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American multinational technology and consulting corporation

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Latest podcast episodes about IBM

The World According to Boyar
James Hagedorn, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board Scotts Miracle Gro CEO on the tremendous opportunity in the cannabis space, potentially spinning off the fast-growing Hawthorne division and more.

The World According to Boyar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 60:01


The Interview Discusses: How their cannabis division Hawthorne has grown over 100% over the past two years.Why he decided to enter the cannabis business.His thoughts on the current regulatory environment for cannabis and what he believes needs to change.Where the biggest money will be made in a post cannabis prohibition world and where they are investing.The logic of potentially spinning out the Hawthorne business.The demographic shift that is greatly helping their traditional consumer business.A meeting he had with Henry Kravis in ~2007 and what he did in response to that meeting.Why Scotts has been a “pandemic beneficiary.” His thoughts on inflation.How they have changed their marketing to target millennials Their innovative weather partnership with IBM that could greatly enhance their marketing.Why he believes private label is not a threat to his consumer business.How they incentivized employees during the pandemic 

Screaming in the Cloud
Handling Time-Series Data with Brian Mullen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:40


About BrianBrian is an accomplished dealmaker with experience ranging from developer platforms to mobile services. Before InfluxData, Brian led business development at Twilio. Joining at just thirty-five employees, he built over 150 partnerships globally from the company's infancy through its IPO in 2016. He led the company's international expansion, hiring its first teams in Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Prior to Twilio Brian was VP of Business Development at Clearwire and held management roles at Amp'd Mobile, Kivera, and PlaceWare.Links:InfluxData: https://www.influxdata.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous nonsense.   Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at InfluxData. And my guest is titled as the Chief Marketing Officer at InfluxData, and I don't even care because his bio has something absolutely fascinating that I want to address instead. Brian Mullen is an accomplished dealmaker is how the bio starts. And so many of us spend time negotiating deals, but so few people describe ourselves in that way. First, Brian, thank you for joining us. And secondly, what's up with that?Brian: [laugh]. Well, thanks, Corey, very excited to be here. And yes, dealmaker; I guess that would be apropos. How did I get into marketing? Well, a lot of my career is spent in business development, and so I think that's where the dealmaker part comes from.Several different roles, including my first role at Influx—when I joined Influx—was in business development and partnerships. And so, prior to coming to Influx, I spent many years building out the business development team at Twilio, growing that up, and we did a lot of deals with carriers, with Cloud partners, with all kinds of different partners; you name it, we worked with them. And then moving into Influx, joined in an BD capacity here and had a couple different roles that eventually evolved to Chief Marketing Officer. But  that's where the dealmaker comes from. I like to do deals, it's always nice to have one on the side   in whatever capacity you're working in, it's nice to have a deal or two working on the side. It kind of keeps you fresh.Corey: It's fun because people think, “Oh, a deal. You're thinking of mergers and acquisitions, and how hard could that be? You just show up with a bag of money and give it to people and then you have a deal closed.” And oh, if only it were that simple. Every client engagement we have on the consulting side has been a negotiation back and forth, and the idea is to ideally get everyone to the point where they're happy, but honestly, if everyone's slightly unhappy but can live with the result, we'll take that too.And as people go through their own careers it's, you're always trying to make a deal in some form: when you try to get a project approved, or you're trying to get resources thrown at something—by which I generally mean money, not people, though people, too—it's something that isn't necessarily clearly understood or discussed very often, despite the fact that half of what I do is negotiating with AWS on behalf of clients for better contractual terms. The thing that I think takes people by surprise the most is that dealmaking is almost never about pounding the table, being angry, and walking out, like you read the world's worst guide to buying a car or something. It's about finding the win for everyone. At least that's the way I've always approached it.Brian: That's a good point. And actually that wording that you described of finding a win for everybody, that's how I always thought about it. I think about it as first of all, you're trying to understand what the other party—and it could be an individual, it could be a company, it could be a group of companies, sometimes—you're trying to understand what their goals are, what their agenda is and see how that matches with your own; sometimes they're opposing, sometimes they're overlapping. And then everyone has to have some perceived win  in a deal. And it's not competitively; it's more like you just have to have value, that is kind of what the win is – having value in that deal.And so that's the way I always approached it. And doing deals, whether you're in BD or sales, or if you're working with vendors and you're in a different functional role, sometimes it's not even commercial, it's just about aligning resources, perhaps. Our deal might be that you and I are both going to put a collective effort into building something or taking something to market. In another scenario might be like, I'm going to pay for this service that you're delivering, or vice versa. Or we're going to go and bring two revenue-generating products together and take them to market. Whatever it might be, it doesn't matter so much what the mechanics are of the deal, but it's usually about aligning those agendas and in having someone get utility, get value on the other side.Corey: I think that people lose sight of the fact as well, that when you're talking about a service provider—and let's be clear, InfluxData has launched a cloud platform that we'll talk about in a minute—this is not the one-off transactional relationship; once the deal is signed, you've got to work with these people. When they host parts of your production infrastructure, whether you want to admit it or not they're your partner more so than they are your vendor. It has to be an ongoing relationship that people are, if they at least aren't thrilled with it, can at least be happy enough to live with, otherwise it just winds up with this growing sense of resentment and it just sort of leads nowhere.Brian: Yeah, there really is no deal moment. Yes, people sign agreements with companies, but that's just the very beginning. Your relationship evolves from there. We're delivering a product, we're delivering this platform that handles time-series data to our customers, and we're asking them to trust us with their product that they're taking out to market. They're asking us to handle their data and to deliver service to them that they're turning into their production applications. And so it's a big responsibility. And so we care about the relationship with our customers to continue that.Corey: So, I first really became aware of time-series data a few years back during a re:Invent keynote when they pre-announced Timestream, which took entirely too long to come to market. Okay, great. So, you're talking about time-series data. Can you explain what that means in simple terms? And I learned over the next eight minutes that they were talking about it, that no, no, they couldn't. I wound up more confused by the end of the announcement than I was at the beginning.So, assuming that I have the same respect for databases as you would expect for someone whose favorite data store is Route 53—because you can misuse it as a beautiful database—what is time-series data and why does it matter in 2021?Brian: Sure, it's a good question. And I was there in that audience as well that day. So, we think of time-series data as really any type of data that's stamped in time, in some way. It could be every hour, every minute, every second, every half second, whatever. But more specifically, it's any type of data that is generated by some source—and that could be a sensor sources within systems or an actual application—and these things change over time, and then therefore, stamped in time in some way.They can come at different frequencies, like I said, from nanoseconds to seconds, or minutes and hours, but the most important thing is that they usually trigger a workflow, trigger some sort of action. And so that's really what our platform is about. It allows people to handle this type of data and then work with it from there in their applications, trigger new workflows, et cetera. Because the historical context of what happens is super important.And when we talk about sources, it could be really many things. It could be in physical spaces, and we have a lot of IoT types of customers and use cases. And those are things like devices and sensors on the factory floor, out in the field, it's on a vehicle. It's even in space, believe it or not. There are customers that are using us on satellites.And then it can also be sources from within software, applications, and infrastructure, things like VMs, and containers, and microservices, all emitting time-series data. And it could be applications like crypto, or financial, or stock market, agricultural type of applications that are themselves as applications emitting data. So, you think about all these sources that are out there from the physical world to the virtual world, and they're all generating time-series data, and our platform is really specially designed to handle that kind of data. And we can get into some details of what exactly that means, but that's really why we're here. That's what time-series is all about.Corey: And this is the inherent challenge I think we're seeing across the entire industry slash ecosystem. I mean, this is airing during re:Invent week, but at the time we are recording this, we have not yet seen the Tuesday keynote that Adam Selipsky will take to the stage, and no doubt, render the stat I'm about to throw at you completely obsolete. But depending on how you count them, there's somewhere between 13 and 15 managed database or database-like services today that AWS offers. And they never turn things off and they're always releasing new things, supposedly on behalf of customers; in practice because someone somewhere wants to get promoted by launching a new service; good for them. Godspeed.If we look into the uncertain future, at some point, someone's job is going to be disambiguating between the 40 different managed database services that AWS offers and picking the one that works. What differentiates time-series from—let's just start with an easy one—something like MySQL or Postgres—or ‘Postgres-squeal' is how I insist on pronouncing that one. Let's stay away from things like Neptune because no one knows what a social graph database is and I assure you, you almost certainly don't need one. Where does something like Influx work in a way that, “Huh. Running this on MySQL is really starting to suck.”Brian: When and why is it time to consider a specialized tool. And in fact, that's actually what we see a lot with our customers is coming to us around that time when a time-series is a problem to solve for them is reaching the point where they really need a specialized tool that's kind of built for that. And so one way to look at that is really just to think about time-series in general as a type of data. It's rapidly rising. It's the fastest growing data category out there right now.And the reason for that is it's being driven by two big macro trends. One is the explosion of all these applications and services running in the cloud. They're expanding horizontally, they're running in more regions, they're in many cases running on multiple clouds, and so it's just getting big—the workloads are getting bigger and bigger. And those are emitting time-series data. And then simultaneously, you have this  growth of all these devices and sensors that are coming online out in the real world: batteries, and temperature gauges, and all kinds of stuff, both new and old, that is coming online, and those sources are generating a lot of time-series data.So typically, we're in a moment now, where a lot of developers are faced with this massive growth of time-series data. And if you think about some data set that you have, that you're putting into some kind of traditional database, now add the component of time as a multiplier by all the data you have. Instead of that one data, that one metric, you're now looking at doing that every one second in perpetuity. And so it's just an order of magnitude more data that you're dealing with. And then you also have this notion of—when you have that magnitude of data, you have fidelity, you're taking a lot of it in at the same time, I mean, very quickly, so you have  batch or stream data coming in at super high volume, and you may need that for a few minutes or a few hours or days, but maybe you don't need it for months and years.And so you'd maybe dropped down to kind of a lower fidelity for the longer-term. But you really have this  toggling back and forth of the high fidelity and low fidelity, all coming at you at pretty high volume. And so typically what happens is, is when the workloads get big enough, the legacy tools, they're just not equipped to do it. And a developer—if they have a small set of time-series they're dealing with, what is the first thing they're going to do? They're going to look around and be like, “Hey, what do I have here? Oh, I've got Mongo over here. I've got Splunk, or I've got this old relational database, I can put it in.”And that's typically what they'll do, and that works fine until it doesn't. And then that's when they come around looking for a specialized tool. So, we really sit in Influx and, frankly, other time-series products really do sit at that point where people are considering a specialized tool just because the workload has gotten such that it requires that.Corey: Yeah. Taking a look at most of the offerings in the space; anything that winds up charging anything more than a very tiny fraction of a penny—from what you're describing—is going to quickly become non-economical, where it's, “Oh, we're going to charge you”—like using S3: every, I think, 1000 writes cost a penny—“Oh, we're just going to use S3 for this.” Well, at some of these data volumes, that means that your request charge on S3 is very quickly going to become the largest single line item in your bill, which is nothing short of impressive in a lot of cases, but it also probably means that you've taken a very specific tool—like an iPad—and tried to use it as something else—like a hammer—and no one's particularly happy with that outcome.Brian: Yeah. First of all, having usage-based pricing is really important. We think about it as allowing people to have the full version of the product without a major commitment, and be using it in test scenarios and then later in the very early production scenarios. But as a principle, it's important for people that just signed up two hours ago using your product are basically using the same full product that the biggest customers that you have are using that are paying many, many thousands or tens of thousands per month. And so the way to do that is to offer usage-based pricing and not force people to commit to something before they're ready to do it.And so there's ways to unlock lower pricing, and we, like a lot of companies, offer annual pricing and we have a sales team that worked with folks to basically draw down their unit costs on the use of the platform once they kind of get comfortable with their workload. So, there's definitely avenues to get lower price, and we're believers in that. And we also want to, from a product development perspective, try to make the product more efficient. And so we basically are trying to drive down the costs through efficiencies in the product: make it run faster, make queries take less time, and also ship products on top of it that require developers to write less code themselves, kind of, do more of the work for them.Corey: One of the things I find particularly compelling about what you've done is it is an open-source project. If I want to go ahead and run