Podcasts about Gatsby

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Best podcasts about Gatsby

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Latest podcast episodes about Gatsby

Nachlese - Alltag mit Barbara und Ralf
Nachlese 462 - Make a great Gatsby

Nachlese - Alltag mit Barbara und Ralf

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 7:44


Make a great Gatsby, mit unserem ältesten Enkel, der zu den jüngsten Schauspielhausbesuchern zählt und Ralf, der eher zu den Ältesten zählt eine weit gespannte Interessengruppe mit viel Applaus für die gelungene Premiere

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

In this Hasty Treat, Scott and Wes talk about Remix! Sponsor - Sanity Sanity.io is a real-time headless CMS with a fully customizable Content Studio built in React. Get a Sanity powered site up and running in minutes at sanity.io/create. Get an awesome supercharged free developer plan on sanity.io/syntax. Sponsor - Sentry If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Show Notes 00:32 Rrrremix Remix 02:03 Sponsor: Sentry 03:48 Sponsor: Sentry 05:51 What is Remix? 07:51 Built on Fetch 12:28 Frameworks are getting so good 13:30 Data loading 14:36 Actions 19:09 Error boundary and catch boundary differences 20:15 Differences between Remix and Gatsby, and other SSG 21:33 What about hot reloading? 22:47 Nested layouts and nested routes 24:25 Typescript support 26:33 Hosting anywhere Remix Docs Remix on GitHub Remix on Twitter Remix on YouTube Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

That's my JAMstack
S3E2 - Salma Alam-Naylor on shipping, learning, and rendering in the Jamstack

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:58


Our Guest: Salma Alam-Naylor What she'd like for you to see: Unbreak.tech Her JAMstack Jams: All the amazing rendering options! Her musical Jam: Move On by Emily Vaughn Grant (pay special attention at 1:47 in the track for the double tracked bass!) Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello Hello everyone. Welcome to another JAM PACKED Jamstack episode. This is That's My Jamstack the podcast where we ask the best question since sliced bread. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host Brian Robinson and this week, we have a very special guest. I'm pleased to introduce the winner of the Jamstack community creator award from Jamstack Conf 2021 Salma Alam-Naylor. Salma helps developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. She does that via her Twitch streams, YouTube channel and blog. One quick update for the episode, we recorded this prior to Salma joining the Netlify team. So while we mentioned Contentful, in various parts of the episode, Sam is now on the DX team at Netlify. Bryan Robinson 1:04 Alright, Salma, well, thanks for joining us on the show today. Salma Alam-Naylor 1:06 Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:08 Awesome. So tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? What do you do for fun, Salma Alam-Naylor 1:13 I am currently a developer advocate for Contentful. I've also got like kind of other stuff that you do. So you might know me on the internet as white Panther. And I help developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. I write educational blog posts about web development. I do a lot of live streaming on Twitch, I make YouTube content. And I'm an all round Jamstack enthusiast To be honest, for fun, I mean, I kind of do that for fun as well. But if you want to know about non web dev stuff, I actually love interior design. And I'm moving in the next like two months. So hopefully, when people hear this, they would have actually finally moved house. So I can't wait to get my hand stuck in to that little project. I also like to play cerebral puzzle games with my husband on on a computer, most recently, a game called Super liminal, which is all about like perspective and maths and stuff. It's very good. Bryan Robinson 2:19 I'm gonna jump in real fast. I have a six year old and we were playing super limited together. Nothing about it. I was like, this is super fun. And like we were having good time. He that was really cool. And then it gets creepy. I didn't expect they get super creepy. And he's like, I don't want to play this game anymore. Daddy. We never have to play it again. You're fine. Salma Alam-Naylor 2:38 Yeah, it was a good game. It's a good game. I remember this one bit that when you get on like a roof, and there's the moon. And we were like on the roof thinking this you have to we have to get above the roof because of the weird glitch thing when you turn the light on and off. But it wasn't it was an Easter egg. It wasn't a thing. It was fun. And I'm also, you know, my background is in music. I did a music degree. I was a music teacher. I was a musician. So I still try to play music for fun with my family. And I do want to get back into making music. Actually, I missed that a lot. But so when I move into my new house, I'll have a proper studio purposely for the music. So I think I'm looking forward to that a lot. Bryan Robinson 3:21 That's amazing. So what's your instrument of choice or musical talent of choice, I suppose. Salma Alam-Naylor 3:27 So when I was growing up, and when I was a teacher, my main instruments were piano and flute, but and singing, but I also taught kids how to play in rock bands for a few years. So I was a bass player. I don't really do much bass now. And I did some guitar and played some drums and stuff. But making music now I really like making electronic music mainly. I was also a musical comedian for a few years. Interesting. touring the UK, singing weirdly satirical British political songs. We'd get cancelled now so you can't hear any of it. Bryan Robinson 4:14 Out of curiosity. Is there any comedy in Britain? That's not satirical political comedy? I feel like everything kind of falls into it. Salma Alam-Naylor 4:23 Yeah, it's pretty much there's a lot to satirize in the British political system. But I guess that's for another podcast. Bryan Robinson 4:31 Yeah, sure. Awesome. Yeah. Let's let's maybe not talk about about the Jamstack. He's, he said that you're a Jamstack enthusiast. So what was your entry point into this ecosystem philosophy, what have Salma Alam-Naylor 4:45 you it was actually with Jekyll, the first static site generator many, many years ago, and that was the only one that existed you know, like around 2015 2016 and I had no idea what it was doing. But I was experimenting, I had really no idea that it was part of the Jamstack. At the time, I was just building a website, I had no idea that it was a static website, and really what that meant, but I was building something with liquid templates that compiled into a website. And I was hosting it on GitLab Pages at the time, not GitHub Pages. I was because I used to get lab for work. And so I kind of naturally gravitated towards GitLab at that time. But I guess the ecosystem sucked me in. I really don't know how I went from building my first Jekyll site to where I am now. I have no idea how, how this has happened, or what made it happen. But clearly, the Jamstack has, has a good thing going right. Like, it's fantastic. Bryan Robinson 5:51 So what are you doing right before you started playing with Jekyll, you were at some sort of company doing tech stuff he's mentioned you are you are using GitLab. So what was that like? Salma Alam-Naylor 5:59 So I did a variety of different things. Before I ended up here. I was working for some startups, I was working for a global e commerce company that was using like Java, whether bespoke kind of E commerce system with JSP front ends. I was also before that I was building a new e commerce platform in a startup that was JavaScript based what we're even using PHP, we're using PHP with JavaScript front end. But it was a it was a plain JavaScript front end, it wasn't statically generated, it wasn't using a framework or anything like that. After the global e commerce company, I was actually working for another startup building a React Native app. So like my career actually had nothing to do with the Jamstack. It was all my side projects. Until my last job, I was working at an agency, product agency. And we built quite a lot of things in the team. And actually we started gravitating towards next J S for these quick. They were initially proofs of concept, because next JS was pretty young at the time. But it ended up that next JS was a really scalable front end with a lot of capabilities. So we normally have like a dotnet back end and an extra as front end kind of thing with the API layer in the middle. And that was really my intro into the enterprise levels, scalable, robust, we can build whatever we want with the Jamstack kind of thing. Bryan Robinson 7:38 Alright, so let's fast forward a little bit. That was your last thing, right? How today, are you using the Jamstack philosophies professionally, I mean, obviously, Contentful is pretty, pretty big in that world. But also personally with both your educational stuff and anything else you're doing on the side. Salma Alam-Naylor 7:52 So one of the biggest philosophies that I like to promote the Jamstack is that just do it, just build something and get it live, just build it learn some stuff while you do it, and have a good time. Like, I can try things out without having to over commit to anything on the Jamstack I if I've got an idea for a website, a lot of the time I will get the idea or buy the domain, I will go on my Twitch stream for three hours. And I will build it and release it in that three hours. And that is the joy of the Jamstack. Salma Alam-Naylor 8:05 And what I love about that as well as it's so accessible to developers, because you don't have to over commit or pay for anything at that stage of IDEA inception. And so it's so accessible, and it's so in reach for so many people, for example, dot take dotnet I don't want to like hate on dotnet. It's great. It's a fantastic enterprise solution for enterprise products. But as a developer, as a front end developer, even though the dotnet comes with front end or back end stuff, what do I do when I've built an app? Like how do I put it online? So like I can just hook up a Jamstack hosting platform to my GIT repository, do a git push and great, there it is. It's online on a on a URL, I don't have to buy a domain even it's just there. And it's it's just so beautiful. And it's it really embodies the actual kind of agile kind of continuous delivery methodology as well. Salma Alam-Naylor 9:26 Every commit is a release, every commit is an immutable release. So you can roll back, you can have a look at the history you can you have, you can just click in a UI in like Vercel or Netlify or GitLab. Just click Oh, look at that. That's what I mean and week ago, I can compare that with what I've got now. And, and it scales. You don't even have to worry about scaling. If you get like a big hit on your proof of concept or whatever. And you know, it just enables developers to move fast to try things out to experiment and test Have fun without all the nonsense that developers have to deal with, day in, day out. And it's just a joy. Salma Alam-Naylor 10:09 And I've learned so much like, I never would have thought like, when I was building my like first websites maybe 10 10-12 years ago, my first proper websites, I never would have thought that I would be utilizing a CDN at the edge. And all of these different rendering methods, depending on the data that I needed to serve, auto scaling, immutable deploys, Git integration, infrastructure, serverless functions, you know, it's like a whole ecosystem that lets you try stuff, to see if it's gonna work. And if it does work, you can go further and make it robust. Like one of one of my biggest slogans is also build first engineer later. And that I think, is a really like, core part of the Jamstack. Just get it live and see what happens. Bryan Robinson 11:00 And you can get it live in any number of ways too, right? You can if you're making a content driven thing to begin with, you don't need a CMS. But yes, it takes like a few lines of code tweaked. And your next js, your 11ty, your whatever static site generator, right, like just ingest from somewhere else. And it's good to go? Unknown Speaker 11:19 Yes. It's very exciting. It's very exciting. Like imagine. So this has happened in the all in the last like six years since like, 2015, when the Jamstack kind of first came about, like what's going to happen in the next six years, and the next six years, and the next six years, I actually did. At the Contentful, fast forward conference at the beginning of November, I actually did the keynote with Stephan Judas, about the last 10 years of web development and how Jamstack came about to solve the problems of old school monolith solutions where back end and front end were divided, where everyone was reinventing the wheel the whole time. And the Jamstack has really come to like, solve these problems, where as a front end developer, you don't need all this back end nonsense anymore. You're and and because of that, it's like enabled developers, it's increased their skills is giving them the power is empowering developers to to build stuff that they couldn't have even dreamed of before. And I think that's really, really, like wonderful for the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 12:24 Like I have a four year old. And I can't wait to show him the stuff like he could put a website live. That's just an HTML page and JavaScript file, potentially, you know, on the Jamstack, when he's like, eight years old, you know. And imagine us being able to do that when we were eight. Bryan Robinson 12:46 At like 14, I think I had my first website. And it was like Microsoft front page built like graphical UI, it was, it was quite choice. Yeah, my six year old, I built him a website in a day, he happened to have a piece of art that he brought home from school, that instead of writing his name on it, he had to write his his first first name, and last initial, because that was yet another, another kid in his class with that name. And then he wrote.com At the end, and I said, I bet that domain is open. And it was and like, I threw it together, uploaded the artwork. And then he told me, he's like, I want to like button. And I was like, I bet I could do that. But you have to do three pieces of art every week to to make it so that I'll build that for you. And then like, I was able to walk him through what I done. And he had no real understanding. But it was like, okay, I can. This is simple enough, I can show you and it's Yeah, super low bar. Salma Alam-Naylor 13:43 Yeah, I can't wait. I can't wait for that. It's so empowering. And it's so exciting to see what our children could make one day with, how it's being innovated, and the improvements and the things that are being done on the Jamstack. And Bryan Robinson 13:57 how it kind of opens up into like the the kind of natural open web platform. Yeah, walled garden is not something that you have to buy into. And it allowed, like, I used to teach a journalism class on HTML and CSS. And I was like, look, you'll you can you can do this. And if you do this, you don't have to depend on these other platforms anymore. And like, I would talk about the history of the web and how in the 90s, it was a creator focus space. And in the current state, in fact, like anything from like, 2010 on, it's very consumer based. And so it's like, there's this dichotomy of the web, and the more people that can be creators, the better. Yes, yeah. So we've talked about next JS some, obviously, you work at Contentful. We talked about the olden days of Jekyll and all that good stuff. What would you say is your current jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite product? Or maybe it's a philosophy or framework. What makes you love the Jamstack? Salma Alam-Naylor 14:53 It's sounds really nerdy. But what I like about the Jamstack is the different types. Types of rendering that are available. This is like, this is so ridiculous, but it's like. So obviously, I work for Contentful. Right, and I'm dealing with data like data comes from a CMS. But data is not all created equal. And so there are four types of rendering depending on the data your data needs, like, it's not just about like pages and posts and stuff, like there are some bits of data that are very granular, they might need to be more up to date than the others, because obviously, mainly Jamstack is static first, right? And so but not everything can be static. But not everything needs to be client side. And so that what the Jamstack has now is like these four types of rendering. So back in the old, old web days, everything was server side rendered, right, you you your web request, hit a server that went to the backend that generated from all the logic a, an HTML document and gave it back to the client, right. So we still got server side rendering on the Jamstack, which I think right now is really great for personalization for things like E commerce, and other things. Because I especially talk a lot about using query params with get server side props with NextJs. JS, for those kind of personalized experiences, rather than just serving everything statically to the same as same to everyone. But then we've got the static, so there's, the second one is static generation. So you've got a plain site content site, nothing changes, nothing needs to update it, just serve it as quickly as you can statically do your visitors great. But now we've got some fancy stuff, there's incremental static regeneration, which is based on a cache validation strategy called stale while revalidate. And what this does, especially inside next js is you choose when the server re validates your data. And at certain intervals, and if it is out of date, it will rebuild in the background via serverless functions. And then for the next visitor, it will show it up to date. So that's like good for kind of data that it's great if it's up to date doesn't matter if some people see it if it's out of date. And then you've got distributed persistent rendering, which so if you want the Jamstack to scale, you, you might have 1000s, and 1000s, and 1000s of pages, right from your CMS, your E commerce site or wherever. Now we know that with the Jamstack, a site to go live and be deployed, it needs to be pre built and pre rendered, right, but 1000s and 1000s of pages could take hours to build. And if you want to continuously deploy and be agile and move fast and break stuff, you can't have every single bill taking hours and hours and hours. So distributed percentage rendering, what it does, it lets you choose what pages are pre rendered, and then doesn't pre render the other ones, you could pre render like your top 20 pages or wherever at build time. But then when someone goes to visit a page that hasn't been pre rendered, it gets pre rendered at request time, and then cached at the edge for future requests. So we've moved away from like building static pages and static data on the Jamstack blanket to a flexible model where you can choose when your pages rendered, depending on the type of data that you're serving your visitors and how up to date it needs to be. It sounds really weird, but this is my favorite part of the Jamstack. Bryan Robinson 18:19 So it obviously, right? Because like that's a lot. And like when you when you actually said like my favorite parts, the rendering modes like okay, all right, but no, totally. And like, here's my absolute favorite bit of that entire of that entire conversation, right? You don't have to understand any of what Salma just said, if you're listening, right? Because you can start and you can, like we talked about, like the accessibility of the Jamstack earlier, you can start and you can just upload an HTML file and you're Jamstack. But then you can bring on something like a nextjs or an 11ty or a Gatsby or what have you. And then you're doing a different kind of Jamstack. And then you can bring in, like you said, the incremental static regeneration ISR. We love acronyms. And that uses SWR another accurate acronym, and then you've got DPR. But you can learn those things slowly as you go. And like you said before it, you can build stuff and put it live and have no understanding of any of that and then come back and get a little bit of performance boost or a little bit of build boost or these little things. And you can go Salma Alam-Naylor 19:24 When you need it. You know when it's appropriate when your site needs to scale when you've now got a CMS when you've got different types of data when you convert to use this database or something like that. And it's so flexible. It's not just static sites. It's it's a whole ecosystem that is so far removed from the monolithic way. We used to do things with just everything, everything from the server at request time done, or you know, everything from the CDN or request time static done. It's like there's these combinations Have those but then some more clever stuff that makes your workflow more efficient. That means that you don't need to worry about these things. And it's just like whoever thought of these things. I wish I had thought of those things. Oh, yeah. I'd feel pretty accomplished. Bryan Robinson 20:20 Oh, yeah. And I mean, we'd be having a completely different conversation if either of us were there. But But, but in all seriousness, right, like, the fact that I built my son's website, and it has a like button, I have no clue. Like, I've been doing this a long time, I have no clue how 10 years ago, I would have done that, because I would have had to stand up a server, I would have had to learn PHP or Python, or a server side scripting language, I would have had to do all these things, I would have had to do the JavaScript on the fly on the front end, I wouldn't have done it just pure and simple, I would not have done it. And literally, it was two hours of work 2 serverless functions and low clients are JavaScript and I was done. Salma Alam-Naylor 20:56 Do you remember back in the day when front end development involved, like httpd conf files and things like that, and I had no idea what that meant server configuration, get out of my life, I just want to build some front end with JavaScript, I don't care about that stuff is in my way. And the amount of I used to work on the LAMP stack when I was first starting because I was doing PHP at work. And so like to set up a whole PHP server on your on your local machine with PHP, MyAdmin, and blah, blah, blah, like, I'm not hating on PHP is great. But as a front end developer, you don't want to deal with that. Because that's not what you are an expert in, that's not what you want to do. That's not what makes you happy. It's, you know, it doesn't make me happy, like the four different types of rendering on the Jamstack makes me happy. Bryan Robinson 21:51 Well, and I mean, you get further into that. And you have to think about the DevOps. And like I, I pride myself on being able to find all the edge cases and break everyone's DevOps, that's something that I'm incredibly good at. And it comes from, like, I learned about Vagrant, and, you know, virtual machines on my laptop. And I, I haven't installed a vagrant or virtual machine on my laptop in six years now. And it is so refreshing. Salma Alam-Naylor 22:18 Yes, I remember that used to do that was all I did at work on these big monolith systems and deploy systems. I wonder how far those systems are away from that now. But I wonder if that's still the same, but it's just, there's always, there's big pain points between Windows and Mac, as well. And the Jamstack doesn't really have that, because you're just running some Node in a terminal right to develop locally. And then you're just sending it to the CDN. It's just Bryan Robinson 22:46 that like, like between Linux that you might have your server and Mac the Mac flavor versions, then then you got like title case sensitivity. Like no, no, don't make me think about that. Please. Bryan Robinson 22:59 Let's pivot a little bit. You have a music history. And so I'm very excited now that I've learned that for the next question, which is what is your actual musical jam right now? What's your favorite musician or album or what's playing on a day to day basis for you? Salma Alam-Naylor 23:14 So I think whenever you ask a musician this question, they will always say, the classic developer line it depends. Always It depends. I have I like such a varied bag of music because I used to listen to such a varied bag of music when I was learning music and writing music. I like music from progressive metal to EDM to jazz to folk to weird sounds. A solid favorite band that I will always reach for is Architectes, which is a British metal core band. And me and my husband. I actually met my husband when I joined his band. So we've got like a lot of music in common. It was a progressive metal band long story a long time ago. But the song I have on repeat right now is more on the EDM side. It's called probably no one's ever heard of this. It's called move on by Grant and I love it right? Because another weird nerdy thing. This is a music nerdy thing now. You know how often in pop songs your head double tracked guitars like panned left and right. This song for the first time in my life, I have heard double tracked bass guitars, and they're playing slightly different things. One minute 47 into the song is a feast for your ears. It's amazing to listen to, and I can't stop listening to it because of this double bass track thing. Move on by Grant if you want to hear some nerdy stuff, musically. Bryan Robinson 24:42 Now for that you probably need stereo headphones, right? Yeah, exactly. Get the benefit of that. Yes. Wow. Okay, that's I am not disappointed by the answer in any way shape or form. I learned a lot I didn't even know that was the thing double tracked anything so excellent nerding on that Salma Alam-Naylor 25:01 Yeah, great nerding love it. Bryan Robinson 25:04 Alright, so before we go, is there anything that you would like to promote out into the Jamstack ecosystem, anything, you're doing Contentful anything. Salma Alam-Naylor 25:11 So on my Twitch streams, I stream twice a week. Currently, I always build on the Jamstack. And one of the most challenging projects I'm building is something called Unbreak dot tech, where, and sometimes it's weird to bring these stuff. These sometimes it's weird to bring these things up in these kinds of podcasts. But as a woman in tech on the internet, it's very difficult, full stop, to realize. And sometimes it generally falls on the women and the marginalized people to talk about the issues that we face. However, unbraked dot Tech offers a platform for men to talk to other men, about being a better person and treating women and marginalized people better. So I've been working on that on my stream, I am welcoming contributions from men who want to talk on the matter. And we'll see how it goes. It's a complete experiment. I have no idea. You know, again, I'm using the Jamstack to experiment and see how it goes. So it's all good. It's hosted on Netlify using like Netlify forms, it's built with NextJs. JS. And I work on that every now and then and see where it goes, you can now submit videos as well as articles to the site, and they have captioned I've got captions and all sorts of accessibility stuff going on. So that's the thing. Catch me on twitch twitch.tv/white p four, and three are the Bryan Robinson 26:45 one of the hardest screen names in the business. Salma Alam-Naylor 26:48 Yeah, I regret it holy. Bryan Robinson 26:50 Anyway, definitely check out on what was it Unbreak tech it on Unbreak dot tech unbrick break dye Tech because I have heard way too many stories, and everyone should know the stories and again, the women and the marginalized people have had to tell them enough. So men, let's step up and do a little bit more around that. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:09 I appreciate that. Bryan Robinson 27:10 Salma, thanks so much for joining us on the show today. And I hope you keep doing amazing things, especially with Unbreak dot tech, and Contentful and everything in the Jamstack. And we hope to see some really cool stuff in the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:21 Thank you, Bryan. Thanks for having me. Bryan Robinson 27:24 Thanks again to our guest, and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoyed the podcast, be sure to leave a review, rating, Star heart favorite, whatever it is, and your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Grand bien vous fasse !
Pour 2022, il faut des jours comme "Gatsby"

Grand bien vous fasse !

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:40


durée : 00:07:40 - L'ami.e du vendredi - À l'aube d'une nouvelle année, ce roman si visuel vous offrira le faste, l'opulence, l'alcool et le jazz ! Si Guillemette a choisi "Gatsby" comme ami en ce jour de fêtes, c'est parce qu'il peut inspirer à chacun et chacune de nouvelles et bonnes résolutions pour 2022.

