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Professional practitioner of engineering and its sub classes

  • 6,485PODCASTS
  • 16,231EPISODES
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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about engineers

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Latest podcast episodes about engineers

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast
Corps, Conservative professor, Callers

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 45:33


Today, Rich reacts to Biden's use of the Army Corps of Engineers to 'fix' the supply chain crisis he created. Then, conservative college professor Nick Gordano details Biden's disastrous foreign policy decisions with Russia and our NATO allies. Plus, callers from across the country call-in with their opinions. Portions of today's program are brought to you by JustFacts.com/Rich. Comment and follow on Facebook, Twitter, GETTR, and Parler or visit us at RichValdes.com.

Finding Harmony Podcast
On Tour with Jens Bache

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 110:17


Jens Bache is not your ordinary Ashtanga yoga practitioner or teacher. He came to yoga as a highly celebrated Engineer, in the middle of a very normal career trajectory, yet he was looking for more… Life had to have more meaning. He felt isolated and stressed. Then in 1997, on a work-study trip in Berkeley California, Jens Bache experienced yoga for the first time. “A daily yoga practice at home gave me the peace of mind I was looking for.” When he returned to Copenhagen he participated in his first workshop in 1999, and quite unexpectedly, he became the main instigator in creating an Ashtanga Yoga grassroots community in Copenhagen. As Jens said, he had a unique set of ‘process oriented skills' from his Business degree in Project Management, which were badly needed in the yoga community. And so, this kind of self reliance in Jens grew into the first Mysore-style school that he nurtured along with Susanna Finocchi for 18 years. In 2003, Jens traveled to Mysore to learn from Guruji at the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute and continued returning annually since this first visit. He enjoyed expanding his knowledge about Indian philosophy, culture, and all things yoga. And, quickly, yet not surprisingly, Jens was soon relied upon by the Jois family themselves to run their European Tour stops! So, luckily for you, in this episode, you'll find out exactly what it might be like to host a tour stop with Sharath Jois and his family! Jens has been the primary catalyst in bringing Sharath Jois to Copenhagen 6 times now, the first tour being in 2006 with the whole family, including Guruji (Sri K. Pattabhi Jois) and Saraswathi. He has risen to the occasion again and again and hopes to have the honour once again this summer, in conjunction with his partner Lisa Lalér, co-owner of the Yoga Shala Stockholm, to host Sharathji on tour. Jens translated Sri K. Pattabhi Jois' book ”Yoga Mala” into Danish and is one of the masterminds behind the documentaries ”Guruji in Copenhagen” and ”Sharath in Copenhagen.” Jens obtained a Masters degree in Indology – the study of Indian history, literature, philosophy and culture – from the Copenhagen University, and now acts as a “Cultural Broker” mediating between companies in Denmark and India to facilitate a greater understanding between organizations, through cultural translation. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT JENS - WEBSITE I INSTAGRAM I FACEBOOK I Talk with Eddie Stern - FEB.11, 2022 JOIN THE FINDING HARMONY INNER CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP TO LISTEN TO BONUS EPISODES! PLUS LIVE CLASSES WITH HARMONY! BECOME A MEMBER ♡ - https://www.harmonyslater-programs.com/membership Enrollment Closes January 31! FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HARMONY - WEBSITE - harmonyslater.com The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations.

Secret Sonics
Secret Sonics 129 - Steve Ornest - Fostering a Community with Music

Secret Sonics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 90:45


Steve Ornest is a music producer, engineer, mixer, musician, and co-owner of Total Access Recording in Redondo Beach, CA, USA! In our conversation, Steve shares his journey; from working in the studio at an early age, to meeting acclaimed producer Wyn Davis and eventually partnering up with Wyn as a co-owner of Total Access Recording. He shares insights on tapping into local talent, building relationships, and being a conduit for the artists he works with. We also talk about working with Mixerman and Ken Scott, overcoming workaholicism, Total Access's new rehearsal space, zooming out and appreciating the journey, and so much more! Check it out!You can learn more about Steve at https://www.tarecording.com/staffYou can follow Steve on Social MediaIG - https://www.instagram.com/steveornest/***As I mentioned in this episode, Carl Bahner is giving away his Spotify algorithm course to listeners of the show. Go to https://www.carlbahner.com/coaching to learn more***You can listen to the song we discussed in the "Sauce" segment in its entirety here - "War Profiteer" by Jokers Hand - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJGByeVH-n8***Join the Secret Sonics Discord community here(!) - discord.gg/UP97b72W6tSubscribe to the podcast and get my free guidebook "Music Production Essentials" here - https://mpe-ebook.benwallick.com/free-downloadReferencesThe Six-Figure Creative episode - https://6figurecreative.com/is-the-antiquated-commercial-recording-studio-dream-dead-maybe-not-with-steve-ornest/Fernando Lodeiro - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2022/1/1/secret-sonics-126-fernando-lodeiro-nurturing-relationships-in-the-studioTravis Ference - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2021/9/26/secret-sonics-114-travis-ference-redefining-success-in-musicWyn Davis - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_Access_RecordingTotal Access Recording - https://www.tarecording.com/Mixerman - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2020/4/21/secret-sonics-017-eric-sarafin-aka-mixermanKen Scott - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_ScottHow Music Works - https://amzn.to/3qTEuATSaturn - https://www.fabfilter.com/products/saturn-2-multiband-distortion-saturation-plug-inDecapitator - https://www.soundtoys.com/product/decapitator/Plugin Alliance SVT - https://www.plugin-alliance.com/en/products/ampeg_svtvr_classic.htmlRecording Studio Rockstars - https://recordingstudiorockstars.com/category/podcast/Thanks for listening to this episode of Secret Sonics! I hope you enjoyed this episode :) Look out for new episodes weekly. Consider rating and reviewing our show on Apple Podcasts and sharing this or any of your favorite episodes with a friend or two.Thank you to Zvi Rodan, Mendy Portnoy, and Yakir Hyman for contributing to the new podcast theme music!Thanks to Gavi Kutliroff for helping edit this episode!You can find out more about Secret Sonics and subscribe on your favorite podcast app by visiting www.secretsonics.coFollow along via social media here:Facebook: www.facebook.com/SecretSonicsPodInstagram: www.instagram.com/secretsonics/ Have a great week, stay safe, and dig in!-Ben

KQED’s Forum
Millennium Tower Engineers Propose New Fix as Building Leans by More Than Two Feet

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 20:58


In 2016, the public learned that Millennium Tower, a 60-story luxury condo highrise in downtown San Francisco, was tilting to the northwestby 16 inches. Fast forward five years and the lean is now at about 26 inches. The tower has been sinking at a rate of about 3 inches per year despite tens of millions of dollars being spent to stop it. . Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, the firm hired to fix the leaning tower, recently submitted a revised plan to city officials after their previous efforts resulted in increased titling. We talk about the latest developments in the Millennium Tower saga.

Being an Engineer
Bill Atterbury What It's Like Being A 40 Year Engineering Veteran At The Same Company

Being an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 54:38


Over his 40 year tenure working at Battelle, Bill has worked on a multitude of different projects, been named on dozens of patents, and developed skills using a wealth of design tools. In the process he has been named inventor of the year (2013) and a Battelle Distinguished Inventor. Join us during our conversation as we discuss what one learns working 40 years at the same company, the importance of process, and how to mentor young engineers.  The Being an Engineer podcast is a repository for industry knowledge and a tool through which engineers learn about and connect with relevant companies, technologies, people resources, and opportunities. We feature successful mechanical engineers and interview engineers who are passionate about their work and who made a great impact on the engineering community.The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us***Valued listener, we need your help getting to 100 podcast reviews. Win a $50 Amazon Gift card if you leave us a review on the Apple Podcasts. Simply email a screenshot of your 5-star review to Podcast@teampipeline.us.We will announce 5 lucky winners at the end of the first quarter in 2022.