some time-series experiments myself, I can spin it up anywhere I want and run it however I see fit. Now, at some point, if I'm doing this for anything more than, “Oh, let's see how I can misuse this today,” I probably want to at least consider letting someone who's better at running these things than I am take it over. And as I'm looking through your customer list, the thing that strikes me is how none of these things are quite like the other. We're talking about companies like Hulu is probably not using it the same way as Capital One is, at least I certainly hope not. You have Texas Instruments; you also have Adobe. And it sort of runs an entire gamut of none of these companies quite look alike; I have to imagine their use cases are also somewhat varied, too.Brian: Yeah, that's right. And we really do see as a platform, and with time-series being the common problem that people are looking to solve, we see this pretty broad set of use cases and customer types. And we have some more traditional customers like the Cisco's and the IBM's of the world, and then some  relatively new folks like Tesla and Hulu and others that are a little bit more recent. But they're all trying to solve the same fundamental problem with time-series, which is “How can I handle it in an efficient way and make use of it meaningfully in my applications and services?”And we were talking earlier about having some sources of time-series data being in, kind of a virtual space, like in infrastructure and software, and then some being in physical space, like in devices and sensors out in the real world. So, we have breadth in that way, too. We have folks who are building big software observability infrastructure solutions on us, and we also have people that are pulling data off of the devices on a solar panel that's sitting on a house in the emerging world, right? So, you have basically these two far ends of the spectrum, but all using this specialized tool to handle the time-series data that they're generating.Corey: It seems to me that for most of these use cases and the way you describe it, it's more about the overall shape of the data when we're talking about time-series more so than it is any particular data point in isolation. Is that accurate, or are there cases where that is very much not the case?Brian: I think that's accurate. What people are mostly trying to understand is context for what's happening. And so it's not necessarily—to your point—not searching for one specific data point or moment, but it's really understanding context for some general state that has changed or some trend that has emerged, whatever that might be, and then making sense of that, and then taking action on that. And taking an action could mean a couple of different things, too. It could be in an observability sense, where somebody in  an operator type of mode where they're looking at dashboards and paying attention to  infrastructure that's running and then need to take some sort of action based on that. It also, in many cases, is automated in some way: it's either some series of automated responses to some state that is reached that is visible in the data, or is actually kicking off some new series of tasks or actions inside of an application based on what is occurring and shown by the time-series data.Corey: You know what doesn't add to your AWS bill? Free developer security from Snyk. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are, finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, repos, and pipelines. And Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like CodePipeline, EKS, ECR, and oh so much more.Secure with Snyk and save some loot. Learn more at snyk.io/scream. That's S-N-Y-K-dot-I-O/screamCorey: So, we've talked about, you have an open-source product, which is the sort of thing that most people listening to this should have a vague idea of, “Oh, that means I can go on GitHub and download it and start using it, if it's not already in my package manager.” Great. You also have the enterprise offering, which is more or less, I presume, a supported distribution of this—for lack of a better term—that you then wind up providing blessed configurations thereof and helping run support for that—for companies that want to run it on-prem. Is that directionally accurate, or am I grossly mischaracterizing [laugh] what your enterprise offering is?Brian: Directionally accurate, of course. You could have a great job in marketing. I really think you could.Corey: Oh, you know, I would argue, on some level, I probably do. The challenge I have is that I keep conflating marketing with spectacle and that leads down to really unfortunate, weird places. But one additional area, which is relatively recent since the last time I spoke with Paul—one of the cofounders of your company—on this show is InfluxDB Cloud, which is one of those, “Oh, let me see if I look—if I'm right.” And sure enough, yeah, you wind up managing the infrastructure for us and it becomes a pay-per consumption model the way that most cloud service providers do, without the really obnoxious hidden 15 levels of billing dimensions.Brian: Yes, we are trying to bring the transparency back. But yes, you're correct. We have open-source and we have—it's very popular—we have over 500,000-plus instances of that deployed globally today in the community. And that's typically very common for developers to get started using the open-source, easily recognizable, it's been out for a long time, and so many people start the journey there.And then we have InfluxDB Enterprise, which it's actually a clustered version of InfluxDB open-source. So, it allows you to basically handle in an environment that you want to manage yourself, you manage a cluster and scale it out and handle ever-increasing workloads and have things like redundancy and replication, et cetera. But that's really specifically for people who want to deploy and operate the software themselves, which is a good set of people; we have a lot of folks who have done that. But one of the areas that's a little bit more recent is InfluxDB Cloud, which is really, for folks who don't want to have anything to do with the management; they really just want to use it as a service, send their data in—Corey: Yeah, give me an API endpoint, and I want you to worry about the care, and the feeding, and the waking up at two in the morning when a disk starts filling up. Yeah, that is the best kind of problem from my perspective: someone else's.Brian: Exactly. That's our job. And increasingly, we've seen folks gravitate to that. We've got a lot of folks have signed up on this product since it launched in 2019, and it's really increasingly where they begin their journey, maybe not even going to the open-source just going directly to this because it's relatively simple to get started.It's priced based on usage. People pay for three vectors: they have the amount of data in; they have number of queries made against the platform; and then storage, how much data you have and for how long. And depending on the use case, some people keep it around for relatively short time, like a few days or a couple of weeks. Other folks have it for many, many months and potentially years in some places. So, you really have that option.But I would say the three products are really about how you want to run it. Do you care about running the, kind of, underlying infrastructure and managing it or do you just want to hit an endpoint, as you said.Corey: You launched this, I want to say in 2019, which feels about directionally right. And I know it was after Timestream was announced, so I just want to say first, how kind and selfless it was of you to validate AWS's market, which is, you know how they always like to clarify and define what they're doing when they decide to enter every single market anywhere to compete with everyone. It turns out, I don't get the sense that they like it quite [laugh] as much being on the other side of that particular divide, but that's the best kind of problem, too: again, someone else's.Brian: Yeah, I think that's really true.Corey: The challenge that I have is that it seems like a weird direction to go in as a company, though it is clearly based upon a number of press releases you have made about the success and market traction that you found, it feels, on some level, like it is falling into an older version of an open-source trap of assuming that, “Well, we wrote the software therefore we are the best people you could pick to run it.” That was what a lot of companies did; it turns out that AWS has this operational excellence, as they call it, and what the rest of us call burning through people and making them wake up in the middle of the night to fix things before it becomes customer-visible. But from the outside, there's no difference. It seems, however, that you have built something that is clearly resonating, and in a big way, in a way that—I've got to be direct with you—the AWS time-series service that they are offering has not been finding success.Brian: Thank you for saying that, and we feel pretty excited about the success we've had even being in the same market as Amazon. And Amazon does a phenomenal job at running products at scale, and the breadth that they have in their product lineup is pretty impressive, especially when they roll out new stuff at AWS re:Invent every year. But we've been able to find some pretty good success with our approach, and it's based on a couple of things. So, one is being the company that actually develops and still deploys the open-source is really important. People gravitate to that.Our roots as a company are open-source, we've been a part of and fostered this community over many, many years, and there's a certain trust in the direction that we're taking the company. And Paul, our founder who you mentioned, he's been front and center with that community, pretty deeply engaged for many, many years. I think that carries a lot of weight. At least that's the way we think about it. But then as far as commercial products go, we really think about it as going to where our customers are, going to where developers are. And that could mean the language that they prefer, the language of preference for them. And that could [crosstalk 00:22:25]—Corey: Oh, and it's very clear; it seems that most database companies that I talk to—again, without naming names—tend to focus on the top-down sale, but I've never worked in an environment where the database that will be used was dictated by anyone other than the application developers who are the closest to the technical requirements for the workload. I've never understood this model of, “Oh, we're going to talk to the C suite because we believe that they're going to pick a database vendor based upon who has box seats this season.” I've never gotten that and that probably means I'm a terrible enterprise marketer, on some level. But unlike almost every other player in the database space, I've never struggled to understand what the hell your messaging has meant, other than the technical bits that I just don't have quite enough neurons to bang together to create sparks to fully understand. It is very clearly targeted at a builder rather than someone who's more or less spending their entire life in meetings. Which, oh, God, that's me.Brian: [laugh]. Yes, it's very much the case. We are focused on the developer. And that developer is a builder of an application or service that is seeing the light of day, it's going out and being used by their own end-users and end-customers.And so we care about going to where those developers are, and that could mean going and making your product easily used in the language and tool that customer cares about. So, if you're a Python developer, it's important for us to have tools and make it easy for Python developers. We have client libraries for Python, for example. It also means going to the cloud where your customers are. And this is something that differentiates us as well, when you start looking at what the other cloud providers are offering, in that data—like it or not—has gravity. And so somebody that has built their whole stack on AWS and sure they care about using a service that is going to receive their data, and that also being in AWS, but—Corey: It has to live where the customers are, especially with data egress charges being what they are, too.Brian: Exactly.Corey: And data gravity is real. The cloud provider people pick is the one where their data lives because of that particular inflection in the market.Brian: Absolutely true. And so that's great if you're only going after people who are on AWS, but what about Google Cloud and what about Microsoft Azure? There are a lot of developers that are building on those platforms as well, and that's one of the reasons we want to go there as well. So, InfluxDB Cloud is a multi-cloud offering, and it's equal experience and capability and pricing on each of the three major clouds. You can buy directly from us; you can put it on any of your cloud bills in one of those marketplaces, and to us that's like a really, really fundamental point is to bring your product and make it as easy to use on those platforms and in those languages, and in those realms and use cases where people are already working.Corey: I'm a big believer in multi-cloud for the use case you just defined. Because I know I'm going to get letters if I don't say this based upon my public multi-cloud is a dumb default worst practice for most folks—because it is, on a workload-by-workload basis—but you're building a service that has to be close to where your customers are and for that specific thing, yeah, it makes an awful lot of sense for you to have a presence across all the different providers. Now, here's the $64,000 question for you: is the experience as an InfluxDB Cloud customer meaningfully different between different providers?Brian: It's not. We actually pride ourselves on it being the same. Using InfluxDB, you sign up for InfluxDB Cloud, you come in, you set up your account, create your organization, and then you choose which underlying cloud provider you want your account to be provisioned in. And so it actually comes as a secondary choice; it's not something that is gated in the beginning, and that allows us to deliver a uniform experience across the board. And you may in a future use case, maybe somebody wants to have part of what they're building data living in AWS and maybe part of it living in Azure, I mean, that could be a scenario as well.However, typically what we've seen—and you've probably seen this as well—is  most developers are—and organizations—are building mostly on one cloud. I don't see a lot of  multi-cloud in that organization. But we ourselves need to be multi-cloud in order to go to where those people are working. And so that's the distinction. It's for us as a company that delivers product to those people, it's important for us to go where they are, whereas they themselves are not necessarily running on all three cloud products; they're probably running on one platform.Corey: Yeah. On a workload-by-workload basis, that's what generally makes sense. Anytime you have someone who has a particular workload that needs to be in multiple providers, okay, great, you're going to put that out there, but their backend systems, their billing, their marketing, all the rest, is not going to go down that path for a variety of excellent reasons, mostly that it is a colossal pain, and a bunch of, more or less, solving the same problems over and over, rather than the whole point of cloud being to make it someone else's. I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak to me about how you're viewing the evolution of the market, how you're seeing your move into cloud, and how you're effectively targeting folks who can actually care about the implementation details of a database rather than, honestly, suits. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Brian: They can go to our website; it's the easiest place to go. So, influxdata.com. You can read all about InfluxDB, it's a pretty easy sign up to get underway. So, I recommend that people get their hands dirty with the product. That's the easiest way to understand what it's all about.Corey: And if you do end up doing that, please tell them I sent you because the involuntary flinch whenever people mention my name to vendors is one of my favorite parts of being me. Brian, thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Brian: Thanks so much for having us on. It was great.Corey: Brian Mullen, Chief Marketing Officer—and dealmaker—at InfluxData. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a long, angry comment telling me that you work on the Timestream service team, and your product is the best. It's found huge success, but I've just never met any of your customers and I can't because they all live in Canada.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
Flexibility and Agility: The Revamped IBM Reseller Program