That's my JAMstack
S3E1 - Sean C. Davis on the Jamstack philosophy, NextJS, and more

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello, and welcome back to season three of That's My Jamstack. It's amazing that we've been going this long. I know it's been quite a bit since our last episode, but to jog your memories, That's My Jamstack is the podcast asks that time honored and tested question. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson and we've got a lot of great guests lined up for this season. So without further ado, let's dive in. On today's episode, we talk with Sean C. Davis. Sean is a passionate tinkerer and teacher. He's currently working as a developer experience engineer at stack bit. Bryan Robinson 1:04 All right, Shawn. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show and talking with us today. Sean C. Davis 1:07 Thanks for having me, Brian. Excited to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:09 Awesome. So first and foremost, tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun outside of work Sean C. Davis 1:15 For for work, I am currently the developer experience engineer for stack bit. I've been in the web development space for about a decade or so the first nine years, were all in agency space building agency freelancing, building websites for folks. And just this last year, took a shift into the product space and spending some time with stack bid. And that's that's been so that's super exciting. That's what I've been doing every day. And I'm sure we'll we'll dig into that a bit. For fun on the side. Well, I feel like I'm the I'm the classic developer in the sense that there's always some, there's always some technical thing that's happening on the side. Right now that thing is, it's it's my personal site I've had, I've had a couple of different blogs that I've maintained over the years. And within the last two years or so I've been trying to focus that content, bringing it all into my personal site. But right now, it's still kind of just like a, it's just a, it's a blog, most of most folks who come there, Googled some problem, they get the solution, and it serves those folks really well. But I'm in this transition of trying to make it more of a learning hub. So that's, it's kind of a side project now. But that's but it's still like it's fun, but it's still I don't know, it's where it could still be in a developer. I'm so like, the the other part of me, I've got two little kids at home and like a lot of folks when the pandemic hits kind of focused a lot of energy and attention into the home. So it's various projects around the house or like like many people I am part of the reason you couldn't find flour at the grocery store because I got really into baking for a while and still doing that a little bit to some like some gardening kind of just fun fun stuff around the house. Bryan Robinson 3:06 In your in your baking exploits. Are we talking like bread, baking, pastry baking, but what kind of baking Sean C. Davis 3:13 where I spend most of my time and still doing a little bit today is the classic sourdough loaf. So mostly bread, mostly bread, at least I'm better at the bread. I've done a bit of the Sweet Treats and trying to learn a little bit about the decorating but it's just the presentation isn't my strong suit. So the flavor might be there. I've got a ways to go in the inner desert department. Bryan Robinson 3:37 Yeah, I've got I've got my own sourdough starter and all that. So I definitely feel I actually, I like a time I can be a hipster about something. And so when my son was born, actually so that was six years ago now. So pre pandemic, my wife my birthday that year, two months after he was born he got me a sourdough starter from King Arthur baking and amazing. I lapsed right because obviously like infant and all that and I baked for a little bit but yeah, then started back up during the pandemic as well. Because who, who doesn't want to do that? We're gonna do Yeah, exactly. You got something to focus on. Anyway, I actually love your site. I'm sure that when we do shout outs at the end, we'll talk about that Sean C. Davis calm but one things that came up on the little repeating thing on your homepage is you're afraid of bears and Bs. Is that Is that a thing? Or is that just a funny thing? Sean C. Davis 4:21 Oh, yeah, it's a it's a funny thing. I mean, I I I love both of them, but also am terrified of both that I do. I do. I guess I didn't mention this in the fun thing. I really enjoy hiking and camping. haven't done much camping since having little kids. We're gonna eventually get them out there. But we do a fair amount of hiking. And so yeah, I've had a number of run ins with both bears and bees. And it's terrifying every time but I also very much appreciate and respect them for what they do for us. Yes. Bryan Robinson 4:54 All right. So let's talk a little bit about the Jamstack. So what was your entry point into this space? It seems this idea of Jamstack or static sites or whatever it was at the time. Sean C. Davis 5:03 It that's an interesting question. Because Okay, so if you say, Yeah, entry point into Jamstack, or static sites, if you broke that apart and said, What's your entry point into Jamstack? And what's your entry point into static sites? I have two different answers. So I'll tell you a little bit about the the journey from one to the other. It's, I find it kind of interesting. So it static sites were was the first thing before I knew anything about Jamstack. In fact, before Jamstack was coined, because the gens Jamstack term comes from I think, later in 2015, I believe. So the first agency job, I had built a few sites with middleman, they were originally a PHP shop, and about the time I joined, were transitioning into becoming a Rails shop. And so Ruby was the bread and butter programming language. And there were a few clients that would come on, who didn't want to pay for a CMS or just like they needed something real quick, and it could be static and totally fine. And so we, we were building middleman sites, but deploying, deploying them to like a digital ocean or equivalent, it's still running on a web server still serving up these pages in real time, even though they're just HTML files city like kind of silly, but But there weren't great solid patterns at that time. And about that time, 2013 or so is also when I started building custom content management systems. I built it, I evolved, and I iterated on it. And I think I was looking at this recently, I believe there were four major, different versions that I built over the series, or course of about three or four years in there. And so I'll come back to that. But as I was, so set, this first agency working on middleman, I built a few middleman sites is when I switched to freelancing. And then at this at the last Agency, also, a few middleman sites like middleman kept kept popping up when I was when I was freelancing there. Actually, that's when I built the fourth and final version of that CMS. And at that time, this is probably I think we're talking about 2016, maybe 20. Yeah, I think that seems right 2016. And so the Jamstack term exists, the term headless CMS exists, but I had no idea that these things were things that people were doing. But I had this need, where I had a client who wanted a mobile native application, and a, also a website. And it seemed like a lot of the content was going to overlap. And I was like, Well, I'm building this next version of a CMS, what should it look like? Maybe it should be able to serve both of these. And so I was like, Oh, brilliant, decoupled architecture like this is this is gonna be great. And so that that last CMS I built was API driven. And, and I believe, I believe the website was a middleman site, it, it may have been some other framework, but it was like this Jamstack pattern, but again, still deployed, still using a web server to serve every request. So like missing that, that final piece that that Netlify gives us in the CDN in that instant cache invalidation. So fast forward to this last agency, and we're also a rail shop Sean C. Davis 8:40 and built a few middleman sites. But what happened was, why I think that the 2017, I believe, the the CTO, late 2017, early 2018, our CTO gets wind of the Jamstack. And so this is pre Jamstack. Conference, still really small kind of tight knit community. And we're like, and everything just kind of aligned because we won this work. For a company where it was going to be building them a new marketing website, it was gonna be a fairly big site. But this company also had a product and an internal product team. And that team had already switched to building that product with React. And so and we had heard a little bit about Jamstack. We heard about Gatsby and we're like, Oh, perfect, perfect time. Gatsby is the cool kid in town. Like we can jump all in on the Jamstack we think we can reduce development costs over time. You know, all the all the classic Jamstack benefits like we can get those and so we took a leap. We jumped all in and so that was like that was the real introduction to Jamstack and I find it I find it kind of funny looking back on it now because I spent all those years with Jamstack like patterns and using tool and middleman was part of all of those and then we're like, oh Jamstack, but also switched to JavaScript based frameworks at the same time, which I think a lot of folks went through that pattern. But I don't know if funny to reflect on. Bryan Robinson 10:11 Yeah, definitely. And like that that kind of journey is really interesting. Like in that agency world, the fact that, like you were having defined these patterns on your own, and then this community kind of sprang up next to what you were doing, and then look like we can do those things, maybe even slightly better than than kind of where we are now that we see kind of this broader scope, and there are products out there. That's really, really interesting. And it kind of mirrors on my own journey. I was at an agency when I discovered all this as well and never really implemented at the agency that we had a customer we had a full fledge, like custom content management system that like the agency had built, so never got a big we Sean C. Davis 10:49 did we did too, I don't it was like it was a compelling enough idea to our CTO, that he's like, we're throat, like we're throwing it all out where we're, I, we had a lot of, I mean, you know, there's issues with you, you have to maintain your own software. And it's it's another piece of the stack. And he's like that we were just getting bogged down with this site went down. And there's a bug in this CMS. And I think the crux was, there was one site where we didn't protect the slash admin route, like, should have done that. And we're like, Okay, well, let's, this is a way to never make that mistake. Again. I'm not Bryan Robinson 11:27 gonna speak for you on this. But my advice to anyone listening out there is if you think you should build a content management system, don't just don't do it. Sean C. Davis 11:38 Yes, yes. I don't know if I may have written a post about this at one point, or maybe it was just an idea in my head, but it was gonna be ashes, I should see if I can find it. The idea was, here's how you can build a content management system and my journey and exactly why you shouldn't do it. Like it's, it's, I think the the lesson I have baked in there is, it can be a really powerful experience for learning about content schemas and know how to organize pages and components and like structured data. But it's also just not a good idea to do it. Because there's there are how many dozens or hundreds of companies that are focusing on that problem every single day. Bryan Robinson 12:20 And let's be fair to our past selves, right, like in 2012 2013 weren't as many companies do, and they weren't as fully featured as they are today. I think it's kind of the same thing. A lot of people have probably created their own, like, custom static site generator in the past, like, Oh, I just made a couple include stuff like that. Let's just, oh, but we have them now. From from the middleman and Jekyll times all the way through to all the fancy ones today. Let's fast forward to now. How are you using Jamstack philosophies professionally? And personally? And obviously, you're at stack bet. So probably quite a bit professionally nowadays. Sean C. Davis 12:54 Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. So Stackbit is, I mean, if the Netlify is the Jamstack tool, but also when you think stack bit like stack bit is, exists, because the Jamstack exists. And it's, I know, the, the Jamstack pattern was really powerful and felt like a great entry point for newer developers. But it, it turned out that it was it was kind of difficult, because it's like you could get started really, really kind of simple to get started. Really difficult to go to the next level, which requires stitching together all of these decoupled services. And so stack bit pops up originally three years ago, as a solution to basically say, well, your start, here's the starting point. And it's Netlify and Jekyll and some markdown files or you know, in some styles, something like that, and it has evolved and now as a full fledge visual editor, what's, what's interesting is, we're in a transition where we're just about to release a new version, or the beta version of a new version. And it's still largely following that pattern. It's a really powerful visual editing experience. But the the Jamstack I feel like Jamstack is kind of in this identity crisis sort of mode or, or maybe not like figuring out where they where they fit. You know, what Jamstack actually means and knowing that the web is going to continue to evolve. And so if you, depending when, when this episode gets released, it's like what we, if we look before this release, and what happens after it right now you go to the website, so pre pre release, and like Jamstack is plastered all over it real big, top of the homepage. And I I'm seeing that this, this language is going to shift a little bit and so we're still very much Jamstack tool. Websites are going to get deployed. They're going to be built with next they're going to be static by default. They're going to be deployed To Netlify using Marco. So it's like still, it's still very much Jamstack pattern. But I think how we, how we talk about that might change a little bit. That's, that's professionally and personally, I mentioned, the, the project I'm spending most of time on now is my personal site, that site is built with eleventy. and deploy to Netlify. And using Mark, just local markdown for content. I, I've been thinking a lot about like, well, what's the future of this? For me, if I really want to make this a hub, and I want to make it a content engine? And I'm thinking well, okay, well, eventually, I'm going to have to go to like a next or something like that. But honestly, I every change that I make, I say, Well, okay, well, can I get this done with eleventy? And I consistently finding that the answer is yes, like it has, there's probably a limit to this some point in my future. But right now, I'm in love with, but eleventy is giving me and so I've kind of have this classic Jamstack pattern happening on the side and loving that Bryan Robinson 16:08 perfectly. And then I mean, I can go on and on about love. And it is it is kind of where I'm at in the last of two and Zach Leatherman, the creator of 11. D, recently just even showed like gated content with 11, D serverless. And so like the, the line is blurring about what 11 D can and can't do, it used to be pretty solid, like there was a pretty solid point where like 11 D didn't serve you anymore. Little little iffy. Now, Sean C. Davis 16:30 I think that the big question for me was, oh, there were two. So one is that I'm I built my own kind of component system using nunchucks shortcodes in and so like, you have this smart transformers that make it nice and easy to work with. But it's I mean, it's still a little clunky, I would love to be able to use something like reactors felt and then hydrate them on the fly as needed. And fortunately, we have been homes and slinky, working on that exact problem. So that's really exciting to follow that. And then the second question I had, and second hurdle I thought I was going to run into was authentication, I don't need it now. But my plan is to start to build out some courses, and some of them will be free, and you don't have to track them. And other ones, you know, I feel like well down the road, I'm going to want people to people are gonna want to sign in, they're gonna want to track their progress, maybe some of them are paid. And just this last week, a video came out where Zach was going through the process of showing authentication with 11. D. And now I'm like I, I mean, I feel like the wall I'm going to hit now has less to do with features, and is probably going to have more to do with how many files can we read from the file system? And but I also think that it's getting smarter in terms of incremental builds. And so maybe I don't hit that. Well, I don't know. I'm gonna keep pushing it. We'll see what happens. Bryan Robinson 17:58 Yeah, that wall becomes smaller and further and smaller and further. Yeah, that's right. That's right. All right. So we've talked about a few technologies. We've talked about a few methodologies. But what would you say currently? Is your jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite service? Maybe its stack, but are your favorite framework or philosophy? What what makes you love working in the Jamstack? Sean C. Davis 18:19 Yeah, talk philosophically for a minute, I suppose. Yeah. So what I really loved about the Jamstack, especially in the early days of me discovering it, I'm thinking pre NextJs. JS blowing up. So like 2019. And before? Is that it? To me, it was it's, well, it's still very much this way like you. It's a methodology. It's not a prescription say this all the time. And there's something really powerful in that in that if here's a pattern that we think is a really strong way to build websites that it's it improves the developer experience, and delivers great experience for end users. But you can use whatever tool you think is best for your particular project. And I what I've realized is as the web continues to evolve, is that the there were more kind of guardrails on what Jamstack is than I originally thought, like there, there are more opinions baked in than I originally was, was seeing. However, it's still within within those guardrails and within that pattern, very open and, and not not prescriptive in terms of tooling. And I think what that has led to that even though the community is led by a product in in Netlify, that it's very open in talking about what tools you can use in the space. It's really everyone's really respectful in that space and empowering and so just like the My Favorite I'd love to philosophy itself, the community that came out of that philosophy. It's is like a really, really great thing to be involved in. But I think in terms of tooling, yeah, I can't. I mean, I love stack. But that's why it's why I'm at stack, but I think it's a, it's a great, I do think it's a great entry point into the Jamstack. space. And it it's, it's a such a unique tool that it can serve. The personal blogger, especially someone who isn't super technically savvy, wants to learn a little development. But it can also serve a serve enterprises that have hundreds 1000s of pages, but are storing those in Contentful, or Sanity, some other headless CMS. But really, I keep coming back to eleventy. Especially, there was some news in the last couple of weeks where Rich Harris, the creator of spelt joined, we joined Vercel. Right, so so it's he gets to work on it full time. It's still community driven, but it still also kind of feels a little bit like funding from Vercel. And with that, I, I don't Okay, I don't know if this is entirely accurate. But it's, I think of the group of static site generators or front end frameworks, popular front end frameworks today. The vast majority of them are funded by or have some ulterior motive for where they're there. The people are working for some particular company. And so even though they're open source, they're, I mean, I don't I'm not saying that they've done their communities to services in any way. But eleventy what I love about eleventy is that it is it for now. I mean, today, it's all about the community it is it is very much driven by the community. And it is. And I just I love the way that Zach leads that project. It's, it's really exciting. And similar to what I said about a stack bit and what we just mentioned about eleventy, it's, it's great, because you can get started and know if you know HTML, like you can, you're good, you can build a website, and you can just you can fly. And then you can you can piece together things a little bit at a time, like learn a little bit of nunchucks. Or eventually if we have if when slinky gets to version one, and maybe it's like maybe you just dip your toes into React and, and, but that it also seems like it's going to it's scaling well for a handful of folks. And so it's not like you learn it as an entry level tool. I think that's that's where it was for a while, like a great entry level tool. And then our I don't want to build a serious site. So I'm going to go get a serious framework. It's starting to become a serious framework, and, but without necessarily raising the barrier to entry. And I think that's, that's really cool. So that's, yeah, I just, I feel like I'm just gonna keep talking about stack bid and 11. D all day. Bryan Robinson 23:07 Yeah, no, that doesn't that that's a great combo. Anyway. Um, I also think it's entering you said, like, you know, rich, rich chains go into Vercel. And, I mean, Zack Letterman's at Netlify. But he's building sites for Netlify. And so I think the interesting thing that's happened there is that he's learned what a company the size of Netlify needs out of some of what it's doing. And that's what's been kind of powering is not that Netlify has been prescribing what he needs. But Zack as a developer using 11. D to build sites for an enterprise level company now knows more about what what 11 D needs for that area. I think that's an interesting bit of information that he's kind of feeding back into the the 11 D framework. That's Sean C. Davis 23:51 a great point. Absolutely. Bryan Robinson 23:53 All right, so let's shift gears a little bit. Let's go away from technology and let's let's find out what is your actual jam right now? What's your favorite song or musician? Or what are you listening to day in day out? Sean C. Davis 24:04 Alright, so I had I had to look this up because I'm I am all over the board in terms of music and I haven't hadn't been listening to as much recently as I have in the past it you know, excluding like, all the all the Disney soundtracks that are on all the time, kids. Okay, so just to tell you how weird my, my taste in music is. I was like, alright, well, what are what are a few of the what are a few of the albums that have been on in the last week or two? Okay, so I've had gone all the way back to the Beatles revolver. I love that one. Okay, then what I'm almost like chronologically What have I done? I put on I put on Jay Z's Black Album. I had. I forget what it's called is Sturgill. Simpson. He released a couple blue grass albums, I think I think they're called cutting grass. Maybe not. Do you know? I do not know. Okay. Blue Grass. And then what did I have? I've had the newer Lord and Taylor Swift albums on as well. So I'm like, all over all over the place all over the Bryan Robinson 25:18 place. Yeah. That's awesome. That's I mean, it's variety is the spice of life, right? Sure. Yes. Yes. I love that. Now, it's kind of open forum, right? Is there anything that you that you are doing right now you stack that whomever that you want to promote and get out into the Jamstack. Community. Sean C. Davis 25:34 I mentioned a little bit earlier, this this idea of the the Jamstack identity crisis. And I try to talk about this without sounding disparaging or critical, because I actually think it's a good thing. And I think there's a lot to come in come from being from the community being introspective and figuring out who we are. And so I had, I've had lots of conversations around this topic throughout the year. And in, in doing so what a few of us realized is that the, it? You know, I think we all kind of have a little bit of different opinion of like, well, where's the line? What exactly does Jamstack mean, but maybe it doesn't, maybe it doesn't totally matter. But it's still, like, like we talked about earlier, like, there's still a there's still that the the guardrail is in a sense, like, there, there is an established pattern, in a way to build websites, the web is going to continue to evolve, and it won't necessarily be the cool thing on the cool kid on the block forever. But that, that that community can still exist. So what what a few of us have done is we said, Okay, well, what if we step outside of that? And to say, What if we created a space where folks could talk about all sorts of different patterns and ways to build websites, and Jamstack and all of the tools and variations within within that community is part of that discussion, but it's not the only part of that discussion. So there's also folks who are building rail sites and are choosing rails for a good reason or choosing full stack WordPress for for a good reason. I'm sure there's a good reason in there somewhere. Maybe. And so it's it's goofy, and it's brand new, but it's called good websites club. And it's at you can visit the bare bones website. It's good websites dot club. And so we're there's, it's just a tiny discord community with a little bit of chatter now, but there are there are some grand visions for it. There's someone who's talking about conference and 20, to 23, maybe some, maybe some various meetups throughout there. Personally, I am starting a show that I'm calling the the good websites show, and I don't know exactly what it's gonna be, it's gonna, it'll evolve. But it's, it's gonna start as a live just like a live interview show. And in kind of, we'll talk about, yeah, grab various folks from around different communities and talk about problems they have solved on the web, all kind of in a way to help inform developers or even marketers, content editors just have different different patterns, different ideas that are out there, and kind of kind of help them hone in on what exactly they are. They're going after, and I think we'll see, my prediction is we're gonna see it largely be, there's, there's gonna be this huge fear to draw a Venn diagram, like a lot of overlap with Jamstack in the beginning, and maybe it evolves, I don't really know. But that's, I'm kind of excited to see where that goes, while also being really heavily invested in Jamstack. And seeing how that evolves, because this, this recent announcement of Netlify got got their next series of funding, and they're gonna pump $10 million investing in the Jamstack. And that is really exciting. I cannot wait to see what that means for the community. So that's, I'm working on Yeah, like, websites club, but but, but also really excited for the Jamstack at same time, Bryan Robinson 29:25 absolutely cool. I'm now a member of the discord as of two months ago. So I'm really excited to see that everyone else listening should go go sign up as well. And then keep an eye out for Shawn doing good websites show in the future as well. So Shawn, thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. And we look forward to seeing more amazing stuff you in the future. Sean C. Davis 29:46 Alright, thanks for having me, Bryan. Bryan Robinson 29:48 Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review rating star heart favorite whatever it is in your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

The CPG Guys
Safe Food Addictions with Halo Top's Doug Bouton

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 34:27


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB, are joined in this episode by Doug Bouton, the founder & CEO of Halo Top International and its US Subsidiary DoJo Brands which manufacturers Gatsby ChocolateFollow  Doug Bouton on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/douglas-bouton-b1205a59/ Follow Halo Top International on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/halo-top-international/ Follow Halo Top International online at:  https://halotop.com/Follow Gatsby Chocolate online at: https://www.gatsbychocolate.com/Doug answers these questions:1)  You market Gatsby as a “safe addiction” food. To a degree, this is how you marketed Halo Top when you introduced pints of ice cream that contained less than 300 calories. Can you share with us your thinking in marketing products with indulgent legacies that have been formulated to reduce the caloric impact while retaining the experience?2) HaloTop was one of the first brands to adopt a revolutionary product locator on its site that allowed consumers to not just find stores that carried HaloTop but actually specific flavors. Can you share with this audience how this helped you in engaging consumers interested in your assortment?3) In 2013, you negotiated the sale of Halo Top NA operations to Blue Bunny while retaining the international business which you still operate now. Can you walk us through how that all transpired and why you didn't just sell the whole company?4) How do you operate Halo Top International in so many markets and how does it work when you share the “brand equity” of the Halo Top name?5) Chocolate candy is a large industry dominated by some major players operating out of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Why enter this market segment and what did you see as being the defining characteristics of Gatsby that would differentiate it from the competition and deliver sustainable growth. Also, why the name Gatsby?6) What are the primary marketing channels that Gatsby is leveraging to build awareness and foster brand loyalty? How do you go about designing an effective marketing mix?7) You've also invested in a high protein milk-based beverage brand: Slate Milk. Can you help us understand your interest in this category and why you think there is a significant opportunity for growth?8) What's next for DoJo Brands? Are there specific categories within food & beverage that you think offer significant growth entry opportunities?Please provide the CPG Guys feedback at http://ratethispodcast.com/cpgguysCPG Guys Website: http://CPGGuys.comCPG Guys on Instagram: https://instagram.com/cpgguysPlease follow the Network of Executive Women at http://newonline.org/cpgguysDISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entit CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

Upon Arrival | Events & Incentives with Adelaine Ng
Ep 65 How to create the Ultimate Office Christmas Party with Lisa Wiles

Upon Arrival | Events & Incentives with Adelaine Ng

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 51:06


How do you create the ultimate office Christmas party? There are some simple but big ideas that can make your event a great success, whether the idea of being volunteered to organise the big year-end event at your workplace fills you with excitement or dread. For example, if you know what to do with lighting and the size of your props, that's more than half the battle won.Lisa Wiles is the founder of Sydney Party Planner, a company she launched in 2001 after working in the events industry for global companies for over 20 years.  She has professionally organised hundreds of themed Christmas parties and loves a challenge, which has included venues from country barns to secret warehouses.Quotes from Episode:"Anyone can do events but it's the people that love it that bring the extra.""People talk about decorations but I think lighting is way more important than decorations"."There's this guy... it's in an industrial wasteland of warehouses and near the airport, and his life passion is to restore carousels and penny arcade circus games. The whole venue just absolutely blows your mind when you walk in". -Lisa WilesDon't miss:-Lisa's most challenging Christmas party assignment and how she solved it-From Cuban to Gatsby to Beach themes-How to use lighting effectively in a party-What to do if you're given a blank canvas-Career destroying moves at Christmas parties-How the event industry and party suppliers are affected by Covid-Can you save a party if not enough people turn up?Connect with Lisa:IG: @sydneypartyplannerLinkedIn: Lisa WilesConnect with Adelaine / Sign up for her newsletter:Email: uponarrivalpodcast@gmail.com

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

In this Hasty Treat, Wes and Scott talk about what's new in Gatsby v4. Sponsor - Prismic Prismic is a Headless CMS that makes it easy to build website pages as a set of components. Break pages into sections of components using React, Vue, or whatever you like. Make corresponding Slices in Prismic. Start building pages dynamically in minutes. Get started at prismic.io/syntax. Sponsor - Sentry If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Show Notes 00:26 Welcome 01:41 Sponsor: Prismic 02:35 Sponsor: Sentry 03:26 Gatsby v4! Gatsby What's new in Gatsby 4 04:26 Any node version requirements? 05:22 Three rendering options 15:47 Parallel Queries 16:28 Data sync 16:57 Gatsby admin deprecated Nextjs Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Composers Datebook
Harbison's "Great American Opera?"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 2:00


Synopsis The American composer John Harbison grew up listening to the Saturday afternoon broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera, so on today's date in 1999 it must have been gratifying to celebrate his 61st birthday taking curtain calls there when his opera “The Great Gatsby” premiered at the Met. F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, a devastating evocation of America's “Roaring 20s,” is a regular contender for the title of the “Great American Novel,” but Harbison says when he told his mother he was writing an opera based on it she wasn't very enthusiastic, arguing that the novel's characters were an unsympathetic bunch. Gatsby, the novel's anti-hero is a both a fraud and a crook. Daisy, Gatsby's lost love and the object of his obsessive desire, is selfish, spoiled and shallow. But Harbison saw it differently: “Yearning and despair are very big operatic themes,” he said. “As for the character of Gatsby, he takes a lot of risks and is steadfast and loyal to some vision that is not realistically possible. The opera provides many opportunities to look at to what degree he's an impostor, and to what degree his story is real, which is a big American theme in general.” Music Played in Today's Program John Harbison (b. 1938) — Remembering Gatsby (Minnesota Orchestra; Edo de Waart, cond.) Vol. 11, from "Minnesota Orchestra at 100" special edition boxed CD set

