches in lung cancer. So, let's move on to another interesting study. This is Abstract 9000. This explores the outcomes of anti-PD-L1 therapy with or without chemotherapy for first-line, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer with a PD-L1 score of greater than 50%. So, this is an FDA pooled analysis. So, what were your key takeaways from this abstract? Dr. Brain Henick: I thought this question was really well suited for a large pooled retrospective analysis and our colleagues at the FDA didn't let us down here. The question really was what's the optimal approach for patients with non-small cell lung cancer with greater than 50% PD-L1 in view of the absence of direct comparisons between these arms in prospective studies? I thought one of the most striking findings from Dr. Akinboro's presentation was the dismally low rate of underrepresented minority patients that were included in these registration trials. As far as the findings for the patients who were studied, although the Kaplan-Meier curves for overall survival showed early separation, the difference wasn't statistically significant. Subgroup analysis revealed a trend towards better outcomes for immunotherapy alone among patients who are [age] 75 and above, suggesting that this may need to be parsed out as a unique population in subsequent studies. But in all, our equipoise as a field on whether to include chemoimmunotherapy-based first-line regimens should persist and should be guided, in my opinion, largely by clinical considerations. Can the patient tolerate chemotherapy? Do you need a rapid response? Are there other things that you thought in hearing all this, Vamsi? Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Yeah, absolutely. I think I am still struggling with the decision of whether to add chemotherapy for patients with greater than 50%. To a large extent, it's actually a clinical decision. In some patients who have a large disease burden, I tend to kind of opt for adding chemotherapy to immunotherapy in the front-line setting. But of course, we need more data here. And this is actually a very helpful piece of information from the FDA. And as you pointed out briefly, Brian, I think the fact that there are very few underrepresented patients in the pooled analysis, I think kind of speaks to the need for addressing increased diversity in clinical trial accruals. I think this is a great segue to also talk about Abstract 9012, talking about disparities in access to immunotherapy globally. This is a study from India looking at 15,000 patients who were checkpoint inhibitor eligible and who have very low rates of uptake of immunotherapy. This is something that reflects the global team of the ASCO Annual Meeting talking about disparities and improving access to treatments in underserved minority populations here in the United States, and also globally, in the developing world, the disparities in terms of access to care are humongous. So, what are your thoughts, Brian? And also, if you could highlight some of the work that you're doing at Columbia about disparities, I think that would be great. Dr. Brain Henick: Absolutely! I think access to medications is a really humbling topic for those of us who are involved in developmental therapeutics, particularly with the transformational impact we've seen with the advent of immunotherapy over the last decade-plus. Dr. Ravikrishna's presentation is therefore extremely important. He described very low rates of uptake of immunotherapy by indication. And perhaps most strikingly, the discrepancy in uptake by patients' ability to pay for therapy with the vast majority of immunotherapy received by those who are private is very concerning. Even if the definition of restricted access was permissive, for example, I didn't see mention of the cancer stage as an eligibility factor, the fact that this represents a single referral center's data doesn't bode well for uptake elsewhere. So, I think we need to continue to work as a field on prioritizing strategies to help overcome these gaps, but good quality data such as this study is an important first step. And to that point, Vamsi, I'm very excited to be working with you in collaboration on an observational study for patients with lung cancer from underserved minority populations with lung cancer in New York City so that we can better characterize access to care, efficacy, and toxicity in this population. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Thank you, Brian. I'd really like to thank you for sharing your valuable insights with us today on the ASCO Daily News Podcast. We really appreciate it. Brian, thank you so much for joining us. Dr. Brain Henick: My pleasure. Thanks for having me. Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: And thank you to all our listeners for joining in today. You will find links to all the abstracts discussed today in the transcript of this episode. Finally, if you value the insights that you hear on the ASCO Daily News Podcast, please take a moment to rate, review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you so much.     Disclosures: Dr. Vamsi Velcheti: Honoraria: Honoraria Consulting or Advisory Role: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Foundation Medicine, AstraZeneca/MedImmune, Novartis, Lilly, EMD Serono, GSK, Amgen Research Funding (Inst.): Genentech, Trovagene, Eisai, OncoPlex Diagnostics, Alkermes, NantOmics, Genoptix, Altor BioScience, Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Atreca, Heat Biologics, Leap Therapeutics, RSIP Vision, GlaxoSmithKline Dr. Brain Henick: None disclosed. Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.