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 17:30


This isn't your father's IBM. Although the hallmarks of IBM remain the same, the company continues to adapt as the marketplace evolves. Recently, that has included some exciting changes to the IBM Reseller Program. Shelby Skrhak talks with Susan Martens, Global Managing Director for Ingram Micro at IBM, and James Pickett, Sr. Solutions Sales Executive, and Lindsay Corbett, Solutions Development Executive, both with Ingram Micro, about: How IBM has both changed and remained the same What IBM's agility means for resellers How IBM emphasizes value for all   For more information, contact Lindsay (lindsay.corbett@ingrammicro.com), James (james.pickett2@ingrammicro.com), or Susan (sldratt@us.ibm.com), and visit Ingram Micro's IBM resource page. To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

It’s about time
It's about time we set the stage

It’s about time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:48


Do not miss this very special episode of It's About Time, as the Chair of IBM's Racial Equity in Design Initiative, Nigel Prentice, steps out from behind the microphone and into the guest chair to share his background, life experiences, and journey to IBM design executive leader. He also reflects on building the racial equity in design effort, and its significance now and into the future.

ACM ByteCast
Amanda Randles - Episode 22

ACM ByteCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 48:56


In this episode of ACM ByteCast, Rashmi Mohan hosts 2017 ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award recipient Amanda Randles, the Alfred Winborne and Victoria Stover Mordecai Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences at Duke University's Department of Biomedical Engineering. She is also Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Biomedical Engineering and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute. She has received the National Science Foundation Career Award and was selected as one of the 10 researchers to work on the Aurora Exascale Supercomputer. Her visionary work in simulating blood flow through the human body in a system called HARVEY, led her to be featured in the MIT Tech Review Innovators Under 35 list. Amanda talks about growing up in Michigan and being inspired early on by her high school computer science teacher. She talks about her passion, which lies in using the largest supercomputers in the world to answer questions otherwise left unanswered, and her Duke research group's focus on building large scale personalized blood flow simulations. She also discusses her 3-year involvement with IBM's Blue Gene Team, where she learned how to debug programs and identify and work through problems collaboratively, and her time at Harvard University, where she learned about fluid dynamics and started writing HARVEY from scratch. She also describes the fascinating contributions her team made to address ventilator shortages during the early days of the COVID-10 pandemic.

Aspen Ideas to Go
We're in a science moment. What will come out of it?

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:48


The Covid-19 vaccine was developed at an unusually rapid pace, and now the public's expectations are high for what science can deliver. It's a good thing we're in a science moment. Gobs of data are being produced, researchers are collaborating more, and the public is engaged. But is the pace of discovery keeping up with the science? Alison Snyder, managing editor at Axios, interviews Darío Gil, senior vice president and director of IBM Research at IBM, Serpil Erzurum, chief research and academic officer of Cleveland Clinic, and Nicholas Dirks, president and CEO of the New York Academy of Sciences, about the pace of discovery in an age of streamlined research and development processes and advanced computing.

The Model FA
Committing Client Segmentation to Your Business's Core with Jon Mauney

The Model FA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:43


Jon Mauney is the General Manager at Betterment, where he also leads the Betterment for Advisors team. Betterment is an organization that empowers financial advisors to do what's best for their client's wealth journey. Before joining Betterment in 2013, Jon worked in data analytics and served as a Senior Consultant for IBM. At Betterment, Jon spent several years building software and leading the company's engineering teams. Today, Jon spends his time working with financial advisors, getting their input and feedback to build Betterment products that make advisors' businesses streamlined and efficient. Jon joins me today to discuss client segmentation and how it can improve business economics and help financial advisors adapt to changing client demographics. He outlines the next steps financial advisors can take after segmenting clients and how they can move current clients who score low in the segmentation process. Jon also explains why advisors may take in prospects at the earlier stages of their wealth journey and underscores the importance of considering a client's lifetime value.   “The number one rule of client segmentation is to have perimeters so you can sort prospects on their way in.” - Jon Mauney   This week on The Model FA Podcast: Jon's career arc, from being a consultant at IBM to working in a client-facing role at Betterment What client segmentation is and how it benefits financial advisors The 80/20 principle and how client segmentation determines touch points with clients The importance of considering lifetime value in evaluating your relationships with clients Five metrics with which you can segment your clients The value of automating the non-human components of your business Why client segmentation needs to be done as part of a financial advisor's onboarding process   Resources Mentioned: Commas Book: The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe   Our Favorite Quotes: “Where your clients are according to your segmentation will determine how frequently you touch base with them.” - David DeCelle “The five categories you should use to segment your clients are revenue, growth potential, coachability, referrability, and likeability.” - David DeCelle “Come up with a lifetime value for all your clients, rank them, and figure out what you need to do to make a change.” - Jon Mauney   Connect with Jon Mauney: Betterment Betterment on LinkedIn Betterment on Instagram Betterment on Facebook Betterment on Twitter Jon Mauney on LinkedIn   About the Model FA Podcast The Model FA podcast is a show for fiduciary financial advisors. In each episode, our host David DeCelle sits down with industry experts, strategic thinkers, and advisors to explore what it takes  to build a successful practice — and have an abundant life in the process. We believe in continuous learning, tactical advice, and strategies that work — no “gotchas” or BS. Join us to hear stories from successful financial advisors, get actionable ideas from experts, and re-discover your drive to build the practice of your dreams.    Did you like this conversation? Then leave us a rating and a review in whatever podcast player you use. We would love your feedback, and your ratings help us reach more advisors with ideas for growing their practices, attracting great clients, and achieving a better quality of life. While you are there, feel free to share your ideas about future podcast guests or topics you'd love to see covered.    Our Team: President of Model FA, David DeCelle   If you like this podcast, you will love our community! Join the Model FA Community on Facebook to connect with like-minded advisors and share the day-to-day challenges and wins of running a growing financial services firm.

Design To Be Conversation
Raquel Breternitz: Manage burnout through intentionality

Design To Be Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:26


Today's show marks our 36th and final episode of the Design To Be Conversation podcast before we come back in February 2022. Before we dive into our episode for today, I want to take a moment to say thank you. Thank you for listening and supporting Design To Be Conversation and thank you to each of our incredible guests who have made each episode so insightful and impactful. I'm extremely excited for the future of Design To Be Conversation. We have an incredible lineup of guests planned for next year, so be sure to follow us along on social at design_tobe or head to designtobeconversation.com to be the first to know when we return. Now, let's get into today's episode.Today, we are wrapping up our show with Raquel Breternitz. Raquel is an award-winning design leader and strategist with a resume spanning years of purpose-driven work experience from serving as Design Director for US Senator Elizabeth Warren to private sector credits at the New York Times, Pivotal Labs, and IBM. Raquel is a public speaker with works and topics connected by a passion for accessibility and inclusion, research-driven design thinking, and a hunger for tackling complex and challenging problems. She has spoken at Lesbians Who Tech, PluralSightLIVE, Wonder Women in Tech, and O'Reilly Design.We dive into what it means to connect with your passions and ideals in design, the importance of prioritizing rest and well-being to manage burnout, and intentional ways to practice self-care that provides purpose and joy.  

Software Developer's Journey
#179 Adrian Colyer went from developer to living under constant jet lag and back

Software Developer's Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 45:40


Adrian took us back to his first line of code on a ZX-Spectrum. We then brushed over his computer science studies and landed at IBM. We talked about how he discovered Java and AspectJ. We discussed how it led him to speak at conferences and stumble upon Spring. We then talked about his role moving out of IBM into SpringSource, then VMWare, and Pivotal. Finally, Adrian dropped a learning-related gem to close the show! We finished by talking about his transition to investment as a technical person and his role at Accel.Here are the links from the show:https://www.twitter.com/adriancolyerThe morning paper: https://blog.acolyer.orgacolyer@accel.comCreditsCover Campfire Rounds by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed CC BY-NC-ND 4.0.Your host is Timothée (Tim) Bourguignon, more about him at timbourguignon.fr.Gift the podcast a rating on one of the significant platforms https://devjourney.info/subscribeSupport the podcast, support us on Patreon: https://bit.ly/devjpatreonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/timbourguignon)

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Ahí me voy otra vez, ahí te dejo Twitter

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 16:54


Jack Dorsey dimite / Diáspora india asalta Silicon Valley / Driver USB para Windows 3.1 / Pasaportes COVID falsos en Telegram / Cae satélite Starlink Patrocinador: Esta Navidad protege los ordenadores de tus seres queridos con menos habilidades informáticas instalándoles el antivirus de nueva generación de Panda Security https://www.pandasecurity.com/es/, un Brand Watchguard. Cuesta muy poco asegurarte de que siempre tienen navegación web segura, sistemas anti-physing, sistemas anti-ransomware y mucho más. Jack Dorsey dimite / Diáspora india asalta Silicon Valley / Driver USB para Windows 3.1 / Pasaportes COVID falsos en Telegram / Cae satélite Starlink

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
IBM: Big Blue Banking On Hybrid Cloud

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 24:50


This year, IBM celebrates its 60th anniversary in Malaysia. But following the sudden closure of its Global Delivery Center in May, how committed is IBM to its Malaysian investments? We speak to Managing Director of IBM Malaysia Catherine Lian on this, as well as the broader pivot of the group to new technologies such as hybrid cloud and artificial intelligence (A.I.).