The Swyx Mixtape
[Weekend Drop] Cloudflare vs AWS, API Economy, Learning in Public on the Changelog

The Swyx Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 68:13


Listen to the Changelog: https://changelog.com/podcast/467Essays: https://www.swyx.io/LIP https://www.swyx.io/api-economy https://www.swyx.io/cloudflare-go TranscriptJerod Santo: So swyx, we have been tracking your work for years; well, you've been Learning in Public for years, so I've been (I guess) watching you learn, but we've never had you on the show, so welcome to The Changelog.Shawn Wang: Thank you. Long-time listener, first-time guest, I guess... [laughs]Adam Stacoviak: Yeah.Jerod Santo: Happy to have you here.Adam Stacoviak: Very excited to have you here.Jerod Santo: So tell us a little bit of your story, because I think it informs the rest of our conversation. We're gonna go somewhat deep into some of your ideas, some of the dots you've been connecting as you participate and watch the tech industry... But I think for this conversation it's probably useful to get to know you, and how you got to be where you are. Not the long, detailed story, but maybe the elevator pitch of your recent history. Do you wanna hook us up?Shawn Wang: For sure. For those who want the long history, I did a 2,5-hour podcast with Quincy Larson from FreeCodeCamp, so you can go check that out if you want. The short version is I'm born and raised in Singapore, came to the States for college, and was totally focused on finance. I thought people who were in the finance industry rules the world, they were masters of the universe... And I graduated just in time for the financial crisis, so not a great place to be in. But I worked my way up and did about 6-7 years of investment banking and hedge funds, primarily trading derivatives and tech stocks. And the more I covered tech stocks, the more I realized "Oh, actually a) the technology is taking over the world, b) all the value is being created pre-IPO, so I was investing in public stocks, after they were basically done growing... And you're kind of just like picking over the public remains. That's not exactly true, but...Jerod Santo: Yeah, tell that to Shopify...Shawn Wang: I know, exactly, right?Adam Stacoviak: And GitLab.Shawn Wang: People do IPO and have significant growth after, but that's much more of a risk than at the early stage, where there's a playbook... And I realized that I'd much rather be value-creating than investing. So I changed careers at age 30, I did six months of FreeCodeCamp, and after six months of FreeCodeCamp - you know, I finished it, and that's record time for FreeCodeCamp... But I finished it and felt not ready, so I enrolled myself in a paid code camp, Full Stack Academy in New York, and came out of it working for Two Sigma as a frontend developer. I did that for a year, until Netlify came along and offered me a dev rel job. I took that, and that's kind of been my claim to fame; it's what most people know me for, which is essentially being a speaker and a writer from my Netlify days, from speaking about React quite a bit.[04:13] I joined AWS in early 2020, lasted a year... I actually was very keen on just learning the entire AWS ecosystem. You know, a frontend developer approaching AWS is a very intimidating task... But Temporal came along, and now I'm head of developer experience at Temporal.Adam Stacoviak: It's an interesting path. I love the -- we're obviously huge fans of FreeCodeCamp, and Quincy, and all the work he's done, and the rest of the team has done to make FreeCodeCamp literally free, globally... So I love to see -- it makes you super-happy inside just to know how that work impacts real people.Like, you see things happen out there, and you think "Oh, that's impacting", but then you really meet somebody, and 1) you said you're a long-time listener, and now you're on the show, so it just really -- like, having been in the trenches so long, and just see all this over-time pay off just makes me really believe in that whole "Slow and steady, keep showing up, do what needs done", and eventually things happen. I just love that.Shawn Wang: Yeah. There's an infinite game mentality to this. But I don't want to diminish the concept of free, so... It bothers me a little, because Quincy actually struggles a lot with the financial side of things. He supports millions of people on like a 300k budget. 300k. If every single one of us who graduated at FreeCodeCamp and went on to a successful tech career actually paid for our FreeCodeCamp education - which is what I did; we started the hashtag. It hasn't really taken off, but I started a hashtag called #payitbackwards. Like, just go back, once you're done -- once you can afford it, just go back and pay what you thought it was worth. For me, I've paid 20k, and I hope that everyone who graduates FreeCodeCamp does that, to keep it going.Adam Stacoviak: Well, I mean, why not...?Shawn Wang: I'd also say one thing... The important part of being free is that I can do it on nights and weekends and take my time to decide if I want to change careers. So it's not just a free replacement to bootcamps, it actually is an async, self-guided, dip-your-toe-in-the-water, try-before-you-buy type of thing for people who might potentially change their lives... And that's exactly what happened for me. I kept my day job until the point I was like "Okay, I like enough of this... I'm still not good, but I like enough of this that I think I could do this full-time."Adam Stacoviak: I like the #payitbackwards hashtag. I wish it had more steam, I suppose.Jerod Santo: We should throw some weight behind that, Adam, and see if we can...Adam Stacoviak: Yeah. Well, you know, you think about Lambda School, for example - and I don't wanna throw any shade by any means, because I think what Austin has done with Lambda... He's been on Founders Talk before, and we talked deeply about this idea of making a CS degree cost nothing, and there's been a lot of movement on that front there... But you essentially go through a TL;DR of Lambda as you go through it, and you pay it after you get a job if you hit certain criteria, and you pay it based upon your earnings. So why not, right? Why not have a program like that for FreeCodeCamp, now that you actually have to commit to it... But it's a way. I love that you paid that back and you made that an avenue, an idea of how you could pay back FreeCodeCamp, despite the commitment not being there.Jerod Santo: Right.Shawn Wang: Yeah. And Quincy is very dedicated to it being voluntary. He thinks that people have different financial situations. I don't have kids, so I can afford a bit more. People should have that sort of moral obligation rather than legal obligation.I should mention that Lambda School is currently being accused of some fairly substantial fraud against its students...Jerod Santo: Oh, really?Shawn Wang: Yeah, it actually just came out like two days ago.Adam Stacoviak: I saw that news too, on Monday.Shawn Wang: Yeah. It's not evidenced in the court of law, it's one guy digging up dirt; let's kind of put this in perspective. But still, it's very serious allegations, and it should be investigated. That said, the business of changing careers and the business of teaching people to code, and this innovation of Income Share Agreements (ISA), where it actually makes financial sense for people to grow bootcamps and fund bootcamps - this is something I strongly support... Whether or not it should be a venture-funded thing, where you try to go for 10x growth every year - probably not... [laughs]Adam Stacoviak: Yeah...Jerod Santo: So after FreeCodeCamp you didn't feel quite ready, so you did do a bootcamp... Did you feel ready after that?Shawn Wang: [08:03] Yeah. [laughs] I did a reflection, by the way, of my first year of learning to code, so people can look it up... It's called "No zero days. My path to learning to code", and I think I posted it on Hacker News. And doing everything twice actually helped me a lot. Because before I came into my paid bootcamp, I had already spun up some React apps. I had already started to mess with WebPack, and I knew enough that I wasn't understanding it very much, I was just following the instructions. But the second time you do things, you have to space, to really try to experiment, to actually read the docs, which most people don't do, and actually try to understand what the hell it is you're doing. And I felt that I had an edge over the other people in my bootcamp because I did six months of FreeCodeCamp prior.Jerod Santo: So this other thing that you do, which not everybody does, is this Learning in Public idea... And you have this post, Learn in Public. You call it "The fastest way to learn", or the fastest way to build your expertise - networking, and second brain. I'm not sure what the second brain is, so help us out with that one... But also, why is learning in public faster than learning in private.Shawn Wang: Yeah. This is a reflection that came from me understanding the difference, qualitatively, between why I'm doing so well in my tech career versus my finance career. In finance, everything is private, meaning the investment memos that I wrote, the trade ideas that I had - they're just from a company; they're intellectual property of my company. In fact, I no longer own them. Some of my best work has been in that phase, and it's locked up in an email inbox somewhere, and I'll never see it again. And that's because tech is a fundamentally open and positive-sum industry, where if you share things, you don't lose anything; you actually gain from sharing things... Whereas in finance it's a zero-sum battle against who's got the secret first and who can act on it first.And I think when you're in tech, you should exploit that. I think that we have been trained our entire lives to be zero-sum, from just like the earliest days of our school, where we learn, we keep it to ourselves to try to pass the test, try to get the best scores, try to get the best jobs, the best colleges, and all that, because everything's positional. For you to win, others have to lose. But I don't see tech in that way, primarily because tech is still growing so fast. There's multiple ways for people to succeed, and that's just the fundamental baseline. You layer on top of that a bunch of other psychological phenomenon.I've been really fascinated by this, by what it is so effective. First of all, you have your skin in the game, meaning that a lot of times when your name is on the blog posts out there, or your name is on the talk that you gave, your face is there, and people can criticize you, you're just incentivized to learn better, instead of just "Oh, I'll read this and then I'll try to remember it." No, it doesn't really stick as much. So having skin in the game really helps.When you get something wrong in public, there are two effects that happen. First is people will climb over broken glass to correct you, because that's how the internet does. There's a famous XKCD comic where like "I can't go to bed yet." "Why?" "Someone's wrong on the internet. I have to correct them."Jerod Santo: Right.Shawn Wang: So people are incentivized to fix your flaws for you - and that's fantastic - if you have a small ego.Jerod Santo: I was gonna say, that requires thick skin.Shawn Wang: Yeah, exactly. So honestly -- and that's a barrier for a lot of people. They cannot get over this embarrassment. What I always say is you can learn so much on the internet, for the low, low price of your ego. If we can get over that, we can learn so much, just because you don't care. And the way to get over it is to just realize that the version that you put out today is the version you should be embarrassed about a year from now, because that shows that you've grown. So you divorce your identity from your work, and just let people criticize your work; it's fine, because it was done by you, before you knew what you know today. And that's totally fine.And then the second part, which is that once you've gotten something wrong in public, it's just so embarrassing that you just remember it in a much clearer fashion. [laughter] This built a feedback loop, because once you started doing this, and you show people that you respond to feedback, then it builds a feedback and an expectation that you'll do the next thing, and people respond to the next thing... It becomes a conversation, rather than a solitary endeavor of you just learning the source material.So I really like that viral feedback loop. It helps you grow your reputation... Because this is not just useful for people who are behind you; a lot of people, when they blog, when they write, when they speak, they're talking down. They're like "I have five years experience in this. Here's the intro to whatever. Here's the approach to beginners." They don't actually get much out of that.[12:17] That's really good, by the way, for beginners; that's really important, that experts in the field share their knowledge. They don't see this blogging or this speaking as a way to level up in terms of speaking to their experts in their fields. But I think it's actually very helpful. You can be helpful to people behind you, you can be helpful to people around you, but you can actually be helpful to people ahead of you, because you're helping to basically broadcast or personalize their message. They can check their messaging and see - if you're getting this wrong, then they're getting something wrong on their end, docs-wise, or messaging-wise. That becomes a really good conversation. I've interacted with mentors that way. That's much more how I prefer to interact with my mentors than DM-ing and saying "Hey, can you be my mentor?", which is an unspecified, unpaid, indefinitely long job, which nobody really enjoys. I like project-based mentorship, I like occasional mentorship... I really think that that develops when you learn in public.Adam Stacoviak: I've heard it say that "Today is the tomorrow you hope for."Shawn Wang: Wow.Adam Stacoviak: Because today is always tomorrow at some point, right? Like, today is the day, and today you were hoping for tomorrow to be better...Jerod Santo: I think by definition today is not tomorrow...Adam Stacoviak: No, today is the tomorrow that you hoped for... Meaning like "Seize your moment. It's here."Jerod Santo: Carpe diem. Gotcha.Adam Stacoviak: Yeah, kind of a thing like that.Shawn Wang: I feel a little shady -- obviously, I agree, but also, I feel a little shady whenever I venture into this territory, because then it becomes very motivational speaking-wise, and I'm not about that. [laughs]Adam Stacoviak: Kind of... But I think you're in the right place; keep showing up where you need to be - that kind of thing. But I think your perspective though comes from the fact that you had this finance career, and a different perspective on the way work and the way a career progressed. And so you have a dichotomy essentially between two different worlds; one where it's private, and one where it's open. That to me is pretty interesting, how you were able to tie those two together and see things differently. Because I think too often sometimes in tech, especially staying around late at night, correcting someone on the internet, you're just so deeply in one industry, and you have almost a bubble around you. You have one lens for which you see the world. And you've been able to have multi-faceted perspectives of this world, as well as others, because of a more informed career path.Jerod Santo: Yeah. When you talk about finance as a zero-sum game, I feel like there's actually been moves now to actually open up about finance as well; I'm not sure if either of you have tracked the celebrity rise of Cathie Wood and Ark Invest, and a lot of the moves that she's doing in public. They're an investment fund, and they will actually publish their moves at the end of every day. Like, "We sold these stocks. We bought these stocks." And people laughed at that for a while, but because she's been successful with early on Bitcoin, early with Tesla, she's very much into growth stocks - because of that, people started to follow her very closely and just emulate. And when she makes moves now, it makes news on a lot of the C-SPANs and the... Is C-SPAN the Congress one? What's the one that's the finance one...?Shawn Wang: CNBC?Jerod Santo: CNBC, not C-SPAN. And so she's very much learning in public. She's making her moves public, she's learning as she goes, and to a certain degree it's paid off, it's paid dividends in her career. Now, I'm not sure if everyone's doing that... When you look at crypto investors, like - okay, pseudonymous, but a lot of that stuff, public ledgers. So there's moves that are being made in public there as well. So I wonder if eventually some of that mentality will change. What do you think about that?Shawn Wang: [15:45] It's definitely changed for -- there's always been celebrity investors, and people have been copying the Buffett portfolio for 30 years. So none of that is new. What is new is that Cathie Wood is running an ETF, and just by way of regulation and by way of innovation, she does have to report those changes. [laughs] So mutual funds, hedge fund holdings - these have all been public, and people do follow them. And you're always incentivized to talk your book after you've established your position in your book...Jerod Santo: Right, but you establish it first.Shawn Wang: ...so none of that has changed. But yeah, Cathie has been leading an open approach...Jerod Santo: Is it the rate of disclosure perhaps that's new? Because it seems like it's more real-time than it has historically...Shawn Wang: Yeah. I mean, she's running an ETF, which is new, actually... Because most people just run mutual funds or hedge funds, and those are much more private. The other two I'll probably shout out is Patrick O'Shaughnessy who's been running I guess a fund of funds, and he's been fairly open. He actually adopted the "learn in public" slogan in the finance field, independently of me. And then finally, the other one is probably Ted Seides, who is on the institutional investor side of things. So he invests for universities, and teachers pensions, and stuff like that. So all these people - yeah, they've been leading that... I'm not sure if it's spreading, or they've just been extraordinarily successful in celebrity because of it.Adam Stacoviak: This idea of "in public" is happening. You see people too, like -- CopyAI is building in public... This idea of learning in public, or building in public, or exiting in public... Whatever the public might be, it's happening more and more... And I think it's definitely similar to the way that open source moves around. It's open, so it's visible to everyone. There's no barrier to see what's happening, whether it's positive or negative, with whatever it is in public. They're leveraging this to their advantage, because it's basically free marketing. And that's how the world has evolved to use social media. Social media has inherently been public, because it's social...Jerod Santo: Sure.Adam Stacoviak: Aside from Facebook being gated, with friends and stuff like that... Twitter is probably the most primary example of that, maybe even TikTok, where if I'm a creator on TikTok, I almost can't control who sees my contact. I assume it's for the world, and theoretically, controlled by the algorithm... Because if I live in Europe, I may not see content in the U.S, and the algorithm says no, or whatever. But it's almost like everybody is just in public in those spaces, and they're leveraging it to their advantage... Which is an interesting place to be at in the world. There was never an opportunity before; you couldn't do it at that level, at that scale, ten years ago, twenty years ago. It's a now moment.Jerod Santo: Yeah. Swyx, can you give us an example of something learned in public? Do you basically mean like blog when you've learned something, or ask questions? What does learning in public actually mean when it comes to -- say, take a technology. Maybe you don't understand Redux. I could raise my hand on that one... [laughter] How could I learn that in public?Shawn Wang: There are a bunch of things that you can try. You can record a livestream of you going through the docs, and that's useful to maintainers, understanding "Hey, is this useful or not?" And that's immediately useful. It's so tangible.I actually have a list -- I have a talk about this on the blog post as well... Just a suggestion of things you can do. It's not just blogging. You can speak, you can draw comics, cheatsheets are really helpful... I think Amy Hoy did a Ruby on Rails cheatsheet that basically everyone has printed out and stapled to their wall, or something... And if you can do a nice cheatsheet, I think that's also a way for you to internalize those things that you're trying to learn anyway, and it just so happens to benefit others.So I really like this idea that whatever content you're doing, it's learning exhaust, it's a side effect of you learning, and you just happen to put it out there; you understand what formats work for you, because you have abnormal talents. Especially if you can draw, do that. People love developers who can draw. And then you just put it out there, and you win anyway just by doing it. You don't need an audience. You get one if you do this long enough, but you don't need an audience right away. And you win whether or not people participate with you. It's a single-player game that can become a multiplayer game.Specifically for Redux - you know, go through source code, or go through the docs, build a sample app, do like a simple little YouTube video on it... Depending on the maturity, you may want to try to speak at a meetup, or whatever... You don't have to make everything a big deal. I'm trying to remove the perception from people that everything has to be this big step, like it has to be top of Hacker News, or something. No. It could just be helpful for one person. I often write blog posts with one persona in mind. I mean, I don't name that person, but if you focus on that target persona, actually often it does better than when you try to make some giant thesis that shakes the world...Adam Stacoviak: [20:22] Yeah. Too often we don't move because we feel like the weight of the move is just too much. It's like "How many people have to read this for me to make this a success for me?" You mentioned it's a learning exhaust... And this exhaust that you've put out before - has it been helpful really to you? Is that exhaust process very helpful to you? Is that ingrained in the learnings that you've just gone through, just sort of like synthesize "Okay, I learned. Here's actually what I learned"?Shawn Wang: Yeah. This is actually an opportunity to tie into that second brain concept which maybe you wanted to talk a little bit about. Everything that you write down becomes your second brain. At this point I can search Google for anything I've ever written on something, and actually come up on my own notes, on whatever I had. So I'm not relying on my memory for that. Your human brain, your first brain is not very good at storage, and it's not very good at search; so why not outsource that to computers? And the only way to do that is you have to serialize your knowledge down into some machine-readable format that's part of research. I do it in a number of places; right now I do it across GitHub, and my blog, and a little bit of my Discord. Any place where you find you can store knowledge, I think that's a really good second brain.And for Jerod, I'll give you an example I actually was gonna bring up, which is when I was trying to learn React and TypeScript - like, this goes all the way back to my first developer job. I was asked to do TypeScript, even though I'd never done it before. And honestly, my team lead was just like "You know TypeScript, right? You're a professional React dev, you have to know TypeScript." And I actually said no, and I started learning on day one.And what I did was I created the React to TypeScript cheatsheet, which literally was just copy-pasteable code of everything that I found useful and I wish I knew when I was starting out. And I've just built that over time. That thing's been live for three years now, it's got like 20,000 stars. I've taught thousands of developers from Uber, from Microsoft, React and TypeScript. And they've taught me - every time they send in a question or a PR... I think it's a very fundamental way of interacting, which is learning in public, but specifically this one - it's open source knowledge; bringing up our open source not just to code, but to everything else. I think that's a fundamental feedback loop that I've really enjoyed as well.Break: [22:31]Jerod Santo: One of the things I appreciate about you, swyx, is how you are always thinking, always writing down your thoughts... You've been watching and participating in this industry now for a while, and you've had some pretty (I think) insightful writings lately. The first one I wanna talk about is this API Economy post. The Light and Dark Side of the API Economy. You say "Developers severely underestimate the importance of this to their own career." So I figure if that's the case, we should hear more about it, right?Shawn Wang: [laughs] Happy to talk about it. So what is the API economy? The API economy is developers reshaping the world in their image. Very bold statement, but kind of true, in the sense that there is now an API for everything - API for cards, API for bank accounts, API for text, API for authentication, API for shipping physical goods... There's all sorts of APIs. And what that enables you to do as a developer is you can call an API - as long as you know REST or GraphQL these days, you know how to invoke these things and make these things function according to the rest of your program. You can just fit those things right in. They're a very powerful thing to have, because now the cost of developing one of these services just goes down dramatically, because there's another company doing that as a service for you.I wrote about it mainly because at Netlify we were pitching serverless, we were pitching static hosting, and we were pitching APIs. That's the A in JAMstack. But when I google "API economy", all the search results were terrible. Just horrible SEO, bland, meaningless stuff that did not speak to developers; it was just speaking to people who like tech buzzwords. So I wrote my own version. The people who coined it at Andreessen Horowitz, by the way, still to this day do not have a blog post on the API economy. They just have one podcast recording which nobody's gonna listen. So I just wrote my version.Jerod Santo: You're saying people don't listen to podcasts, or what?Shawn Wang: [laughs] When people are looking up a term, they are like "What is this thing?", and you give them a podcast, they're not gonna sit down and listen for 46 minutes on a topic. They just want like "Give me it, in one paragraph. Give me a visual, and I'm gonna move on with my day." So yeah, whenever I see an opportunity like that, I try to write it up. And that's the light side; a lot of people talk about the light side. But because it's a personal blog, I'm empowered to also talk about the dark side, which is that as much as it enables developers, it actually is a little bit diminishing the status of human expertise and labor and talent. So we can talk a little bit about that, but I'm just gonna give you time to respond.Jerod Santo: [28:05] Hm. I'm over here thinking now that you're not at Netlify, I'm curious - this is tangential, but what's your take on JAMstack now? I know you were a professional salesman there for a while, but... It seems like JAMstack - we've covered it for years, it's a marketing term, it's something we've already been doing, but maybe taking it to the next level... There's lots of players now - Netlify, Vercel etc. And yet, I don't see much out there in the real world beyond the people doing demos, "Here's how to build a blog, here's how to do this, here's my personal website", and I'm just curious... I'm not like down on JAMstack, but I just don't see it manifesting in the ways that people have been claiming it's going to... And maybe we're just waiting for the technology to catch up. I'd just love to hear what you think about it now.Shawn Wang: Yeah. I think that you're maybe not involved in that world, so you don't see this, but real companies are moving on to JAMstack. The phrasing that I like is that -- JAMstack has gone mainstream, and it's not even worth talking about these days, because it's just granted that that's an option for you... So PayPal.me is on the JAMstack, there's large e-commerce sites... Basically, anything that decouples your backend from your frontend, and your frontend is statically-hosted - that is JAMstack.I actually am blanking on the name, but if you go check out the recent JAMstack Conf, they have a bunch of examples of people who've not only moved to JAMstack, but obviously moved to Netlify, where they're trying to promote themselves.Jerod Santo: Sure, yeah.Shawn Wang: So yes, it's true that I'm no longer a professional spokesperson, but it's not true that JAMstack is no longer being applied in the enterprise, because it is getting adoption; it's moved on that boring phase where people don't talk about it.One thing I'll say - a thesis that I've been pursuing is that JAMstack is in its endgame. And what do I mean by that? There's a spectrum between the previous paradigm that JAMstack was pushing back on, which is the all-WordPress/server-render-everything paradigm, and then JAMstack is prerender-everything. And now people are filling in--Jerod Santo: In the middle.Shawn Wang: ...I'm gonna put my hands in the Zoom screen right now. People are filling that gap between fully dynamic and fully static. So that's what you see with Next.js and Gatsby moving into serverless rendering, partial rendering or incremental rendering... And there's a full spectrum of ways in which you can optimize your rendering for the trade-offs of updating your content, versus getting your data/content delivered as quickly as possible. There's always some amount of precompilation that you need to do, and there's always some amount of dynamicism that you have to do, that cannot be precompiled. So now there is a full spectrum between those.Why I say it's the end game is because that's it, there's nothing else to explore. It's full-dynamic, full-static, choose some mix in the middle, that's it. It's boring.Jerod Santo: Hasn't that always been the case though? Hasn't there always been sites that server-side render some stuff, and pre-render other things? You know, we cache, we pre-render, some people crawl their own websites once, and... I don't know it seems like maybe just a lot of excitement around a lot of things that we've been doing for many years.Shawn Wang: [laughs] So first of all, those are being remade in the React ecosystem of things, which a lot of us lost when a lot of the web development industry moved to React... So that's an important thing to get back.I mean, I agree, that's something that we've always had, pre-rendering, and services like that, caching at the CDN layer - we've always had that. There's some differences... So if you understand Netlify and why they're trying to push distributed persistent rendering (DVR), it's because caching is a hard problem, and people always end up turning off the cache. Because the first time you run into a bug, you're gonna turn off the cache. And the cache is gonna stay off.So the way that Netlify is trying to fix it is that we put the cache in Git, essentially. Git is the source of truth, instead of some other source of truth distributed somewhere between your CDN and your database and somewhere else. No, everything's in Git. I'm not sure if I've represented that well, to be honest... [laughter]Adam Stacoviak: Well, good thing you don't work for Netlify anymore. We're not holding you to the Netlify standard.Shawn Wang: [31:58] Exactly. All I can say is that to me now it's a good thing in the sense that it's boring. It's the good kind of boring, in the sense of like "Okay, there's a spectrum. There's all these techniques. Yes, there were previous techniques, but now these are the new hotness. Pick your choice." I can get into a technical discussion of why this technique, the first one, the others... But also, is it that interesting unless you're evaluating for your site? Probably not...Jerod Santo: Well, it does play into this API economy though, right? Because when you're full JAMstack, then the A is your most important thing, and when the A is owned by a bunch of companies that aren't yours - like, there's a little bit of dark side there, right? All of a sudden, now I'm not necessarily the proprietor of my own website, to a certain degree, because I have these contracts. I may or may not get cut off... There's a lot of concerns when everybody else is a dependency to your website.Shawn Wang: Yeah. So I don't consider that a dark side at all.Jerod Santo: No, I'm saying to me that seems like a dark side.Shawn Wang: Yeah, sure. This is the risk of lock-in; you're handing over your faith and your uptime to other people. So you have to trade that off, versus "Can you build this yourself? And are you capable of doing something like this, and are you capable of maintaining it?" And that is a very high upfront cost, versus the variable cost of just hiring one of these people to do it for you as a service.So what I would say is that the API economy is a net addition, because you as a startup - the startup cost is very little, and if you get big enough where it makes sense for you to build in-house - go ahead. But this is a net new addition for you to turn fixed costs into variable costs, and start with a small amount of investment. But I can hire -- like, Algolia was started by three Ph.D's in search, and I can hire them for cents to do search on my crummy little website. I will absolutely do that every single day, until I get to a big enough point where I cannot depend on them anymore, and I have to build my own search. Fine, I'll do that. But until then, I can just rely on them. That's a new addition there.Jerod Santo: One hundred percent. So what then do you think is the darker side? You mentioned it, but put a finer point on it.Shawn Wang: Yeah. The dark side is that there are people -- like, when I call an Uber ride, Uber is an API for teleportation, essentially. I'm here, I wanna go there. I press a button, the car shows up. I get in the car, get off, I'm there. What this papers over is that the API is calling real actual humans, who are being commoditized. I don't care who drives the car, I really don't. I mean, they may have some ratings, but I kind of don't care.Jerod Santo: That was the case with taxis though, wasn't it?Shawn Wang: That was the case with taxis, for sure. But there's a lot of people living below the API, who are economically constrained, and people who live above the API, developers, who have all the upside, essentially... Because the developers are unique, the labor is commoditized. My DoorDash pickers, my Instacart deliverers - all these are subsumed under the API economy. They're commodities forever, they know it, and there's no way out for them, unless they become developers themselves. There's a class system developing below and above the API. And the moment we can replace these people under the API with robots, you better believe we'll do that, because robots are way cheaper, and they complain less, they can work 24 hours, all this stuff.Jerod Santo: Yeah.Shawn Wang: So that's the dark side, which is, yeah, as a developer now - fantastic. I can control most parts of the economy with just a single API call. As a startup founder, I can develop an API for literally anything, and people will buy it. The downside is human talent is being commoditized, and I don't know how to feel about that. I think people are not talking enough about it, and I just wanna flag it to people.Jerod Santo: Yeah.Adam Stacoviak: So dark side could mean a couple things. One, it could mean literally bad; dark as synonymous with bad. Or dark as in shady. And we're not sure, it's obscured in terms of what's happening. And so let's use an Instacarter or a Dasher - to use their terminology. I happen to be a DoorDash user, so I know they're called Dashers; that's the only reason I know that. It's not a downplay, it's just simply what the terminology is...