Engineer of Finance
Conversation With Stefphon Jefferson - Episode 207

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 26:15


What hooks you to continue reading a book? Is there a certain topic of interest that catches your attention, even by reading the book's sleeve or summary? Ken welcomes former football player and now author, Stefphon Jefferson, to talk about very interesting topics. Stefphon is a phenomenal athlete, entrepreneur, father, and husband. Together with Ken, he shares the different routines that he practices with his kids. He also talks about the expectations readers have with his book. Stefphon describes the different mantras he and his kids follow as well as the greatest takeaways he has from competing in sports. Ken Greene transitioned from being a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to the “Engineer of Finance.” His goal is to help people become financially independent and help them earn better yields with less risk by investing Off Wall Street. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information of this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance Connect with Stefphon Jefferson The Adventures of Luxton the World Changer: The Gift of Being a Doctor by Stefphon Jefferson https://www.linkedin.com/in/stefphon-jefferson-1a3247a6 https://www.instagram.com/kooldadstef/ Catch Stefphon Jefferson's Book Signing and Meet & Greet at The Urban Deli: “The Adventures of Luxton the World Changer: The gift of being a doctor” by Stefphon Jefferson February 4th, 2022 from 4 – 6 pm The Urban Deli, 7111 S. Virginia St., Suite A5, Reno, NV 89511 https://theurbandelireno.com/   Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes What Ken and Stefphon discussed last time. - 1:21 A little surprising background tidbit about Stefphon. - 3:03 Expectations from the book. - 5:04 The routine he goes through with his children. - 8:49 Preparing his kids. - 12:53 Repeating the mantra: “I can. I will. I must.” - 15:42 Stefphon's greatest takeaways from competing in sports. - 16:57 Why did he hate Tom Brady in the beginning? - 19:24 With a little bit of discipline, comes a world of freedom. - 22:22 The best ways to find out about Stefphon's book. - 24:17 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS

Living the Sky Life - Autism Journey
S3: Episode 107 - Advocating for autism families, this research loving father shares his experience raising two sons on the spectrum & his own autism diagnosis

Living the Sky Life - Autism Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 50:29


Alex Filstein is an award-winning inventor in Canada's energy sector whose innovations focus on emission-reducing technologies to achieve net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Alex is the recipient of the 2018 Oilweek/JWN Magazine Rising Star Award and the recipient of the prestige 2019 Technical Achievement Alumni Award from University of Calgary Schulich School of Engineering. He lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, with his wife and two young sons who are both on the autistic spectrum. After his son's diagnosis, Alex was diagnosed ASD-Level 1 /Asperger's. He is an active volunteer in the autism community, administrator for the “Autism Stories ” group on Facebook and passionate about sharing data related to the autism community to advance happier Autism families. Connect with Alex on FB: @autismstories and @alexfilstein ***************************************** To purchase my book “Welcome to My Life – A Personal Parenting Journey Through Autism” click HERE or visit Amazon.com! You can easily stay connected to the Living the Sky Life podcast and me in various ways.  Please visit my website www.lauriehellmann.com for all the links. I'd love to hear what you think, so if listening on the Apple platform, please leave a written review and rating of the podcast!  If you are interested in being a guest on an episode of Living the Sky Life, please contact me!

The SaaS Podcast - SaaS, Startups, Growth Hacking & Entrepreneurship
304: A Founder's Journey from Engineer to CEO of Introhive - with Jody Glidden

The SaaS Podcast - SaaS, Startups, Growth Hacking & Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 34:56


Jody Glidden is the co-founder and CEO of Introhive, an AI-powered SaaS platform that helps companies improve sales by making sense of huge amounts of data and understanding their relationship graph'.Show Notes:https://saasclub.io/304Join Our Email ListGet weekly SaaS learnings, new podcast episodes, and actionable insights right in your inbox:https://saasclub.io/email/Join Our Community for FreeSaaS Club is the community for early-stage SaaS founders and entrepreneurs.https://saasclub.co/join

The Transition
Leveraging Technology As A Force For Good With James Samuel, Founder & CEO of PLURIBUS Inc.

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:55


In the following episode of the Transition, I interview former Air Force Fighter Pilot, Engineer, and now Tech Entrepreneur, James Samuel, Founder & CEO of PLURIBUS Inc., a big data, geospatial analytics company headquartered in McLean, Virginia, which is leading the world in the new industry of identity based navigation. James recently launched Pluribus's first product, ANJEL Tech, an app that turns any smartphone into a powerful bodycam. James launched the app to provide security and safety, for black and brown lives, in response to violence, police misconduct, racial injustices across the country. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne To learn more about ANJEL Tech & Pluribus Inc. visit: https://www.anjel.tech/ Apply For The Breaking Barriers in Entrepreneurship Workshop Series here: https://bunkerlabs.org/breaking-barriers/

Tractionville
S2 Tips: Can You Engineer Your Future?

Tractionville

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 3:55


Too often entrepreneurs and business leaders find themselves fighting the fires of the culture they have created rather than getting out in front and engineering the future of their business. In this week's tip, we share an exercise we use at System and Soul that will help your organization create and embrace the culture you want to create. This episode is sponsored by S2 Sync. Running the day-to-day of your business shouldn't feel like herding cats, right? Well, it can. With a full team and full plates, it's tough to have a pulse on the big picture all the way down to what's going on today in the business. There's an easier way to keep track of it all and keep your team connected. That's what S2 Sync is all about. S2 Sync is a platform designed to help you run easily on the System & Soul Framework. Everything from your Org Chart to Scoreboard, Quarterly Objectives to weekly meetings. You can track it all in S2 Sync. S2 Sync gives your business the clarity and control you need to breakthrough to the next stage/phase of your business. Experience a free trial today at S2sync.com.

Teach the Geek Podcast
EP. 186 Dr. Mary Kinsella: Engineering Her Career - public speaking for engineers

Teach the Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:47


Dr. Mary Kinsella: Engineering Her Career - public speaking for engineers Dr. Mary Kinsella is the founder of Her Engineering Career, working with female engineers so they can command greater influence and impact. She worked for years as an engineer before striking out on her own. She's also host of the Her Engineering Career Podcast. I'm always keen on talking to engineers who start their own businesses. I wanted to learn more about her motivation to go out on her own, her previous life as an engineer, and the takeaways people can get from her podcast. To learn more about Dr. Kinsella, visit https://herengineeringcareer.com/. __ TEACH THE GEEK teachthegeek.com anchor.fm/teachthegeek youtube.teachthegeek.com @teachthegeek (FB, Twitter) @_teachthegeek_ (IG, TikTok) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Marketplace Minute
Mortgage rates are near two-year highs - Midday - Marketplace Minute - January 19, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 1:50


The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage rose to more than 3.6%; new home construction increased in December for third straight month; Army Corps of Engineers gets billions to fund new infrastructure, climate projects

Author Hour with Rae Williams
Raising Engineers: David Dettmer

Author Hour with Rae Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 22:25


You have the idea, the drive, and now, the capital to create the company you've always envisioned. Now comes the most important part, assembling a team of high performers. To build a sustainable ... The post Raising Engineers: David Dettmer appeared first on Author Hour.

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

EECO Asks Why Podcast
183. Hero: Chester Burke - Controls Engineer at Cadence Inc.

EECO Asks Why Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 27:11


"I like helping people, learning and leaving things a little better than I found it."  That sums up our hero Chester Burke and he shared his inspirational journey in this hero conversation. At the core he loves to create new things and he provided great insight to how the world of engineering and manufacturing provides so many opportunities for that to happen.  When he is faced with an opportunity to improve a process or engineer automation he loves how that allows him to use his unique skills to build something truly incredible.  He shared some of the challenges he sees as a direct front line leader in manufacturing.  There was great advice offered for others to consider as they begin their own journeys and many of the points shared can apply to multiple disciplines of industry.  Chester is an all around fun guy and has a passion for everything he does.  Whether he is engineering a cutting edge automation solution, finding peace on the gun range, spending time with his wonderful wife and daughter, Chester will always leave a lasting impact on others as his outlook on life and how he treats others truly makes him our hero!It was an absolute treat to hear Chester's story and for those looking for inspiration and encouragement look no further - enjoy the ride with our hero Chester Burke! Guest: Chester BurkeHost: Chris GraingerExecutive Producer: Adam SheetsPodcast Editor: Andi ThrowerIndustry War Story Submission: Send us a DM!FacebookInstagram

Growth Mindset Podcast
200 - From sheep-farming as a kid to named Best Business Woman 2017 - Rachel Carrell, CEO of Koru Kids

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:20


Rachel Carrell Rachel Carrell is the CEO of KoruKids, building the world's best childcare service. She was the former CEO of DrThom, a healthcare company which she grew to 1.3 million paying users in 3 countries. She has a DPhil in Development from the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and was elected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2014. She was named 'Best Business Woman in Technology' at the 2017 Best Business Women awards, and also won the 'Inspirational Mother' award at the 2017 Inspiration awards. Takeaways Building trust as a foundation with your people will bring more positive consequences. Having an emotional check-in within your team will help you understand each other and boost productivity at work. Who: The A Method for Hiring (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Who-Geoff-Smart/dp/0345504194) by Geoff Smart and Randy Street - (book recommended when hiring) 01:20 - Who is Rachel? 02:00 - Childhood Competitions and Entrepreneurial Experience 04:16 - Common Things About Founders 05:14 - Other Business Experience 06:24 - Management Consulting Experience 07:28 - People Management Tip 12:51 - Hiring People 16:43 - Interview Sample Questions 20:38 - Feedback Received by Rachel 23:35 - How did Rachel start Koru Kids 28:22 - The Koru Kids Team 33:55 - Rachel's Childhood Memories 36:01 - Kindest Thing Done for Rachel 38:34 - Rachel's advice CONNECT WITH RACHEL Koru Kids (https://www.korukids.co.uk/) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachcarrell) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/rach.of.koru.kids) Twitter (https://twitter.com/rachcarrell) ABOUT THE HOST My name is Sam Harris. I am a British entrepreneur, investor and explorer. From hitchhiking across Kazakstan to programming AI doctors I am always pushing myself in the spirit of curiosity and Growth. My background is in Biology and Psychology with a passion for improving the world and human behaviour. I have built and sold companies from an early age and love coming up with unique ways to make life more enjoyable and meaningful. Connect with Sam: LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharris48/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/samjamharris/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) Wiser than Yesterday (https://www.wiserpod.com) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: Rachel Carrell.

Disaster Tough Podcast
#92 Hospitals and EM - Interview with NYU Emergency Manager, Kelly McKinney

Disaster Tough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 38:14


Disaster Tough continues its strong start to Season 3 with Emergency Manager and Author, Kelly McKinney.Kelly is a longtime Emergency Manager and professional engineer who currently serves as the Associate Vice President of Emergency Management + Enterprise Resilience for NYU Langone Health. He has also lead Emergency Management teams for the American Red Cross and the New York Office of Emergency Management working in the aftermath of such disasters as 9/11, Super Storm Sandy, among others. In this episode, talks about Emergency Managers and Emergency Management systems and how they play a vital role in disaster and emergency response specifically in New York City and beyond.Doberman Emergency Management owns and operates the Disaster Tough Podcast. Contact us here at: www.dobermanemg.com or email us at: info@dobermanemg.com.We are proud to endorse L3Harris and the BeOn PPT App. Learn more about this amazing product here: L3Harris.com/ResponderSupport.FS Global in partnership with Tiger Tech has created the first reusable, electronic, FDA approved, COVID-19 test. Strap it to your arm, get a reading - it's that simple. Sterilize and reuse. Amazing technology! For more information on the COVID PLUS TEST, click here: https://www.fsglobalsolutions.com

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast
TECC 264: Leading With Gratitude: Tips for Engineers to Enhance How They Lead

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:53


In this episode, we talk to Steve Foran, P.ENG, CSP, MBA, engineer, founder of Gratitude at Work, and author of the book “Surviving to Thriving – The 10 Laws of Grateful Leadership,” about leadership and how engineering leaders are leading with gratitude to enhance how they lead. He also talks about how engineers can build […] The post TECC 264: Leading With Gratitude: Tips for Engineers to Enhance How They Lead appeared first on Engineering Management Institute.

Coding Blocks
PagerDuty’s Security Training for Engineers, Penultimate

Coding Blocks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


We're pretty sure we're almost done and we're definitely all present for the recording as we continue discussing PagerDuty's Security Training, while Allen won't fall for it, Joe takes the show to a dark place, and Michael knows obscure, um, stuff.

Dreaming Out Loud With Morgan T Nelson
121. Yemi Penn - How To Use Past Trauma For Success

Dreaming Out Loud With Morgan T Nelson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 37:14


In today's episode, I sit down with Yemi Penn, a British-born Nigerian living in Sydney, Australia, an Engineer by profession, an entrepreneur by passion, and a mindset transformation coach by mission. Tune in and discover how Yemi used her past trauma for success!In this episode, you can expect to hear:-How to turn your negative experience into a source of strength-Why is it necessary to have "ME" time?-How to identify trauma-The steps to healing from trauma-Why is dealing with previous trauma so important?-How to use your pain to gain power-And a lot more incredible topics that will help you in healing your past trauma!Connect with Yemi:Website: https://www.yemipenn.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yemi.pennFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/YemiPenn/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yemi-penn-nee-solanke-35413411/Join our free circle of influence Facebook group herehttps://bit.ly/2RSBKVFFollow me on Instagram herewww.Instagram.com/morgantnelsonWant to start your own podcast? Grab my book Money Power Podcasts below where I teach you exactly how to launch a successful podcast and monetize it.www.moneypowerpodcasts.com

Secret Sonics
Secret Sonics 128 - Matt Rifino - Driven by Music

Secret Sonics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 96:39


Matt Rifino is a music mixer and audio engineer based out of New Jersey, USA! In our conversation, Matt shares his journey; mixing from an early age, working at Avatar Studios, and mixing live music shows on NBC's "The Today Show." He shares insights on how to mix for live TV, how to make sure your mixes translate on consumer devices, and how TV mixing helps him mix better for artists in his personal mixing work. We also talk about overcoming burnout, quitting alcohol, becoming friends with the people you work with, becoming a life-long student, and so much more! Check it out!You can learn more about Matt at https://www.mattrifinomusicmixer.com/You can follow Matt on Social MediaIG - https://www.instagram.com/magicmatt_mixing/***As I mentioned in this episode, Carl Bahner is giving away his Spotify algorithm course to listeners of the show. Go to https://www.carlbahner.com/coaching to learn more***You can listen to the song we discussed in the "Sauce" segment in its entirety here - "Nightbird (Companion)" by Connor Bracken and the Mother Leeds Band - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irHNpO2n334&ab_channel=ConnorBrackenandtheMotherLeedsBand-Topic***Join the Secret Sonics Discord community here(!) - discord.gg/UP97b72W6tSubscribe to the podcast and get my free guidebook "Music Production Essentials" here - https://mpe-ebook.benwallick.com/free-downloadReferencesMatt's WCA episode - https://www.workingclassaudio.com/wca-322-with-matthew-rifino/The Today Show - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Today_(American_TV_program)Willie Green - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2022/1/9/secret-sonics-127-willie-green-being-true-to-artistic-intentValhalla Verb - https://valhalladsp.com/Soothe - https://oeksound.com/plugins/soothe2/Al Schmitt - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_SchmittThanks for listening to this episode of Secret Sonics! I hope you enjoyed this episode :) Look out for new episodes weekly. Consider rating and reviewing our show on Apple Podcasts and sharing this or any of your favorite episodes with a friend or two.Thank you to Zvi Rodan, Mendy Portnoy, and Yakir Hyman for contributing to the new podcast theme music!Thanks to Gavi Kutliroff for helping edit this episode!You can find out more about Secret Sonics and subscribe on your favorite podcast app by visiting www.secretsonics.coFollow along via social media here:Facebook: www.facebook.com/SecretSonicsPodInstagram: www.instagram.com/secretsonics/ Have a great week, stay safe, and dig in!-Ben

The CyberWire
Marina Ciavatta: Going after the human error. [Social engineer] [Career Notes]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 10:36


Social engineer and CEO of Hekate, Marina Ciavatta, shares her story of how people think her job is a la Mission Impossible coming from the ceiling with a rope and stealing stuff in the dead of the night. Marina does physical pentesting. Starting with an unused degree in journalism, Marina turned her talent for writing into a job as a content producer for a technology company and this appealed to her self-proclaimed nerdism. She fell in love with hacking and got into pentesting thanks to a friend. Marina recommends those interested in physical pentesting "try to find other social engineers to mingle. It's in the name. We are social creatures." We thank Marina for sharing her story with us.

Easier Said: Student Talk
Story Structure: How to engineer great narrative

Easier Said: Student Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 61:31


Chekov's Gun. Three-Act Structure. The crew returns to discuss the power of story structure. We also ask - what's the best theory of story structure? How do you reach satisfying setup and payoff? Host-notes: Always remember. It's like poetry. It rhymes. ________________________________________________________________________ NEW — Become a Renaissance Writer renaissancewriters.substack.com/p/coming-soon Clayton is organizing a writers group and class centered on bringing together novelists, short story writers, playwrights, screenwriters, poets and more to break down the barriers between story forms and spark insights. Come think outside your toolbox with us! Sign up now for the newsletter and get the course overview ahead of time! Sign up here: (https://bit.ly/3q9jcxp) ________________________________________________________________________ Find us: Facebook Twitter Podchaser The Easier Said podcast is a production of Conceit Media.

Being an Engineer
Tommy Kronmark Engineering Branding, Engineering Marketing, and Making Biodiesel

Being an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:01


 Tommy is a bioengineer with bachelors and masters degrees from Cal Poly who, in addition to building medical devices, helps driven engineers land dream jobs using LinkedIn and personal branding. On the side, he barbeques, works on his truck, and brews his own biodiesel. The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us.   ABOUT BEING AN ENGINEERThe Being an Engineer podcast is a repository for industry knowledge and a tool through which engineers learn about and connect with relevant companies, technologies, people resources, and opportunities. We feature successful mechanical engineers and interview engineers who are passionate about their work and who made a great impact on the engineering community.The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us***Valued listener, we need your help getting to 100 podcast reviews. Win a $50 Amazon Gift card if you leave us a review on the Apple Podcasts. Simply email a screenshot of your 5-star review to Podcast@teampipeline.us , the email will be in the show notes. We will announce 5 lucky winners at the end of the first quarter in 2022.

On Air With Ryan Seacrest
The Busted Engineer

On Air With Ryan Seacrest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 49:52


Relive Engineer Tubbs Hilariously Getting Caught On-Air Watching 'Fifty Shades' Researchers Named This the No. 1 Diet for a Healthy 2022 Rob Lowe on His Love for Dogs, New Season of '9-1-1: Lone Star' & More And an all-new Ryan's Roses...her husband received a thoughtful gift in the mail. He claims he bought it for himself. She believes otherwise. Who was it from and what does it mean? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Content Marketing, Engineered Podcast
Context Matters: Writing for Engineers with Adam Kimmel

Content Marketing, Engineered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 25:08


Understanding the context of why and who makes all the difference when writing for engineers and technical buyers.Adam Kimmel, Principal Technical Content Writer at ASK Consulting, spends his days boiling down highly technical information into consumable content targeted to specific audience personas. During this episode, we covered a ton of ground -- from what behaviors make a technical writer successful to how to extract the right information from subject-matter experts. Aside from the numerous nuggets of advice, what struck me most about this episode is one word that kept creeping in throughout our discussion: context.When interviewing a subject-matter expert (SME), it's important to contextualize why a solution is significant and where it fits into the broader market landscape. Data is great, but the context of why the data is significant (e.g. competitive comparisons, etc.) helps to demonstrate value and build preference. Your audience needs to first care about a topic, then be enticed to go deeper and learn more. Understanding the context of where your content piece fits into the buyer's journey helps you to position the material at the right technical level and build upon information served elsewhere. For show links and more, visit the Content Marketing, Engineered podcast blog https://bit.ly/CMEPodcast Learn more about TREW Marketing https://www.trewmarketing.com Order the book! Content Marketing, Engineered https://bit.ly/contentmktgeng

Engineer of Finance
Help Wanted - Episode 206

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 10:39


Why are establishments and restaurants looking to hire more people even after the pandemic scare? What are the possible reasons why we still see “Help Wanted” signs? In today's episode, Ken tries to figure out why several businesses, even his favorite Mexican restaurant, are still looking for more people to join their business. Is it because the workforce finally found a better source of income? He answers several questions such as “What's going on?” and “Where's the disconnect?” Ken Greene transitioned from being a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to the “Engineer of Finance.” His goal is to help people become financially independent and help them earn better yields with less risk by investing Off Wall Street. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information of this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance  Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes Possible reasons why there are still a lot of “Help Wanted” signs. - 1:29 What it does for Ken by being out and creating and doing. - 2:17 Seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. The opportunity for the world to turn again. - 3:07 What's going on? Where's the disconnect? - 7:20 What's our number one investment? - 8:33 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS

BSD Now
437: Audit that package

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:03


Using FreeBSD's pkg-audit, 20 year old bug that went to Mars, FreeBSD on Slimbook, LLDB FreeBSD kernel core dump support, Steam on OpenBSD, Cool but obscure X11 tools, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Using FreeBSD's pkg-audit (https://klarasystems.com/articles/using-freebsds-pkg-audit-to-investigate-known-security-issues/) The 20 year old bug that went to Mars (http://blog.securitymouse.com/2014/06/raising-lazarus-20-year-old-bug-that.html) It's rare that you come across a bug so subtle that it can last for two decades. But, that's exactly what has happened with the Lempel-Ziv-Oberhumer (LZO) algorithm. Initially written in 1994, Markus Oberhumer designed a sophisticated and extremely efficient compression algorithm so elegant and well architected that it outperforms zlib and bzip by four or five times their decompression speed. I was impressed to find out that his LZO algorithm has gone to the planet Mars on NASA devices multiple times! Most recently, LZO has touched down on the red planet within the Mars Curiosity Rover, which just celebrated its first martian anniversary on Tuesday. In the past few years, LZO has gained traction in file systems as well. LZO can be used in the Linux kernel within btrfs, squashfs, jffs2, and ubifs. A recent variant of the algorithm, LZ4, is used for compression in ZFS for Solaris, Illumos, and FreeBSD. With its popularity increasing, Lempel-Ziv-Oberhumer has been rewritten by many engineering firms for both closed and open systems. These rewrites, however, have always been based on Oberhumer's core open source implementation. As a result, they all inherited a subtle integer overflow. Even LZ4 has the same exact bug, but changed very slightly. Because the LZO algorithm is considered a library function, each specific implementation must be evaluated for risk, regardless of whether the algorithm used has been patched. Why? We are talking about code that has existed in the wild for two decades. The scope of this algorithm touches everything from embedded microcontrollers on the Mars Rover, mainframe operating systems, modern day desktops, and mobile phones. Engineers that have used LZO must evaluate the use case to identify whether or not the implementation is vulnerable, and in what format. News Roundup FreeBSD on Slimbook -- 14 months of updates (https://euroquis.nl/freebsd/2021/12/11/slimbook.html) LLDB FreeBSD kernel core dump support (https://www.moritz.systems/blog/lldb-freebsd-kernel-core-dump-support/) Steam on OpenBSD (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2021-12-01-openbsd-steam.html) Beastie Bits • [OpenSSH Agent Restriction](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20211220061017) • [OpenBSD's Clang upgraded to version 13](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20211220060327) • [Cool, but obscure X11 tools](http://cyber.dabamos.de/unix/x11/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

Teach the Geek Podcast
EP. 185 - Victor Antonio: An engineer in sales? How!?

Teach the Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 31:47


Victor Antonio: An engineer in sales? How!? Victor Antonio founded the Sellinger Group, providing sales training and keynote speaking. He has worked in sales for years. Would you believe that he started out as an engineer? Engineering to Sales. Quite the switch. He's also the author of several sales-related books, and he's a podcaster, host of the Sales Influence - Why People Buy! Podcast. We chatted about the reason he left engineering to go into sales, the motivation for writing his books, and the goal of his podcast. Want to learn more about Victor? Visit https://victorantonio.com/ TEACH THE GEEK teachthegeek.com anchor.fm/teachthegeek youtube.teachthegeek.com @teachthegeek (FB, Twitter) @_teachthegeek_ (IG, TikTok) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Climate Connections
Why a Colorado engineer switched from oil industry to geothermal

Climate Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 1:31


The Department of Energy predicts that more than 8% of U.S. electricity generation could come from geothermal by 2050. Learn more at https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/

Signal To Noise Podcast
136. Krysten "KD" Dean - Systems Engineer

Signal To Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 59:24


Krysten Dean AKA "KD" joins the hosts on episode 136. KD  is a touring  Systems Engineer and Crew Chief working for Eighth Day Sound Systems. They discuss her untraditional path of jumping into the audio industry at the age of 30 after she graduated from Full Sail University.  She is focused on mentoring and giving back to the audio community. KD is also passionate about changing the narrative for females and people of color within our industry. Michael Lawerence recently worked on a show with KD and they discuss how to Systems engineers come together on one show. Read more about Krysten Dean here:https://soundgirls.org/krysten-dean-changing-the-narrative-for-the-next-generation/This episode is sponsored by Audix and Allen & Heath.Be sure to check out the Signal To Noise Facebook Group, & Discord Server It's a space for listeners to create to generate conversations around the people and topics covered in the podcast — we want your questions and comments! Let's build a great sound community with a place to learn, discuss, and reminisce about the “good old days.”The Signal To Noise podcast series on ProSoundWeb is hosted by Live Sound/PSW technical editor Michael Lawrence and pro audio veterans Kyle Chirnside and Chris Leonard

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Thank You, Mama
The Engineer's Kitchen

Thank You, Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 39:44


Ivona Brandić is a Professor for High Performance Computing Systems at the University of Vienna. She shares lessons she learned from her Bosnian mom Manda about not being afraid to follow a career in tech & science, making life plans but not sticking to them, the value of hard work, focusing on good things in life, and how cooking skills translate to computer sciences. Ivona also shares lessons she learned through her experiences of being a teenage war refugee, starting a life in a new country, and being successful in a male-dominated field: always have the courage to try something new, and always trust your own skills and abilities. You can learn more about Ivona's work here and here.  For more about “Thank You, Mama" and to subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: http://www.thankyoumama.net

Thrive Podcast #forflorists
3 Secrets to Success – Step #2- Reverse Engineer Your Approach

Thrive Podcast #forflorists

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 30:53


Hey Flower Boss – I'd LOVE to work with you!Learn the skills you need to attract better customers, show up with more confidence and make more money.** CHECK OUT THE FLOWER BOSS BOOTCAMP **See you on the inside?

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine Podcast
Episode 220: Kyle Harrup of Horus Aged Ales Pushes the Edges of Adjunct Technique

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 74:30


If there was a Guinness world record for most beer collaborations, Kyle Harrup of Horus Aged Ales (https://horusbeer.com) would surely hold it. The 400-plus beers Harrup has brewed with other breweries are even more impressive when you consider that brewing is still a side hustle for the full-time accountant. Today, Horus Aged Ales is known as much for its collaborations as for the beers he brews and releases to club members from his small fermentation warehouse in Oceanside, California. However, one thing that defines all Horus beers is an aggressive yet nuanced approach to using adjunct ingredients. In this episode, Harrup discusses the myriad of ways he and his collaborators employ adjunct ingredients in the pursuit of flavor, including: building base beers with eventual ingredient additions in mind, for better balance brewing barrel-aged beers to high finishing gravities for more robust aging the best bourbon barrel ages and sources developing a family of base recipes for aging and blending developing Cryst-Ale, a barrel-aged beer made with 100 percent crystal malt ingredient methods and variety selection for coffee, vanilla, and coconut using difficult adjunct ingredients, such as nuts pasteurizing for better longevity and flavor And more. *This episode is brought to you by: * G&D Chillers (https://gdchillers.com): What if you could chill your beer with a more efficient chiller? The Answer? G&D Chillers new Micro Channel Condensers! G&D's Micro Channel Condensers are highly efficient in hotter regions, use a fraction of the refrigerant over traditional chillers which provides less opportunity for leaks along with lower global warming potential. G&D Chillers' Engineers are committed to green technology design, while developing a more energy efficient chiller for the brewing industry. Contact G&D Chillers today at gdchillers.com (https://gdchillers.com) BSG (https://go.bsgcraft.com/Contact-Us) This episode is brought to you by BSG, exclusive distributors of Rahr Malting Co. Since 1847, Rahr malt has been a benchmark of quality and consistency for brewers, from the 19th century through today's craft beer pioneers. Whether you're creating classic lagers, resin-clouded hazies, or barrel-aged behemoths, inspired malts like Rahr North Star Pils, Malted Oats, and more are here to make your brewing dreams a reality. Get in touch today at go.bsgcraft.com/Contact-Us (https://go.bsgcraft.com/Contact-Us) Old Orchard (https://www.oldorchard.com/brewer): Is your brewery struggling to source or afford berry ingredients? Historic heatwaves devastated U.S. berry crops, causing supply to dwindle and prices to skyrocket. That's why brewers are switching over to Old Orchard's craft concentrate blends, which mimic straight concentrates but at a better price point—and with more reliable supply. Is it any surprise that Old Orchard's best-sellers are Raspberry and Blackberry flavors? Reclaim your margins and order your craft concentrates at oldorchard.com/brewer (https://www.oldorchard.com/brewer) Precision Fermentation (https://precisionfermentation.com/brewing): BrewMonitor, from Precision Fermentation, is the first real-time, comprehensive fermentation monitoring solution. It works with your existing fermentation tanks to track dissolved oxygen, pH, gravity, pressure, temperature, and conductivity in real-time, from any smartphone, tablet, or PC. BrewMonitor provides detailed insight into your fermentations that helps improve beer consistency, reduce tank-time, and increase overall efficiency–saving your brewery time and money. Get started for 30 days, risk-free. Visit precisionfermentation.com/brewing (https://precisionfermentation.com/brewing). Ss Brewtech (https://www.ssbrewtech.com): From the rotatable pick-up tube on Rogue Brewing's pilot brewhouse to the integrated hopbacks on Sierra Nevada's twin prototyping brewhouses, Ss Brewtech has taken technology they invented working with world-renowned industry veterans and made them available to every craft brewer. To learn more about Ss Brewtech's innovation list, head over to SsBrewtech.com (https://www.ssbrewtech.com) Five Star Chemicals (https://fivestarchemicals.com): Have you heard of PBW Tablets? Yeah, that's right, the PBW powder you've known and trusted is now in tablet form from Five Star Chemicals (https://fivestarchemicals.com). Available in two sizes so you can use just one tablet in either 32 ounces or one gallon of water, to optimize your cleaning. Forget measuring, just add a tablet to water and quickly clean all stainless equipment, growlers, kettles, or carboys. Purchase on their website or your favorite homebrew supplier.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Fulfillment success with Steve Shebuski

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 54:17


Fulfillment Success with Steve Shebuski Steve Shebuski and Joe Lynch discuss fulfillment success. Steve is he Vice President of Digital Strategy at Blue Horseshoe, part of Accenture, a company that helps companies reimage fulfillment operations to align with business goals, address market trends, and meet customer demands. About Steve Shebuski Steve Shebuski is the Vice President of Digital Strategy at Blue Horseshoe, part of Accenture. Steve has 20+ years of experience as a Program Manager/Design Lead/Project Manager implementing both Microsoft Dynamics AX / Dynamics 365 as well as tier I and tier II warehouse management and transportation software solutions. Steve's deep knowledge within the distribution industry and his innovative approach to solution architecture are the backbone of the solutions being implemented and deployed by Blue Horseshoe. He attended Michigan State University where he received his bachelor of science in chemical engineering. About Blue Horseshoe, Part of Accenture Blue Horseshoe, part of Accenture, helps companies reimage fulfillment operations to align with business goals, address market trends, and meet customer demands. By connecting physical assets with digital intelligence, we help companies: - Engineer operational designs that connect processes and equipment with assets, people, and data - Guide application selection and enable digital connections that share data across enterprise systems - Create efficiency with warehouse hardware, automation equipment, and mobile devices - Provide implementation and support services that generate quicker time to value Key Takeaways: Fulfillment Success Steve Shebuski is the Vice President of Digital Strategy at Blue Horseshoe, a supply chain technology company that helps their customer drive value through greater efficiencies and productivity. In the podcast interview, Steve describes 6 things that drive fulfillment success: #1 - Technology platform that seamlessly connect the fulfillment company to customers, suppliers, and technology providers. A connected platform enables companies to easily communicate, collaborate, and efficiently manage exceptions. #2 - In-depth understanding of the customer profile is required to set-up the facility for success The facility, systems, processes, and talent are organized to support the customer's order profile (volume, pallet vs unit, SKU count, etc..) #3 - Business applications must be aligned to customer's objectives. Configure the technologies (WMS, TMS) to support operational effectiveness and efficiency. #4 - The right hardware, technology, and automations to serve their customers. The use of automation, robotics, and scanning technology enable workers to accomplish more, which is increasingly important with the labor shortage. #5 - Data insights Real-time reports and dashboards that enable the entire supply chain to monitor performance. #6 – Partnerships Developing and managing partnerships is one of the keys to success in the 3PL business. Blue Horseshoe helps companies define and plan their enterprise strategy, connect and collaborate with business applications, and optimize and execute supply chain operations. Learn More About Fulfillment Success Steve Shebuski LinkedIn Blue Horseshoe Blue Horseshoe at Modex Blue Horseshoe Supply Chain Cloud Videos The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Intelligent Design the Future
Engineers Crash the Evolution Party, Rethink Biological Variation

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 22:15


On today's ID the Future, physicist and engineer Brian Miller sits down with host Casey Luskin to survey exciting developments in intelligent design research that are driven by an engineering model for understanding and studying variations in species. ID researchers are pushing this work, but so too are systems biology researchers outside the intelligent design community. Tune in to hear Miller and Luskin discuss everything from fruit flies, finch beaks, and stickleback fish to mutational hotspots, phenotypic plasticity, and the gravity well model of biological adaptation. Source

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2164: Hele-Shaw

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 3:53


Episode: 2164 Henry Selby Hele-Shaw, and the many faces of yesterday's engineer.  Today, a remarkable engineer from another century.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
90. Hovering Space Rover, New Advances In 3D Printing, Protein Found to Reverse Muscle Aging

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 30:04


MIT Engineers Test An Idea For A New Hovering Rover | Brighter Side News (01:28) Due to the lack of atmosphere, the moon and other airless bodies such as asteroids can build up an electric field.Because of direct exposure to the sun and surrounding plasma. Moon's electric charge is strong enough to levitate dust more than 1 meter above the ground. Engineers at NASA and elsewhere have recently proposed harnessing this natural surface charge to levitate a gliderMylar wings, which is a material that holds the same charge as surfaces on airless bodies.  Thinking of magnets, the same charged sides would repel causing a levitation effect  A design would likely be limited to small asteroids, as larger planetary bodies would have a stronger, counteracting gravitational pull. Or would it?MIT's rover could get around this The concept resembles a retro-style, disc-shaped flying saucer, and uses tiny ion beams to both charge up the vehicle and boost the surface's natural charge.Generates a relatively large repulsive force between the vehicle and the ground with a small amount of power  In an initial feasibility study, the researchers show that such an ion boost should be strong enough to levitate a small, 2-pound vehicle on the moon and large asteroids. Large asteroid using a 10-kilovolt ion source The Moon the same rover would need a 50-kilovolt source Design relies on the use of miniature ion thrusters, called ionic-liquid ion sources Using a basic disc model with ion thrusters Could achieve levitation of about one centimeter off the ground Co-author Paulo Lozano explains why levitation on a rover would be good:“With a levitating rover, you don't have to worry about wheels or moving parts … An asteroid's terrain could be totally uneven, and as long as you had a controlled mechanism to keep your rover floating, then you could go over very rough, unexplored terrain, without having to dodge the asteroid physically.”   MIT unveils the world's longest flexible fiber battery. You can weave and wash it in fabrics | ZME Science (08:01) Engineers at MIT have created a rechargeable lithium-ion battery in the form of very long fiber.Could be used to 3D print batteries in any shape. The proof of concept is 140 meters long, making it the longest flexible fiber battery thus far.Length is arbitrary according to the engineers since they could do much longer lengths. Fiber batteries are not new, however previously they have all the lithium and other key materials outside the fiber, which would leave them unprotected.This Fiber is the opposite with the new system embedding the battery inside the fiber  This provides a protective outside coating, which gives the fiber both stability and waterproofing. The thickness of the fiber device is only a few hundred microns, much thinner than any previous attempts at a fiber battery. To demonstrate the functionality of this proof of concept, the researchers used the fiber battery to power a “Li-Fi” communications system, the kind that uses pulses of light to transmit data rather than radio waves. Includes a microphone, pre-amp, transistor, and diodes The 140-meter-long battery fiber has a rated energy storage capacity of 123 milliamp-hours  Enough to power a smartwatch or phone.  Battery fibers could be woven to produce two-dimensional fabrics like those used for clothing, but could also be used in 3-D printing to create solid objects, such as casings.Because the system creates it all without having to add anything else it would be one-step printing.   Scientists Can Now Print Metal Objects That Are Only 25 Nanometers Long | Interesting Engineering (13:08) A group of scientists has set a new benchmark in 3D printing by succeeding in fabricating ultrasmall metal objects using a new technique. According to the team, their system can be used to make objects out of copper just 25 billionths of a meter in diameter (equivalent to 25 nanometres).Equivalent to 195 copper atoms in a row. Their electrochemical 3D printing technique fabricates complex conductive structures with nanometer resolution, and it could have potential applications in battery technology, microelectronics, and sensor technology. The new electrochemical technique could be used to print far smaller metal objects that have never been printed before. Dr. Dmitry Momotenko of a chemist at the University of Oldenburg talked on the printing method with Phys.org:“The technology we are working on combines both worlds — metal printing and nanoscale precision … 3D-printed catalysts with high surface area and special geometry to allow particular reactivity could be prepared for the production of complex chemicals.” Momotenko and his team are currently working towards improving the efficiency of electrical energy storage through three-dimensional electrodes.     Smart sutures to monitor deep surgical wounds | MedicalXPress (17:24) Monitoring surgical wounds after an operation is an important step to prevent infection, wound separation and other complications. However, when the surgical site is deep in the body, monitoring is normally limited to clinical observations or costly radiological investigations that often fail to detect complications before they become life-threatening. To detect wound complications as soon as they happen, a team of researchers from National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a smart suture that is battery-free and can wirelessly sense and transmit information from deep surgical sites. The NUS team's invention has three key components: a medical-grade silk suture that is coated with a conductive polymer to allow it to respond to wireless signals; a battery-free electronic sensor; and a wireless reader used to operate the suture from outside the body. These smart small sensors can monitor multiple problems (i.e. Wound integrity, gastric leakage and tissue micromotions), while also providing healing outcomes which are equivalent to medical-grade sutures.For example, if the suture is broken, an external reader picks up a reduced signal due to a reduction in the length of the smart suture's antenna, alerting the attending doctor to take action. One advantage of these smart sutures is that their use involves minimal modification of the standard surgical procedure.  Similar to existing sutures, clips and staples, the smart sutures may be post-operatively removed by a minimally invasive surgical or endoscopic procedure when the risk of complications has passed. Assistant Professor John Ho, who lead the team, commented on the smart sutures capability & the effect it would have: "Currently, post-operative complications are often not detected until the patient experiences systemic symptoms like pain, fever, or a high heart rate. These smart sutures can be used as an early alert tool to enable doctors to intervene before the complication becomes life-threatening, which can lead to lower rates of re-operation, faster recovery, and improved patient outcomes."  In future, the team is looking to develop a portable wireless reader to replace the setup currently used, enabling surveillance of complications even outside of clinical settings. Additionally they want to increase the detection capabilities for detecting wound bleeding and leakage after gastrointestinal surgery.   Researchers uncover protein that reverses muscle aging | Brighter Side News (23:13) A University at Buffalo-led research team has shown that a protein, NANOG, is effective at reversing aging in skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscles are organs of the vertebrate muscular system that are mostly attached by tendons to bones of the skeleton.Longer than in the other types of muscle tissue, and are often known as muscle fibers. In a series of experiments with mice, researchers overexpressed NANOG in myoblasts, which are the embryonic precursors to muscle tissue. The myoblasts were senescent, meaning they were no longer able to divide and grow. The overexpression improved some of the primary characteristics associated with age-related deterioration of cells, including autophagy, energy homeostasis, genomic stability, nuclear integrity and mitochondrial function.Autophagy - Bodies' way of clearing out damaged cells Additionally there was an increase in the number of muscle stem cells in the muscle of prematurely aging mice.Demonstrating the feasibility of reversing cellular aging in the body The study's corresponding author Stelios T. Andreadis, PhD stated:“Our work focuses on understanding the mechanisms of NANOG's actions in hopes of discovering druggable targets in signaling or metabolic networks that mimic the anti-aging effects of NANOG. Ultimately, the work could help lead to new treatments or therapies that help reverse cellular senescence, and aid the many people suffering from age-related disorders.”  ----more---- Podcast Links: Website: https://thatscoolnews.com/ Review The Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/review Email List: https://thatscoolnews.com/email Follow On Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatscoolnews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Thats_Cool_News  Join the Community: Discord: https://thatscoolnews.com/discord Facebook Group: https://thatscoolnews.com/group  

Secret Sonics
Secret Sonics 127 - Willie Green - Being True to Artistic Intent

Secret Sonics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 127:25


Paul "Willie Green" Womack is a music producer, mixer, and artist based out of Brooklyn, NY, USA! In our conversation, Willie shares his journey from the Berklee College of Music to producing and mixing independent hip hop in Brooklyn. He shares insights on having professionalism and confidence, the importance of sleep, enjoying the journey, serving the music, and bringing others into your creative process. We go deep on NFTs, immersive audio, the diminishing value of art in a noisy content-driven world, and how the music industry spreads artists too thin. We also go deep on his project "Press Play" where Willie created sonic art from visual works of art in order to enhance said visual art exhibition! Check it out!You can learn more about Willie at https://www.williegreenmusic.com/You can follow Willie on Social MediaIG - https://www.instagram.com/williegreen1/Twitter - https://twitter.com/williegreen1***As I mentioned in this episode, Carl Bahner is giving away his Spotify algorithm course to listeners of the show. Go to https://www.carlbahner.com/coaching to learn more***You can listen to the song we discussed in the "Sauce" segment in its entirety here - "Stonefruit" by Armand Hammer/The Alchemist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S3gEfqPQlM&ab_channel=ArmandHammer-TopicJoin the Secret Sonics Discord community here(!) - discord.gg/UP97b72W6tSubscribe to the podcast and get my free guidebook "Music Production Essentials" here - https://mpe-ebook.benwallick.com/free-downloadReferencesFernando Lodeiro - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2022/1/1/secret-sonics-126-fernando-lodeiro-nurturing-relationships-in-the-studioSmokey Robinson - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smokey_RobinsonBackwoodz Studioz - https://backwoodzstudioz.com/super chron flight brothers - https://backwoodzstudioz.com/products/super-chron-flight-brothers-cape-verdeDamian Taylor - https://www.benwallick.com/podcast-episodes/2021/11/28/secret-sonics-123-damian-taylor-music-productions-deep-thinker“Nightmares.” - Open Mike Eagle - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSf7RvaSS4A&ab_channel=OpenMikeEaglePress Play - https://williegreen.bandcamp.com/album/press-playSonic Photo app - https://www.skytopia.com/software/sonicphoto/Haram record - https://armandhammer.bandcamp.com/album/haramWhat's Going On Marvin Gaye - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDK7TiEiMOI&ab_channel=MarvinGayeVEVORX - https://www.izotope.com/en/products/rx.htmlSpectral Layers - https://www.steinberg.net/spectralayers/Thanks for listening to this episode of Secret Sonics! I hope you enjoyed this episode :) Look out for new episodes weekly. Consider rating and reviewing our show on Apple Podcasts and sharing this or any of your favorite episodes with a friend or two.Thank you to Zvi Rodan, Mendy Portnoy, and Yakir Hyman for contributing to the new podcast theme music!Thanks to Gavi Kutliroff for helping me edit this episode!You can find out more about Secret Sonics and subscribe on your favorite podcast app by visiting www.secretsonics.coFollow along via social media here:Facebook: www.facebook.com/SecretSonicsPodInstagram: www.instagram.com/secretsonics/ Have a great week, stay safe, and dig in!-Ben

The Andrew Hines Real Estate Investing Podcast
Big Ontario Cash Flow and Real Estate Flips with Chris Herlin

The Andrew Hines Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 49:22


In E153, Chris Herlin discusses his transition from Engineer to Real Estate investor full time. He's built a buy-and-hold portfolio in addition to his flips in the St Thomas and Stratford areas of Ontario and has recently made a move out to British Columbia as part of a life-long dream. In this episode Chris shares details on his wholesale business, his flipping business as well as his high cash flow BRRRR rentals that have allowed him to entirely fund his living. Listen on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and more @ https://linktr.ee/theandrewhines Connect with Chris Herlin instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chris.herlin/ facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cherlin1984 Connect with Andrew Hines on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theandrewhines facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theandrewhines Andrew Hines Audio · E153 Big Ontario Cash Flow and Real Estate Flips with Chris Herlin Music Info, Artist: JPB, Song: High, NCS Release: Feb 1 2015, No Copyright Copyright Free

Mage: The Podcast
Tome of Magick: Convention Book: Void Engineers

Mage: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 103:57


Terror lurks beyond the Gauntlet. Threat Null will co-opt any agent who's been Processed leaving the Void Engineers as earth's sole defense. Adam and Terry talk time travel, guns, spaceships, and guns for spaceships. Convention Book: Void Engineers - This book Mage: The Ascension 20th Anniversary Edition Quickstart - Next book Action Scientist shirt - Enlist today. Max Tegmark's levels of the multiverse - A theory that posits mathematical objects as quite real. Usurper of the Sun - Manga Adam mentioned --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mage-the-podcast/message

The UAV Digest
382 RaceDayQuads v. FAA

The UAV Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 30:11


RaceDayQuads v. FAA and the Remote ID rule, drones for law enforcement and telehealth, Russian attack drones and drones that recharge from power lines, a DARPA program for underwater drones, and finding lost hikers. UAV News D.C. Circuit May Blow Up the Remote Identification Rule for Drones Oral arguments were heard in the RaceDayQuads v. FAA case where the FAA's remote identification (RID) rule is being challenged. In brief, the RID rule applies to small drones (0.55-55 lbs) which would broadcast a “digital license plate” over WiFi and/or Bluetooth with a unique identifier, position, altitude, velocity, control station coordinates, and other “message elements.” The broadcast would be openly accessible by anyone.  This RID capability must be either hardwired into the drone (Standard Remote ID) or attached externally in the form of a module (Broadcast Module RID or BMID). Drones without RID can only fly in FAA-recognized identification areas (FRIAs) under the purview of community-based organizations and educational institutions. Manufacturers have until September 2022 to comply. Drone operators have until September 2023 to comply. RaceDayQuads (RDQ) is a large online retailer that supports first-person view (FPV) drone-racing customers. RDQ's co-founder and CEO, Tyler Brennan said he seeks “to protect the constitutional rights of U.S. citizens to be free from unreasonable searches from the government when they are flying in their own backyards.” RDQ alleges that: The rule is a violation of the Fourth Amendment because it allows warrantless tracking in a backyard.The FAA arbitrarily and capriciously relied on undisclosed ex parte communications during the rulemaking process.The final rule was not a logical outgrowth from the NPRM.The FAA failed to comply with a legal mandate to consult with Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).The FAA failed to address significant public comments as required by the Administrative Procedure Act.  For its part, the Government contends: Merely requiring RID technology onboard a drone does not equate to an unreasonable search. Planes flying in public view do not give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy.Even if the rule did violate the Fourth Amendment, the special needs exception would legally justify it. A ruling is likely to come sometime in early 2022.  Autonomous drones to respond to gunshots in new policing system US company ShotSpotter and Israel-based Airobotics are teaming to provide Israeli law enforcement agencies with a system that detects and locates gunfire, alerts the police, and provides live drone video footage and stills of the scene. ShotSpotter would identify and locate the sound of gunshots with a network of acoustic sensors. Airobotics would deploy its autonomous drones to the ShotSpotter coordinates. Special Delivery: Drones bring the doctor to you: Medicine's next big thing? Manish Kumar, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Cincinnati says, "We are building a telehealth drone that will have the ability to go inside people's homes.” Engineers are designing and testing a system with sensors that allow the drones to maneuver through a front door and into a patient's living room. Patients would connect with a doctor for a telehealth appointment. A medical kit on the drone would be used to measure and transmit health information. Russian Orion Drone Downs Unmanned Copter In a video, the Russian Ministry of Defense (MoD) shows an Orion reconnaissance and attack drone that fired an air-to-air missile and destroyed a hovering unmanned helicopter. The drone is also to be fitted with an electronic warfare suite “to defend itself against missiles…and to suppress any enemy systems in the interests of other units on the battlefield.”  Video: Первое применение беспилотника «Орион» по воздушной цели https://youtu.

Being an Engineer
S3E1 Sol Rosenbaum | Networking, Public Speaking, & Fitting Equipment Through Doors

Being an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 37:44


Sol Rosenbaum is an energy engineer with both bachelors and masters degrees in mechanical engineering. Sol is also passionate about mentoring younger engineers, so much so that he has founded TheEngineeringMentor.com where he helps people in the industry find jobs, network, and learn non-technical skills. ABOUT BEING AN ENGINEERThe Being an Engineer podcast is a repository for industry knowledge and a tool through which engineers learn about and connect with relevant companies, technologies, people resources, and opportunities. We feature successful mechanical engineers and interview engineers who are passionate about their work and who made a great impact on the engineering community.The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us***Valued listener, we need your help getting to 100 podcast reviews. Win a $50 Amazon Gift card if you leave us a review on the Apple Podcasts. Simply email a screenshot of your 5-star review to Podcast@teampipeline.us , the email will be in the show notes. We will announce 5 lucky winners at the end of the first quarter in 2022.

Recording Studio Rockstars
RSR331 - Craig Parker Adams - The Oldest Recording Studio In The World

Recording Studio Rockstars

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 135:54


My guest today is Craig Parker Adams who in 1997 was lucky enough to take over a historic recording space in Hollywood Ca which would become known as Winslow Ct. Studio. The studio's original history was said to be one of the oldest audio recording studios in the world for film dating back to the early 1900's.  At one time it was an RCA location as well as Columbia but nonetheless by way of doing Craig would eventually become a word of mouth go-to-guy for many diverse artists and top tier session players.  Owning & operating a historic boutique recording studio business in the heart of Hollywood for 20 plus years and working with accomplished artists from all over the world as well as a multitude of industry greats of varying styles ranging all the way from Opera to Punk, Writers & Artists, Producers, Directors  Photographers, Editors, Engineers, Thinkers, Healers, Politicians, Actors, Models,  Athletes & even Motivational Speakers has brought so much to Craig's studio skills, production & all-around artistic insights.  Thank you to (EYE-An) Ian Brennen for the introduction. Get access to FREE mixing mini-course: http://MixMasterBundle.com THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS! https://RecordingStudioRockstars.com/Academy Use code ROCKSTAR to get 10% https://samplyaudio.com Use code RSR20 to get 20% off for the first 3 months https://carltatzdesign.com/Mixroom-Mentor https://www.Spectra1964.com http://MacSales.com/Rockstars http://iZotope.com/Rockstars use code ROCK10 for 10% off http://www.thetoyboxstudio.com http://UltimateMixingMasterclass.com Hear guests discography on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3aWNiedgR7Fr7ph6Yh7jb8?si=e3266bf4034c4356 If you love the podcast, then please leave a review: https://RSRockstars.com/Review CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE SHOW NOTES AT: http://RSRockstars.com/331

Engineer of Finance
Actuarial Science and Data Will Give You The Truth! - Episode 205

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 19:33


What are your goals for this new year? Are you planning to start a new investment or make better use of your money to create a potential for a way wealthier tomorrow? For this episode, Ken covers a lot of different topics. He talks about the real truth that everyone should discover and research more. He also compared the difference between life, auto, and loan insurances. Ken also cites the learnings he got from different great leaders and minds. Ken Greene transitioned from being a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to the “Engineer of Finance.” His goal is to help people become financially independent and help them earn better yields with less risk by investing Off Wall Street. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information of this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance The Center Square Investopedia - Definition of Actuarial Science Robert W. Malone, MD, MS - Substack Article The Epoch Times - Fentanyl Article Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes The Truth: The data is the truth - 1:50 Comparing life insurance to auto and loan insurance. - 5:51 Fighting to make sure that the clients are to be treated fairly and the contracts are honored. - 7:26 Learning from Scott Davidson and the other great leaders and minds. - 12:18 We need the truth: A 40% increase in deaths since the pandemic, we need to see what's going on. 16:03 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS

This Is Purdue
NASA Space Suit Engineer Amy Ross Discusses Purdue's Impact on Her Career

This Is Purdue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 23:20


On this episode of This Is Purdue, we're talking to Amy Ross, NASA Space Suit Engineer and Purdue alumna. Listen in as Amy discusses her first big design project at NASA, working with her father (NASA astronaut and fellow Purdue alum Jerry Ross), and where she thinks the future of space exploration is headed. Plus, she touches on the importance of introducing students to STEM education early, women trailblazers in engineering and space, and the power of the Purdue community.

Product Thinking
Marrying Product Management and Engineering with Maura Kelly

Product Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 32:46


Maura Kelly is VP of Engineering at Mailchimp. With over 17 years of experience in the tech industry, Maura is an expert in software development and programming. She joins Melissa Perri on this week's Product Thinking Podcast to provide engineering's point of view, and to share helpful tips that will improve the way you as a product manager are collaborating with developers.   Here are some key points you'll hear Melissa and Maura talk about in this episode: Maura's traditional path to engineering, and her experience at Mailchimp, where the culture is about empowering the underdog. [1:45] Mailchimp's first product managers came from other internal disciplines and were workers who already knew Mailchimp and their customers very well. Over time, they continued nurturing people into product managers and started hiring people with product management experience externally. They also mixed up the teams, so that people new to Mailchimp could learn from veterans of the company. [5:44] There is a misconception that engineers don't care about customers and should keep their heads down doing code, Melissa says. “Engineers want to work on stuff that matters,” Maura claims. They want to be part of a larger mission that makes a difference; it motivates them and enhances their performance. If your head stays down, it's hard to know the context and information that can help you build a better product. “First solve the problem, then write the code,” she adds. [11:03] Why engineers should be involved in the discovery process, and how this can be done. [12:12] Combining something that someone wants to do with something the company needs, is a great way to both solve a problem and motivate an employee. Maura shares how Mailchimp conducts this ‘management magic.' [15:05] Melissa and Maura explore how product managers and engineers can work with leadership to ensure their teams focus on the right things. If there are people that aren't a good fit or aren't doing the best work that they could be doing for whatever reason, that should be discussed at the leadership level. [17:16] One thing people don't realize about engineering is that there is a lot going on behind the scenes. Not only do they write code for solving customer problems, but they also have to write that code to certain coding standards; they're also getting code reviews, giving them to other people, thinking about the security of the feature they're writing, among other things. [20:35] Product managers often struggle with understanding the technical side of building a feature. Melissa asks Maura how they should be checking in with the engineering team about the timeline of things that need to be done. [25:28] Resources Maura Kelly on LinkedIn | Twitter MauraChache.com

GOLF SMARTER
My Personal History with John Madden as His Recording Engineer from 1982-1986

GOLF SMARTER

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 35:10


826: With the passing of John Madden at the end of 2021, host Fred Greene digs into his personal archives to share stories, recordings, and his history with Coach Madden. From 1982-1986, Fred was Madden's recording engineer for a nationally syndicated program that Madden provided to the RKO Radio Network. Even though they only recorded for about 15-25 minutes multiple times each week, they would spend hours talking, laughing, and brainstorming business ideas. Our guest for the conversation is TV personality, radio host, and New England sports junkie, Matty Blake. WIN a box Golf Smarter golf balls and be part of the podcast! When you record our episode intro from your phone, you'll be eligible to win a box of golf balls with the Golf Smarter logo! Write to GolfSmarterPodcast@gmail.com and tell us that you want to play. We'll assign you an episode number and a script to record for the intro of the show. Every ten listeners who participate will be entered into a drawing for a box of balls with the Golf Smarter logo!Golf Smarter is your podcast forecaddie! We are an entertainment service that is focused on enhancing every round for you. Just like caddies, we accept tips for services rendered. Please click on the DONATE button at GolfSmarter.com to show your support so that we can continue to provide weekly, helpful, and entertaining content. Your donation can be as much, or as little as you'd like. It can be a one time offering or your can even do it recurring. Thank you very much.

Coding Blocks
PagerDuty’s Security Training for Engineers! Part Deux

Coding Blocks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022


We continue our discussion of PagerDuty's Security Training presentation while Michael buys a vowel, Joe has some buffer, and Allen hits everything he doesn't aim for.