Teaching Learning Leading K-12
Hunter Moore - CEO & Founder of Plasma Games - Getting Kids Interested in Pursuing STEM Field Careers - 432

Teaching Learning Leading K-12

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:49


Hunter Moore - CEO & Founder of Plasma Games - Getting Kids Interested in Pursuing STEM Field Careers. This is episode 432 of Teaching Learning Leading K12, an audio podcast. Hunter is the founder and CEO of Plasma Games. His passion for science and education began in childhood and later grew when he got a taste for educational instruction in the STEM field as a TA for engineering courses while in college. Hunter had the initial idea for Plasma Games based on his work experience at IBM, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, and Sandia National Laboratories, where a shortage of eligible, trained technical staff was apparent across the US economy. He has a BSME and MSME from Georgia Institute of Technology and an MBA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Our focus today is learning about Plasma Games and getting kids interested in learning more about STEM career fields. Thanks for listening. So much to learn! But wait... The holidays can be a particularly stressful time of year if you don't have a plan. Well have I got the solution for you!  Join my friend Lynn with  "Connect.Flow.Grow." in her launch of... Stress Less Holidays!  Lynn will teach you how to evaluate your stress and develop a plan to reduce it. Learn more about Stress Less Holidays and join by clicking on this link  Stress Less Holidays ...the link will take you to where you can find out more information and sign up…   Could you do me a favor? Please go to my website at https://www.stevenmiletto.com/reviews/ or open the podcast app that you are listening to me on and would you rate and review the podcast? That would be Awesome. Thanks!   Have you been wanting to tell your story on podcasts? Podcasts are a great way to grow your personal and business brand. Kitcaster specializes in developing real human connections through podcast appearances. If you are an expert in your field, have a unique story to share, or an interesting point of view-- it's time to explore the world of podcasting with Kitcaster. Go to https://kitcaster.com/tllk12 or go to my webpage at https://stevenmiletto.com/sponsors click on the Kitcaster logo to apply for a special offer for friends of Teaching Learning Leading K12.   Ready to start your own podcast? Podbean is an awesome host. I have been with them since 2013. Go to https://www.podbean.com/TLLK12 to get 1 month free of unlimited hosting for your new podcast.    Remember to take a look at NVTA (National Virtual Teacher Association) The NVTA Certification Process was created to establish a valid and reliable research-based teacher qualification training process for virtual teachers to enhance their teaching and develop their ongoing reflective skills to improve teaching capacity. NVTA is an affiliate sponsor of Teaching Learning Leading K12, by following the link above if you purchase a program, Teaching Learning Leading K12 will get a commission and you will help the show continue to grow.    Don't forget to go to my other affiliate sponsor Boone's Titanium Rings at www.boonerings.com. When you order a ring use my code - TLLK12 - at checkout to get 10% off and help the podcast get a commission.   Oh by the way, you can help support Teaching Learning Leading K12 by buying me a soft drink (actually making a donation to Teaching Learning Leading K12.) That would be awesome! You would be helping expand the show with equipment and other resources to keep the show moving upward. Just go to https://www.buymeacoffee.com/stevenmiletto Thanks! Have an awesome day! Connect & Learn More: https://play.plasma.games/about https://play.plasma.games/ https://twitter.com/playplasmagames https://www.facebook.com/PlayPlasmaGames/ https://www.pinterest.com/PlayPlasmaGames/ https://www.instagram.com/playplasmagames/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7qesg-ffGwv9FkTOoR8uaQ Length - 38:49

The Marketing Book Podcast
359 Renegade Marketing by Drew Neisser

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 82:56


Renegade Marketing: 12 Steps to Building Unbeatable B2B Brands by Drew Neisser About the Book: Marketing has become ridiculously complicated, but yours doesn't have to be. With decades of hands-on experience, expert strategist and writer Drew Neisser has witnessed the dramatic evolution of business-to-business marketing. Working alongside giant brands like IBM, as well as start-ups and midsize companies, and interviewing over four hundred top practitioners, Neisser uncovered the top four characteristics that all successful marketers have in common: they are Courageous, Artful, Thoughtful, and Scientific (CATS). These four characteristics form the basis for the framework in Renegade Marketing. Over the years, Neisser created a twelve-step formula to radically simplify B2B marketing and build an unbeatable brand. In his book, he shares the stories of marketing CATS as he gives you the tools to: Walk through a highly refined discovery process that culminates in finding your brand's purpose Define your company's purpose in eight words or fewer Build team support for new marketing initiatives while establishing your unique brand story, voice, and design Assemble effective marketing plans that engage employees, inspire customers, and attract new business Drive perpetual growth by creating a culture with metrics, marketing technology, and experimentation About the Author: Drew Neisser is the founder of Renegade, a strategic boutique for B2B innovators, and CMO Huddles, a membership organization exclusively for B2B CMOs. He's also the host of Renegade Thinkers Unite. Ranked among the top B2B influencers, Drew has been a featured marketing expert on ABC News, CNBC, CBS Radio, and Tony Robbins's podcast, among many others. Besides his long-running Ad Age magazine column, he's contributed articles to FastCompany, Forbes, MediaPost, and CMO.com. Drew's first book, The CMO's Periodic Table: A Renegade's Guide to Marketing, published in 2015, features interviews with sixty-four marketing leaders at top brands, including American Express, Dow, IBM, and SAP. Drew started his advertising career at Wells Rich Greene, and later moved to J. Walter Thompson, and Chiat/Day, and then founded the agency that became Renegade in 1993. And, interesting fact – he's obsessed with (and a bit of an expert) on American founding father Benjamin Franklin! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/renegade-marketing-drew-neisser

Software Defined Talk
Episode 331: Graphics of Guerrillas

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 63:58


This week we discuss the rise of Web3 and make a few AWS re:invent predications. Plus, what if Billy Joel and Huey Lewis formed a band… Rundown It's a Web3 World Now — How the Hype Compares to Web 2.0 (https://thenewstack.io/its-a-web3-world-now-how-the-hype-compares-to-web-2-0/) Crypto group tries to claw back fees after failed Constitution bid (https://www.axios.com/crypto-constitution-bid-high-cost-6ab84b3b-79c0-40d0-be6b-232172a3ed7a.html) $10B is the new $1B, and we need a new framework for startup valuations (https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/23/10b-is-the-new-1b-and-we-need-a-new-framework-for-startup-valuations/) AWS Re:Invent Predictions 5 Things To Know About New AWS Channel Chief Ruba Borno (https://www.crn.com/slide-shows/cloud/5-things-to-know-about-new-aws-channel-chief-ruba-borno) Andy Jassy was reportedly surprised when Jeff Bezos asked him to take on the job of Amazon CEO: 'I wasn't clamoring for it' (https://www.businessinsider.com/jeff-bezos-choosing-andy-jassy-surprised-amazon-ceo-2021-11) “Who Is He?”: Andy Jassy, Amazon's New CEO, Enters the Ring (https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/11/andy-jassy-amazons-new-ceo-enters-the-ring) Relevant to your interests Amazon's Dark Secret: It Has Failed to Protect Your Data (https://www.wired.com/story/amazon-failed-to-protect-your-data-investigation/) Apple's Plan to Scan Handset Images Stopped Before It Started (https://m-cacm.acm.org/news/256904-apples-plan-to-scan-handset-images-stopped-before-it-started/fulltext) Andy Jassy's Big Idea for AWS Expansion Marred by Glitches, High Prices (https://www.theinformation.com/articles/andy-jassys-big-idea-for-aws-expansion-marred-by-glitches-high-prices) The NFT Bay Debuts to Save You a Right-Click on Someone's Precious Digital Art (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/nft-bay-debuts) Follow Matthew Ball for MetaVerse Info (https://twitter.com/ballmatthew/status/1462787490272759811) IBM tells POWER8 owners: the end is nigh for upgrades (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/ibm_power8_eol/) VMware withdraws major vSphere release due to bugs (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/vsphere_7_update_3_withdrawn/) Webhooks provider Svix snags $2.6M to simplify software management (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/21/no-code-webhooks-provider-svix-snags-2-6m-to-simplify-software-management/) Drama in the Rust community — mod team resignation (https://github.com/rust-lang/team/pull/671) The bitcoin fanatics fuel GPU shortages for gamers (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/19/gpu_makers_not_keen_on_crypto/) AWS commits to update its own Linux every other year (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/23/amazon_linux_2022/) Announcing $150M to build the end-to-end platform for the modern Web (https://vercel.com/blog/vercel-funding-series-d-and-valuation) Oracle and Google join Microsoft and Amazon in bidding for Defense Department's Joint Warfighter Cloud Capability (https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/oracle-and-google-join-microsoft-and-amazon-in-bidding-for-defense-departments-joint-warfighter-cloud-capability/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) We got an exclusive look at the 13-slide pitch deck Stytch, a passwordless startup, used to raise $90 million from Coatue (https://www.businessinsider.com/stytch-startup-used-this-pitch-deck-to-raise-90m-from-coatue-2021-11#-13) Nonsense Dollar Tree will raise prices from $1 to $1.25 (https://twitter.com/axios/status/1463225256131375110) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/) Software Defined Talk Live Recording - THAT (https://that.us/activities/onqzzIqfp9NOeyLm67SY) DevOpsDays Chicago 2022: Call for Speakers/Papers (https://sessionize.com/devopsdays-chicago-2022/) PaperCall.io - DevOps Days Birmingham AL, 2022 (https://www.papercall.io/devopsdays-2022-birmingham-al) Listener Feedback InfraCloud is Hiring a Customer Success Engineer (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/2806304163/?refId=N26Jg1NXR196pB%2BG8KRQ5Q%3D%3D&trackingId=O4BTvvSN7iujIpAR1gCxlA%3D%3D) Brian recommends Outliers (https://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017930) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=823) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Wave Mic Arm LP (https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Elgato-Gaming/Audio/Wave-Mic-Arm/p/10AAN9901) The Infinite Machine (https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Infinite-Machine-Audiobook/0062990187?ref=a_library_t_c5_libItem_&pf_rd_p=80765e81-b10a-4f33-b1d3-ffb87793d047&pf_rd_r=EKPH6JXTYCGYS2SK9JKH) Matt: Corn Pudding (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj5mJGyoYIM) for Thanksgiving Coté: J. Kenji López-Alt (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos)'s videos (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos), for example, Beef with Broccoli (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEs3qXQvg6M). Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/eiY4KJ62P5Q) Cover Art (https://unsplash.com/photos/Ta-q5ZBqXRQ)

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 657: Web 3.0 and Beyond - WordPress Breach, SCO vs IBM lawsuit

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:21


What never stops and what's barely started are the topics debated by our panel of co-hosts: Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Aaron Newcomb and Simon Phipps. We start with the SCO vs. IBM (and before that, many others) lawsuit, which was reportedly settled. What really happened with the GoDaddy and WordPress breach? It's been 25 years of PHP and then look forward to the time when we're all in Web 4.0 talking about what failed in Web 3.0. Hosts: Doc Searls, Aaron Newcomb, Simon Phipps, and Katherine Druckman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
FLOSS Weekly 657: Web 3.0 and Beyond

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:40


What never stops and what's barely started are the topics debated by our panel of co-hosts: Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Aaron Newcomb and Simon Phipps. We start with the SCO vs. IBM (and before that, many others) lawsuit, which was reportedly settled. What really happened with the GoDaddy and WordPress breach? It's been 25 years of PHP and then look forward to the time when we're all in Web 4.0 talking about what failed in Web 3.0. Hosts: Doc Searls, Aaron Newcomb, Simon Phipps, and Katherine Druckman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 657: Web 3.0 and Beyond

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:21


What never stops and what's barely started are the topics debated by our panel of co-hosts: Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Aaron Newcomb and Simon Phipps. We start with the SCO vs. IBM (and before that, many others) lawsuit, which was reportedly settled. What really happened with the GoDaddy and WordPress breach? It's been 25 years of PHP and then look forward to the time when we're all in Web 4.0 talking about what failed in Web 3.0. Hosts: Doc Searls, Aaron Newcomb, Simon Phipps, and Katherine Druckman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