[35:59] You could say it's below the API, but I wonder, if you've spoken with these people, or people that live in what you call below the API, because I would imagine they're not doing that because they're being forced. Like, it's an opportunity for them.Shawn Wang: Oh, yeah.Adam Stacoviak: And I remember when I was younger and I had less opportunity because I had less "above the API" (so to speak) talent... And I do agree there's a class here, but I wonder if it's truly bad; that dark is truly bad, or if it's just simply obscure in terms of how it's gonna play out.Shawn Wang: This is about upside. They will never get to that six figures income with this thing.Adam Stacoviak: Not that job.Jerod Santo: No.Shawn Wang: It's really about the class system, which is the dark side. You don't want to have society splinter into like a serving class and whatever the non-serving class is. It's also about the upside - like, I don't see a way for these people to break out unless, they really just take a hard stop and just go to a completely different career track.Jerod Santo: Right.Adam Stacoviak: Here's where I have a hard time with that... I'm not pushing back on that you're wrong, I'm just wondering more deeply...Shawn Wang: Sure.Adam Stacoviak: I imagine at one point in my life I was a DoorDasher.Shawn Wang: Yeah.Adam Stacoviak: I washed dishes, I did definitely unique jobs at a young age before I had skill. And so the path is skill, and as long as we have a path to skill, which you've show-cased through FreeCodeCamp in your path, then I think that dark side is just simply shady, and not bad.Shawn Wang: Okay.Adam Stacoviak: And I'm just trying to understand it, because I was truly a DoorDasher before DoorDash was available. I washed dishes, delivered papers, I had servant-level things; I was literally a server at a restaurant before... And I loved doing that kind of work, but my talents have allowed me to go above that specific job, and maybe even the pay that came with that job. I've served in the military before, got paid terrible dollars, but I loved the United States military; it's great. And I love everybody who's served in our military. But the point is, I think the path is skill, and as long as we have a pathway to skill, and jobs that can house that skill and leverage that skill to create new value for the world, I just wonder if it's just necessary for society to have, I suppose, above and below API things.Jerod Santo: Until we have all the robots. Then there is nobody underneath. At that point it's all robots under the API.Shawn Wang: Yes, and that is true in a lot of senses, actually. Like, farming is mostly robots these days. You do have individual farmers, but they're much less than they used to be. I don't know what to say about that, shady or dark... I think it's just -- there's no career track. You have to go break out of that system yourself. Thank God there's a way to do it. But back in the day, you used to be able to go from the mailroom to the boardroom.Adam Stacoviak: I see.Shawn Wang: I see these stories of people who used to be janitors at schools become the principal. Companies used to invest in all their people and bring them up. But now we're just hiring your time, and then if you wanna break out of that system - good luck, you're on your own. I think that that lack of upward mobility is a problem, and you're not gonna see it today. It's a slow-moving train wreck. But it's gonna happen where you have society split in two, and bad things happen because of it.Adam Stacoviak: I mean, I could agree with that part there, that there definitely is no lateral movement from Dasher to CEO of DoorDash.Shawn Wang: It's just not gonna happen.Adam Stacoviak: Or VP of engineering at DoorDash. I think because there is no path, the path would be step outside of that system, because that system doesn't have a path. I could agree with that, for sure.Jerod Santo: Yeah. I mean, the good news is that we are creating -- there are paths. This is not like a path from X to Y through that system, but there are other alternate paths that we are creating and investing in, and as well as the API gets pushed further and further down in terms of reachability - we now have more and more access to those things. It's easier now, today, than it ever has been, because of what we were talking about, to be the startup founder, right? To be the person who starts at CEO because the company has one person in it, and they're the CEO. And to succeed in that case, and become the next DoorDash.Adam Stacoviak: True.Jerod Santo: So there are opportunities to get out, it's just not a clear line... And yeah, it takes perhaps some mentorship, perhaps ingenuity... A lot of the things that it takes to succeed anyway, so...Shawn Wang: [40:05] I'll give a closing note for developers who are listening, because you're already a developer... So the analogy is if you're above the API, you tell machines what to do; if you're below the API, machines tell you what to do. So here's the developer analogy, which is there's another division in society, which is the kanban board. If you're below the kanban board, the kanban board tells you what to do. If you're above it, you tell developers what to do. [laughs]Jerod Santo: There you go.Shawn Wang: So how do you break out of that class division? I'll leave it out to you, but just keep in mind, there's always layers.Jerod Santo: I love that.Adam Stacoviak: I love the discussion around it, but I'm also thankful you approached the subject by a way of a blog post, because I do believe that this is interesting to talk about, and people should talk about it, for sure. Because it provides introspection into, I guess, potentially something you don't really think about, like "Do I live below or above the APi?" I've never thought about that in that way until this very moment, talking to you, so... I love that.Break: [40:58]Jerod Santo: So another awesome post you have written lately is about Cloudflare and AWS. Go - not the language, the game Go... I know very little about the language, and I know even less about the game... And Chess... How Cloudflare is approaching things, versus how AWS and Google and others are... Given us the TL;DR of that post, and then we'll discuss.Shawn Wang: Okay. The TL;DR of that post is that Cloudflare is trying to become the fourth major cloud after AWS, Azure and GCP. The way they're doing it is fundamentally different than the other three, and the more I've studied them - I basically observed Cloudflare for the entire time since I joined Netlify. Netlify kind of is a competitor to Cloudflare, and it's always this uncomfortable debate between "Should you put Cloudflare in front of Netlify? Netlify itself is a CDN. Why would you put a CDN in front of another CDN?" Oh, because Netlify charges for bandwidth, and Cloudflare does not. [laughter]Jerod Santo: It's as simple as that.Shawn Wang: And then there's DDOS protection, all that stuff; very complicated. Go look up the Netlify blog post on why you should not put Cloudflare in front of Netlify, and decide for yourself. But Netlify now taking on AWS S3 - S3 is like a crown jewel of AWS. This is the eighth wonder of the world. It provides eleven nines of durability. Nothing less than the sun exploding will take this thing down... [laughs]Jerod Santo: Right? You know what's funny - I don't even consider us at Changelog AWS customers; I don't even think of us that way. But of course, we use S3, because that's what you do. So yeah, we're very much AWS customers, even though I barely even think about it, because S3 is just like this thing that of course you're gonna use.Shawn Wang: There's been a recent history of people putting out S3-compatible APIs, just because it's so dominant that it becomes the de-facto standard. Backblaze did it recently. But Cloudflare putting out R2 and explicitly saying "You can slurp up the S3 data, and by the way, here's all the cost-benefit of AWS egress charges that's what Matthew Prince wrote about in his blog post is all totally true, attacks a part of AWS that it cannot compromise on and just comes at the top three clouds from a different way, that they cannot respond to.[44:17] So I always like these analogies of how people play destruction games. I'm a student of destruction, and I study Ben Thompson and Clay Christensen, and that entire world, very quickly... So I thought this was a different model of destruction, where you're essentially embracing rather than trying to compete head-on. And wrapping around it is essentially what Go does versus chess, and I like -- you know, there's all these comparisons, like "You're playing 2D chess, I'm playing 3D chess. You're playing chess, I'm playing Go." So Cloudflare is playing Go by surrounding the S3 service and saying "Here is a strict superset. You're already a consumer of S3. Put us on, and magically your costs get lower. Nothing else about it changes, including your data still lives in AWS if you ever decide to leave us." Or if you want to move to Cloudflare, you've just gotta do the final step of cutting off S3.That is a genius, brilliant move that I think people don't really appreciate, and it's something that I study a lot, because I work at companies that try to become the next big cloud. I worked at Netlify, and a lot of people are asking, "Can you build a large public company on top of another cloud? Our second-layer cloud is viable." I think Vercel and Netlify are proving that partially it is. They're both highly valued. I almost leaked some info there... When does this go out? [laughs]Jerod Santo: Next week, probably...Shawn Wang: Okay, alright... So they're both highly valued, and - like, can they be hundred-billion-dollar companies? I don't know. We don't know the end state of cloud, but I think people are trying to compete there, and every startup -- I nearly joined Render.com as well. Every startup that's trying to pitch a second-layer cloud thesis is always working under the shadows of AWS. And this is the first real thesis that I've seen, that like "Oh, okay, you not only can credibly wrap around and benefit, you can actually come into your own as a fourth major cloud." So I'm gonna stop there... There's so many thoughts I have about Cloudflare.Jerod Santo: Yeah. So do you see that R2 then -- I think it's a brilliant move, as you described it... As I read your post, I started to appreciate, I think, the move, more than I did when I first read about it and I was like "Oh, they're just undercutting." But it seems they are doing more than just that. But do you think that this R2 then is a bit of a loss leader in order to just take a whole bunch of AWS customers, or do you think there's actually an economic -- is it economically viable as a standalone service, or do you think Cloudflare is using it to gain customers? What are your thoughts in their strategy of Why?Shawn Wang: This is the top question on Twitter and on Hacker News when they launch. They are going to make money on this thing, and the reason is because of all the peering agreements that they've established over the past five years. As part of the normal business strategy of Cloudflare, they have peering agreements with all of the ISPs; bandwidth is free for them. So... For them in a lot of cases. Again, I have to caveat all this constantly, because I should note to people that I am not a cloud or networking expert. I'm just learning in public, just like the rest of you, and here's what I have so far. So please, correct me if I'm wrong, and I'll learn from it.But yeah, I mean - straight on, it's not a loss leader. They plan to make money on it. And the reason they can is because they have worked so hard to make their cost structure completely different in AWS, and they've been a friend to all the other ISPs, rather than AWS consuming everything in its own world. Now you're starting to see the benefits of that strategy play out. And by the way, this is just storage, but also they have data store, also they have service compute, all following the same model.Jerod Santo: So what do you think is a more likely path over the next two years? Cloudflare --Adam Stacoviak: Prediction time!Jerod Santo: ...Cloudflare steals just massive swathes of AWS customers, or AWS slashes prices to compete?Shawn Wang: So I try not to do the prediction business, because I got out of that from the finance days... All I'm doing is nowcasting. I observe what I'm seeing now and I try to put out the clearest vision of it, so the others can follow.I think that it makes sense for them to be replicating the primitives of every other cloud service. So in 2017 they did service compute with Cloudflare Workers. In 2018 they did eventually consistent data store. In 2019 - website hosting; that's the Netlify competitor. In 2020 they did strongly-consistent data store, with Durable Objects. In 2021 object storage. What's next on that list? Go on to your AWS console and go shopping. And instead of seven different ways to do async messaging in AWS, probably they're gonna do one way in Cloudflare. [laughs]Adam Stacoviak: [48:34] A unified API, or something like that...Jerod Santo: Yeah, they'll just look at AWS' offerings, the ones they like the best, and do it that way, right?Shawn Wang: Yeah, just pick it up.Adam Stacoviak: Maybe the way to get a prediction out of you, swyx, might be rather than directly predict, maybe describe how you win Go.Shawn Wang: How you win Go...Adam Stacoviak: Yeah, what's the point of Go? How do you win Go? Because that might predict the hidden prediction, so to speak.Shawn Wang: Okay. For listeners who don't know Go, let me draw out the analogy as well. So most people are familiar with chess; individual chess pieces have different values and different points, and they must all support each other. Whenever you play chess, you need the Knight to support the pawns, something like that... Whereas in Go, you place your pieces everywhere, and they're all indistinguishable from each other. And it's more about claiming territory; at the end of the day, that's how you win Go, you claim the most territory compared to the others... And it's never a winner-take-all situation. Most likely, it's like a 60/40. You won 60% of the territory and your competitor has 40% of the territory. That's more likely a mapping of how cloud is gonna play out than chess, where winner-takes-all when you take the King. There's no King in the cloud, but--Jerod Santo: Are you sure...?Shawn Wang: ...there's a lot likely of territory claiming, and Cloudflare is really positioned very well for that. It's just part of the final realization that I had at the end of the blog post. And partially, how you take individual pieces of territory is that you surround all the pieces of the enemy and you place the final piece and you fill up all the gaps, such that the enemy is completely cut off from everything else and is surrounded. And that's what R2 does to S3 - it surrounds S3, and it's up to you to place that final piece. They call it, Atari, by the way, which is the name of the old gaming company, Atari. They have placed AWS S3 in Atari, and it's up to the customers to say "I'm gonna place that final piece. I'm gonna pay the cost of transferring all my data out of S3 and cut S3 off", and they cut off all the remaining liberties. So how do you win in Go? You claim the most amount of territory, and you surround the pieces of the enemy.Adam Stacoviak: Which, if you thought maybe that was oxygen, the territory, you might suck the oxygen away from them, so they can't live anymore, so to speak... And maybe you don't take it by killing it. Maybe you sort of suffocate it almost, if their space becomes small enough; if you take enough territory and it begins to shrink enough, it's kind of like checkmate, but not.Shawn Wang: Yeah. There's also a concept of sente in Go, which is that you make a move that the opponent has to respond to, which is kind of like a check, or checkmate -- actually, not; just the check, in chess. And right now, AWS doesn't feel the need to respond. Cloudflare is not big enough. Like, these are names to us, but let's just put things in numbers. Cloudflare's market cap is 36 billion, AWS' market cap is 1.6 trillion; this is Amazon's total market cap. Obviously, AWS is a subset of that.Jerod Santo: Sure.Shawn Wang: So your competitor is 40 times larger than you. Obviously, Cloudflare is incentivized to make a lot of noise and make themselves seem bigger than it is. But until AWS has to respond, this is not real.Adam Stacoviak: Nice.Jerod Santo: So as a developer, as a customer of potentially one or both of these... Let's say you have a whole bunch of stuff on S3 - I'm asking you personally now, swyx - and R2 becomes available... Is that a no-brainer for you, or is there any reason not to use that?Shawn Wang: You're just adding another vendor in your dependency tree. I think for anyone running silicon bandwidth, it is a no-brainer.Jerod Santo: Yeah. So over the course of n months, where n equals when they launch plus a certain number - I mean, I think this is gonna end up eventually on Amazon's radar, to where it's gonna start affecting some bottom lines that important people are gonna notice. So I just wonder - I mean, how much territory can Cloudflare grab before there's a counter-move? It's gonna be interesting to watch.Shawn Wang: [52:12] So Ben from Vantage actually did a cost analysis... Vantage is a startup that is made up former AWS Console people; they're trying to build a better developer experience on top of AWS. They actually did a cost analysis on the R2 move, and they said that there's probably a hundred billion dollars' worth of revenue at stake for Amazon. So if they start to have a significant dent in that, let's say like 40%, AWS will probably have to respond. But until then, there's nothing to worry about. That's literally how it is in Amazon; you have to see the numbers hit before you respond.Jerod Santo: Yeah. It hasn't even been a blip on the radar at this point, the key metrics to the people who are important enough to care are watching. You said you started watching all of these CDNs. Of course, you worked at Netlify... You take an interest in backends. There's something you mentioned in the break about frontenders versus backend, and where you've kind of been directing your career, why you're watching Cloudflare so closely, what you're up to now with your work... Do you wanna go there?Shawn Wang: Let's go there. So if you track my career, I started out as a frontend developer. I was developing design systems, I was working with Storybook, and React, and all that... Then at Netlify I was doing more serverless and CLI stuff. At AWS more storage and database and AppSync and GraphQL stuff... And now at Temporal I'm working on a workflow engine, pure backend. I just went to KubeCon two weeks ago...Jerod Santo: Nice!Shawn Wang: What is a frontend developer doing at KubeCon...?Adam Stacoviak: New territory.Shawn Wang: It's a frontend developer who realizes that there's a career ceiling for frontend developers. And it's not a polite conversation, and obviously there are exceptions to frontend developers who are VPs of engineering, frontend developers who are startup founders... And actually, by the way, there's a lot of VC funding coming from frontend developers, which is fantastic for all my friends. They're all getting funded, left, right and center. I feel left out. But there is a Career ceiling, in a sense that survey a hundred VPs of engineering, how many of them have backend backgrounds, and how many of them have frontend backgrounds? And given that choice, what's more likely for you and your long-term career progression? Do you want to specialize in frontend or do you want to specialize in backend? Different people have different interests, and I think that you can be successful in whatever discipline you pick. But for me, I've been moving towards the backend for that reason.Adam Stacoviak: Describe ceiling. What exactly do you mean when you say "ceiling"?Shawn Wang: Career ceiling. What's your terminal title.Jerod Santo: Like your highest role, or whatever. Highest salary, highest role, highest title...Adam Stacoviak: Gotcha.Shawn Wang: Like, straight up, how many VPs of engineering and CTOs have backend backgrounds versus frontend.Jerod Santo: Yeah. I mean, just anecdotally, I would agree with you that it's probably 8 or 9 out of 10 CTOs have -- is that what you said, 8 or 9?Shawn Wang: Yeah, yeah. So there's obviously an economic reasoning for this; it's because there's a bias in the industry that frontend is not real development, and backend is. And that has to be combated. But also, there's an economic reasoning, and I always go back to the economics part, because of my finance background... Which is that your value to the company, your value to the industry really depends on how many machines run through you. You as an individual unit of labor, how much money do you control, and how much machine process, or compute, or storage, or whatever runs through you. And just straight-up frontend doesn't take as much. [laughs] Yes, frontend is hard, yes, design is hard, yes, UX is crucially important, especially for consumer-facing products... But at the end of the day, your compute is being run on other people's machines, and people don't value that as much as the compute that I pay for, that I need to scale, and therefore I need an experienced leader to run that, and therefore that is the leader of my entire eng.Jerod Santo: I wonder if that changes at all for very product-focused orgs, where I think a lot of frontenders, the moves are into product design and architecture, and away from - not software architecture, but product design. And it seems like maybe if you compare - not VP of engineering, but VP of product, you'd see a lot of former frontenders.Shawn Wang: [56:03] Yeah.Jerod Santo: Maybe that's their path. Do you think that's --Shawn Wang: Totally. But you're no longer a frontend dev. You suddenly have to do mocks...Jerod Santo: Yeah, but when you're VP of engineering you're not a backend dev either.Shawn Wang: Yeah.Jerod Santo: So you're kind of both ascending to that degreeShawn Wang: Backends devs will never report to you, let's put it that way.Jerod Santo: Okay. Fair.Shawn Wang: [laughter] But somehow, frontend devs have to report to backend devs, for some reason; just because they're superior, or something. I don't know, it's just like an unspoken thing... It's a very impolite conversation, but hey, it's a reality, man.Jerod Santo: So do you see this personally, or do you see this by looking around?Shawn Wang: Yeah.Jerod Santo: Yeah. You felt like you had reached a ceiling.Shawn Wang: Well, again, this is very impolite; there's a ton of ways to succeed, and there are definitely exceptions. Emily Nakashima at Honeycomb - former frontend person, now VP of engineering. I don't know, I could have done that. I have interest in backend and I'm pursuing that. So I will say that - this is a soft ceiling, it's a permeable ceiling. It's not a hard ceiling.Jerod Santo: Sure.Shawn Wang: But there's a ceiling though, because you can see the numbers.Adam Stacoviak: What is it in particular the VP of engineering does that would make a frontender less likely to have that role? What specifically? I mean, engineering is one of the things, right? Commanding the software... Which is not necessarily frontend.Jerod Santo: Well, frontend is also an engineering discipline.Adam Stacoviak: I guess it kind of depends on the company, too. Honeycomb is probably a different example.Shawn Wang: I haven't been a VP of engineering, so I only have some theories. I suggest you just ask the next VP of engineering that you talk to, or CTO.Adam Stacoviak: Yeah.Jerod Santo: Yeah. That'd be a good one to start asking people.Adam Stacoviak: What do you do here? What is it you do here?Shawn Wang: What is it you do here?Jerod Santo: Exactly.Shawn Wang: [laughs]Adam Stacoviak: Well, I just wondered if there was a specific skillset that happens at that VP of engineering level that leads more towards a backender being more likely than a frontender to get hired into the role.Shawn Wang: I think there's some traditional baggage. Power structures persist for very long times... And for a long time UX and frontend was just not valued. And we're like maybe five years into the shift into that. It's just gonna take a long time.Jerod Santo: I agree with that. So tell us what you're up to now. You said you're doing workflows... I saw a quick lightning talk; you were talking about "React for the backend." So you're very much taking your frontend stuff into the backend here, with React for the backend. Tell us about that.Shawn Wang: Let's go for it. So at Netlify and at AWS I was essentially a developer advocate for serverless. So this is very cool - it does pay-as-you-go compute, and you can do a lot of cool stuff with it. But something that was always at the back of my mind bothering me, that serverless does not do well, is long-running jobs. It just does not do well. You have to chain together a bunch of stuff, and it's very brittle; you cannot test it... It's way more expensive than you would do in a normal environment.Jerod Santo: Yeah.Shawn Wang: And it made me realize that in this move to take apart everything and make everything as a service, we have gained scalability, but we've lost basically everything else. And what I was trying to do was "How do we reconstruct the experience of the monolith? What are the jobs to be done?" When you break it down, what does a computer do for you, and what is not adequately addressed by the ecosystem?I went through the exercise... I wrote a blog post called "Reconstructing the monolith, and I actually listed it out." So what are the jobs of cloud for a computer? You want static file serving, you want functions, you want gateway, you want socket management, job runners, queue, scheduler, cold storage, hot storage. There's meta jobs like error logging, usage logging, dashboarding, and then edge computing is like a unique to cloud thing. But everything else, you can kind of break it up and you can locate it on one machine, or you can locate it on multiple machines, some of them owned by you, some of them not owned by you.The thing that serverless -- that had a whole in the ecosystem was job running. Not good. Basically, as an AWS developer right now, the answer is you set a CloudWatch schedule function, and you pull an endpoint, and that should read some states from a database, and check through where you are, and compute until the 15-minute timeout for Lambda, and then save it back in, and then wait for the next pull, and start back up again. Super-brittle, and just a terrible experience; you would never want to go this way.[01:00:08.13] The AWS current response to that is AWS Step Functions, which is a JSON graph of what happens after the other, and this central orchestrator controls all of that. I think we could do better, and that's eventually what got me to temporal. So essentially, this blog post that I wrote - people found me through that, and hired both our head of product and myself from this single blog post. So it's probably the highest ROI blog post I've ever written.Jerod Santo: Wow. That's spectacular.Shawn Wang: It's just the VC that invested in Temporal. So what Temporal does is it helps you write long-running workflows in a doable fashion; every single state transition is persisted to a database, in idiomatic code. So idiomatic Java, idiomatic Go, idiomatic JavaScript, and PHP. This is different from other systems, because other systems force you to learn their language. For Amazon, you have to learn Amazon States Language. For Google Workflows - Google Workflows has a very long, very verbose JSON and YAML language as well.And these are all weird perversions of -- like, you wanna start simple; JSON is very simple, for doing boxes and arrows, and stuff like that... But you start ending up having to handwrite the AST of a general-purpose programming language, because you want variables, you want loops, you want branching, you want all that god stuff. And the best way to model asynchronous and dynamic business logic is with a general-purpose programming language, and that's our strong opinion there.So Temporal was created at Uber; it runs over 300 use cases at Uber, including driver onboarding, and marketing, and some of the trips stuff as well. It was open source, and adopted at Airbnb, and Stripe, and Netflix, and we have all those case studies on -- DoorDash as well, by the way, runs on the Uber version of Temporal.Jerod Santo: There you go, Adam.Shawn Wang: And yeah, they spun out to a company two years ago, and we're now trying to make it as an independent cloud company. And again, the