The History of Computing
An Abridged History of Free And Open Source Software

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:34


In the previous episodes, we looked at the rise of patents and software and their impact on the nascent computer industry. But a copyright is a right. And that right can be given to others in whole or in part. We have all benefited from software where the right to copy was waved and it's shaped the computing industry as much, if not more, than proprietary software. The term Free and Open Source Software (FOSS for short) is a blanket term to describe software that's free and/or whose source code is distributed for varying degrees of tinkeration. It's a movement and a choice. Programmers can commercialize our software. But we can also distribute it free of copy protections. And there are about as many licenses as there are opinions about what is unique, types of software, underlying components, etc. But given that many choose to commercialize their work products, how did a movement arise that specifically didn't? The early computers were custom-built to perform various tasks. Then computers and software were bought as a bundle and organizations could edit the source code. But as operating systems and languages evolved and businesses wanted their own custom logic, a cottage industry for software started to emerge. We see this in every industry - as an innovation becomes more mainstream, the expectations and needs of customers progress at an accelerated rate. That evolution took about 20 years to happen following World War II and by 1969, the software industry had evolved to the point that IBM faced antitrust charges for bundling software with hardware. And after that, the world of software would never be the same. The knock-on effect was that in the 1970s, Bell Labs pushed away from MULTICS and developed Unix, which AT&T then gave away as compiled code to researchers. And so proprietary software was a growing industry, which AT&T began charging for commercial licenses as the bushy hair and sideburns of the 70s were traded for the yuppy culture of the 80s. In the meantime, software had become copyrightable due to the findings of CONTU and the codifying of the Copyright Act of 1976. Bill Gates sent his infamous “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in 1976 as well, defending the right to charge for software in an exploding hobbyist market. And then Apple v Franklin led to the ability to copyright compiled code in 1983. There was a growing divide between those who'd been accustomed to being able to copy software freely and edit source code and those who in an up-market sense just needed supported software that worked - and were willing to pay for it, seeing the benefits that automation was having on the capabilities to scale an organization. And yet there were plenty who considered copyright software immoral. One of the best remembered is Richard Stallman, or RMS for short. Steven Levy described Stallman as “The Last of the True Hackers” in his epic book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution.” In the book, he describes the MIT Stallman joined where there weren't passwords and we didn't yet pay for software and then goes through the emergence of the LISP language and the divide that formed between Richard Greenblatt, who wanted to keep The Hacker Ethic alive and those who wanted to commercialize LISP. The Hacker Ethic was born from the young MIT students who freely shared information and ideas with one another and help push forward computing in an era they thought was purer in a way, as though it hadn't yet been commercialized. The schism saw the death of the hacker culture and two projects came out of Stallman's technical work: emacs, which is a text editor that is still included freely in most modern Unix variants and the GNU project. Here's the thing, MIT was sitting on patents for things like core memory and thrived in part due to the commercialization or weaponization of the technology they were producing. The industry was maturing and since the days when kings granted patents, maturing technology would be commercialized using that system. And so Stallman's nostalgia gave us the GNU project, born from an idea that the industry moved faster in the days when information was freely shared and that knowledge was meant to be set free. For example, he wanted the source code for a printer driver so he could fix it and was told it was protected by an NDAQ and so couldn't have it. A couple of years later he announced GNU, a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix. The next year he built a compiler called GCC and the next year released the GNU Manifesto, launching the Free Software Foundation, often considered the charter of the free and open source software movement. Over the next few years as he worked on GNU, he found emacs had a license, GCC had a license, and the rising tide of free software was all distributed with unique licenses. And so the GNU General Public License was born in 1989 - allowing organizations and individuals to copy, distribute, and modify software covered under the license but with a small change, that if someone modified the source, they had to release that with any binaries they distributed as well. The University of California, Berkley had benefited from a lot of research grants over the years and many of their works could be put into the public domain. They had brought Unix in from Bell Labs in the 70s and Sun cofounder and Java author Bill Joy worked under professor Fabry, who brought Unix in. After working on a Pascal compiler that Unix coauthor Ken Thompson left for Berkeley, Joy and others started working on what would become BSD, not exactly a clone of Unix but with interchangeable parts. They bolted on the OSI model to get networking and through the 80s as Joy left for Sun and DEC got ahold of that source code there were variants and derivatives like FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin, and others. The licensing was pretty permissive and simple to understand: Copyright (c) . All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the . The name of the may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. By 1990 the Board of Regents at Berkley accepted a four clause BSD license that spawned a class of licenses. While it's matured into other formats like a 0 clause license it's one of my favorites as it is truest to the FOSS cause. And the 90s gave us the Apache License, from the Apache Group, loosely based on the BSD License and then in 2004 leaning away from that with the release of the Apache License 2 that was more compatible with the GPL license. Given the modding nature of Apache they didn't require derivative works to also be open sourced but did require leaving the license in place for unmodified parts of the original work. GNU never really caught on as an OS in the mainstream, although a collection of tools did. The main reason the OS didn't go far is probably because Linus Torvalds started releasing prototypes of his Linux operating system in 1991. Torvalds used The GNU General Public License v2, or GPLv2 to license his kernel, having been inspired by a talk given by Stallman. GPL 2 had been released in 1991 and something else was happening as we turned into the 1990s: the Internet. Suddenly the software projects being worked on weren't just distributed on paper tape or floppy disks; they could be downloaded. The rise of Linux and Apache coincided and so many a web server and site ran that LAMP stack with MySQL and PHP added in there. All open source in varying flavors of what open source was at the time. And collaboration in the industry was at an all-time high. We got the rise of teams of developers who would edit and contribute to projects. One of these was a tool for another aspect of the Internet, email. It was called popclient, Here Eric S Raymond, or ESR for short, picked it up and renamed it to fetchmail, releasing it as an open source project. Raymond presented on his work at the Linux Congress in 1997, expanded that work into an essay and then the essay into “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” where bazaar is meant to be like an open market. That inspired many to open source their own works, including the Netscape team, which resulted in Mozilla and so Firefox - and another book called “Freeing the Source: The Story of Mozilla” from O'Reilly. By then, Tim O'Reilly was a huge proponent of this free or source code available type of software as it was known. And companies like VA Linux were growing fast. And many wanted to congeal around some common themes. So in 1998, Christine Peterson came up with the term “open source” in a meeting with Raymond, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Sam Ockman, and Jon “Maddog” Hall, author of the first book I read on Linux. Free software it may or may not be but open source as a term quickly proliferated throughout the lands. By 1998 there was this funny little company called Tivo that was doing a public beta of a little box with a Linux kernel running on it that bootstrapped a pretty GUI to record TV shows on a hard drive on the box and play them back. You remember when we had to wait for a TV show, right? Or back when some super-fancy VCRs could record a show at a specific time to VHS (but mostly failed for one reason or another)? Well, Tivo meant to fix that. We did an episode on them a couple of years ago but we skipped the term Tivoization and the impact they had on GPL. As the 90s came to a close, VA Linux and Red Hat went through great IPOs, bringing about an era where open source could mean big business. And true to the cause, they shared enough stock with Linus Torvalds to make him a millionaire as well. And IBM pumped a billion dollars into open source, with Sun moving to open source openoffice.org. Now, what really happened there might be that by then Microsoft had become too big for anyone to effectively compete with and so they all tried to pivot around to find a niche, but it still benefited the world and open source in general. By Y2K there was a rapidly growing number of vendors out there putting Linux kernels onto embedded devices. TiVo happened to be one of the most visible. Some in the Linux community felt like they were being taken advantage of because suddenly you had a vendor making changes to the kernel but their changes only worked on their hardware and they blocked users from modifying the software. So The Free Software Foundation updated GPL, bundling in some other minor changes and we got the GNU General Public License (Version 3) in 2006. There was a lot more in GPL 3, given that so many organizations were involved in open source software by then. Here, the full license text and original copyright notice had to be included along with a statement of significant changes and making source code available with binaries. And commercial Unix variants struggled with SGI going bankrupt in 2006 and use of AIX and HP-UX Many of these open source projects flourished because of version control systems and the web. SourceForge was created by VA Software in 1999 and is a free service that can be used to host open source projects. Concurrent Versions System, or CVS had been written by Dick Grune back in 1986 and quickly became a popular way to have multiple developers work on projects, merging diffs of code repositories. That gave way to git in the hearts of many a programmer after Linus Torvalds wrote a new versioning system called git in 2005. GitHub came along in 2008 and was bought by Microsoft in 2018 for 2018. Seeing a need for people to ask questions about coding, Stack Overflow was created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky in 2008. Now, we could trade projects on one of the versioning tools, get help with projects or find smaller snippets of sample code on Stack Overflow, or even Google random things (and often find answers on Stack Overflow). And so social coding became a large part of many a programmers day. As did dependency management, given how many tools are used to compile a modern web app or app. I often wonder how much of the code in many of our favorite tools is actually original. Another thought is that in an industry dominated by white males, it's no surprise that we often gloss over previous contributions. It was actually Grace Hopper's A-2 compiler that was the first software that was released freely with source for all the world to adapt. Sure, you needed a UNIVAC to run it, and so it might fall into the mainframe era and with the emergence of minicomputers we got Digital Equipment's DECUS for sharing software, leading in part to the PDP-inspired need for source that Stallman was so adamant about. General Motors developed SHARE Operating System for the IBM 701 and made it available through the IBM user group called SHARE. The ARPAnet was free if you could get to it. TeX from Donald Knuth was free. The BASIC distribution from Dartmouth was academic and yet Microsoft sold it for up to $100,000 a license (see Commodore ). So it's no surprise that people avoided paying upstarts like Microsoft for their software or that it took until the late 70s to get copyright legislation and common law. But Hopper's contributions were kinda' like open source v1, the work from RMS to Linux was kinda' like open source v2, and once the term was coined and we got the rise of a name and more social coding platforms from SourceForge to git, we moved into a third version of the FOSS movement. Today, some tools are free, some are open source, some are free as in beer (as you find in many a gist), some are proprietary. All are valid. Today there are also about as many licenses as there are programmers putting software out there. And here's the thing, they're all valid. You see, every creator has the right to restrict the ability to copy their software. After all, it's their intellectual property. Anyone who chooses to charge for their software is well within their rights. Anyone choosing to eschew commercialization also has that right. And every derivative in between. I wouldn't judge anyone based on any model those choose. Just as those who distribute proprietary software shouldn't be judged for retaining their rights to do so. Why not just post things we want to make free? Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all a part of intellectual property - but as developers of tools we also need to limit our liability as we're probably not out there buying large errors and omissions insurance policies for every script or project we make freely available. Also, we might want to limit the abuse of our marks. For example, Linus Torvalds monitors the use of the Linux mark through the Linux Mark Institute. Apparently some William Dell Croce Jr tried to register the Linux trademark in 1995 and Torvalds had to sue to get it back. He provides use of the mark using a free and perpetual global sublicense. Given that his wife won the Finnish karate championship six times I wouldn't be messing with his trademarks. Thank you to all the creators out there. Thank you for your contributions. And thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. Have a great day.