为你读英语美文
了不起的盖茨比 · 熊叔

为你读英语美文

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:10


第438期 Gatsby believed in the green light盖次比信奉的那盏绿灯,The orgastic future the year by year recedes before us是年复一年在我们眼前渐渐消失的极乐未来。It eluded us then, but that's no matter我们始终追它不上,但没有关系Tomorrow we will run faster明天我们会跑得更快,Stretch out our arms farther and one fine morning把手伸得更长, 等到某个美好的早晨So we beat on于是我们奋力前进Boats against the current却如同逆水行舟Borne back ceaselessly into the past注定要不停地退回过去。OneIn my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice.在我年纪还轻、世故不深的时候...我父亲曾教训我一句话。"Always try to see the best in people." he would say.他说“总要把人往最好的方面想”。As a consequence, I'm inclined to reserve all judgments.由此,我一生待人接物宁可采取保留的态度。But even I have a limit.但是即便我也是有限度的。Back then, all of us drank too much.彼时,我们所有人都沉溺于杯中物。The more in tune with the times we were the more we drank.我们越想跟着这个时代我们就越纵情沉醉。And none of us contributed anything new.我们当中任何人也没创造出什么新的价值。TwoLife is something you dominate ,If you're any good.只要你足够优秀,人生由你主宰。All the bright, precious things fade so fast. And they don't come back.所以美好珍贵的事物总是消失得太快。一去不复返。ThreeHigh over the city, our yellow windows must have contributed their share of human secrets to the casual watcher in the street.我们这排灯火辉煌的窗户高高在这都市之上,不知蕴藏着何等人生的秘密。And I was him too looking up and wondering.而我脑海中也见到这么一位过客偶尔路过此地,抬头望望,不知所以。I was within and without enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life.我自己似乎又在里边又在外边。对这幕人生悲喜剧无穷的演变,又是陶醉又是恶心。FourHis smile was one of those rare smiles that you may come across four or five times in life.他那种笑容是你一辈子也难得遇见四五次的。It seemed to understand you and believe in you just as you would like to be understood and believed in.他这一笑向你表示他了解你,相信你,并且如同你心里正想的那般。FiveWe can't lose each other. And let all this glorious love into nothing.我们无法失去彼此,就让这段美好的爱情无疾而终吧...Come home. I'll be here waiting and hoping, for every long dream of you to come true.快回来,我在这儿怀着期望等待,望每个有你的梦都能成真。SixHe knew his mind would never again be free to romp like the mind of God.他知道他的意志再也不会无拘无束地驰骋天空了。SevenI remembered how we had all come to Gatsby's and guessed at his corruption while he stood before us concealing an incorruptible dream.我忆起我初次去他家的情形 我们一个个都在揣想他的背景是多么龌龊 而他本人站在我们面前 心里蕴藏着他纯洁的梦。The moon rose higher. And as I stood there, brooding on the old, unknown world. I thought of Gatsby's wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy's dock.夜幕渐渐降临。我站在那儿,一面思潮回到那古老、未知的世界。一面想到盖茨比第一次认出对岸黛西那盏绿灯的时候一定也有同等的惊奇。He had come such a long way. And his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it.他好不容易历尽甘苦。他的梦想似乎近在眼前,一伸手就可以掌握。But he did not know that it was already behind him.他所不知道的是他所追求的早已丢在了背后。主播介绍熊叔:毕业于上海外国语大学,英语名师,公众号:熊叔英语文章,音乐,图片非商业用途,版权归作者或版权方所有我们生活在世界各地,从事不同职业,利用业余时间做节目。为保证品质,至少每周三更新1期新节目。

Just Get A Real Job
Ep. 59 - Isabella Van Braeckel (Set & Costume Designer)

Just Get A Real Job

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 57:34


In Episode 59, Jamie has a great chat with Set & Costume Designer Isabella Van Braeckel about everything from her earliest creative memories, her journey into the theatre industry, her day-to-day workings as a Set Designer, working on her current show “Gatsby” (a musical retelling) and much more. This week's episode also features a cover of Johnny Cash's ‘Four Strong Winds' in tribute to James (Jas) Mackinlay (Jamie's late Grandad). Gone but never forgotten ❤️️   Isabella Van Braeckel: Isabella's Website: https://isabellavanbraeckel.com/ 'Gatsby' at Southwark Playhouse: https://www.southwarkplayhouse.co.uk/show-whats-on/gatsby/    Check out our website!: https://www.justgetarealjob.com   Donate to our Patreon page ☺️: www.patreon.com/justgetarealjob    Check out our YouTube Channel!: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAkul72gVEI6BYy2C5tKHig  Follow us on... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/justgetarealjob/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/justgetarealjob/    Twitter: https://twitter.com/justgetarealjob    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5jhVdYlNMU8jrFUQxShMit    Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/just-get-a-real-job/id1540434153    Artwork by Aimee Dinsdale: https://www.instagram.com/artbyaimeead/    Like and Subscribe ❤

Breaking the Curtain
Ep53 - Once Upon a December Updates

Breaking the Curtain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 38:21


It's time to unwrap our Stagey Holiday Gift Guide! Join Crissy and Jocelyn as they chat about the HOTTEST theatre news around the world from the upcoming NBC event - Annie Live! to the new Gatsby musical across the pond. They also share what made their 'must-have stagey gift list', and so much more on the final updates episode for Season 2 of Breaking the Curtain!

Rave Culture Podcast
@Momo_Dubz on Becoming a Fashion Designer & Sober Raver

Rave Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:15


Shop Raveraide hydration sticks (discount code EMMAK) - https://drinkraveraide.com Shop Freedom Rave Wear's new Gatsby collection dropping on 12/2 (15% discount code EMMANYE) - https://freedomravewear.com/ In this episode, I'm joined by @Momo_Dubz - one of the most genuine, kind creators in the EDM scene. Maureen is the Creative Director of Operations at Freedom Rave Wear where she helps design several of their recent clothing lines. She also lends her design chops to artists like Jauz for their own merch lines. Maureen is also very open about being a recovering addict and clean raver. We're going to chat a little bit about that journey and how she's been able to embrace this community while raving sober. I know a lot of people will resonate with her story so I'm so excited to welcome her to the podcast! Set of the week: Matroda live from EDC Las Vegas - https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/dM4ZK7sPDoqhWDYR8

Ready Set BBQ Podcast
Ep. 42 - Hiram's Gatsby Bday & Gucci Mashed Potatoes

Ready Set BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:35


In this episode I am joined by Jaime and Hiram (virtually) as we start off once again talking about another disappointing Cowboy's loss. In a shocking headline we learn that Oklahoma's coach has left the team for Hollywood.  Local fighter Brandon Figueroa gets his first defeat as the fight goes to the cards. We have a little issue with his opponent's ring attire.  I talk about my trip to Austin over the weekend and how I witnessed the first Longhorn wins in what feels like forever.  I tell the guys that many things have changed over the past 2 years since I've been to a game in Austin.  The tailgate has moved from the surrounding parking lots to right outside the stadium.  Unfortunately you have to pay for the beer.  I said I wasn't going to eat Austin BBQ but when I saw the options in the stadium I opted for the giant tray of Stubb's BBQ Brisket nachos.  We share a little about our Thanksgiving meals and admit we need a little break to make room for the Christmas meals.  We play a little game called Thanksgiving draft.  Each of us takes turns picking one dish to put together a Thanksgiving meal.  Each dish can only be picked once.  There were some interesting choices on this one.  Vote on who's Thanksgiving you are coming to.   Hiram gives us a little more detail about his Gatsby Bday party and takes a moment to appreciate that he is living in Los Angeles, Hollywood.  He gives a run down of the fancy party as well as a friends giving that had an upscale spread of foods as well as Gucci Mashed potatoes.  A bunch of joes that cook like pros!!!Ready Set BBQ Shophttps://www.readysetbbq.com/shop Law Office of Hector Hernandezhttp://hhernandezlaw.com/?fbclid=IwAR3kaG_wQzrsUJ-cVxJLUyjvipMPM1R59xo9YMKFFsiGHaaUgdZ8hd8cB7Y

Mark's Movie Collection
The Long Goodbye

Mark's Movie Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 47:48


The final entry into Noirvember 2021. Private Investigator? I barely even know her! The 1973 entry into the annals of detective movies by Robert Altman starring Elliott Gould. There's a lot to talk about and I won't mention any of it. I'll try not to. This one is coming out hot so keep your eyes peeled for any updates here. This movie definitely has some content warnings that the 70's just didn't have. Marty Augustine is huge on that. He's the prototype for the Heath Ledger Joker, pretty much. He's like "what if the Joker was a chill dude within the system versus outside of it?" It's wild. High Tower Court is a wild place. Really. https://www.laweekly.com/high-tower-court-what-its-like-to-live-in-the-famous-hollywood-landmark-from-the-long-goodbye/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpgm7SVRws0 High Tower Court like overlooks the Hollywood Bowl (or is super nearby). This area is pretty magical to me. Coming from flatland the elevation changes alone are wonderful. But it's mysterious. It's fascinating. I saw a musical at the Hollywood Bowl and it definitely felt like something. A Simple Favor, starring Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively, feels like an update version of The Long Goodbye. It's an interesting movie. I liked it a lot more than I initially thought I would although it's maybe more inspired by the text than the film. Still, worth mentioning. Also, Michael Connolley's second Bosch book, The Black Ice, is inspired by a mix of the book and the film. I liked that book quite a bit as well. I feel like "el porto del gato" inspired the "GATO!!!" in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. Shane Black isn't above that. "El Porto" is an unusual way to say "the door" in Spanish. I'd go for "la puerta" but I learned not too long ago that "porton" was an older word for a door based on the name of a restaurant. So I'll accept it as being fine although, in the book, the Spanish isn't always exactly on point. Chandler was born in Chicago and grew up in England so the actual fuck did he know about Spanish. That doesn't detract from the story or anything but he's such a picky little bastard about his hoighty toighyt literary references you'd think he'd spend a little more time getting that right. But Chandler had a lot of his own issues. I didn't mention Dr. Veringer at all and I'm sure there's a lot to mention there but he's played by the Illinois Nazi from The Blues Brothers, Henry Gibson. Wonderful character actor. I also didn't mention the kid working at the grocery store or Marlowe subsequently seeing him in jail. Good stuff. There's a lot of that. I also didn't mention dogs. But there was the one white dog in the middle of the road that Marlowe calls "Asta". He's got a cigarette in his mouth so it sounds like Astor as if it was a rich person or an Iranian prophet but it's definitely Asta the dog from The Thin Man. The director and screenwriter(s) definitely know about Film Noir and detective movies and books and they consciously chose to not quite do that. The Thin Man movie slaps, though. Super good. I think that Roger Wade was an insert for Chandler but also a reference to Hammett. I organically compared Hammett to Hemingway in that last episode but it turns out that was far from an original thought. He's a tall (6'5" or 195-196cm) bearded man who is wildly alcoholic which is a dead ringer for Hemingway. In Cuba tall men are referred to as a "Hemingway". Or were. Chandler, probably, had a bit of an inferiority complex with regards to Hammett who was the originator--the creator from which Chandler modeled his work. But Chandler also probably used that character as an insert himself--being problematically alcoholic. David Carradine has a cameo that focuses on the prison industrial complex and the impending "war on drugs". That was wild. The car that Marlowe drives in this movie was Elliott Gould's actual car at the time. It was a 1948 Lincoln Continental. Really wild. I maintain that cars got cool in the 50's. If you come at be with "but uughghgugh t-buckets and '32 fords" yeah those didn't look like how we think they look like now until the late 40's and early 50's when the GIs came back from military service and had fabrication and mechanical experience and few outlets to get that programming out. But that's when hot rods really took flight. And then the Tri-5's and the Barracuda came out. It's a whole cascade of cool cars around that time. Apropos of nothing, F1 is really cool. If you haven't ever really been into it you can check out F1: Drive to Survive on Netflix. It'll bring you in and explain things along with giving you the stories. Expecto Petronas. Lennox calls Marlowe a "born loser". Lennox and Marlowe weren't friends quite like that in the book--it was more chill and Marlowe was more taking on a charity case as well as sticking to his principles and finding another misfit to get along with. When I said it was a reverse The Great Gatsby I meant it. Just Lennox wasn't the Gatsby. Elieen Wade was the Gatsby and she was murderous. It felt stupid after a while but the writing was compelling. Vilmos Zsigmond is a gangster. The free-roaming camera of this movie was wonderful. I didn't talk about it enough and I didn't inspect this enough but I was short on time and energy. Being sick sucks, team. It really does. I know there were some flubs and yeah, there's not images in this one. Sorry team. I just didn't have the fuel for it. I'll see you sometime next year. I'm still on twitter @coolmarkd feel free to tweet @ me. I don't think DMs are on because I'm not really up for receiving communications from strangers that they wouldn't be OK with saying publicly.

Slow & Steady
No Cell Service. No Internet.

Slow & Steady

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 40:42


Brian is back! He returns from the Grand Canyon trip and reflects on his time spent while disconnected. Benedicte gives a progress update on her Gatsby work and her plans for streaming in the coming months. Queen Raae GitHub: gatsby-plugin-let-it-snow Conference Buddy — an app by Mirjam Aulbach Stream: Use a plugin to accept Stripe donations of any amount  semantic-release: Benedicte's "tech crush" Benedicte catches up with Brian after he returns from his trip to the Grand Canyon. She is feeling focused, hitting a good rhythm, and is cranking out code! She has a lot of excitement around the NPM package semantic-release this week and is headed in the right direction for her Gatsby-authority business. She shares her latest YouTube livestream plans as she wraps up season two of Gatsby Deep Dives with Queen Raae and the Nattermob Pirates.Without cell service or internet connectivity, Brian had time to reflect while having a blast backpacking the Grand Canyon. The headline? He might be ready for a break from bootstrapping. Certainly not a "forever" break, but perhaps some time for hobbies to be just that — hobbies. To be continued...

Startup Insider
"Wir wollen das nächste Unicorn werden!" - die Erfolgsgeschichte der Datenplattform Y42 – Teil 2

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:18


In unserer Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute erneut Hung Dang, CEO & Founder von Y42, und schließen in dem zweiten Teil an das Gespräch vom 9. November an. Vor kurzem hat Y42 eine Serie-A-Finanzierungsrunde in Höhe von 32 Millionen US-Dollar, unter der Leitung von Atomico und Insight Partners abgeschlossen.

RT
On Contact: Rich People Things

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 27:05


On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses the peculiar pathology of the rich and our oligarchic state with Chris Lehmann, editor-at-large for The New Republic. “The rich are different from us,” F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, “Yes, they have more money.” The exchange, although it never took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway. The rich are different. The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers, and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in ‘The Great Gatsby' and his short story “The Rich Boy,” a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities. Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear. “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy,” Fitzgerald wrote of the wealthy couple at the center of Gatsby's life. “They smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” Aristotle, Niccolò Machiavelli, Alexis de Tocqueville, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx all began from the premise there is a natural antagonism between the rich and the masses. “Those who have too much of the goods of fortune, strength, wealth, friends, and the like, are neither willing nor able to submit to authority,” Aristotle wrote in ‘Politics.' “The evil begins at home; for when they are boys, by reason of the luxury in which they are brought up, they never learn, even at school, the habit of obedience.” Oligarchs, these philosophers knew, are schooled in the mechanisms of manipulation, subtle and overt repression, and exploitation to protect their wealth and power at our expense. Foremost among their mechanisms of control is the control of ideas. Ruling elites ensure that the established intellectual class is subservient to an ideology – in this case free market capitalism and globalization – that justifies their greed. “The ruling ideas are nothing more than the ideal expression of the dominant material relationships,” Marx wrote, “the dominant material relationships grasped as ideas.” Chris Lehmann, an editor-at-large for The New Republic and The Baffler, and the author of ‘Rich People Things.'

Ready Set BBQ Podcast
Ep. 41: Outdoor Cooking & Fancy Bday Party

Ready Set BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:39


In this episode I am joined by Jaime and Hiram (virtually) as we talk a little bit of Cowboys football as the rollercoaster ride continues as they keep us on the ropes whether they are a great team or a so so team. Jaime is barely hanging on to the band wagon.  We also talk about the fight between Crawford and Porter and did Porter's dad throw him under the bus?  We debate who the best pound for pound fighter is.  I stop by GW's BBQ and Catering once again to enjoy some breakfast barbacoa.  Hiram attempts to practice cooking steak and admits he needs some help. My attempt to cook a Thanksgiving meal outdoors was a success but not without a few hick ups. I attempt and execute a menu of smoked turkey, mac and cheese, scratch green bean casserole, jalapeno cornbread and sausage stuffing.  I talk about what went right and some things I would change if I had to do it all over again.  They guys talk about what they have planned for Thanksgiving and Hiram has a birthday party planned the day before Thanksgiving.   I had my Thanksgiving meal early because I plan to travel to Austin on Thursday.  We talk about some of the places we remember eating during our time in Austin and some of our visits.  We end up mostly talking about places we ate at 2am after a night out. Jaime talks about his experiences working at Walmart on a Black Friday.  He coins a term that would make Urban Dictionary blush.  We talk a little bit about wrestling and the steroid controversy in sports.   Hiram doesn't think the Rock is "All Natural".  We talk a little bit about movies, specifically the ones that wrestlers star in.  Hiram throws Derek Jeter under the bus but we respect his game and a dude.  Hiram gives us some more details on his 20s Gatsby party he plans to have for his birthday.  His bar plans to all dress up and have a 20s theme style party with prohibition drinks and old movies on the tube.  Happy Birthday Hiram!!A bunch of joes that cook like pros!!!Ready Set BBQ Shophttps://www.readysetbbq.com/shop Law Office of Hector Hernandezhttp://hhernandezlaw.com/?fbclid=IwAR3kaG_wQzrsUJ-cVxJLUyjvipMPM1R59xo9YMKFFsiGHaaUgdZ8hd8cB7YGW's BBQ & Catering Co.BBQ | United States | GW's BBQ Catering Co. (gwsbbqcatering.com)

Big Table
Episode 23: Matthew Specktor

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:16


The Interview:Matthew Specktor grew up in Los Angeles, the son of a talent agent and screenwriter. One of his childhood heroes was the doomed writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, who arrived in Hollywood in the late 1930s to eke out a living as a screenwriter while he labored on what ended up being his fourth and final novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon. A few months shy of his 40th birthday, Specktor moved back to L.A. and into a crumbling building across the street from where Fitzgerald lived out his last years. Flailing professionally and reeling from his mother's cancer diagnosis, he became "unmoored." Instead of cracking up, as Fitz had after the Roaring Twenties ended and he struggled to complete his post-Gatsby masterpiece Tender is the Night, Specktor embarked on a journey of self-discovery, re-evaluating ideas of success and failure in general but especially in Los Angeles, his home town. What followed is part cultural memoir, part cultural history, and part portrait of a place, as the dust jacket declares in Always Crashing in the Same Car: On Art, Crisis & Los Angeles, California (Tin House Books, 2021). Specktor tells his own narrative alongside some known and lesser-known players of the New Hollywood era of his youth: you meet Carole Eastman, Eleanor Perry, Warren Zevon, Tuesday Weld, Hal Ashby, and Michael Cimino. The result is a masterwork of genre-bending nonfiction, an unvarnished view of Tinseltown and its demons, but also its undeniable magic and charm. In the end, after much loss, optimism wins. And that is when you know you have a good book on your hands: When it helps us navigate through the "beautiful ruins that await us all." J.C. Gabel spoke with Skecktor, earlier this fall, about his latest book and the creative process. The Reading: Matthew Specktor reads from his latest book, Always Crashing in the Same Car: On Art, Crisis & Los Angeles, California.Music by David Bowie.

Bourbon and Buckeyes
Same As It Ever Was

Bourbon and Buckeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 56:06


With the reference to the Talking Heads, there will be no doubt how true those words are (yes we're talking about the CFP).  Updates and, of course, opinions on the latest and greatest around the sports world (even Gatsby has opinion and gives his insight on this week's episode)It's the uncut version of Bourbon and Buckeyes  . . . Same As It Ever Was -#talkingheads#putcincyin#takebamaout#goawayaaron#getwellbutcherbaker#shutuptony

Slow & Steady
Let it Snow!

Slow & Steady

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 46:53


Benedikt and Benedicte pair up for another week without Brian. Benedikt continues to interview at Userlist which offers learning opportunities. Benedicte shares both a change in plans for the end of this year and a broad goal for 2022. Queen Raae GitHub: gatsby-plugin-let-it-snow "Let it Snow" in action Now Hiring: Frontend Developer (Ember.js) at Userlist Rewardful: affiliate & referral setup for SaaS companies using Stripe Benedicte is feeling creative after working on a short, fun Gatsby plugin, "Let it Snow". On the topic of plugins, there has been a change in plans. After canceling the launch of the pay-what-you-want bootcamp last week, she plans to rework the bootcamp offerings in favor of creating Gatsby plugins. The new strategy is to offer these plugins and have additional paid, asynchronous coursework available for those who want to customize or dive deeper.Benedikt moves ahead with hiring at Userlist for the frontend developer position. Questions still remain about the process and he ponders the best way to structure a paid test project. After preparing the test project for interviews, he spent time on a rejuvenating task — improving the integration architecture. The Rewardful integration is scheduled to launch today!Finally, in a shared win of mutual accountability, Benedicte continues yoga and Benedikt continues walking.

Bright Side Home Theater
Take Over Tuesday Nov 16th

Bright Side Home Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:40


It's Take Over Tuesday where you the listener run the podcast.Email, Comment on Twitter or Comment on YouTube and DJ will talk about your comment on the Take Over Tuesday Podcast.  A movie you liked?  A Movie you hated?  A favorite scene?  Got some new Home Theater gear?  Comments about past Bright Side Home Theater podcasts?  Anything Home Theater, just let him know.Now just Push Play to start talking Home Theater, this is YOUR podcast.To Help Support the Podcast you can sign up for a Monthly Donation HERE to become a Patreon Member

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network
BRIGHT SIDE HOME THEATER: TAKE OVER TUESDAY NOV 16TH

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:40


It's Take Over Tuesday where you the listener run the podcast.Email, Comment on Twitter or Comment on YouTube and DJ will talk about your comment on the Take Over Tuesday Podcast.  A movie you liked?  A Movie you hated?  A favorite scene?  Got some new Home Theater gear?  Comments about past Bright Side Home Theater podcasts?  Anything Home Theater, just let him know.Now just Push Play to start talking Home Theater, this is YOUR podcast.To Help Support the Podcast you can sign up for a Monthly Donation HERE to become a Patreon Member

10X Success Hacks for Startups, Innovations and Ventures (consulting and training tips)
Pitch Cafe Podcast EP 1 | Facebook Product Leader & Angel Investor Shares Her Hacks | Deepthi Rao

10X Success Hacks for Startups, Innovations and Ventures (consulting and training tips)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 32:20


In this episode of Pitch Cafe ☕️, I talk with good friend Deepthi Rao

Ryan Seaman and Friends
Mike Kaminsky- Artist Manager/Adventure Cat Records

Ryan Seaman and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


This week I have artist manager Mike Kaminsky, he was one of my first roommates in Los Angeles! He's managed bands: 3oh3!, The Summer Set, Meg and Dia, Gatsby's American Dream, Tonight Alive, Neck Deep, Twin XL, and TONS more! Tune in as we talk about how Mike and I met each other as well as he got his start in the music industry that he's now successful in!

Slow & Steady
Hiring, Bootcamps, and Winter!

Slow & Steady

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:41


With Brian away, Benedikt and Benedicte discuss the nuances of why hiring can be difficult. Benedikt shares how the search for open roles at Userlist is going. Benedicte is scheduling the remaining Gatsby bootcamps and is open to experimenting with offerings and formats in the future. The two discuss valuable aspects of different educational content formats. Finally, winter is coming and Benedikt is not particularly excited about it. Now Hiring: Customer Success Manager at Userlist Now Hiring: Frontend Developer (Ember.js) at Userlist Develop and deploy a pay-what-you-want feature with Stripe BREATH - A 30 Day Yoga Journey Benedikt gives an update on hiring efforts at Userlist. The number of applications for the frontend developer position is well below the number of applications for the customer success position. Benedikt weighs waiting to hire someone who is an excellent fit versus hiring someone more quickly. Benedicte agrees that either way, it's important to find a personality that is willing to jump into the fold at a startup. If you are interested in this role, please apply or forward it to someone that might be.Benedicte has scheduled the second of three Gatsby mini bootcamps and is finalizing the schedule for the third. As discussed previously, there is room for experimentation. Specificity in the content is important for making the learning relevant but a few questions remain. Are takeaway coding examples the valuable piece? How about asynchronous content delivery? Besides Gatsby, she hopes to sneak in some coding on POW! soon.Winter is coming and Benedikt isn't thrilled. The two discuss some strategies for coping with less sunlight at higher latitudes — Vitamin D, sun lamps, and exercise. After a few days away from yoga, Benedicte is starting a new 30-day journey herself.

Software Sessions
Taking Notes on Serverless

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:23


Swizec is the author of the Serverless Handbook and a software engineer at Tia.Swizec Swizec's personal site Serverless Handbook AWS Lambda API Gateway Operating Lambda (The cold start problem) Provisioned Concurrency DynamoDB Relational Database Service Aurora Simple Queue Service CloudFormation CloudWatch Other serverless function hosting providers Gatsby Cloud Functions Vercel Serverless Functions Netlify Functions Cloud Functions for Firebase Related topics Serverless Framework Jamstack Lighthouse What is a Static Site Generator? What is a CDN? Keeping Server-Side Rendering Cool With React Hydration TypeScript TranscriptYou can help edit this transcript on GitHub.[00:00:00] Jeremy: Today, I'm talking to Swiz Teller. He's a senior software engineer at Tia. The author of the serverless handbook and he's also got a bunch of other courses and I don't know is it thousands of blog posts now you have a lot of them.[00:00:13] Swizec: It is actually thousands of, uh, it's like 1500. So I don't know if that's exactly thousands, but it's over a thousand.I'm cheating a little bit. Cause I started in high school back when blogs were still considered social media and then I just kind of kept going on the same domain.Do you have some kind of process where you're, you're always thinking of what to write next? Or are you writing things down while you're working at your job? Things like that. I'm just curious how you come up with that. [00:00:41] Swizec: So I'm one of those people who likes to use writing as a way to process things and to learn. So one of the best ways I found to learn something new is to kind of learn it and then figure out how to explain it to other people and through explaining it, you really, you really spot, oh shit. I don't actually understand that part at all, because if I understood it, I would be able to explain it.And it's also really good as a reference for later. So some, one of my favorite things to do is to spot a problem at work and be like, oh, Hey, this is similar to that side project. I did once for a weekend experiment I did, and I wrote about it so we can kind of crib off of my method and now use it. So we don't have to figure things out from scratch.And part of it is like you said, that just always thinking about what I can write next. I like to keep a schedule. So I keep myself to posting two articles per week. It used to be every day, but I got too busy for that. when you have that schedule and, you know, okay on Tuesday morning, I'm going to sit down and I have an hour or two hours to write, whatever is on top of mind, you kind of start spotting more and more of these opportunities where it's like a coworker asked me something and I explained it in a slack thread and it, we had an hour. Maybe not an hour, but half an hour of back and forth. And you actually just wrote like three or 400 words to explain something. If you take those 400 words and just polish them up a little bit, or rephrase them a different way so that they're easier to understand for somebody who is not your coworker, Hey, that's a blog post and you can post it on your blog and it might help others.[00:02:29] Jeremy: It sounds like taking the conversations most people have in their day to day. And writing that down in a more formal way. [00:02:37] Swizec: Yeah. not even maybe in a more formal way, but more, more about in a way that a broader audience can appreciate. if it's, I'm super gnarly, detailed, deep in our infrastructure in our stack, I would have to explain so much of the stuff around it for anyone to even understand that it's useless, but you often get these nuggets where, oh, this is actually a really good insight that I can share with others and then others can learn from it. I can learn from it. [00:03:09] Jeremy: What's the most accessible way or the way that I can share this information with the most people who don't have all this context that I have from working in this place. [00:03:21] Swizec: Exactly. And then the power move, if you're a bit of an asshole is to, instead of answering your coworkers question is to think about the answer, write a blog post and then share the link with them.I think that's pushing it a little bit.[00:03:38] Jeremy: Yeah, It's like you're being helpful, but it also feels a little bit passive aggressive.[00:03:44] Swizec: Exactly. Although that's a really good way to write documentation. One thing I've noticed at work is if people keep asking me the same questions, I try to stop writing my replies in slack and instead put it on confluence or whatever internal wiki that we have, and then share that link. and that has always been super appreciated by everyone.[00:04:09] Jeremy: I think it's easy to, have that reply in slack and, and solve that problem right then. But when you're creating these Wiki pages or these documents, how're people generally finding these. Cause I know you can go through all this trouble to make this document. And then people just don't know to look or where to go. [00:04:30] Swizec: Yeah. Discoverability is a really big problem, especially what happens with a lot of internal documentation is that it's kind of this wasteland of good ideas that doesn't get updated and nobody maintains. So people stop even looking at it. And then if you've stopped looking at it before, stop updating it, people stop contributing and it kind of just falls apart.And the other problem that often happens is that you start writing this documentation in a vacuum. So there's no audience for it, so it's not help. So it's not helpful. That's why I like the slack first approach where you first answered the question is. And now, you know exactly what you're answering and exactly who the audiences.And then you can even just copy paste from slack, put it in a conf in JIRA board or wherever you put these things. spice it up a little, maybe effect some punctuation. And then next time when somebody asks you the same question, you can be like, oh, Hey, I remember where that is. Go find the link and share it with them and kind of also trains people to start looking at the wiki.I don't know, maybe it's just the way my brain works, but I'm really bad at remembering information, but I'm really good at remembering how to find it. Like my brain works like a huge reference network and it's very easy for me to remember, oh, I wrote that down and it's over there even if I don't remember the answer, I almost always remember where I wrote it down if I wrote it down, whereas in slack it just kind of gets lost.[00:06:07] Jeremy: Do you also take more informal notes? Like, do you have notes locally? You look through or something? That's not a straight up Wiki. [00:06:15] Swizec: I'm actually really bad at that. I, one of the things I do is that when I'm coding, I write down. so I have almost like an engineering log book where everything, I, almost everything I think about, uh, problems I'm working on. I'm always writing them down on by hand, on a piece of paper. And then I never look at those notes again.And it's almost like it helps me think it helps me organize my thoughts. And I find that I'm really bad at actually referencing my notes and reading them later because, and this again is probably a quirk of my brain, but I've always been like this. Once I write it down, I rarely have to look at it again.But if I don't write it down, I immediately forget what it is.What I do really like doing is writing down SOPs. So if I notice that I keep doing something repeatedly, I write a, uh, standard operating procedure. For my personal life and for work as well, I have a huge, oh, it's not that huge, but I have a repository of standard procedures where, okay, I need to do X.So you pull up the right recipe and you just follow the recipe. And if you spot a bug in the recipe, you fix the recipe. And then once you have that polished, it's really easy to turn that into an automated process that can do it for you, or even outsource it to somebody else who can work. So we did, you don't have to keep doing the same stuff and figuring out, figuring it out from scratch every time.[00:07:55] Jeremy: And these standard operating procedures, they sound a little bit like runbooks I guess. [00:08:01] Swizec: Yep. Run books or I think in DevOps, I think the big red book or the red binder where you take it out and you're like, we're having this emergency, this alert is firing. Here are the next steps of what we have to check.[00:08:15] Jeremy: So for those kinds of things, those are more for incidents and things like that. But in your case, it sounds like it's more, uh, I need to get started with the next JS project, or I need to set up a Postgres database things like that. [00:08:30] Swizec: Yeah. Or I need to reset a user to initial states for testing or create a new user. That's sort of thing.[00:08:39] Jeremy: These probably aren't in that handwritten log book.[00:08:44] Swizec: The wiki. That's also really good way to share them with new engineers who are coming on to the team.[00:08:50] Jeremy: Is it where you just basically dump them all on one page or is it where you, you organize them somehow so that people know that this is where, where they need to go. [00:09:00] Swizec: I like to keep a pretty flat structure because, I think the, the idea of categorization outlived its prime. We have really good search algorithms now and really good fuzzy searching. So it's almost easier if everything is just dumped and it's designed to be easy to search. a really interesting anecdote from, I think they were they were professors at some school and they realized that they try to organize everything into four files and folders.And they're trying to explain this to their younger students, people who are in their early twenties and the young students just couldn't understand. Why would you put anything in a folder? Like what is a folder? What is why? You just dump everything on your desktop and then command F and you find it. Why would you, why would you even worry about what the file name is? Where the file is? Like, who cares? It's there somewhere.[00:09:58] Jeremy: Yeah, I think I saw the same article. I think it was on the verge, right?I mean, I think that's that's right, because when you're using, say a Mac and you don't go look for the application or the document you want to run a lot of times you open up spotlight and just type it and it comes up.Though, I think what's also sort of interesting is, uh, at least in the note taking space, there's a lot of people who like setting up things like tags and things like that. And in a way that feels a lot like folders, I guess [00:10:35] Swizec: Yeah. The difference between tags and categories is that the same file can have multiple tags and it cannot be in multiple folders. So that's why categorization systems usually fall apart. You mentioned note taking systems and my opinion on those has always been that it's very easy to fall into the trap of feeling productive because you are working on your note or productivity system, but you're not actually achieving anything.You're just creating work for work sake. I try to keep everything as simple as possible and kind of avoid the overhead.[00:11:15] Jeremy: People can definitely spend hours upon hours curating what's my note taking system going to be, the same way that you can try to set up your blog for two weeks and not write any articles. [00:11:31] Swizec: Yeah. exactly.[00:11:32] Jeremy: When I take notes, a lot of times I'll just create a new note in apple notes or in a markdown file and I'll just write stuff, but it ends up being very similar to what you described with your, your log book in that, like, because it's, it's not really organized in any way. Um, it can be tricky to go back and actually, find useful information though, Though, I suppose the main difference though, is that when it is digital, uh, sometimes if I search for a specific, uh, software application or a specific tool, then at least I can find, um, those bits there [00:12:12] Swizec: Yeah. That's true. the other approach I'd like to use is called the good shit stays. So if I can't remember it, it probably wasn't important enough. And you can, especially these days with the internet, when it comes to details and facts, you can always find them. I find that it's pretty easy to find facts as long as you can remember some sort of reference to it.[00:12:38] Jeremy: You can find specific errors or like you say specific facts, but I think if you haven't been working with a specific technology or in a specific domain for a certain amount of time, you, it, it can be hard to, to find like the right thing to look for, or to even know if the solution you're looking at is, is the right one. [00:13:07] Swizec: That is very true. Yeah. Yeah, I don't really have a solution for that one other than relearn it again. And it's usually faster the second time. But if you had notes, you would still have to reread the notes. Anyway, I guess that's a little faster, cause it's customized to you personally.[00:13:26] Jeremy: Where it's helpful is that sometimes when you're looking online, you have to jump through a bunch of different sites to kind of get all the information together. And by that time you've, you've lost your flow a little bit, or you you've lost, kind of what you were working on, uh, to begin with. Yeah. [00:13:45] Swizec: Yeah. That definitely happens.[00:13:47] Jeremy: Next I'd like to talk about the serverless handbook. Something that you've talked about publicly a little bit is that when you try to work on something, you don't think it's a great idea to just go look at a bunch of blog posts. Um, you think it's better to, to go to a book or some kind of more, uh, I don't know what you would call it like larger or authoritative resource. And I wonder what the process was for, for you. Like when you decided I'm going to go learn how to do serverless you know, what was your process for doing that? [00:14:23] Swizec: Yeah. When I started learning serverless, I noticed that maybe I just wasn't good at finding them. That's one thing I've noticed with Google is that when you're jumping into a new technical. It's often hard to find stuff because you don't really know what you're searching for. And Google also likes to tune the algorithms to you personally a little bit.So it can be hard to find what you want if you are, if you haven't been in that space. So I couldn't really find a lot of good resources, uh, which resulted in me doing a lot of exploration, essentially from scratch or piecing together different blogs and scraps of information here and there. I know that I spend ridiculous amounts of time in even as deep as GitHub issues on closed issues that came up in Google and answer something or figure, or people were figuring out how something works and then kind of piecing all of that together and doing a lot of kind of manual banging my head against the wall until the wall broke.And I got through. I decided after all of that, that I really liked serverless as a technology. And I really think it's the future of how backend systems are going to be built. I think it's unclear yet. What kind of systems is appropriate for and what kind of kind of systems it isn't.It does have pros and cons. it does resolve a lot of the very annoying parts of building a modern website or building upon backend go away when you go serverless. So I figured I really liked this and I've learned a lot trying to piece it together over a couple of years.And if combined, I felt like I was able to do that because I had previous experience with building full stack websites, building full stack apps and understanding how backends work in general. So it wasn't like, oh, How do I do this from scratch? It was more okay. I know how this is supposed to work in theory.And I understand the principles. What are the new things that I have to add to that to figure out serverless? So I wrote the serverless handbook basically as a, as a reference or as a resource that I wish I had when I started learning this stuff. It gives you a lot of the background of just how backends work in general, how databases connect, what different databases are, how they're, how they work.Then I talked some, some about distributed systems because that comes up surprisingly quickly when you're going with serverless approaches, because everything is a lot more distributed. And it talks about infrastructure as code because that kind of simplifies a lot of the, they have opposite parts of the process and then talks about how you can piece it together in the ends to get a full product. and I approached it from the perspective of, I didn't want to write a tutorial that teaches you how to do something specific from start to finish, because I personally don't find those to be super useful. Um, they're great for getting started. They're great for building stuff. If you're building something, that's exactly the same as the tutorial you found.But they don't help you really understand how it works. It's kind of like if you just learn how to cook risotto, you know how to cook risotto, but nobody told you that, Hey, you actually, now that you know how to cook risotto, you also know how to just make rice and peas. It's pretty much the same process.Uh, and if you don't have that understanding, it's very hard to then transition between technologies and it's hard to apply them to your specific situation. So I try to avoid that and write more from the perspective. How I can give somebody who knows JavaScript who's a front end engineer, or just a JavaScript developer, how I can give them enough to really understand how serverless and backends works and be able to apply those approaches to any project.[00:18:29] Jeremy: When people hear serverless, a lot of times they're not really sure what that actually means. I think a lot of times people think about Lambdas, they think about functions as a service. but I wonder to you what does serverless mean? [00:18:45] Swizec: It's not that there's no server, there's almost always some server somewhere. There has to be a machine that actually runs your code. The idea of serverless is that the machine and the system that handles that stuff is trans is invisible to you. You're offloading all of the dev ops work to somebody else so that you can full focus on the business problems that you're trying to solve.You can focus on the stuff that is specific and unique to your situation because, you know, there's a million different ways to set up a server that runs on a machine somewhere and answers, a, API requests with adjacent. And some people have done that. Thousands of times, new people, new folks have probably never done it.And honestly, it's really boring, very brittle and kind of annoying, frustrating work that I personally never liked. So with serverless, you can kind of hand that off to a whole team of engineers at AWS or at Google or, whatever other providers there are, and they can deal with that stuff. And you can, you can work on the level of, I have this JavaScript function.I want this JavaScript function to run when somebody hits this URL and that's it. That's all, that's essentially all you have to think about. So that's what serverless means to me. It's essentially a cloud functions, I guess.[00:20:12] Jeremy: I mean, there been services like Heroku, for example, that, that have let people make rails apps or Django apps and things like that, where the user doesn't really have to think about the operating system, um, or about creating databases and things like that. And I wonder, to you, if, if that is serverless or if that's something different and, and what the difference there might be. [00:20:37] Swizec: I think of that as an intermediary step between on prem or handling your own servers and full serverless, because you still have to think about provisioning. You still have to think of your server as a whole blob or a whole glob of things that runs together and runs somewhere and lives or lifts somewhere.You have to provision capacity. You have to still think about how many servers you have on Heroku. They're called dynos. you still have to deal with the routing. You have to deal with connecting it to the database. Uh, you always have to think about that a little bit, but you're, you're still dealing with a lot of the frameworky stuff where you have to, okay, I'm going to declare a route. And then once I've declared the route, I'm going to tell it how to take data from the, from the request, put it to the function. That's actually doing the work. And then you're still dealing with all of that. Whereas with full serverless, first of all, it can scale down to zero, which is really useful.If you don't have a lot of traffic, you can have, you're not paying anything unless somebody is actually using your app. The other thing is that you don't deal with any of the routing or any of that. You're just saying, I want this URL to exist, and I want it to run that function, that you don't deal with anything more than that.And then you just write, the actual function that's doing the work. So it ends up being as a normal jobs function that accepts a request as an argument and returns a JSON response, or even just a JSON object and the serverless machinery handles everything else, which I personally find a lot easier. And you don't have to have these, what I call JSON bureaucracy, where you're piping an object through a bunch of different functions to get from the request to the actual part that's doing the work. You're just doing the core interesting work.[00:22:40] Jeremy: Sort of sounds like one of the big distinctions is with something like Heroku or something similar. You may not have a server, but you have the dyno, which is basically a server. You have something that is consistently running, Whereas with what you consider to be serverless, it's, it's something that basically only launches on when it's invoked. Um, whether that's a API call or, or something else. The, the routing thing is a little bit interesting because the, when I was going through the course, there are still the routes that you write. It's just that you're telling, I guess the API gateway Amazon's API gateway, how to route to your functions, which was very similar to how to route to a controller action or something like that in other languages.[00:23:37] Swizec: Yeah. I think that part is actually is pretty similar where, I think it kind of depends on what kind of framework you end up building. Yeah, it can be very simple. I know with rails, it's relatively simple to define a new route. I think you have to touch three or four different files. I've also worked in large express apps where.Hooking up the controller with all of the swagger definitions or open API definitions, and everything else ends up being like six or seven different files that have to have functions that are named just right. And you have to copy paste it around. And I, I find that to be kind of a waste of effort, with the serverless framework.What I like is you have this YAML file and you say, this route is handled by this function. And then the rest happens on its own with next JS or with Gatsby functions, Gatsby cloud functions. They've gone even a step further, which I really like. You have the slash API directory in your project and you just pop a file in there.And whatever that file is named, that becomes your API route and you don't even have to configure anything. You're just, in both of them, if you put a JavaScript file in slash API called hello, That exports, a handler function that is automatically a route and everything else happens behind the scenes.[00:25:05] Jeremy: So that that's more of a matter of the framework you're using and how easy does it make it to, to handle routing? Whether that's a pain or a not.[00:25:15] Swizec: Yeah. and I think with the serverless frameworks, it's because serverless itself, as a concept makes it easier to set this up. We've been able to have these modern frameworks with really good developer experience Gatsby now with how did they have Gatsby cloud and NextJS with Vercel and I think Netlify is working on it as well.They can have this really good integration between really tight coupling and tight integration between a web framework and the deployment environment, because serverless is enabling them to spin that up. So easily.[00:25:53] Jeremy: One of the things about your courses, this isn't the only thing you focus on, but one of the use cases is basically replacing a traditional server rendered application or a traditional rails, django, spring application, where you've got Amazon's API gateway in front, which is serving as the load balancer.And then you have your Lambda functions, which are basically what would be a controller action in a lot of frameworks. and then you're hooking it up to a database which could be Amazon. It could be any database, I suppose. And I wonder in your experience having worked with serverless at your job or in side projects, whether that's like something you would use as a default or whether serverless is more for background jobs and things like that.[00:26:51] Swizec: I think the underlying hidden question you're asking is about cold starts and API, and the response times, is one of the concerns that people have with serverless is that if your app is not used a lot, your servers scale down to zero. So then when somebody new comes on, it can take a really long time to respond.And they're going to bail and be upset with you. One way that I've solved, that is using kind of a more JAM Stacky approach. I feel like that buzzword is still kind of in flux, but the idea is that the actual app front-end app, the client app is running off of CDNs and doesn't even touch your servers.So that first load is of the entire app and of the entire client system is really fast because it comes from a CDN that's running somewhere as close as possible to the user. And it's only the actual APIs are hitting your server. So in the, for example, if you have something like a blog, you can, most blogs are pretty static.Most of the content is very static. I use that on my blog as well. you can pre-render that when you're deploying the project. So you, you kind of, pre-render everything that's static when you deploy. And then it becomes just static files that are served from the CDN. So you get the initial article. I think if you, I haven't tested in a while, but I think if you load one of my articles on swizec.com, it's readable, like on lighthouse reports, if you look at the lighthouse where it gives you the series of screenshots, the first screenshot is already fully readable.I think that means it's probably under 30 or 40 milliseconds to get the content and start reading, but then, then it rehydrates and becomes a react app. and then when it's a react app, it can make for their API calls to the backend. So usually on user interaction, like if you have upvotes or comments or something like that, Only when the user clicks something, you then make an API call to your server, and that then calls a Lambda or Gatsby function or a Netlify cloud function, or even a Firebase function, which then then wakes up and talks to the database and does things, and usually people are a lot more forgiving of that one taking 50 milliseconds to respond instead of 10 milliseconds, but, you know, 50 milliseconds is still pretty good.And I think there were recently some experiments shared where they were comparing cold start times. And if you write your, uh, cloud functions in JavaScript, the average cold startup time is something like a hundred milliseconds. And a big part of that is because you're not wrapping this entire framework, like express or rails into your function. It's just a small function. So the server only has to load up something like, I don't know. I think my biggest cloud functions have been maybe 10 kilobytes with all of the dependencies and everything bundled in, and that's pretty fast for a server to, to load run, start no JS and start serving your request.It's way fast enough. And then if you need even more speed, you can go to rust or go, which are even faster. As long as you avoid the java, .net, C-sharp those kinds of things. It's usually fine.[00:30:36] Jeremy: One of the reasons I was curious is because I was going through the rest example you've got, where it's basically going through Amazon's API gateway, um, goes to a Lambda function written in JavaScript, and then talks to dynamoDB gives you a record back or creates a record and, I, I found that just making those calls, making a few calls, hopefully to account for the cold start I getting response times of maybe 150 to 250 milliseconds, which is not terrible, but, it's also not what I would call fast either.So I was just kind of curious, when you have a real app, like, are, are there things that you've come across where Lambda maybe might have some issues or at least there's tricks you need to do to, to work around them? [00:31:27] Swizec: Yeah. So the big problem there is, as soon as a database is involved, that tends to get. Especially if that database is not co-located with your Lambda. So it's usually, or when I've experimented, it was a really bad idea to go from a Vercel API function, talk to dynamo DB in AWS that goes over the open internet.And it becomes really slow very quickly. at my previous job, I experimented with serverless and connecting it to RDS. If you have RDS in a separate private network, then RDS is that they, the Postgres database service they have, if that's running in a separate private network, then your functions, it immediately adds 200 or 300 milliseconds to your response times.If you keep them together, it usually works a lot faster. ANd then there are ways to keeping them. Pre-warned usually it doesn't work as well as you would want. There are ways on AWS to, I forget what it's called right now, but they have now what's, some, some sort of automatic rewarming, if you really need response times that are smaller than a hundred, 200 milliseconds.But yeah, it mostly depends on what you're doing. As soon as you're making API calls or database calls. You're essentially talking to a different server that is going to be slower on a lambda then it is if you have a packaged pserver, that's running the database and the server itself on the same machine.[00:33:11] Jeremy: And are there any specific challenges related to say you mentioned RDS earlier? I know with some databases, like for example, Postgres sometimes, uh, when you have a traditional server application, the server will pool the connections. So it'll make some connection into your data database and just keep reusing them.Whereas with the Lambda is it making a new connection every time? [00:33:41] Swizec: Almost. So Lambdas. I think you can configure how long it stays warm, but what AWS tries to do is reuse your laptops. So when the Lambda wakes up, it doesn't die immediately. After that initial request, it stays, it stays alive for the next, let's say it's one minute. Or even if it's 10 minutes, it's, there's a life for the next couple of minutes.And during that time, it can accept new requests, new requests and serve them. So anything that you put in the global namespace of your phone. We'll potentially remain alive between functions and you can use that to build a connection pool to your database so that you can reuse the connections instead of having to open new connections every time.What you have to be careful with is that if you get simultaneous requests at actually simultaneous requests, not like 10 requests in 10 milliseconds, if you get 10 requests at the same millisecond, you're going to wake up multiple Lambdas and you're going to have multiple connection pools running in parallel.So it's very easy to crash your RDS server with something like AWS Lambda, because I think the default concurrency limit is a thousand Lambdas. And if each of those can have a pool of, let's say 10 requests, that's 10,000 open requests or your RDS server. And. You were probably not paying for high enough tier for the RDS server to survive that that's where it gets really tricky.I think AWS now has a service that lets you kind of offload a connection pool so that you can take your Lambda and connect it to the connection pool. And the connection pool is keeping warm connections to your server. but an even better approach is to use something like Aurora DB, which is also an on AWS or dynamo DB, which are designed from the ground up to work with serverless applications.[00:35:47] Jeremy: It's things that work, but you have to know sort of the little, uh, gotchas, I guess, that are out there. [00:35:54] Swizec: Yeah, exactly. There's sharp edges to be found everywhere. part of that is also that. serverless, isn't that old yet I think AWS Lambda launched in 2014 or 2015, which is one forever in internet time, but it's still not that long ago. So we're still figuring out how to make things better.And, it's also where, where you mentioned earlier that whether it's more appropriate for backend processes or for user-facing processes, it does work really well for backend processes because you CA you have better control over the maximum number of Lambdas that run, and you have more patience for them being slow, being slow sometimes. And so on.[00:36:41] Jeremy: It sounds like even for front end processes as long as you know, like you said, the sharp edges and you could do things like putting a CDN in front where your Lambdas don't even get hit until some later time. There's a lot of things you can do to make it where it is a good choice or a good I guess what you're saying, when you're building an application, do you default to using a serverless type of stack? [00:37:14] Swizec: Yes, for all of my side projects, I default to using serverless. Um, I have a bunch of apps running that way, even when serverless is just no servers at all. Like my blog doesn't have any cloud functions right now. It's all running from CDNs, basically. I think the only, I don't know if you could even count that as a cloud function is w my email signup forms go to an API with my email provider.So there's also not, I don't have any servers there. It's directly from the front end. I would totally recommend it if you are a startup that just got tens of millions of dollars in funding, and you are planning to have a million requests per second by tomorrow, then maybe not. That's going to be very expensive very quickly.But there's always a trade off. I think that with serverless, it's a lot easier to build in terms of dev ops and in terms of handling your infrastructure, it's, it takes a bit of a mind shift in how you're building when it comes to the actual logic and the actual, the server system that you're building.And then in terms of costs, it really depends on what you're doing. If you're a super huge company, it probably doesn't make sense to go and serverless, but if you're that. Or if you have that much traffic, you hopefully are also making enough money to essentially build your own serverless system for yourself.[00:38:48] Jeremy: For someone who's interested in trying serverless, like I know for myself when I was going through the tutorial you're using the serverless framework and it creates all these different things in AWS for you and at a high level I could follow. Okay. You know, it has the API gateway and you've got your simple queue service and DynamoDB, and the lambdas all that sort of thing.So at a high level, I could follow along. But when I log into the AWS console, not knowing a whole lot about AWS, it's creating a ton of stuff for you. And I'm wondering from your perspective for somebody who's learning about serverless, how much do they need to really dive into the AWS internals and understand what's going on there. [00:39:41] Swizec: That's a tough one because personally I try to stay away as much as possible. And especially with the serverless framework, what I like is configuring everything through the framework rather than doing it manually. Um, because there's a lot of sharp edges there as well. Where if you go in and you manually change something, then AWS can't allow serverless framework to clean up anymore and you can have ghost processes running.At Tia, we've had that as a really interesting challenge. We're not using serverless framework, we're using something called cloud formation, which is essentially. One lower level of abstraction, then serverless framework, we're doing a lot more work. We're creating a lot more work for ourselves, but that's what we have. And that's what we're working with. these decisions predate me. So I'm just going along with what we have and we wanted to have more control, because again, we have dev ops people on the team and they want more control because they also know what they're doing and we keep having trouble with, oh, we were trying to use infrastructure as code, but then there's this little part where you do have to go into the AWS console and click around a million times to find the right thing and click it.And we've had interesting issues with hanging deploys where something gets stuck on the AWS side and we can take it back. We can tear it down, we can stop it. And it's just a hanging process and you have to wait like seven hours for AWS to do. Oh, okay. Yeah. If it's been there for seven hours, it's probably not needed and then kills it and then you can deploy.So that kind of stuff gets really frustrating very quickly.[00:41:27] Jeremy: Sounds like maybe in your personal projects, you've been able to, to stick to the serverless framework abstraction and not necessarily have to understand or dive into the details of AWS and it's worked out okay for you. [00:41:43] Swizec: Yeah, exactly. it's useful to know from a high, from a high level what's there and what the different parts are doing, but I would not recommend configuring them through the, through the AWS console because then you're going to always be in the, in the AWS console. And it's very easy to get something slightly wrong.[00:42:04] Jeremy: Yeah. I mean, I know for myself just going through the handbook, just going into the console and finding out where I could look at my logs or, um, what was actually running in AWS. It wasn't that straightforward. So, even knowing the bare minimum for somebody who's new to, it was like a little daunting. [00:42:26] Swizec: Yeah, it's super daunting. And they have thousands, if not hundreds of different products on AWS. and when it comes to, like you mentioned logs, I, I don't think I put this in the handbook because I either didn't know about it yet, or it wasn't available quite yet, but serverless can all the serverless framework also let you look at logs through the servers framework.So you can say SLS function, name, logs, and it shows you the latest logs. it also lets you run functions locally to an extent. it's really useful from that perspective. And I personally find the AWS console super daunting as well. So I try to stay away as much as possible.[00:43:13] Jeremy: It's pretty wild when you first log in and you click the button that shows you the services and it's covering your whole screen. Right. And you're like, I just want to see what I just pushed. [00:43:24] Swizec: Yeah, exactly. And there's so many different ones and they're all they have these obscure names that I don't find meaningful at all.[00:43:34] Jeremy: I think another thing that I found a little bit challenging was that when I develop applications, I'm used to having the feedback cycle of writing the code, running the application or running a test and seeing like, did it work? And if it didn't, what's the stack trace, what, what happened? And I found the process of going into CloudWatch and looking at the logs and waiting for them to eventually refresh and all that to be, a little challenging. And, and, um, so I was wondering in your, your experience, um, how you've worked through, you know, how are you able to get a fast feedback loop or is this just kind of just part of it. [00:44:21] Swizec: I am very lazy when it comes to writing tests, or when it comes to fast feedback loops. I like having them I'm really bad at actually setting them up. But what I found works pretty well for serverless is first of all, if you write your backend a or if you write your cloud functions in TypeScript that immediately resolves most of the most common issues, most common sources of bugs, it makes sure that you're not using something that doesn't exist.Make sure you're not making typos, make sure you're not holding a function wrong, which I personally find very helpful because I have pretty fast and I make typos. And it's so nice to be able to say, if it's completely. I know that it's at least going to run. I'm not going to have some stupid issue of a missing semi-colon or some weird fiddly detail.So that's already a super fast feedback cycle that runs right in your IDE the next step is because you're just writing the business logic function and you know, that the function itself is going to run. You can write unit tests that treat that function as a normal function. I'm personally really bad at writing those unit tests, but they can really speed up the, the actual process of testing because you can go and you can be like, okay.So I know that the code is doing what I want it to be doing if it's running in isolation. And that, that can be pretty fast. The next step that is, uh, Another level in abstraction and and gives you more feedback is with serverless. You can locally invoke most Lambdas. The problem with locally running your Lambdas is that it's not the same environment as on AWS.And I asked one of the original developers of the same serverless framework, and he said, just forget about accurately replicating AWS on your system. There are so many dragons there it's never going to work. and I had an interesting example about that when I was building a little project for my girlfriend that sends her photos from our relationship to an IOT device every day or something like that.It worked when I ran SLS invoke and it ran and it even called all of the APIs and everything worked. It was amazing. And then when I deployed it, it didn't work and it turned out that it was a permissions issue. I forgot to give myself a specific, I am role for something to work. That's kind of like a stair-stepping process of having fast feedback cycles first, if it compiles, that means that you're not doing anything absolutely wrong.If the tests are running, that means it's at least doing what you think it's doing. If it's invoking locally, it means that you're holding the API APIs and the third-party stuff correctly. And then the last step is deploying it to AWS and actually running it with a curl or some sort of request and seeing if it works in production.And that then tells you if it's actually going to work with AWS. And the nice thing there is because uh serverless framework does this. I think it does a sort of incremental deploys. The, that cycle is pretty fast. You're not waiting half an hour for your C code pipeline or for your CIO to run an integration test, to do stuff.One minute, it takes one minute and it's up and you can call it and you immediately see if it's working.[00:47:58] Jeremy: Basically you're, you're trying to do everything you can. Static typing and, running tests just on the functions. But I guess when it comes down to it, you really do have to push everything, update AWS, have it all run, um, in order to, to really know. Um, and so I guess it's, it's sort of a trade-off right. Versus being able to, if you're writing a rails application and you've got all your dependencies on your machine, um, you can spin it up and you don't really have to wait for it to, to push anywhere, but, [00:48:36] Swizec: Yeah. But you still don't know if, what if your database is misconfigured in production?[00:48:42] Jeremy: right, right. So it's, it's never, never the same as production. It's just closer. Right? Yeah. Yeah, I totally get When you don't have the real services or the real databases, then there's always going to be stuff that you can miss. Yeah, [00:49:00] Swizec: Yeah. it's not working until it's working in production.[00:49:03] Jeremy: That's a good place to end it on, but is there anything else you want to mention before we go?[00:49:10] Swizec: No, I think that's good. Uh, I think we talked about a lot of really interesting stuff.[00:49:16] Jeremy: Cool. Well, Swiz, thank you so much for chatting with me today. [00:49:19] Swizec: Yeah. Thank you for having me.

Novel Pairings
86. Palpable tension and shocking twists in Passing by Nella Larsen

Novel Pairings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:08


When we first released our episode on Passing by Nella Larsen in June of 2020, we were already professing our excitement for the new movie starring Tessa Thompson and Ruth Nega. This month, the film is finally releasing on Netflix.  We can't wait to watch and see how the palpable tension and twisty tone translate to the screen. This episode contains spoilers, but we give you ample warning so feel free to listen before or after watching. Our discussion includes:  Gatsby connections galore, and an argument for replacing Gatsby with Passing [16:35]  Intersectionality and Irene's struggle with loyalty across race, gender, and class lines [27:56]  Who should pick this up? [32:15] Plus, as always, we're recommending six contemporary books to pair with our classic,  including a literary thriller and one of this summer's buzziest books. For more bonus episodes, nerdy classes, and extra book talk,  join our Classics Club: patreon.com/novelpairings.com. Connect with us  on Instagram or Twitter. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get updates and behind-the-scenes info. Get two audiobooks for the price of one from Libro.fm. Use our Libro.fm affiliate code NOVELPAIRINGS and support independent bookstores.   Show Notes: Emily Bernard's intro Excerpt from Vanishing Half @reggiereads review Chelsey's Pairings: My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite [40:48] Black is the Body by Emily Bernard [47:05] The Only Black Girls in Town by Brandy Colbert [53:17]   Sara's Pairings: Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson [37:50] Born a Crime by Trevor Noah [43:14] The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett [50:00]   Pick of the Week: You Must Remember This podcast “Passing for White, Merle Oberon” 13th the Ava DuVerny documentary

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners
Building a theme business using Gatsby w/ Alexandra Spalato

Matt Report - A WordPress podcast for digital business owners

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 29:16


Now that the WordPress acquisition market has cooled a bit, it's time to stoke the fire on all things Gatsby and JAMStack-y-ness….again. Don't let Full Site Editing steal all of the thunder, there's still so much happening around headless WordPress and the ability to integrate 3rd party APIs to take the place of plugins. Look, I know it's a polarizing thought process to some of us, but if we want WordPress to continue to grow -- we need to give it some room for new use cases. I'm joined by Alexandra Spolato to talk about her company GatsbyWPThemes and how this hotness comes with some red hot opportunity. If you're wondering how to make money in the WordPress theme space headed into 2022, look no further than this conversation. Get schooled on the technology and learn how the heck she found her co-founder along with their recipe to success splitting the responsibilities.

Slow & Steady
Don't we all want a successful SaaS?

Slow & Steady

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 53:14


Brian starts his role at GitLab and continues to make progress on outsourcing development with JTBD.app. Benedikt recaps the email marketing feature launch and shares open roles at Userlist. Benedicte prepares for the Gatsby mini bootcamp kickoff, discusses pricing strategy, and wonders, "Don't we all want a successful SaaS?" JTBD.app Now Hiring: Customer Success Manager at Userlist Userlist's Marketing Email feature Benedicte's Gatsby Bootcamp Jonathan Stark Benedicte's POW! Brian's first day at GitLab was as expected — he started setting up and filled out HR paperwork. Learning about the remote-first culture was fascinating, though. On JTBD.app, onboarding development help is getting more exciting. He expects progress on feature improvements soon.Benedikt recaps the email marketing feature launch from last week at Userlist. He feels good about it but anticipates some time before seeing an impact beyond the initial marketing splash. Userlist is looking to hire a customer success manager and a front end web developer and Benedikt is finalizing the job post for the latter.Benedicte is preparing for the Gatsby mini bootcamp that launches this weekend! Between planning other topics, iterating on pricing, and building a community, there's a lot of work to be done. Ideally, the up-front effort could make for a rewarding long-term project. POW! is something that Benedicte wants to maintain on the side because... "Don't we all want a successful SaaS?"

Old Codger with Courtney T. Edison | WFMU
Knew Gatsby when he was just "pretty good." from Nov 2, 2021

Old Codger with Courtney T. Edison | WFMU

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Paul Whiteman and His Concert Orchestra - "Grand Canyon Suite: V. Cloudburst" Gus Bodenheim - "A Tour Through My Library" Ruth Etting & the Victor Young Orchestra - "Whose Honey Are You?" Harry "the Hipster" Gibson - "Who's Goin' Steady with Who" Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang - "Pretty Trix" Victoria Spivey - "One Hour Mama" Gorni Kramer - "China Boy" Fletcher Henderson & His Orchestra - "Tidal Wave" Blind Blake - "Champagne Charlie is My Name" The Brox Sisters - "Red Hot Mamma" Betty Boop - "Betty Boop's Crazy Inventions" Edith Evans - "Oh, You Have No Idea!" Gus Bodenheim - "123 and Me™" Vaughn De Leath - "Sing Me a Baby Song" https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/109198

Build The Future
#70 — Sam Bhagwat: Gatsby.js & Open Source

Build The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 39:33


Today, we're talking with Sam Bhagwat, the Cofounder and Chief Strategy Officer at Gatsby. Gatsby's an open source web firmware that enables developers to create websites optimized for the modern web. In doing so, they're ensuring that this digital web infrastructure, that we all take for granted, keeps improving and getting better.To listen to more episodes and to stay connected, follow along athttps://www.buildthefuturepodcast.com/https://twitter.com/camwieseDon't forget to leave a review and subscribe.Have a great week and until next time, go build!

Elevate Your Brand
Elevate Your Brand with Doug Bouton of Halo Top & Gatsby Chocolate

Elevate Your Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 32:51


Doug Bouton is the Co-Founder of Halo Top, the iconic low-calorie ice cream brand that has taken the world by storm. Halo Top sold its business to Wells Enterprises in September 2019, after which Doug spun out Halo Top's international operations into Halo Top International where he currently serves as CEO. In 2021, Doug launched Gatsby Chocolate, the first-ever and only low-calorie chocolate brand that's positioned to disrupt the chocolate and confectionery category much like Halo Top disrupted the ice cream category. Doug received his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2010 and his B.S. from Georgetown University in 2007 with a double-major in mathematics and theology.Laurel Mintz, founder and CEO of award-winning marketing agency Elevate My Brand, explores some of the most exciting new and growing brands in Los Angeles and the US at large. Each week, the Elevate Your Brand podcast features an entrepreneurial special guest to discuss the past, present and future of their brand.

eCommerce Badassery
84. How to Find Influencers from Your Existing Customer Base with Gatsby

eCommerce Badassery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 30:18


Raise your hand if you've been wanting to do more influencer marketing, but you find it too time-consuming to find the right partners? What if you could build an army of micro influencers who you know already love your product and shop with you? It'd be freakin' awesome, right!?   Well, guess what? There's an app for that! Tune into this week's episode to hear why micro influencers might be the best way to do influencer marketing and why tapping your existing customer base is the best place to find micro-influencers. What You'll Learn Why tapping your existing customer base is the best place to find micro-influencers,  Why micro-influencers beat out the big names, and how Gatsby can help you do this at scale.  How you can use an integrated email marketing platform like Klaviyo keep track of influencers  Learn More About Gatsby Website: https://www.gatsby.ai/ Demo Video: https://www.gatsby.ai/product#demo-video Case Studies: https://www.gatsby.ai/case-studies   Read the Full Transcript eCommerceBadassery.com/84   FREE Resource Library  Every freebie I've created to help you grow the traffic, sales, and profit in your eCommerce Business, all in one place! http://ecommercebadassery.com/freestuff   Want More Badassery? Join the eCommerce Badassery Facebook Group and connect with other eCommerce entrepreneurs just like you!  http://ecommercebadassery.com/facebook Let's connect on Instagram @ecommercebadassery https://instagram.com/ecommercebadassery   Ready to Level Up Your Email Marketing & eCommerce Business? Try the Klaviyo Email Marketing Platform - Built specifically for eCommerce, serving entrepreneurs, and iconic brands.   https://ecommercebadassery.com/klaviyo Work With Me Interested in getting my brain focused on YOUR business? Learn more about my services…   Email Marketing Help: https://ecommercebadassery.com/email-marketing eCommerce Help: https://ecommercebadassery.com/ecommerce-help   Rate, Review, & Subscribe Like what you heard? I'd be forever grateful if you'd rate, review and subscribe to the show! Not only does it help your fellow eCommerce entrepreneurs find the eCommerce Badassery podcast; it's also valuable feedback for me to continue bringing you the content you want to hear.    Review Here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ecommerce-badassery/id1507457683 This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:  Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Women in WP | WordPress Podcast
069: Learning to code the Headless Way with Alexandra Spalato

Women in WP | WordPress Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 43:24


This episode is sponsored by Ninja Forms About Alexandra Spalato: Alexandra Spalato is on a mission to evangelize the power of Gatsby to the WordPress community as she is convinced that it is the future. She is a freelance developer and entrepreneur with several years of experience working as a WordPress expert at Codeable and […]

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Horror Web Dev Stories - 2021