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better
Episode 311: We Break, You Fix

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:50


We cover a wide range of tech news in this episode and spend quite a while discussing what Amazon says are the hottest tech gifts of 2021, listen in to see if you agree. Followup:   Vizio makes twice as much profit on ads, subscriptions, and data (02:10) Standard eBooks (04:25) We missed the NFT.NYC conference (06:00) Dave's Pro Tip of the Week: Translate text with a tap (07:35) Takes:  Apple launching do-it-yourself repair program for iPhones (12:00) Amazon announces hottest tech gifts of 2021 (15:55) IBM launches 127-qubit Eagle quantum processor (26:05) Hoax email blast abused poor coding in FBI website (27:15) Robinhood data breach (28:00) Bonus Odd Take: Scan of the month: Minifig (30:30) Picks of the Week:  Dave: TORRO Magnetic Case Compatible with iPad Mini 6th Gen 2021 - Genuine Leather Cover with [Multiple Viewing Angles] [Wake/Sleep Enabled] (Black) (32:05) Nate: Ocenaudio free audio editor (35:20) Find us elsewhere: https://www.notnerd.com https://ratethispodcast.com/notnerd https://www.tiktok.com/@notnerdpod https://www.twitter.com/n0tnerd/ https://www.instagram.com/n0tnerd https://www.facebook.com/n0tnerd/ info@Notnerd.com Call or text 608.618.NERD(6373) If you would like to help support Notnerd financially, mentally, or physically, please contact us via any of the methods above. Consider any product/app links to be affiliate links.

Author's Note : Don't Like, Don't Listen
Click Clack Down the Desk - Mechanical Keyboards with Nica

Author's Note : Don't Like, Don't Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 94:48


We brought back Nica to talk about their love of MKs (that's mechanical keyboards (and also membrane keyboards, but we mean mechanical here (yes, it's confusing. we know. we're sorry.)))! If you've got someone in your life diving into the hobby, Nica is here to share a wealth of knowledge to get you started in understanding all the intricate little info about these clickity clackity boys. Find Nica on Twitter and on TumblrRESOURCES & MENTIONABLESCompilation and Comparison video of Key Switch SoundsBeginner Guide and Catalogue Keeb Subreddit KBS Keyboard SimulatorKeyboard Simulator XYZYou can find us on twitter @authorsnotepod and contact us via authorsnotepod@gmail.comFor information about us, pitching yourself for a guest spot, and more, visit www.authorsnotepod.comIf you're interested in supporting this podcast, please consider joining our patreon for exclusive bonuses or donating via our ko-fiOur theme music is by James YaiulloOur cover art is by @nyalliest

Morning Fire!
Using Crisis to Pivot with Drew Neisser

Morning Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:29


On today's podcast I have CEO and Founder of Renegade, Drew NeisserUniquely wired as both strategist and writer, Drew has helped dozens of CMOs unleash their inner renegade and told the stories of over 450 marketers via the #2 podcast for CMOs called Renegade Thinkers Unite, a live-streaming show on LinkedIn called Renegade Thinkers Live, his CMO Spotlight column for AdAge, and his 1st book The CMO's Periodic Table: A Renegade's Guide to Marketing.His 2nd book, Renegade Marketing: 12 Steps to Building Unbeatable B2B Brands recently launched and is out now. Considered among the top B2B influencers by Adobe/Marketo, Gartner, IBM and Pega Systems, Drew has been a featured marketing expert on ABC News, CNBC, CBS Radio and Tony Robbins' podcast among many others. A frequent keynote speaker and moderator at industry conferences, Drew is deeply passionate about the role marketing can play to make our lives a bit better if not save the planet. Have a listen!Where to find Drew:https://renegade.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/drewneisser/

Twins Talk it Up Podcast
Twins Talk it Up Episode 72: Leadership Insights for Partner Growth

Twins Talk it Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:25


We welcome a thought leader within the Vendor & Managed Services Providers space to the program. Jay McBain is the Principal Analyst of Channels, Partnerships & Ecosystems for Forrester. Jay is a highly sought-after speaker, author and has received numerous accolades, including being named as the 2021 Channel Influencer of the Year by Channel Partners Magazine. We ask Jay to share how the pandemic has and will continue to impact the tech channel community. His research certainly piques curiosity from all sectors as he identifies trends and shares fascinating content on channels, partnerships, and ecosystems. Jay touches on the importance of understanding influence and why we should be aware of the numerous social media groups/tools including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Clubhouse and how this can increase engagement with buyers and partnerships.Jay states that there is a major demographic shift taking place as the majority of technology buyers will be millennials, which indicates a need for understanding the psychology and behavior of purchasing habits of this digital age. We had to ask Jay about his own growth as a speaker. He shares a lesson he learned early in his career while at IBM, that people will forget what you told them, forget what you showed them and even forget you, so get over yourself. Focus instead on connectivity, energy and perhaps the 1 or 2 points that will resonate.To learn more about Jay, his work or to inquire about his speaking availability, visit https://go.forrester.com/blogs/author/jay_mcbain/ and http://jaymcbain.com/Be sure to Support and Follow us by Subscribing & Downloading.--- more ---If you are looking to learn the art of audience engagement while listening for methods to conquer speaking anxiety, deliver persuasive presentations, and close more deals, then this is the podcast for you.Twins Talk it Up is a podcast where identical twin brothers Danny Suk Brown and David Suk Brown discuss leadership communication strategies to support professionals who believe in the power of their own authentic voice. Together, we will explore tips and tools to increase both your influence and value. Along the way, let's crush some goals, deliver winning sales pitches, and enjoy some laughs.Danny Suk Brown and David Suk Brown train on speaking and presentation skills. They also share from their keynote entitled, “Identically Opposite: the Pursuit of Identity”.Support and Follow us:YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCL18KYXdzVdzEwMH8uwLf6gInstagram: @twinstalkitupInstagram: @dsbleadershipgroupTwitter: @dsbleadershipLinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/twins-talk-it-up/LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/dsbleadershipgroup/Facebook: facebook.com/TwinsTalkitUpFacebook: facebook.com/dsbleadership/Website: dsbleadershipgroup.com/TwinsTalkitUp

Square Pizza
#73 - Lydia Logan, Vice President for Education and Workforce Development, CSR at IBM

Square Pizza

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:32


We are excited to bring you this episode of the #squarepizzapod. This week, Greg is in conversation with Lydia Logan, Vice President for Global Education and Workforce Development, Corporate Social Responsibility at IBM. She serves as the global lead for IBM's education and workforce development initiatives.In this episode:Family background within education  Her vision of effective philanthropy and social-impact work from the corporate sideSkilling 30M jobs by 2030IBM's apprenticeship program being recognized by the department of laborSkills-build Now - programFavorite professional failureBio:        Lydia Logan is the Vice President for Education and Workforce Development, CSR. She is responsible for leading the strategy, development, and end-to-end execution of IBM's global education and workforce development initiatives which include P-TECH, IBM SkillsBuild and STEM for Girls. Her portfolio also includes the development of new and innovative education initiatives and strategic global partnerships with IBM's clients, non-profit organizations, governments, and content and curriculum developers. She is an education expert with over 25 years of experience in education, non-profit organization management, policy, and philanthropy.          Prior to joining IBM, she led the Verizon Innovative Learning Schools initiative. A national digital inclusion initiative providing technology, access and training in over 500 under-resourced public schools. Lydia also served as the vice president of programs for the Kimsey Foundation, where her grant portfolio focused on improving educational outcomes for students in under-resourced public schools and closing the digital divide for low-income families. Lydia holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. To learn more about IBMSupport the show (http://Scherm.co)

Data Protection Gumbo
121: Why Tape is Here to Stay - Modern Day Tape Enthusiast

Data Protection Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:25


Rob Turk, aka the Modern Day Tape Enthusiast provides us with a brief history of the use of tape, who the players are that's still in the game of the tape industry, and some advice on utilizing tape to combat ransomware.

Software Developer's Journey
#178 Aviv Ben-Yosef is a tech leader who went through a lifelong experience pressure cooker

Software Developer's Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:53


Aviv took us back to his childhood, discovering PCs and learning how to code on his own. We then talked about his time in the army, applying for and then working in Unit-8200. We talked about purpose and how it was to do meaningful work. We then talked about his time at IBM and how disappointing it was. Aviv then told us about his growth from a first engineer to leader inside a startup and how it encouraged him to go freelance. We finally discussed how he realized that he could play a role in advising and coaching executives.Here are the links from the show:https://www.twitter.com/avivbyhttps://avivbenyosef.com/tech-executive-operating-systemCreditsCover Campfire Rounds by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed CC BY-NC-ND 4.0.Your host is Timothée (Tim) Bourguignon, more about him at timbourguignon.fr.Gift the podcast a rating on one of the significant platforms https://devjourney.info/subscribeSupport the podcast, support us on Patreon: https://bit.ly/devjpatreonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/timbourguignon)

Waters Wavelength
Episode 244: IBM's Likhit Wagle on modernizing mainframes

Waters Wavelength

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:51


This week, we have a return guest on the podcast. Likhit Wagle, general manager of global banking and financial markets at IBM, joins Tony to discuss mainframe modernization and its importance, particularly since it will be a while before banks put a substantial portion of their mission-critical workloads onto the public cloud. 5:00 –Wagle joins the podcast and details why it's necessary to consider mainframe modernization efforts. 8:30 – He says banks need to prioritize which applications should be modernized and rationalized. 10:00 – It will take some time before banks put a substantial chunk of particularly mission-critical workloads onto the public cloud. 11:00 – Firms want to be cloud native. Why is it important to modernize mainframes if the end goal is to move away from them? 15:00 – Wagle says the winning strategy is a hybrid strategy—public, private, on-prem. 16:30 – Then, he walks through IBM's latest z15 mainframe, and the new version, which will come out in early 2022. 18:00 – Where do mainframes fit into the AI and analytics ecosystem that banks and asset managers want to leverage? 22:30 – Will there be an even split between public cloud, private cloud and mainframe? 25:00 – Then, they discuss how quantum computing impacts the idea of mainframes, public and private cloud. 28:30 – More banks are preferring buy versus build. Does that software sit on the public cloud?

Relay FM Master Feed
Flashback 23: IBM's Search for an Operating System

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:06


With its PC built, IBM needed to find an operating system that would run on it. Its choice would change the computer industry forever.

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast
Thanksgiving with OGGN, ep 251

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:38


Welcome to the Oil and Gas This Week podcast — brought to you by IBM on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. Paige takes a break while Mark and Michael fill in with a special holiday episode. Don't forget to ask a question for our next First Friday Q&A. You ask the questions and we answer them.  Have a question? Click here to ask. The Weekly Rig Count by Baker Hughes https://rigcount.bakerhughes.com/rig-count-overview  IBM Giveaway — Enter to Win Here! Sign-up for your chance to win a T-shirt with a unique serial number. This means each shirt is different making it an awesome collector's item! Plus it comes inside an official OGGN insulated tumbler. At the end of the year we will have a drawing to win our grand prize! This will be a pool of all of the serial numbers on the t-shirts! The grand prize will be announced a bit later in the year! More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Paige Wilson LinkedIn Mark LaCour Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

Opinion Science
#51: Debate with Harish Natarajan, Dan Zafrir, & Noa Ovadia

Opinion Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:44


This episode follows up on the previous episode of Opinion Science about IBM's Project Debater. If you haven't already, be sure to check out that episode.But this week we hear more from Harish Natarajan, Dan Zafrir, and Noa Ovadia--three accomplished debaters. They'll share how they got into debate, what debate means to them, and why the exercise of debate is so important.In the opening section of the episode, we hear a quick clip from social psychologist Richard Petty. And the study I summarize is from a working paper by Peter Schwardmann, Egon Tripodi, and Joël J. van der Weele.Music in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue).For a transcript of this episode, visit: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/debate-with-harish-natarajan-dan-zafrir-noa-ovadia/Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.

Que se vayan todos
Aburrido 132

Que se vayan todos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 92:49


Austria se lanza de lleno en las medidas que nadie había querido imponer en el mundo occidental, me preocupa cuando la vanguardia es austriaca… Y en Holanda las orgías ahora son de violencia según el alcalde de Rotterdam.. En el tercer mundo la esperanza es de primera y en el primero escasea… Bezos ayuda a limpiar las calles, de gente sin hogar… Y Amazon no sabe muy bien dónde están tus datos pero comprate este pendrive ahora vale… Para los que se ríen del Metaverso hay unos datos no tan virtuales… El río de la expansión china trae más piedras que antes aunque suene menos… El procesador cuántico de IBM es increíble ahora solo tenemos que decidir qué hacer con él… por ejemplo predecir las drogas de diseño del próximo verano… Todo el mundo se ríó de la demanda de AMLO a los Estados Unidos menos la Smith and Wesson… Y porqué es justo sacar un rifle en medio de una turba si eres menor de edad… Chile listo para mandar la batiseñal a América Latina… Un activista que le enseña a los españoles a dejar de ser románticos… joder… Los aliados de USA entre los menos democráticos… Y los gobiernos se preparan para meterse más esteroides y bebidas de proteínas… Murdoch y el arte de hacerse el pendejo… Y EN EL EXTRA católicos, jesuitas, musulmanes y gays. ESENCIALES https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/17/upshot/global-survey-optimism.html . https://www.economist.com/leaders/dont-mock-the-metaverse/21806354 . https://www.economist.com/briefing/2021/11/20/governments-are-not-going-to-stop-getting-bigger COMPLEMENTARIOS https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/11/19/world/covid-vaccine-boosters-mandates#covid-austria-lockdown . https://www.euronews.com/2021/11/19/police-fire-warning-shots-during-protests-against-dutch-covid-measures . https://www.morningstar.com/news/marketwatch/20211119345/jeff-bezos-giving-nearly-100-million-to-groups-serving-homeless-families . https://revealnews.org/article/inside-amazons-failures-to-protect-your-data-internal-voyeurs-bribery-schemes-and-backdoor-access/ . https://www.economist.com/the-world-ahead/2021/11/08/chinese-firms-are-quietly-pursuing-a-new-global-strategy . https://apnews.com/article/business-china-europe-serbia-pollution-67431ad5f51b553357911dea24c70359 . https://www.xataka.com/investigacion/ibm-presenta-eagle-su-procesador-cuantico-127-qubits-imposible-simularlo-cualquier-otra-cosa . https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/entrenan-a-ia-para-detectar-drogas-diseno-puede-predecir-incluso-cuales-probables-que-entren-circulacion . https://www.infobae.com/america/mexico/2021/11/18/demanda-de-mexico-provoco-desplome-en-la-bolsa-de-empresas-armamentistas/ . https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-53934109 . https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/11/19/political-shakeup-on-horizon-as-chile-to-elect-new-president . https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/11/18/dissident-vows-return-to-cuba-after-landing-in-spain . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIcyzYh8FTE . https://www.nytimes.com/es/2021/11/18/espanol/usa-aliados-democracia.html . EXTRA https://www.ncregister.com/blog/jesuit-scholar-seeking-to-defend-islam-at-all-costs-is-betraying-the-truth . https://www.nytimes.com/es/2021/11/16/espanol/opinion/iglesia-catolica-gay.html

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Understanding the Rise of Technosocialism, with author Brett King

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 37:35


Jamil catches up with Irish Tech News favourite Brett King Brett King is an International Bestselling Author, a world- renowned futurist and media personality. President Xi Jinping cited his book Augmented. He has spoken in over 50 countries, given keynotes for TEDx, Wired, Techsauce, Singularity University, Web Summit, The Economist, IBM's World of Watson, CES, SIBOS and more. He has appeared on CNBC, BBC, ABC, Fox, and Bloomberg. He advised the Obama administration on Fintech. King hosts the world's #1 Fintech Radio Show/Podcast called Breaking Banks (180 countries, 6.5 million listeners). He is the founder of Moven, a globally recognized mobile start-up, which has raised over US$40 million to date, and launched the first in-app mobile bank account offered anywhere in the world. Banking Exchange named him the King of the Disruptors, he was nominated as American Bankers Innovator of the Year, voted the world's #1 Financial Services Influencer by The Financial Brand and listed by Bank Innovation as one of the top 10 coolest brands in banking. King was shortlisted for the Advance Global Australian of the Year for being one of the most influential Australians offshore. His book Augmented: Life in the Smart Lane, was a top-10 non-fiction book in North America. Bank 4.0 remained a global bestseller in banking more than 12 months after release. The Rise of Technosocialism, is his 7th book Jamil Hasan is a crypto and blockchain focused podcast host at the Irish Tech News and spearheads our weekend content “The Crypto Corner” where he interviews founders, entrepreneurs and global thought leaders. Prior to his endeavors into the crypto-verse in July 2017, Jamil built an impressive career as a data, operations, financial, technology and business analyst and manager in Corporate America, including twelve years at American International Group and its related companies. Since entering the crypto universe, Jamil has been an advisor, entrepreneur, investor and author. His books “Blockchain Ethics: A Bridge to Abundance” (2018) and “Re-Generation X” (2020) not only discuss the benefits of blockchain technology, but also capture Jamil's experience on how he has transitioned from being a loyal yet downsized former corporate employee to a self sovereign individual. With over ninety podcasts under his belt since he joined our team in February 2021, and with four years of experience both managing his own crypto portfolio and providing crypto guidance and counsel to select clients, Jamil continues to seek opportunities to help others navigate this still nascent industry. Jamil's primary focus outside of podcast hosting is helping former corporate employees gain the necessary skills and vision to build their own crypto portfolios and create wealth for the long-term.

The Truthzilla Podcast
Truthzilla Swapcast - NY Patriot Show (AUDIO FIXED)

The Truthzilla Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 68:13


What's up everybody! Had an awesome conversation with NY Patriot on his "NY Patriot" Show. You've also heard NY Patriot on the epic show "Occult Rejects". We get into vaccine passports, compare notes on the tyranny we are living under, IBM's involvement in the Holocaust and escaping a secret society. Enjoy! Follow and support NY Patriot here: Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCSx-m3eH1hWBfvSKLS_6FKg Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/15MXajuYMN1AXYx59j4rkt Apple Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-ny-patriot/id1545014664 Rumble https://rumble.com/user/NyPatriot1978 Bitchute https://bitchute.com/channel/NQ2Iu5MTfFGO/ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@NyPatriot:2 Gab https://gab.com/NyPatriot1978 instagram https://instagram.com/nypatriot1978/ How to Follow and Support the Truthzilla Podcast: WEBSITE: https://Truthzilla.org ORIGINAL SHIRTS: https://Truthzilla.org/shirts VALUE-FOR-VALUE: https://Truthzilla.org/Donate CROWDFUNDING: https://GiveSendGo.com/NoVaxx PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/Truthzilla MONTHLY RE-OCCURING DONATION https://BuyMeACoffee.com/Truthzilla PAYPAL: https://PayPal.me/Truthzilla CASHAPP: $Truthzilla VENMO: $Truthzilla ROKFIN: https://Rokfin.com/Truthzilla TELEGRAM: @Truthzillapod https://t.me/truthzillapod DISCORD: https://discord.gg/WQTstB4YbB **************** This Episode Brought To You By Our Sponsors https://TruthTRS.com - Start your Heavy Metal Detox Journey today!   @Codys_Crystals on Instagram - Your source for the COOLEST crystals ever, you gotta go check it out! **************** Join our {Patreon} for ]PREMIUM] Audio episodes: https://www.patreon.com/Truthzilla   https://Rokfin.com/Truthzilla Create a FREE account and watch all our videos on Rokfin.com. We get crypto just for your clicks! Become a subscriber and you get exclusive PREMIUM content from Truthzilla and EVERY other content creator on the site!  https://Rokfin.com/Truthzilla   Support Truthzilla and your personal health by shopping with our friends, Chemical Free Body:  https://chemicalfreebody.com/?ref=Truthzilla Lose Weight, Transform your Health and take Your Fitness to the Next Level!  

The E-Spot With Camille
Javier Leiva on The E-Spot with Camille #315

The E-Spot With Camille

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:32


Javier Leiva is a Mid-south Emmy award-winning producer and writer. He is also the creator and host of Pretend Radio, a documentary-style podcast about people pretending to be someone else. Javier has also worked in marketing and advertising for more than 15 years. He started his career producing documentaries and television news. He quickly transitioned to marketing and has created content for some of the biggest brands in the world: Red Hat, FedEx, AutoZone, IBM, and Hilton. Today, he's a Digital Associate Creative Director at Red Hat in Raleigh, NC. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/camillekauer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/camillekauer/support

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast
Oil and Gas This Week – Nov 15 2021, ep 250

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:48


Welcome to the Oil and Gas This Week podcast — brought to you by IBM on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. World Petroleum Conference   Don't forget to ask a question for our next First Friday Q&A. You ask the questions and we answer them.  Have a question? Click here to ask. The Weekly Rig Count by Baker Hughes https://rigcount.bakerhughes.com/rig-count-overview  IBM Giveaway — Enter to Win Here! Sign-up for your chance to win a T-shirt with a unique serial number. This means each shirt is different making it an awesome collector's item! Plus it comes inside an official OGGN insulated tumbler. At the end of the year we will have a drawing to win our grand prize! This will be a pool of all of the serial numbers on the t-shirts! The grand prize will be announced a bit later in the year! More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Paige Wilson LinkedIn Mark LaCour Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
More than Just Consulting: The Security Side of IBM

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 20:19


You likely know IBM for the big blue logo. They're masters at technology consulting all over the globe. But did you know that they're also the largest enterprise cybersecurity provider on the planet? Helping analyze over 2 trillion security events per day? With over 8,000 security-specific employees? On this episode of B2B Tech Talk, Brendon Munn, the Channel Sales Leader for IBM North America, talks all about the ways that IBM can help keep your business safe, whether you have 5 employees or 50,000. Some things we discussed: - The 4 core competencies that make up IBM security services - The challenges facing business today and how IBM can help - How IBM can help not just enterprise companies, but SMBs as well - His thoughts on where technology is headed in the next year To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

New Scientist Weekly
#94: IBM's huge quantum computer, Russia's anti-satellite weapon, the verdict on COP26, AI predicting the next legal highs

New Scientist Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:42


The race for quantum supremacy continues, with IBM setting a new benchmark for processing power. But the new supercomputer hasn't actually demonstrated its capabilities just yet - so will it really beat its competitors? The team shares the latest. They also report on Russia's ‘dangerous' anti-satellite weapon test, which sent fragments of satellite hurtling towards the International Space Station. They hear from founder of the popular science YouTube channel Kurzgesagt, Philipp Dettmer, about his new book Immune: A Journey into the Mysterious System That Keeps You Alive. As the dust starts to settle following COP26 in Glasgow, the team reflects on the progress that has been made - providing countries stick to their pledges. And there's a story about an AI drug detective, which has been trained to help keep “legal highs” off the market. On the pod are Penny Sarchet, Timothy Revell, Matthew Sparkes, Leah Crane, Chelsea Whyte and Conrad Quility-Harper. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido
Ep342: Misil Antisatélite; Agujero Negro Discutido; Computación Cuántica; Planeta 9; Gravedad Cuántica

Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 153:39


La tertulia semanal en la que repasamos las últimas noticias de la actualidad científica. En el episodio de hoy: Rusia destruye un satélite (min 7:00); El cuestionado descubrimiento de un agujero negro (25:00); Colaboración ProAm (1:05:00); IBM anuncia avances en computación cuántica (1:10:00); Buscando el Planeta 9 en datos de IRAS (1:29:30); Métricas complejas y la cuantización de la gravedad (1:54:00); Señales de los oyentes (2:16:00). Contertulios: Gastón Giribet, Ángel López Sánchez, Francis Villatoro, Héctor Socas. Todos los comentarios vertidos durante la tertulia representan únicamente la opinión de quien los hace... y a veces ni eso. CB:SyR es una actividad del Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos de Tenerife.