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 51:02


For episode 400, Scott and Wes talk about web dev horror stories - 2021 edition! LogRocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Mux - Sponsor Mux Video is an API-first platform that makes it easy for any developer to build beautiful video. Powered by data and designed by video experts, your video will work perfectly on every device, every time. Mux Video handles storage, encoding, and delivery so you can focus on building your product. Live streaming is just as easy and Mux will scale with you as you grow, whether you're serving a few dozen streams or a few million. Visit mux.com/syntax. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 02:54 - Hi guys, love the show. I wanted to share with you something that happened just the other day (Oct 4th), I was starting my new job today at a large tech company. They use React for everything (even DNS!, don't ask me how, it's complicated). I figured I'd celebrate my first day and push some code to prod, (how hard could useEffect be right?) Next thing you know, they ended up bringing in a guy with an angle grinder to get access to the server cage. 04:15 - No one from Denver can buy 06:38 - Bug accidentally gives $90 million to users https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/01/defi-protocol-compound-mistakenly-gives-away-millions-to-users.html 08:34 - Share Pointy Knives Hi! I'm a developer at a consulting firm in Sweden, writing C# on the backend and using React with either JavaScript or TypeScript and hosting things in Azure 99% of the time (and 1% in SharePoint). I was in my last week at my last job before I was due to start my new job. Worked 12 h/day to keep up with all the handovers etc. to colleagues so they would have a chance to continue working on the solutions I have taken care of. One project was a process tool hosted in SharePoint Online. The guy who would oversee it had -1% experience with SharePoint (which I pointed out to my bosses). But to make things a bit easier, I wrote a deploy script to ease things a bit. Starts the terminal and runs the script towards the acceptance environment. Umpteen million errors appear… Which is strange, because there would only be about 20 commands (which can cause errors like these). I log into the environment to double check if I now accidentally entered the wrong values in the script (which looked okay according to me). But I get a 404 error when I try to reach the environment… I log into the admin interface; I discover that the site is gone… Also checking the trash can, there are no things there. Very strange. I find that I'm in a different folder than the one where I saved my script… In that folder there is an old deploy script that was used when the project was started a thousand years ago (which was not used after the project was “finished”). The first thing the script does is force delete the site and then try to create a new empty site… The site is gone with lists and everything (lists are a SharePoint thing, think of it as sql-lite), there are no backups of the acceptance environment (although it is very important). I just feel a little panicked about how I'm going to solve this. However, I remember testing a tool six months ago to copy entire environments. Where the first attempt was made on the acceptance environment. Finds the cloned environment and can use the same tool to clone it back. It took only 8-12 hours of work to create all the new things done in the environment in the last 6 months instead of X number of hours to build everything from scratch. Once I updated a feature that saves accessories on orders (same solution). However, I failed to add all the new fields to the production environment. Which meant that accessories were not saved at all… Which was discovered after a week… I fixed the error in 5 minutes and the sellers had to contact x number of customers to double check what kind of accessories they would have for their orders… 11:22 - External HD One time I needed to format a server. It was an outdated Windows server. I selected all the files and copied and pasted to an external hard drive. My drive was pretty fast and it took like a minute. I was like: “Wow! That's a great external hd”. Formatted the server and, as soon as I realized it didn't copy 10% of the files, I had that face. We all know that face. Anyways. Tried to restore the files using some HD recovery tools but they were all corrupted, not by the formatting itself but for the installation of the new OS. My boss was pissed! I was very young so I blame it on the server. I'm not proud of it. But why the heck they would ask a developer to format a server in the first place? By the way, my birthday is on Halloween. Spoooky. 13:07 - Hey Loser I was testing new code to automate mass-mailings to our customers. Who knows what demon drove me but I wrote the “test” mailings like ransom notes: “Dear loser! Fork over all your $$$ or else!” Well, all was looking great and I wa s feeling pretty pleased with myself. Progress bars were sliding and counters were spinning. But I could hear a rising commotion from the marketing guys behind me. Phones ringing, voices raised. Turns out I had moronically wired myself to the production database! Even worse for me, I'd only been at the company a month or two. I thought my goose was cooked and the Big Boss was plenty mad, but I owned up right away and apologized. We put out a cover story that we'd been hacked and all was forgiven. 15:01 - HE HATE ME I was part of the developer team that accidentally leaked the 8 cities the XFL, an alternate football league, a week before their press conference. ewrestling.com/article/wwe-ac… We were using Contentful and Gatsby. A junior dev entered the information into the prod space instead of the UAT space and when we released some bug fixes, it picked up the contact us content update. I found out after seeing stories pop up in Google News when I was about to go to sleep. Was taking the content down when we started getting calls from the CIO of the WWE. The league went bust because of COVID. 19:23 - I Don't Have Memory of This I had two pretty bad code changes that only showed their problems when they went live in production. Around 6 years ago, I was running into a large performance issue with some of our queries running slowly against this giant DB. We were using JPA/Hibernate and we had a bunch of joins that were done lazily. I switched a few of them to eager so that they would create a single SQL statement instead of a bunch (or thousands). The change worked fine on my dev environment, QA, and staging. Staging was supposed to be representative of production. So we went live and within minutes the entire system went down because of out of memory errors. We quickly switched back to the lazy joins. We found out that staging had more memory and fewer DB records than production though they were supposed to be exactly the same. 21:05 - Your Performance is Slowing us down Back when VMWare was becoming a thing, like 2010 or so. I was working at an ecomm site and we were seeing slow performance between the app server and some data services. I decided to build a little multithreaded logger that could track when a query to Oracle Financials was running too slow and generate a warning. Oracle Financials was doing the credit card transactions, orders, and all the rest of the sites DB work. The code had no impact on my dev, QA, and staging environments. We were hitting well over our minimum number of concurrent users. We deployed it to production and then the system got slower and slower, but never crashed. Again, production and staging were set up differently. Staging was a bare-metal server. Production was running on an ESXi server on a host that was split 4 ways. The multi-threaded code meant to detect performance degradations was slowing the whole system down when it tried to synchronize data across threads. I was pretty embarrassed by both these two issues. It went to show that production is its own special thing and that you really don't know if your server-side code is really going to work until it starts running there. 23:15 - Dead Button Way back when mainframes were king, a guy I worked with pushed a button in, that if released, would immediately take down the entire company. He stood there for 4 hours, holding the button in, until we could let it crash after business hours. We gave him a chair after 2 hours. 25:12 - No Deploys on Fridays I was a junior dev working on our company's website. They were HTML + nunjucks templates that were later being integrated with the backend using some Python witchcraft. There was also a metric ton of JS libraries added (like Babra for page transitions, threejs for a cool interactive animation on the landing page etc.). Didn't really get much of all this package.json stuff at that seniority level. So after running yarn or npm or whatever, and seeing some warnings about a couple packages being outdated, I decided to update some of them. It ran great locally, but I didn't build the prod version, as I didn't know there could be any differences. I was working on some minor feature (or maybe even some minor bug) and the PM decided there's no time for code review. So I pushed it to the repo, the backend guy did his integration, and launched it on prod. As it turned out, there were some breaking changes in one of the libraries I decided to update. It crashed the entire site. On Friday. At 4:30PM. And that, kids, is why you don't deploy on Fridays. 27:33 - Stupid Selfie Horror story for you Wes. I work for one of the biggest retailers in the UK and we were working on an app that would go on a ‘media wall' in their flagship store in London. Basically a giant 200-inch screen in the middle of the store that social content can go on. Turns out that I left my local Dev version connected to the production API when I uploaded a couple of stupid selfies of my big head in the office. Get a call the next day to ask why my face is on the medial wall. 28:37 - Soda I was a computer operator back in the late 1960's, operating a Honeywell mainframe. The consoles were huge, about the size of a dishwashing machine, with the console typewriter and printer inset in the middle, on top. I had a soft drink on the console, next to the typewriter mechanism. We were told never to bring a drink into the room but we all did it, especially on third shift. Long story short, someone called my name, I turned around and knocked the glass of soda into the console. Had to be completely replaced – machine was down for two days. My boss was not happy. 31:22 - Oof A bigger horror story. I had my own software company in the 90's and was in Singapore, customizing my software package for Johnson & Higgins Insurance Brokers – I had their Asian contract for my Insurance Broker/Accounting package. I spent a good 40 hours on Saturday and Sunday, making all the changes they asked for, getting ready for a demo on Monday morning. I finished up about 4am on Monday morning and was cleaning up my files. All this work was done on a Novell server. Print files had an extension of .prt and I had a ton of them in the main directory from all of the testing I had done. I was cleaning out old files, getting ready to back everything up and I thought I would delete all of the print files. I mistakenly keyed in erase *.prg, instead of erase *.prt (or whatever the delete command was – can't remember it now). Programming files have a .prg extension – I had deleted all of my updated files from the weekend. In desperation I called Novell in Utah, hoping they could help me recover the files, but no-go. The demo Monday morning was not fun. 33:24 - Young Dev I was a young dev right out of college. My first job was at a child support company where we had desktop apps that would handle case information more efficiently than using Excel. My first project was to write a POC that would later be implemented into a new, bigger app that consolidated all the “POCs” for various parts of the child support process. For some odd reason, I still don't know why to this day, my boss wanted me to write this “new” app on top of an old app with a bunch of legacy code. I never understood why but as a young dev fresh out of school, you tend to just do what you're told. In school, I mainly used PHP/HTML/CSS for learning how to work with a database; this job however used C#/.NET for their desktop apps so I was doing a lot of learning as I went. I remember finally learning how to connect to the database and run some SQL after fighting with this old pile of legacy code. In early versions, I chose to handle creates/updates for these records in the same function. My young, dumb self wrote a try catch statement that would attempt to create the record and if it failed, it would try to update the record. Before the first production release, I updated the flow to handle creates/updates in separate functions - but never removed the update in the catch block of the original function now used for creates only. Somehow I, or any PM/QA, never failed on a create and hit this catch block while testing. Fast-forward probably 9-12 months later, I got a ticket to investigate why every case's data looked the same in Production. I login to the app, search a few case numbers and sure enough, every case's data is the same. I began freaking out as I had no clue how this could've happened. I mean it had never happened in all the dev work, testing, and months of live Production use. After I investigated with a senior dev, we realized the try block had failed and the update query in the catch block ran for that record - we also realized that I left off the where clause in the related SQL query to specify which record needs updating - so ALL records got updated with this data. Thankfully, we kept regular back-ups and were able to restore the data to a recent timeframe without users losing a ton of work. We commented out that database update call and redeployed the code ASAP. Also the senior dev was cool about it and was like “hey, it happens to all of us at some point”. Let's just say I've learned a ton since then and definitely steer clear from writing code like that. You live and you learn I suppose. 38:40 - Where Wolf Here's my development tale of terror: One night I was burning the midnight oil trying to get caught up on a never-ending workload. At the time I was working for an online travel booking site. It was after 11, and the last thing I had to do for the night was to rename one of the hotels in our production database. So I wrote my query: UPDATE hotels SET name=‘Some Hotel Chain'; One problem, I FORGOT THE WHERE CLAUSE. Suddenly, over 5,000 hotels in our production database all had the same name. This was around 2003, so well before the time of point-in-time restores, and we were only backing up the database every week at that point. I was panicking. Fortunately, I had a dump of the production database that I had created only a couple of hours earlier sitting on my local hard drive. So thankfully, I was able to restore almost all of the hotel names, save for a couple that signed up after that data dump, and my boss was none the wiser. That's when I learned that working late hours is not worth it, because at some point you are so tired that you can no longer make good decisions. 41:19 - I Want Your Job When I first started out I worked for a consultancy and they trained us in sales meetings to help managers get promoted because we were coming in to make them “look good”. This was okay b/c obviously, we were coming in as a contractor; however, after being laid off due to 9/11 (yes, this was about 20 years ago), I was looking for a new job and during an interview when asked where I'd like to be in X years, I mentioned to the hiring manager that I wanted to eventually do what he was doing. Well, I guess he didn't take it that I wanted to make him get promoted to then take his spot. Safe to say I didn't get hired.

Down In the Basement Podcast
In The Mind Of: The Artist (Feat. Gatsby)

Down In the Basement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 68:09


On this weeks installment of our In The Mind Of series, we got deep in the mind of local artist and talent, Gatsby. The homie came through to our block party and performed some of his tracks which were among the crowd favorites. Gatsby came through to the basement to discuss his mission through his music, his lyrical and motivational inspirations, how music can be interpreted, and much much more! Tune In! Follow the homie Gatsby on IG! https://www.instagram.com/jaayy_gatsby Here is his current album "Currently Unnamed" https://open.spotify.com/album/2axSbyvPXloGp2E8bh7nkY?si=b9LNf3OaTX6b4GnEWWkQOg & Check out his latest music video titled "12 out of 10" which we used in the outro(HEATER!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUnmKMg-N7Y

Bawdy Storytelling
Episode 197: ‘Boozy Bacchanal‘ (Andrew Gatsby)

Bawdy Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:52


Welcome to the S3x Party! When first time storyteller Andrew Gatsby moves to a new 1 bedroom apartment on Seattle's Capitol Hill, he wonders: why settle for cocktails & Cards Against Humanity with his nerdy vanilla college friends when his new non-monogamous community is throwing a big soiree just 2 blocks away? With the help of a Saudi Seth Rogen, Andrew chats & flirts & makes out, and soon he's christening his new home with a sexy afterparty for 12. Could someone get the door? I'm BUSY. #Polyamory #NakedAndErect #NRE   Song: ‘The Cult of Dionysus' (The Orion Experience)   Episode Links Dipsea: Dipsea is an audio app full of short, sexy stories designed to turn you on. Whether you want a story to turn you on or to wind you down for better sleep, Dipsea has wellness sessions, bedtime stories and soundscapes to help you relax. Dipsea helps you get in touch with yourself for some extra sweet dreams.  And for listeners of the Bawdy Storytelling podcast, Dipsea is offering a 30 day free trial when you go to https://www.dipseastories.com/ and use the promo code DIXIE.  Dipsea release new stories every week, so there's always more to explore - no matter who you're into or what turns you on.  Download the app right now, and get a 30 day free trial when you go to https://www.dipseastories.com/Dixie   Uberlube: Uberlube is a luxurious, high-grade silicone lubricant made from clean, body-friendly ingredients; it's just silicone with a little Vitamin E. Überlube offers long-lasting performance when you want it  - and there's no flavor or scent. & They're offering **Bawdy Storytelling** listeners a special offer – 10% off and free shipping when you use my code “Dixie” at UberLube.com. That's 10% off and free shipping!  Just use code “Dixie” at https://www.uberlube.com/   Patreon: Become a member of our Patreon community & You can get free livestream tickets, get access to all the livestream replays, be connected to other Bawdy fans, and so much more. Sign up for The Hookup ($10/month) or higher means that you receive free tickets to special events, Free tickets to our Livestream shows, access to the livestream replay, ad-free episodes of the podcast & more. Our Patreon has new patron tiers like the Confidante, the Concierge & more. Our Patrons have kept Bawdy going during COVID and as we struggle with re-entry, we're saying Thank you to all of you with Insider Info and exclusive access. While other events have gone away, Patreon (and you) are allowing us to continue to produce the Bawdy podcast, livestreams and live shows. We're offering great rewards on Patreon,  so become a Member Now at https://www.patreon.com/Bawdy   You can also Support Bawdy by sending your one-time donation to: Venmo: Venmo.com/BawdyStorytelling Paypal: BawdyStorytelling@gmail.com Zelle: BawdyStorytelling@gmail.com (& Thank You in advance!)   Dixie has created her own fragrance, and it's the perfect gift for your favorite Bawdy podcast fan! You'll love #BawdyGotMeLaid perfume, scented with amber, ylang ylang, warm vanilla and golden honey. There's also our (scented or unscented) creamy Bawdy Butter, Hair & Bawdy Oil, & more. Bawdy Merchandise means you can deliver your own great smelling Motorboats while supporting Dixie and Bawdy. Get yours today at https://bawdystorytelling.com/merchandise Cameo/Custom Dixie video: Need the perfect gift? I've been having so much fun making customized videos for you! Send your friends and lovers a custom ‘Cameo' video from Dixie (with or without applause tiddies), it's a great way to send love from far away to a Bawdy fan… For just $69, you and I can have a short zoom call, you can tell me all about the recipient, and I'll make a custom video from you for their special day. Find out more by emailing dixie@BawdyStorytelling.com #CustomVideo #Gift   Ready to tell your story, and change your life? I'm offering Storytelling for Self-Discovery. Anxious about navigating what's next? Are you writing a book, or working on your brand storytelling for your business?  No matter what you're up against, I can help you communicate with calmness & clarity - and I'd love to help you find your story. Email me at dixie@BawdyStorytelling.com for more info - we can book a short discovery call, and I'm happy to answer any questions.   Check out our Bawdy Storytelling Fiends and Fans group on Facebook - it's a place to discuss the podcast's stories with the storytellers, share thoughts with your fellow listeners, & help Dixie make the podcast even better. Just answer 3 simple questions and you're IN! https://www.facebook.com/groups/360169851578316/ Subscribe to our email list & you'll be notified of all upcoming Livestreams, Podcasts and Special Events first - it's at  https://bawdystorytelling.com/subscribe   Thank you to the Team that makes this podcast possible   Team Bawdy is:   Podcast Producer: Marty Garcia Sound Engineer: David Grosof Archivist / Video: Joe Moore Bawdy Livestream pre-show video by Donal Mooney Storytelling support by Mosa Maxwell-Smith & Bawdy Creator & Podcast Host Dixie De La Tour & Thank you to Pleasure Podcasts. Bawdy Storytelling is proud to be part of your sex-positive podcast collective! 

I Want to Put a Baby in You!
Episode 125: I'm Very Ferris – Tess Kossow

I Want to Put a Baby in You!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:58


Entrepreneurship has always been Tess Kossow's dream profession. And after having her miracle baby boy, Ferris, she realized this was a now-or-never moment to jump in and become an author with a product the world needs. Ferris was her last embryo and the answered prayer of faith, love, and science through IVF. Reading holds a very special place in Tess's heart, and this next stage of her career has her creating something she is so very passionate about in the lives of children through her picture books: in vitro fertilization. In November 2019, Tess was a finisher in the New York City Marathon. In October 2020, she survived sudden cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. Still through it all, she loved to host parties and celebrate life, no matter the occasion! She holds a Bachelor's and Master's Degree from Elmhurst College, which is also where she met her best friend and husband, Dan. She has a Havanese named Gatsby and a Siamese cat named James Bond. (Both of which are Ferris' partners in crime). Tess is a mother, first and foremost, and everything else comes second. She believes you really can have and achieve anything you want…but you are going to have to work for it and expect nothing to be handed to you. Her husband often calls her his real-life Steve Jobs, because of how she lives her life and leads by example for her son to believe in the following: “Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes… the ones who see things differently — they're not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things… they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.” Ferris is her inspiration, and her husband, Dan, is the motivation that keeps her running the extra mile in all she does. Listen to Tess as she discusses with Ellen and Jenn: • How Tess and her husband found themselves needing fertility assistance and IVF. • How her pregnancy changed her lifestyle. • Finding ways to normalize and discuss the struggles of pregnancy and post-partum experiences. • What changed in her view of life to start to write children's books. • Tess's story of cardiac arrest and survival. • Her mission to get her story out there and help others. Want to share your story or ask a question? Call and leave us a message on our hotline: 303-997-1903. Learn more about our podcast: https://iwanttoputababyinyou.com/ Learn more about our surrogacy agencies: https://www.brightfuturesfamilies.com/ Get your IWTPABIY merch here! https://iwanttoputababyinyou.com/merch Learn more about Ellen's law firm: http://trachmanlawcenter.com/ Learn more about Tess Kossow and her blog, books and more at https://tesskossow.com/

Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast
Oilfield Outreach, Events and Networking with Marc L’heureux, Founder of Social Octane (OGOS143)

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Welcome to the Oil and Gas Onshore podcast — brought to you by TechnipFMC on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened-to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. In this episode, Justin sits down with Marc L'heureux to discuss how Social Octane has taken over the Oil and Gas Networking space and how The Orphan Well Project is helping shape the positive story behind the oilfield. Marc also shares his journey on how he went from working on rigs at the age 18 to running one of the biggest energy networking platforms in the US. LinkedIn profile link: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-l-heureux-102b3b45/ Website link: https://www.socialoctane.co/ Oil and Gatsby link: www.oilandgatsby.com We'd like to highlight some fascinating technology provided by our sponsor, TechnipFMC. Their new and integrated iComplete™ ecosystem is digitally enabled and delivers efficiency benefits by dramatically reducing components and connections while simultaneously providing real-time data to operators about the #wellpad operations. TechnipFMC is continuing to push the limits in order to achieve full frac automation. To discover more about all the benefits of iComplete™ click the link in the show notes or check them out on linkedin: https://lnkd.in/eeSVvcc TechnipFMC Giveaway https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/pcEvkKz/OGGN Ogio Dome duffle bag Yeti 20 oz purple tumbler Executive power bank Columbia neck gator AcePods 2.0 - True Wireless Stereo (TWS) Bluetooth Ear Buds Free day passes at The Cannon If you're in Houston ... The Cannon is a global membership community that is building a virtual and physical network of entrepreneurs, startups, investors, advisors and established companies to connect innovators of all types and from all backgrounds with the resources they need to succeed. If you are looking for flexible office or desk space so that you can take a break from your work from home situation, mention OGGN at the front desk of The Cannon for a free day pass! More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Justin Gauthier LinkedIn

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck — Corn Shucking × Self-Hosting Images × WordPress × Getting Scammed × Portfolios

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:39


It's another Potluck! In this episode, Scott and Wes answer your questions about corn shucking, self-hosting images, WordPress, getting scammed, portfolios, more! Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Auth0 - Sponsor Auth0 is the easiest way for developers to add authentication and secure their applications. They provides features like user management, multi-factor authentication, and you can even enable users to login with device biometrics with something like their fingerprint. Not to mention, Auth0 has SDKs for your favorite frameworks like React, Next.js, and Node/Express. Make sure to sign up for a free account and give Auth0 a try with the link below. https://a0.to/syntax Show Notes 02:55 - Hey guys, I love the podcast! This is a silly question and possibly the least important potluck question you'll ever get. When you get a new Apple device like an iPhone, Apple Watch, or Macbook Pro… do you keep the box? Why or why not? 06:56 - Hey guys! Awesome podcast! Could you go over the advantages and disadvantages of using local images vs external images service (e.g. Cloudinary) for displaying images on a web app? 11:26 - Heyyyy Scott and Wes! 40-year-old lady here looking to make a career change. It's taken me a year plus, but after building several tutorial React apps, I finally built a fullstack JavaScript app of my own, with lots of rad Postgres database stuff, a bunch of secure Node/Express API endpoints, role-based access control, fancy Oauth, and of course the latest React tech (context, hooks, etc). I'm pretty proud of it. I even managed to configure Nginx and deploy it to AWS. The only problem is…it looks like crap. My portfolio site itself is pretty darn slick, since I used a gorgeous Gatsby template that required only a bit of tweaking. But the site I architected and worked so hard to bring to life? It looks like an 8-bit game for toddlers, a responsive yet Bootstrapy game. My question: does this matter? I would hope that this project shows off my backend skills, but I'm afraid they'll judge a book by its cover. (I guess a second question would be: how do you show off your backend skills? I have a README in my repo, but will they actually read it? Or, can you be a fullstack React developer with no design skills?) I am very, VERY ready to apply to jobs (emotionally and financially), but I am terrified of making a fool of myself and worried I'll never get hired. I am completely self-taught and have just been plugging away at this on my own for the duration of the pandemic, so I send a massive thank you to you guys for the sense of community that your show provides! Props to Wyze sprinkler controllers! 16:14 - Scott, I just finished your “SvelteKit” course and now I'm working on “Building Svelte Components”. I have some questions regarding testing. I was listening to an interview with Rich Harris on Svelte Radio and it's my understanding that the framework is trying not to be opinionated as far as testing. What are you doing as far as testing with SvelteKit? Do you have any recommended packages/plugins/libraries? I've only ever written unit tests with Jest in Vue. I'm loving Svelte, but I really want to work on writing tests as well. Basically, everything/anything you've got on testing with SvelteKit would be much appreciated. I've been listening to the show since forever, you guys are both awesome, shout out to Wes too, you've both taught me so much! Thank you, peace, love, and happiness

Agency Journey
Email Marketing Best Practices With Chase Dimond

Agency Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 25:23


Chase Dimond is an email marketing expert who is currently a Partner at Structured and Boundless Labs and an Advisor for Triple Whale. He created the popular “$75M Ecommerce Email Marketer” course and offers an email marketing guide on his website, chasedimond.com. Chase is also an Angel Investor for several companies, including Gatsby, Miracle Brand, Gainful, and Newchip Accelerator.Chase's accomplishments include scaling a product he built, marketed, and managed to 500,000 visitors in 6 months, generating 1.5 million visitors for a dating site within the first two months of launch, and acquiring 500,000 subscribers in 10 months for a travel email newsletter he helped launch — all while spending either zero or very little traditional advertising dollars.In this episode…These days, businesses need help with social media advertising, email marketing, website design, and more. How can they meet all their needs without hiring 12 different agencies?The team at Structured has your back. They handle social media, email, SMS, and content — and they do it really well. Chase Dimond leads the email marketing sector with years of success under his belt. He drove over 350,000 unique clicks and responses through cold email campaigns in 2017, acquired 20,000 users in three weeks for a polling app, and generated $175,000 in new revenue in three months while working as an intern. So, what's Chase's secret?In this episode of Agency Journey, Gray MacKenzie is joined by e-commerce email marketing expert Chase Dimond to discuss how email can revolutionize your business. Chase talks about his email marketing course, how the services at Structured can benefit your company, and his favorite online e-commerce tools.

Spoop Hour
Wonka-Tesla-Gatsby Baby

Spoop Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 64:28


We're trekking north to revisit the spoop of New England! Ed and Lorraine Warren make an appearance for the exorcism of Maurice Theriault, then we meet the scientist/spiritualist John Hammond Jr and his bizarre collection of gadgets. Finally, we explore the Bennington Triangle and its mysterious disappearances from 1945-1950. Happy spooky season, y'all!   -- SUPPORT SOME QUALITY SCHOOL STUFF with this fundraiser and we'll send you some stickers! Just email us a screenshot of your donation and we'll take care of the rest. Food Pantry: https://bit.ly/2RpZ4X1 OR https://amzn.to/3iqY7cJ   WE HAVE A PATREON. Check it out here: https://www.patreon.com/SpoopHour Find us on Twitter/Instagram @spoophour and send your spooky stories to spoophour[at]gmail[dot]com. Want Spoop Hour merch? We've got that too! www.spoophour.threadless.com  

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour
0479 - The Tree and Fruit Metaphor Is Being Paid Off

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 11:00


Thanks to everyone who supports TMBH at patreon.com/thetmbhpodcast You're the reason we can all do this together! Discuss the episode here Music written and performed by Jeff Foote.

馬克信箱 (Dear Marcy)
【馬信大調查】搬出去 v. 住家裡,dochi?

馬克信箱 (Dear Marcy)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 54:03


GATSBY潔面濕紙巾,從清涼到急凍,給你清爽不黏膩的好心情 GATSBY日本銷售NO.1男性潔面濕紙巾品牌 優惠下殺這邊請: https://lihi1.com/nTwbW 去你的熱 去你的髒 -------- 每週五晚上九點,歡迎加入17LIVE,跟馬克瑪麗一起嗨~https://bit.ly/formarcmail17

the memory palace
Memory Palace Summer Reading: The Great Gatsby, part 3

the memory palace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 99:39


The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. In lieu of my usual re-runs filling out August, I'm doing something different: a full-reading of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, presented in three parts.This is part 2. Music for Gatsby was composed and performed by Mary Lattimore. Find and buy her music at marylattimoreharpist.bandcamp.com The cover art is from Jen Corace. See more of Jen's work at jencorace.com. Back with the third and final part on August 19th. Back with new episodes of The Memory Palace in September.

the memory palace
Memory Palace Summer Reading: The Great Gatsby, Part 2

the memory palace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 75:21


The Memory Palace is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. In lieu of my usual re-runs filling out August, I'm doing something different: a full-reading of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, presented in three parts.This is part 2. Music for Gatsby was composed and performed by Mary Lattimore. Find and buy her music at marylattimoreharpist.bandcamp.com The cover art is from Jen Corace. See more of Jen's work at jencorace.com. Back with the third and final part on August 19th. Back with new episodes of The Memory Palace in September.