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast
Four Key Tools for Robust Enterprise NLP with Yunyao Li - #537

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:01


Today we're joined by Yunyao Li, a senior research manager at IBM Research.  Yunyao is in a somewhat unique position at IBM, addressing the challenges of enterprise NLP in a traditional research environment, while also having customer engagement responsibilities. In our conversation with Yunyao, we explore the challenges associated with productizing NLP in the enterprise, and if she focuses on solving these problems independent of one another, or through a more unified approach.  We then ground the conversation with real-world examples of these enterprise challenges, including enabling level document discovery at scale using combinations of techniques like deep neural networks and supervised and/or unsupervised learning, and entity extraction and semantic parsing to identify text. Finally, we talk through data augmentation in the context of NLP, and how we enable the humans in-the-loop to generate high-quality data. The complete show notes for this episode can be found at twimlai.com/go/537

Catalog & Cocktails
Long live the monolith? w/ Andy Palmer from Tamr

Catalog & Cocktails

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:41


It wasn't that long ago that enterprise software was dominated by proprietary data architectures from the likes of IBM, Oracle, and SAP. Once you made a selection, you were stuck with it for better or worse, in sickness and in health. But that's not the case today. The methodical movement towards resilient, open SaaS applications and best-of-breed tools has ushered in the era of DataOps buoyed by the “modern data stack.” But, is this a good thing? Join Tim, Juan and special guest Andy Palmer, CEO of Tamr, to talk open vs. closed ecosystems and how to decide what's right for you. This episode will feature: How DataOps will reshape the next wave of best-of-breed systems Will monoliths make a comeback? What was a big purchase you made that you almost immediately regretted?

TechStuff
How a human-centered approach is building trustworthy AI.

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:48


Creating trust and transparency in AI isn't just a business requirement, it's a social responsibility. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Christina Montgomery, IBM's Chief Privacy Officer and AI Ethics Board Co-Chair, and Dr. Seth Dobrin, Global Chief AI Officer, about IBM's approach to AI and how it's helping businesses transform the way they work with AI systems that are fair and address bias so AI can benefit everyone, not just a few. This is a paid advertisement from IBM. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
421: What Makes a Good Leader in 2021 (with David Bradford)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:02


Welcome to an episode with the Eugene O'Kelly II Senior Lecturer Emeritus in Leadership at Stanford Graduate School of Business, David Bradford. Get David's new book here: https://amzn.to/3lAmUhi David Bradford is one of the two researchers behind Stanford's most popular class: Interpersonal Dynamics, where students and leaders learn how to greatly improve personal and professional relationships. He has produced six books, numerous articles, three training programs, and a massive open online course on leadership, team performance, and the influence process. He has worked with and helped some of the biggest companies in the world including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco Systems, IBM, Levi Strauss, Raychem, etc. He is currently a member of the Editorial Boards of the Academy of Management Learning & Education, the Journal of Applied  Behavioral Science, and the Journal of Management Education. In this episode, David talked about how leaders can shift their way of thinking and have a better approach to managing their organizations. For those leaders who want to learn how to solve their companies' biggest problems, this is for you. CONNECT: Building Exceptional Relationships with Family, Friends, and Colleagues. David Bradford & Carole Robin: https://amzn.to/3lAmUhi Enjoying our podcast? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo We use affiliate links whenever possible (if you purchase items listed above using our affiliate links, we will get a bonus).

Stuff To Blow Your Mind
Smart Talks with IBM and Malcolm Gladwell: How a Human-Centered Approach is Building Trustworthy AI

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:48


Creating trust and transparency in AI isn't just a business requirement, it's a social responsibility. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Christina Montgomery, IBM's Chief Privacy Officer and AI Ethics Board Co-Chair, and Dr. Seth Dobrin, Global Chief AI Officer, about IBM's approach to AI and how it's helping businesses transform the way they work with AI systems that are fair and address bias so AI can benefit everyone, not just a few. This is a paid advertisement from IBM. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 65: Disappearing Cities, Drive-Thru Robots, & a 1,200-Year-Old Canoe

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 79:28


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Keybilly Amber Ale from Lakeland, Florida, and gives a review of her fantastic weekend at The Villages in Florida with a shoutout to the JW Marriott in Orlando for having a cool lazy river pool that she spent more time in than she'd planned to. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Brach's Turkey Dinner Candy Corn, which she describes the smell as “candy corn on steroids” and doesn't actually think it tastes anything like turkey dinner OR candy corn. She moves on to taste Pringles Ranch Crisps, which she absolutely loves. She finishes her tasting menu with the limited edition Holiday Chocolate-Covered Ritz Crackers, which isn't her thing but she also thinks would wow guests at a Midwest holiday party. KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen gives an update on the Court, showcasing her new Dolly Parton holiday spatula and Holly Dolly holiday cookie cutter set from Williams Sonoma, which she intends to use while baking Christmas cookies with her nieces. UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on LAX's “Jetpack Guy,” new QAnon's conspiracy theories, the golden parachute of WeWork's Adam Neumann, the Colorado elk's liberation from his tire necklace, and the latest in the Elizabeth Holmes trial. NEW ORLEANS IS SINKING: Kathleen reads an article outlining the Climate Central project, which creates maps that show the impact of flooding due to rising sea levels. The project identifies specific cities around the globe that could find themselves underwater as early as 2030, based on the most reliable climate-change data from IPCC. MCDONALD'S ROBOTIC DRIVE-THRU: Kathleen shares McDonald's new drive-thru concept utilizing robots. The fast-food chain announced that it has a strategic partnership with IBM to develop artificial intelligence technology that will help McDonald's automate its drive-thru lanes to increase speed and volume. The concept was recently testedin the Chicago market, with evaluation and a potential roll-out strategy still in the works. FACEBOOK'S METAVERSE TROUBLES: Kathleen laughs when sharing an article outlining the Facebook rebranding efforts that have already failed within a few weeks of the launch, as the new company name “Meta” has been proven to already exist before the Zuckerberg team filed their trademark request. Meta PC has been a company for over a year, but only recently filed for a trademark on the name. Filing takes time to process so neither company has been granted the trademark yet, but Meta PC was the first to file and has offered to cancel their trademark request if Facebook is willing to pay them $20 million.ANCIENT CANOE DISCOVERED IN WISCONSIN: Kathleen is excited to read a news release out of Wisconsin where a dugout canoe thought to be 1,200 years old has been retrieved from Lake Mendota.Historians believe that dugout canoes are most likely the earliest forms of constructed watercraft in the world.MEET POLIO PAUL: Kathleen shares an article about a Texas man named Paul Alexander, who has been confined to an iron lung for over 70 years since contracting polio at the age of 6. Alexander states that he has had a fulfilling life, becoming a lawyer specializing in fighting for patient rights and promoting vaccination efficiency. Kathleen shares her own childhood stories regarding how vaccinations were handled in their Catholic school.SITTING BULL'S GRANDSON CONFIRMED: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article confirming that a South Dakota man who has maintained for decades that he is the great-grandson of the legendary leader Sitting Bull has confirmed his lineage through DNA analysis. A lock of the famous Lakota chief‘s hair once stored at the Smithsonian Institution was used to confirm the claim, Reuters.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

50 años del Intel 4004 / APU Aerith para Steam Deck / Asus tira de gráficas viejas / Huawei tiene un plan para saltarse las sanciones / Tensión en la Estación Espacial / Spotify se mete en los audiolibros Patrocinador: La gala de premios Huawei Next Image son el mayor concurso de fotografía móvil https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ del mundo. Más de dos millones de personas de todo el mundo han participado, y este año viene con más premios que nunca. — Las inscripciones están abiertas https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ hasta el 30 de noviembre, y puedes participar en múltiples categorías. Si algún lector gana que lo comparta conmigo, ¿eh? 50 años del Intel 4004 / APU Aerith para Steam Deck / Asus tira de gráficas viejas / Huawei tiene un plan para saltarse las sanciones / Tensión en la Estación Espacial / Spotify se mete en los audiolibros

Helping Sells Radio
312 Sasi Yajamanyam Reimagining customer success

Helping Sells Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 55:41


Sasi Yajamanyam is the director of customer success strategy and operations at ServiceNow and author of Reimagining customer success: Designing organizations around customer value. Sasi has an extensive career in customer facing roles from senior consulting and strategy roles at IBM and Freddie Mac to product management and customer success roles at the CEB (Corporate Executive Board). And now at ServiceNow.Sasi saw a problem with how customer success is being implemented, as a siloed department. Not as organization design. In his book he offers a framework for how companies can design their entire organization around customer success and customer value. More about Sasi:His book: https://www.amazon.com/Reimagine-Customer-Success-Designing-Organizations-ebook/dp/B09DX99TWD/ref=sr_1_1?crid=EQ5PQEIV0194&keywords=reimagine+customer+success&qid=1636682836&sprefix=reimagine+customer+success%2Caps%2C399&sr=8-1On Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sasiyajamanyam/ Subscribe at helpingsells.substack.com

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom

Marc Miller's career journey includes multiple jobs over 22 years at IBM, several thriving tech startups, a stint as a high school math teacher, and a gig raising funds. Often repeating the same mistakes taught him his most crucial lesson: Most people don't really know what makes them happy at their core, what fulfills them. Marc's latest endeavor “Career Pivot” uses his extensive experience to help others—especially Baby Boomers and GenXers—find careers they can grow into for the decades ahead.

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
Microsoft's End to End Excuses – DTNS 4152

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


We go in detail on the reasons why chip shortages will exist until next year. IBM announced its 127 qubit Eagle quantum chip, and Apple announced residents in eight US states to store digital state IDs and driver's license. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Stephanie Humphrey, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos. MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
Microsoft's End to End Excuses – DTNS 4152

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


We go in detail on the reasons why chip shortages will exist until next year. IBM announced its 127 qubit Eagle quantum chip, and Apple announced residents in eight US states to store digital state IDs and driver's license. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Stephanie Humphrey, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos. MP3 Download Using a ScreenContinue reading "Microsoft's End to End Excuses – DTNS 4152"

Daily Tech News Show
Microsoft's End to End Excuses - DTNS 4152

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:20


We go in detail on the reasons why chip shortages will exist until next year. IBM announced its 127 qubit Eagle quantum chip, and Apple announced residents in eight US states to store digital state IDs and driver's license.Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Stephanie Humphre, Roger Chang, Joe.Link to the Show Notes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Axios Today
Progressives worry about getting their spending agenda passed

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:44


House Democrats continue to push for a vote of that nearly two trillion dollar Build Back Better spending bill. After months of wrangling, no date has been set and passage of President Biden's massive agenda remains in question. So one question we're asking this morning is: Is all the momentum lost? Plus, IBM's quantum computing ambitions. And, Conclusions after the global climate summit. Guests: Axios' Hans Nichols, Ina Fried and Ben Geman. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Julia Redpath, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, and Jayk Cherry. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Progressives fearful as Biden plan pushed into December Exclusive: IBM achieves quantum computing breakthrough COP26 climate deal calls for historic shift from fossil fuels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices