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    Best podcasts about developers

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    Latest podcast episodes about developers

    Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

    PyPI has been in the news for a bunch of reasons lately. Many of them good. But also, some with a bit of drama or mixed reactions. On this episode, we have Dustin Ingram, one of the PyPI maintainers and one of the directors of the PSF, here to discuss the whole 2FA story, securing the supply chain, and plenty more related topics. This is another important episode that people deeply committed to the Python space will want to hear. Links from the show Dustin on Twitter: @di_codes Hardware key giveaway: pypi.org OpenSSF funds PyPI: openssf.org James Bennet's take: b-list.org Atomicwrites (left-pad on PyPI): reddit.com 2FA PyPI Dashboard: datadoghq.com github 2FA - all users that contribute code by end of 2023: github.blog GPG - not the holy grail: caremad.io Sigstore for Python: pypi.org pip-audit: pypi.org PEP 691: peps.python.org PEP 694: peps.python.org Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat IRL Podcast AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

    Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
    THE HASH: Suspected Under Arrest Tornado Cash Developer is Reportedly Identified

    Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 24:24


    The most valuable crypto stories for Friday, Aug. 12, 2022."The Hash" team discusses the latest developments. According to The Block, the developer who was arrested in Amsterdam and is suspected of being involved in the sanctioned Tornado Cash protocol is Alexey Pertsev. Plus, sales of Pudgy Penguin non-fungible tokens (NFT) heat up after the project announced it would be licensing select NFTs to be made into physical toy collectibles. See also: Netherlands Arrests Suspected Tornado Cash DeveloperPudgy Penguins NFT Prices Surge After Creator Unveils IRL ToysTornado Cash's Discord Appears to go Dark-I.D.E.A.S. 2022 by CoinDesk facilitates capital flow and market growth by connecting the digital economy with traditional finance through the presenter's mainstage, capital allocation meeting rooms and sponsor expo floor. Use code HASH20 for 20% off the General Pass. Register now: coindesk.com/ideas-This episode has been edited by Michele Musso. Our executive producer is Jared Schwartz. Our theme song is “Neon Beach.”See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Podcasting 2.0
    Episode 97: Forever Fifteen

    Podcasting 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 101:56


    Podcasting 2.0 for August 12th 2022 Episode 97: "Forever Fifteen" Adam & Dave discuss the week's developments on podcastindex.org with some bold predictions! ShowNotes Apple namespace within a year Hosting companies will now move the needle Wallets and App Stores Marketing Announcing Taro: A New Protocol for Multi-Asset Bitcoin and Lightning

    Techmeme Ride Home
    Fri. 08/12 – How Do We Feel About Arresting Open-Source Developers?

    Techmeme Ride Home

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 16:47


    Dutch authorities have arrested a developer related to Tornado Cash. But is there a grey area here that is a bit messy? LinkedIn seems ready to go all in on the creator and influencer economy. Apple seems to have confidence that there's not going to be a slowdown in iPhone sales. And of course, the weekend Longreads suggestions.Sponsors:Masterworks.com/rideLinks:Suspected Tornado Cash developer arrested in Amsterdam (The Block)LinkedIn rolls out new tools to give creators more ways to share visual content (TechCrunch)Apple Expects to Sustain iPhone Sales in 2022 as Market Slows (Bloomberg)Weekend Longreads Suggestions:How Did Two Unknown Latin Music Operators Make $23 Million From YouTube? The IRS Says They Stole It (Billboard)Tornado Cash Crackdown Shows Limits of Regulating Cryptocurrency Services (WSJ)Man who built ISP instead of paying Comcast $50K expands to hundreds of homes (ArsTechnica)New – AWS Private 5G – Build Your Own Private Mobile Network (AWS Blog)The High-Stakes Race to Engineer New Psychedelic Drugs (Wired)The End of Manual Transmission (The Atlantic)The job openings at Sensel: https://www.indeed.com/cmp/Sensel/jobsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    9to5Mac Happy Hour
    iOS 16 beta 5 new features, iPhone 14 price rise and new iPad Pro rumors

    9to5Mac Happy Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 70:33


    Benjamin and Zac discuss all the new features and changes in iOS 16 beta 5, including the new battery percentage option. Also, the iPhone 14 Pro is rumored to get more expensive, and the 2022 iPad Pro might have a new 4-port connector. Sponsored by Helix Sleep: Learn more and take the Helix Sleep quiz at helixsleep.com/9to5mac. Sponsored by Zocdoc: Go to Zocdoc.com/happyhour and download the Zocdoc app to sign-up for free and book a top-rated doctor. Many are available as soon as today. Sponsored by Pillow: Pillow is an all-in-one sleep tracking solution to help you get a better night's sleep. Download it from the App Store today. Sponsored by Kolide: Is your Service Desk struggling with remote work and a mix of Mac, Windows, and Linux devices? Kolide can help. Learn more here. Follow Zac Hall @apollozac Benjamin Mayo @bzamayo Read More The good news about Apple's rumored iPhone 14 Pro price hike Bloomberg: Apple tells suppliers to make at least 90 million iPhone 14 units Here's everything we know so far about the 2022 iPad Pro Apple expands original podcasts investment as it hunts for compelling stories to adapt into TV+ shows Kuo: iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max to get more expensive NASA is sending an iPad around the moon to help test Alexa in space Third iOS 16 public beta now available with new battery percentage icon, more Kuo: iPhone 14 series not facing impacts on supply chain as mass production and shipment schedule are on track Apple and Kim Kardashian collaborate on unique Beats Fit Pro line Kuo: AirPods to switch to USB-C for charging alongside iPhone 15 in 2023 Find My has a new sound alert with iOS 16 beta 5, here's how it sounds iOS 16 beta 5 adds ‘Copy and Delete' option for sharing screenshots without clutter AAPL acquisitions fell dramatically in 2021 and 2022, show regulatory filings iPhone 14 event: Apple begins production of virtual keynote for September Rumor: 2022 iPad Pro to feature two new ‘four-pin connectors' for accessories Listen to more Happy Hour Episodes Subscribe Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Listen to more 9to5 Podcasts Apple @ Work Alphabet Scoop Electrek The Buzz Podcast Space Explored Rapid Unscheduled Discussions Enjoy the podcast? Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Happy Hour or shop 9to5Mac Merch!

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Developers offered tax relief if homes go to renters for 10 years

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 5:56


    Developers who go big on rental blocks - can now get tax relief if they offer homes to tenants for 10 years. The government package announced today applies to new and existing build-to-rent developments of 20 or more units. And they only have to offer 10 years - tenants can say no and leave with 58 days notice. I asked the Housing Minister Megan Woods how it will work. [embed] https://players.brightcove.net/6093072280001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6310755695112

    China Stories
    [Caixin Global] What's behind China's mortgage strikes?

    China Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 13:37


    Developers were allowed to skirt rules designed to ensure they could afford to finish building homes buyers had already paid for — then the market turned.Click here to read the article by Guo Yingzhe, Niu Mujiangqu and Zhu Liangtao.Narrated by Ryan Cunningham.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    DevOps and Docker Talk
    Kubernetes Autoscaling with Karpenter

    DevOps and Docker Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 52:39


    Bret is joined by Nirmal Mehta, a Principal Specialist Solution Architect at AWS, and a Docker Captain, to discuss Karpenter, an autoscaling solution launched by AWS in 2021. Karpenter simplifies Kubernetes infrastructure by automating node scaling up and down, giving you "the right nodes at the right time."Autoscaling, particularly for Kubernetes, can be quite a complex project when you first start. Bret and Nirmal discuss how Karpenter works, how it can help or complement your existing setup, and how autoscaling generally works.Streamed live on YouTube on June 9, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #173). Includes demos.★Topics★Starship Shell PromptBret's favorite shell setupKarpenterKarpenter release blogK8s Scheduling ConceptsOther types of autoscalers:Horizontal Pod AutoscalerVertical Pod AutoscalerCluster Autoscaler★Nirmal Mehta★Nirmal on TwitterNirmal on LinkedIn★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

    The Trophy Room: A PlayStation Podcast
    Xbox Claims PlayStation Pays Developers to Block Game Pass l Cult of the Lamb Review l Spider Man Remastered Steam Deck Impressions

    The Trophy Room: A PlayStation Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 102:49 Very Popular


    Follow The Trophy Room Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BadBit Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/2PglU1a Discord: https://discord.gg/wPNp3kC Twitter: https://twitter.com/PSTrophyRoom ****** In this week's episode of The Trophy Room A PlayStation Podcast hosts Joseph and Kyle talk about how Microsoft has clapped back at PlayStation's answer from the Brazilian Regulators questionare. Xbox claims that PlayStation is paying for exclusive games, deals, and paying developers and publishers to block Xbox Game Pass fees. Xbox clarifies that Call of Duty Franchise is not going to be on Xbox Exclusive instead with stay on PlayStation platforms including PS4 and PS5. We're talking about Square Enix is looking to sell stakes in some of its studios that may see Tencent, Nexon, and PlayStation interested in purchasing and aquiring some studios and IPs. Will from the MegaDads comes on to share his review thoughts with Cult of the Lamb and as well as Joe shares his thoughts on SPider-Man Remastered PC impressions on the Valve Steam Deck.

    Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for Professional Software Developers

    In this episode, Abi Noda, founder of Pull Panda and DX, discusses developer experience with SE Radio host Brijesh Ammanath. They examine the basic concept of DX and its importance before diving into a wide variety of issues, including methodologies...

    Double Barrel Gaming
    Sony Paying For "Blocking Rights" To Prevent Developers From Adding Content To Xbox Game Pass CONFIRMED By Microsoft In Brazilian Regulators Documents!

    Double Barrel Gaming

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 120:25


    Time Stamps: 01:00 Panel and Guest Intros 05:00 Manscaped Ad 08:00 BREAKING NEWS: @PlayStation paying for ‘blocking rights' to prevent developers from adding content to @XboxGamePass says NEW Report!! 1:15:00 Playstation's "Nightmare Scenario" the New Call Of Duty releases in Xbox Game Pass for as low as $5 (through the XGP Family Plan) & is $76.43 after-tax on PS5. Do PS gamers movecto Xbox? 1:50:00 Panel and Guest Outros, plus Special Message To The Community --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-ravitch/support

    Adventures in DevOps
    Personal Branding as a Developer with Pavan Belagatti - DevOps 126

    Adventures in DevOps

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 49:50


    Top Dev Ops global influencer, award-winning tech writer, and developer advocate Pavan Belagatti joins the show today to share the importance of personal branding as a developer, plus tactical strategies you can implement today. In this episode… How to get started and get noticed  Building your brand through networks Benefits of building a brand Writing tech articles to get an edge Utilizing Google alerts Refining your thoughts and communication delivery Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs LinksPavan Belagatti - Developer Advocate - Harness | LinkedInPicks Jonathan – Sentry.io Jonathan- Agile Tour Vienna 2022 Jonathan – Dynamic Reteaming Pavan- Harness | The Modern Software Delivery Platform - CI, CD, Feature Flags, Cloud Costs & more Will- The Network State: How To Start a New Country Will- Building a Second Brain

    CoinDesk Reports
    OPINIONATED: The DeFi Developer Who Weaponized Pseudonymity

    CoinDesk Reports

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 25:15


    “If DeFi is going to work without being subject to the rules of the old systems, then there has to be some sort of accountability. Even in systems where there's anonymity,” Danny Nelson says.Danny Nelson breaks down his recent investigative story, “Master of Anons: How a Crypto Developer Faked a DeFi Ecosystem,” with “Opinionated” Ben Schiller and Anna Baydakova. Nelson's investigative piece uncovered how one Solana ecosystem was largely faked by a pair of brothers and their “anon army,” or their 11 faked anonymous identities. What does this cautionary tale say about allowing the right to pseudonymity, a right deeply ingrained in crypto culture?I.D.E.A.S. 2022 by CoinDesk is the place to see your idea for the next big thing through – meet with leading investors, vet service providers and meet fellow visionaries. Learn more and apply to become a presenter today: coindesk.com/ideasThis show is produced and edited by Eleanor Pahl with additional production support and announcements by Michele Musso. Our theme song is by Elision.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Adventures in Angular
    Code Practice: Become a Top 1% Developer - AiA 353

    Adventures in Angular

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 32:56


    Do you want to level up in your career?  Do you want to become a top 1% developer?  Today on the show, Charles provides three simple steps you can implement today to help get you there. In this episode… Have a side project Learn something every day Commit code every day Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Picks Charles - Top End Devs | Conferences Charles - Top End Devs | Meetups Charles – Innova OBD2 Code Reader Charles- BMK 200W Car Power Inverter DC 12V to 110V AC Car Inverter 4 USB Ports Charger Adapter Car Plug Converter with Switch and Current LCD Screen Charles- Just Wireless 15W Magnetic Wireless Charger Car Vent Mount for MagSafe Devices Black 20017 - Best Buy Charles- Fantastic Beasts: Perilous Pursuit

    All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
    Code Practice: Become a Top 1% Developer - AiA 353

    All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 32:56


    Do you want to level up in your career?  Do you want to become a top 1% developer?  Today on the show, Charles provides three simple steps you can implement today to help get you there. In this episode… Have a side project Learn something every day Commit code every day Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Picks Charles - Top End Devs | Conferences Charles - Top End Devs | Meetups Charles – Innova OBD2 Code Reader Charles- BMK 200W Car Power Inverter DC 12V to 110V AC Car Inverter 4 USB Ports Charger Adapter Car Plug Converter with Switch and Current LCD Screen Charles- Just Wireless 15W Magnetic Wireless Charger Car Vent Mount for MagSafe Devices Black 20017 - Best Buy Charles- Fantastic Beasts: Perilous Pursuit

    Screaming in the Cloud
    Creating Conversations on TikTok with Alex Su

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 33:46


    About AlexAlex Su is a lawyer who's currently the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, the #1 contract lifecycle management technology company that's backed by Accel, Sequoia, Y Combinator, and other leading investors. Prior to joining Ironclad, Alex sold cloud software to legal departments and law firms on behalf of early stage startups. Alex maintains an active presence on social media, with over 180,000 followers across Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and TikTok. Links Referenced: Ironclad: https://ironcladapp.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexander-su/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyitsalexsu Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyitsalexsu/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@legaltechbro TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been off the beaten path from the traditional people building things in cloud by the sweat of their brow and the snark on their Twitters. I'm joined today by Alex Su, who's the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, and also relatively well-renowned on the TikToks, as the kids say. Alex, thank you for joining me.Alex: Thank you so much for having me on the show.Corey: It's always been an interesting experience because I joined TikTok about six months or so ago, due to an escalatingly poor series of life choices that continue to fail me, and I have never felt older in my life. But your videos consistently tend to show up there. You are @legaltechbro, which sounds like wow, I hate all of those things, and yet your content is on fire.How long have you been doing the public dance thing, for lack of a better term? I don't even know what they call it. I know how to talk about Twitter. I know how to talk about LinkedIn—sad. LinkedIn is sad—but TikTok is still something I'm trying to wrap my ancient brain around.Alex: Yeah, I felt out of place when I first made my first TikTok. And by the way, I'm known for making funny skits. I have actually never danced. I've always wanted to, but I don't think I have that… that talent. I started posting TikToks in, I will call it—let's call it the fall of 2020. So, after the pandemic.Before that, I had been posting consistently on LinkedIn for, gosh, ever since 2016, when I got into legal tech. And during the pandemic, I tried a bunch of different things including making funny skits. I'd seen something somewhere online if somebody's making fun of the doctor life. And so, I thought, hey, I could do that for legal too. And so, I made one with iMovie. You know, I recorded it on Zoom.And then people started telling me, “Hey, you should get on this thing called TikTok.” And so, I resisted it for a while because I was like, “This is not for me.” But at some point, I said, “I'll try this out. The editing seems pretty easy.” So, I made a couple of videos poking fun at the life of a law firm lawyer or a lawyer working for a corporate legal department.And on my fourth video, I went massively viral. Like, unexpected went viral, like, millions of—I think two million or so views. And I found myself with a following. So, I thought, “Hey, I guess this is what I'm doing now.” And so, it's been, I don't know, a year-and-a-half since then, and I've been continuously posting these skits.Corey: It's like they say the worst thing can happen when you go into a casino and play for the first time is you win.Alex: [laugh].Corey: You get that dopamine hit, and suddenly, well now, guess what you're doing for the rest of your life? There you go. It sounds like it worked out for you in a lot of fun ways. Your skits about big law of life definitely track. My wife used to work in that space, and we didn't meet till she was leaving that job because who has time to date in those environments?But I distinctly remember one of our early dates, we went out to meet a bunch of her soon-to-be-former coworkers at something like eight or nine o'clock in Los Angeles on a Friday night. And at the end of it, we went back to one of our places, and they went back to work. Because that is the lifestyle, apparently, of being in big law. I don't have the baseline prerequisites to get into law school, to let alone get the JD and then go to work in big law, and looking at that lifestyle, it's, “Yeah, you know, I don't think that's for me.” Of course, I say that, and then three days later, I was doing a middle of the night wake up because the pager went off.Like, “Oh, are you a doctor?” And the pager is like, “Holy shit. This SSL certificate expires in 30 days.” It's, yeah. Again, life has been fun, but it's always been one of those things that was sort of, I guess, held in awe. And you're putting a very human face on it.Alex: Yeah. You know, I never expected to be in big law either, Corey. Like, I was never good at school, but as I got older, I found a way to talk my way into, like, a good school. I hustled my way into a job at a firm that I never imagined I could get a job at. But once I got in, that's when I was like, “Okay, I don't feel like I fit in.”And so, I struggled but I still you know grinded it out. I stayed at the job for a couple of years. And I left because I was like, “This is not right for me.” But I never imagined that all of those experiences in big law ended up being the source material for my content, like, eight years after I'd left. So, I'm very thankful that I had that experience even if it wasn't a good fit for me. [laugh].Corey: And on some level, it feels like, “Where do you get your material from?” It's, “Oh, the terrible things that happened to me. Why do you ask?”Alex: That's basically it. And people ask me, they say, you know, “You haven't worked in that environment for eight years. It's probably different now, right?” Well, no. You know, the legal industry is not like the tech industry. Like, things move very slowly there.The jokes that made people laugh back then, you know, 10 years ago, even 20 years ago, people still laugh at today because it's the same way things have always worked. So, again, I'm very thankful that that's been the case. And, you know, I feel like, the reason why my content is popular is because a lot of people can resonate with it. Things that a lot of people don't really talk about publicly, about the lifestyle, the culture, how things work in a large firm, but I make jokes about it, so people feel comfortable laughing about it, or commenting and sharing.Corey: I want to get into that a little bit because when you start seeing someone pop up again and again and again on TikTok, you're one of those, “Okay, I should stalk this person and figure out what the hell their story is.” And I didn't have to look very far in your case because you're very transparent about it. You're the head of community development at a company called Ironclad, and that one threw me for a little bit of a loop. So, let's start with the easy question, I suppose. What is Ironclad?Alex: We're a digital contracting technology that helps accelerate business contracts. Companies deal with contracts of all types; a lot of times it gets bogged down in legal review. We just help with that process to make that process move faster. And I never expected I'd be in this space. You know, I always thought I was going to be a trial lawyer.But I left that world, you know, maybe six years ago to go into the legal technology space, and I quickly saw that contracts was kind of a growing challenge, contracting, whether it's for sales or for procurement. So, I found myself as a salesperson in legal tech selling, first e-discovery software, and then contracting software. And then I found my way to Ironclad as part of the community team, really to talk about how we can help, but also speaking up about the challenges of the legal profession, of working at a law firm or at a legal department. So, I feel like it's all been the culmination of all my experiences, both in law and technology.Corey: In the world in which I've worked, half of my consulting work has been helping our clients negotiate their large-scale AWS contracts and the other half is architectural nonsense of, “Hey, if you make these small changes, that cuts your bill in half. Maybe consider doing them.” But something that I've learned that is almost an industry-wide and universal truism, is that you want to keep the salespeople and the lawyers relatively separate just due to the absolute polar opposites of incentives. Salespeople are incentivized to sell anything that holds still long enough or they can outrun, whereas lawyers are incentivized to protect the company from risk. No, is the easy answer and everything else is risk that has to be managed. You are one of those very rare folks who has operated successfully and well by blending the two. How the hell did that happen?Alex: I'm not sure to this day how it happened. But I think part of the reason why I left law in the first place was because I don't think I fit in. I think there's a lot of good about having a law degree and being part of the legal profession, but I just wanted to be around people, I wanted to work with people, I didn't want to always worry about things. And so, that led me to technology sales, which took me to the other extreme. And so, you know, I carried a sales quota for five years and that was such an interesting experience to see where—to both sell technology, but also to see where legal fit into that process.And so, I think by having the legal training, but also having been part of a sales team, that's given me appreciation for what both teams do. And I think they're often at tension with one another, but they're both there to serve the greater goals of the company, whether it's to generate revenue or protect against risk.Corey: I think that there's also a certain affinity that you may have—I'm just spitballing wildly—one of the things that sales folks and attorneys tend to have in common is that in the public imagination, as those roles are not, shall we call it, universally beloved. There tend to be a fair number of well, jokes, in which case, both sides of that tend to be on the receiving end. I mean, at some level, all you have to do is become an IRS auditor and you've got the holy trifecta working for you.Alex: [laugh]. I don't know why I gravitated to these professions, but I do think that it's partly because both of these roles hold a significant amount of power. And if you look at just contracting in general, a salesperson at a company, they're really the driver of the sales process. Like, if there's no sale to be made, there's no contract. On the flip side, the law person, the lawyer, knows everything about what's inside of the contract.They understand the legal terms, the jargon, and so they hold an immense amount of power over advising people on what's going to happen. And so, I think sometimes, salespeople and legal people take it too far and either spend too much time reviewing a contract and lording it over the business folks, or maybe the salesperson is too blase about getting a deal done and maybe bypasses legal and doesn't go through the right processes. By the way, Corey, these are jokes that I make in my TikToks all the time and they always go viral because it's so relatable to people. But yeah, that's probably why people always make jokes about lawyers and salespeople. There's probably some element of ridiculing people with a significant amount of power within a company to determine these transactions.Corey: Do you find that you have a better affinity for the folks doing contract work on the seller side or the buyer side? Something they don't tell you when you run companies is, yeah, you're going to spend a lot of time working on contracts, not just when selling things, but also when buying things and going back and forth. Aspects of what you're talking about so far in this conversation have resonated, I guess, with both sides of that for me. What do you have the affinity for?Alex: I think on the sales side, just because of my experience, you know, I think when you go through a transaction and you're trying to convince someone to doing something, and this is probably why I wanted to go to law school in the first place. Like I watched those movies, right? I watched A Few Good Men and I thought I'd be standing up in court convincing a jury of something. Little did I know that that sort of interest [crosstalk 00:10:55]—Corey: Like, Perry Mason breakthrough moment.Alex: That moment where—the gotcha moment, right? I found that in sales. And so, it was really a thrill to be able to, like, talk to someone, listen to them, and then kind of convince them that, based on what challenges they're facing, for them to buy some technology. I love that. And I think that was again, tied to why I went to law school in the first place.I didn't even know sales was a possible profession because I grew up in an immigrant community that was like, you just go to school, and that'll lead to your career. But there's a lot of different careers that are super interesting that don't require formal schooling, or at least the seven years of schooling you need for law. So, I always identify with the sales side. And maybe that's just how I am, but obviously, the folks who deal with the buy side, it's a pretty important job, too.Corey: There's a lot of surprise when I start talking to folks in the engineering world. First, they're in for a rough awakening at times when they learn exactly how much qualified enterprise salespeople can make. But also because being a lawyer without, you know, the appropriate credentials to tie into that, you're going to have a bad time. There are regulatory requirements imposed on lawyers, whereas to be a salesperson, forget the law degree, forget the bachelor's, forget the high school diploma, all you really need to be able to do from an academic credential standpoint is show up.The rest of it is, can you actually sell? Can you have the conversations that convince people to see the outcome that benefits everyone? And I don't know what that it's possible, or advised necessarily, to be able to find a way to teach that in some formalized way. It almost feels like folks either have that spark or they don't. Do you think it's one of those things that can be taught? Do you think it's something that people have to have a pre-existing affinity for?Alex: It's both, right, because part of it is some people will just—they don't have the personality to really sell. It's also like their interest; they don't want to do that. But what I found that's interesting is that what I thought would make a good salesperson didn't end up being true when I looked at the most effective sellers. Like, in my head, I thought, “Oh, this is somebody who's very boisterous, very extroverted,” but I found that in my experience in B2B SaaS that the most effective sellers are very, very much active listeners. They're not the people showing up and talking at you. They are asking you about your day-to-day asking about processes, understanding the context of your situation, before making a small suggestion about what you might want to do.I was very impressed the first time I saw one of these enterprise sellers who was just so good at that. Like, I saw him, and he looked nothing like what I imagined an effective sales guy to look like. And he was really kind and he just, kind of, just talked to me, like, I was a human being, and listened to my answers. So, I do think that there is some element of nature, your talent when it comes to that, but it can also be trained because I think a lot of folks who have sales talent, they don't realize that they could be good at it. They think that they've got to be this extroverted, happy hour, partying, storyteller, where —Corey: The Type A personality that interrupts people as they're having the conversation.Alex: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Yeah.Alex: So anyways, I think that's why it's a mix of both.Corey: The conversations that I've learned the most from when I'm talking to prospects and clients have been when I asked the quote-unquote, dumb question that I already know the answer to, and then I shut up and I listen. And wow, I did not expect that answer. And when you dig a little further, you realize there's nuance that—at least in my case—that I've completely missed to the entire problem space. I think that is really one of the key differentiators to my mind, that separate people who are good at this role from folks who just misunderstand what the role is based upon mass media, or in other cases—same problem with lawyers—the worst examples, in some cases, of the profession. The pushy used car salesperson or the lawyer they see advertising on the back of a bus for personal injury cases. The world is far more nuanced than that.Alex: Absolutely. And I think you hit the nail on the head when you said, you know, you ask those questions and let them talk. Because that's an entire process within the sales process. It's called discovery, and you're really asking questions to understand the person's situation. More broadly, though, I think pitching at people doesn't seem to work as well as understanding the situation.And you know, I've kind of done that with my content, my TikToks because, you know, if you look at LinkedIn, a lot of people in our space, they're always prescribing solutions, giving advice, posting content about teaching people things. I don't do that. As a marketer, what I do is I talk about the problems and create discussions. So, I'll create a funny video—Corey: I think you're teaching a whole generation that maybe law school isn't what they want to be doing, after all there is that.Alex: There is that. There is that. It's a mix of things. But one of the things I think I focus on is talking about the challenges of working with a sales team if you're an in-house lawyer. And I don't prescribe technology, I don't prescribe Ironclad, I don't say this is what you need to do, but by having people talk about it, they realize, right—and I think this is why the videos are popular—as opposed to me coming out and saying, “I think you need technology because of XYZ.” I think, like, facilitating the conversation of the problem space, that leads people to naturally say, “Hey, I might need something. What do you guys do, by the way?”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: It sounds ridiculous for me to say that, “Oh, here's my entire business strategy: step one, I shitpost on the internet about cloud computing; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out to talk about their AWS bills.” But it's also true. Is that the pattern that you go through: step one, shitpost on TikTok; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out asking to learn more about what your company does? Or is there more nuance to do it?Alex: I'm still figuring out this whole thing myself, but I will say shitposting is incredibly effective. Because I'm active on Twitter. Twitter is where I start my shitposts. TikTok, I also shitpost, but in video format, I think the number one thing to do is figure out what resonates with people, whether it's the whole contracting thing or if it's frustrations about law school. Once you create something that's compelling, the conversation gets going and you start learning about what people are thinking.And I think that what I'm trying to figure out is how that can lead to a deeper conversation that can lead to a business transaction or lead to a sale. I haven't figured it out, right, but I didn't know that when I started creating content that spoke to people when I was a quota-carrying salesperson, people reached out to me for demo requests, for sales conversations. There is something that is happening in this quote-unquote, “Dark funnel,” that I'm sure you're very familiar with. There's something that's happening that I'm trying to understand, and I'm starting to see.Corey: This is probably a good thing to the zero in on a bit because to most people's understanding of the sales process, it would seem that you going out and making something of a sensation out of yourself on the internet, well what are you doing that for? That's not sales work? How is that sales? That's just basically getting distracted and going to do something fun. Shouldn't you be picking up the phone and cold calling people or mass-emailing folks who don't want to hear from you because you trick them into having a badge scanned somewhere? I don't necessarily think that is accurate. How do you see the interplay of what you do and sales?Alex: When you're selling something like makeup or clothing, it's a pretty transactional process. You create a video; people will buy, right? That's B2C. In B2B, it's a much more complex processes. There's so many touchpoints. The start of a sales conversation and when they actually buy may take six months, 12 months, years. And so, there's got to be a lot of touch points in between.I remember when I was starting out in my content journey, I had this veteran enterprise sales leader, like, your classic, like, CRO. He said to me, “Hey, Alex, your content's very funny, but shouldn't you be making cold calls and emails? Like, why are you spending your time doing this?” And I said, “Hey, listen, do you notice that I'm actually sourcing more outbound sales calls than any other sales rep? Like, have you noticed that?”And he's like, “Actually, yeah, I did notice that. You know, how are you doing it?” And I was like, “Do you not see that these two are tied? These are not people I just started calling. They are people who have seen my content over time. And this is how it works.”And so, I think that the B2B world is starting to wise up to this. I think, for example, Ironclad is leading the way on creating a community team to create those conversations, but plenty of B2B companies are doing the same thing. And so, I think by inserting themselves in a conversation—a two-way conversation—during that process, that's become incredibly effective, far more so than, like, cold-calling a lawyer or a developer who doesn't want to be bothered by some pushy salesperson.Corey: Busy, expensive professionals generally don't want to spend all their time doing that. The cold outreach emails that drive me nuts are, “Hey, can we talk for half an hour?” Yeah, I don't tend to think in terms of billable hours because that's not how I do anything that I do, but there is an internal rate that I used to benchmark and it's what you want me just reach into my pocket and give you how much money for a random opportunity to pitch me on something that you haven't even qualified whether I need or not? It's like, asking people for time is worse, in some ways, than asking for money because they can always make more money, but no one can make more time.Alex: Right, right. That's absolutely right.Corey: It's the lack of awareness of understanding the needs and motivations of your target market. One thing that I found that really aided me back when I was working for other folks was trying to find a company or a management structure that understood and appreciated this. Easy example, when I was setting out as an independent consultant after a few months I'd been doing this and people started to hear about me. But you know, it turns out that there are challenges to running a business that are not recommended for most people. And I debated, do I take a job somewhere else?So, I interviewed at a few places, and I was talking to one company that's active in the cloud costing space at the time and they wanted me to come aboard. But discussions broke down because they thought I was, quote, “More interested in thought leadership than I was and actually fixing the bills themselves.” And looking at this now, four years later or so, yeah, they were right. And amazing how that whole thing played out, but that the lack of vision around, there's an opportunity here, if we can chase it, at least in the places I was at, was relatively hard to come by. Did you luck out in finding a role that works for you in this way or did you basically have to forge it for yourself from the sweat of your brow and the strength of your TikTok account?Alex: It was uphill at first, but eventually, I got lucky. And you know, part of it was engineered luck. And I'll explain what I mean. When I first started out doing this, I didn't expect this to lead to any jobs. I just thought it would support my sales career.Over time, as the content got more popular, I never wanted to do anything else because I was like, I don't want to be a marketer. I'm not a—I don't know anything about demand gen. All I know is how to make funny videos that get people talking. The interesting that happened was that these videos created this awareness, this energy in our space, in the legal space. And it wasn't long before Ironclad found me.And you know, Ironclad has always been big on community, has always done things like—like, our CEO, our founder, he said that he used to host these dinners, never talking about Ironclad, but just kind of talking about law school and law with potential clients. And it would lead to business. Like, it's almost the same concept of, like, not pushing sales on people. And so, Ironclad has always had that in its DNA. And one of our investors, our board members, Jessica Lee from Sequoia, she is a huge believer in community.I mean, she was the CEO of another company that leveraged community, and so there's this community element all throughout the DNA of Ironclad. Now, had I not put myself out there with this content, I may not have been discovered by Ironclad. But they saw me, they found me, and they said, “We don't think about these things like many other companies. We really want to invest in this function.” And so, it's almost like when you put yourself out there, yes, sometimes some people will say, “What are you doing? Like, this makes no sense. Like, stop doing that.” But there's going to be some true believers who come out and seek you out and find you.And that's been my experience here, like, at Ironclad. Like, people were like, “When you go there, are they going to censor you? Is your content going to be less edgy?” No. Like, they pulled me aside multiple times and said, “Keep being yourself. This is what we want.” And I think that is so special and unique. And part of it is very much lucky, but it's also when you put yourself out there kind of in a big way, like-minded people will seek you out as well.Corey: I take the position that part of marketing, part of the core of marketing, is you've got to have an opinion. But as soon as you have an opinion, people are going to disagree with you. They're going to, effectively, forget the human on the other side of it and start taking you for a drag on social media and whatnot. So, the default reaction a lot of people have is oh, I shouldn't venture opinions forward.No. People are always going to dislike you for something and you may as well have it be for who you are and what you want to be doing rather than who you're pretending to be. That's always been my approach. For me, the failure mode was not someone on Twitter is going to get mad about what I wrote. No one's going to read it. That's the failure mode. And the way to avoid that is make it interesting.Alex: That is a hundred percent relatable to me because I think when I was younger, I was scared. I did worry that I would get in trouble for what I posted. But I realized these people I was worried about, they weren't going to help me anyways. These are not people who are going to seek me out and help me but then say, “Oh, I saw your content, so now I can't help you.” They were not going to help me anyways.But by being authentic to myself and putting things out there, I attracted my own tribe of people who have helped me, right? A lot of my early results from content came not because I reached my target customers; it was because somebody resonated with what I put out there and they carried my message and said, “Hey, you should talk to Alex.” Something special happens when you kind of put yourself out there and say an opinion or share a perspective that not everyone agrees with because that tribe you build ends up helping you a lot. And meanwhile, these other people that might not like it, they probably weren't going to help you either.Corey: I maintain that one of the most valuable commodities in the universe is attention. And so, often there's so much information overload that's competing for our attention every minute of every day that trying to blend in with the rest of it feels like the exact wrong approach. I'm not a large company here. I don't have a full marketing department to wind up doing ad buys, and complicated campaigns, and train a team of attacking interns to wind up tackling people to scan their badges at conferences. I've got to work with what I've got.So, the goal I've always had is trigger the Rolodex moment where someone hears about a problem in the AWS billing space—ideally—and, “Oh, my God, you need to talk to Corey about that.” And it worked, for better or worse. And a lot of it was getting lucky, let's be very clear here, and people doing me favors that they had no reason to do and I'll never be able to repay. But being able to be in that space really is what made the difference. Now, the downside, of course, when you start doing that is, how do you go back to what happened before?If you decide okay, well, it's been a fun run for you and Ironclad. And yeah, TikTok. Turns out that is, in fact, for kids; time to go somewhere else. Like, I don't know that you would fit into your old type of job.Alex: Yeah. No, I wouldn't. But very early on, I realized, I said, “If I'm going to find meaningful work, it's okay to be wrong.” And when I went to big law, I realized this is not right for me. That's okay. I'm just not going to get another big law job.And so, when people ask me, “Hey, now that you've put yourself out there, you probably can't get a job at a big firm anymore.” And that's okay to me because I wasn't going to go back anyways. But what I have found, Corey, is that there's this other universe of people, whether it's a entrepreneur, smaller businesses, technology companies, they would be interested in working with me. And so, by being myself, I may have blocked out a certain level of opportunities or a safety net, but now I'm kind of in this other world where I feel very confident that I won't have trouble finding a job. So, I feel very lucky to have that, but that's why I also don't worry about the possibility of not going back.Corey: Yeah, I've never had to think about the idea of, well, what if I go have to get a job again? Because at that point, it means well, it's time to let every one at the company who is depending on the go, and that's the bigger obstacle because, let's be honest, I'm a white guy in tech, and I look like it. My failure mode is basically a board seat and a book deal because of inherent bias in the system.Alex: [laugh]. Oh, my god.Corey: That's the outcome that, for me personally, I will be just fine. It's the other people took a chance on me. I'm terrified of letting them down. So far, knock on wood, I haven't said anything too offensive in public is going to wind up there. That's also not generally my style.But it is the… it is something that has weighed on me that has kept me from I guess, thinking about what would my next job be? I'm convinced this is the last job I'll ever have, if for no other reason that I've made myself utterly unemployable.Alex: [laugh]. Well, I think many of us aspire to find that perfect intersection of what you love doing and what pays the bills. Sounds like you've found it, I really do feel like I found it, too. I never imagined I'd be doing what I do now. Which is also sometimes hard to describe.I'm not making TikToks for a living; I'm just on the community team, doing events—I'm getting to work with people. I'm basically doing the things that I wanted to do that led me to quit that job many years ago, that big law job many years ago. So, I feel very blessed and for anybody who's, like, looking for that type of path, I do think that at some point, you do need to kind of shed the safety nets because if you always hang on to the safety nets, whether it's a big tech job or a big law job, there's going to be elements of that that don't fit in with your personality, and you're never going to be able to find that if you kind of stay there. But if you venture out—and, you know, I admire you for what you've done; it sounds like you're very successful at what you do and get to do what you love every day—I think great things can happen.Corey: Yeah, I get to insult Amazon for a living. It's what I love. It's what I would do if I weren't being paid. So, here we are. Yeah—Alex: [laugh].Corey: I have no sense of self-preservation. It's kind of awesome.Alex: I love it.Corey: But you're right. It's… there's something to be said for finding the thing that winds up resonating with you and what you want to be doing.Alex: It really does. And you know, I think when I first made the move to technology, to sales, there was no career path. I thought I would—maybe I thought I might be a VP of Sales. But the thing is, when you put yourself out there, the opportunities that show up might not be the ones that you had always seen from the beginning. Like if you ask a lawyer, like, “What can I do if I don't practice law?” They're going to give you these generic answers. “Work here. Work there. Work for that company. I've seen a lot of people do this.”But once you put yourself out there in the wilderness, these opportunities arise. And I've been very lucky. I mean, I never imagined I'd be a TikTokker. And by the way, I also make memes on Twitter. Couldn't imagine I'd be doing that either. I learned, like, Mematic, these tools. Like, you know, like, I'm immersed in this internet culture now.Corey: It is bizarre to me and I never saw it coming either. For better or worse, though, here we are, stuck at it.Alex: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and follow along for the laughs, if nothing else, where's the best place for them to find you?Alex: The best way to find me is on LinkedIn; just look up Alex Su. But I'm around and on lots of social media platforms. You can find me on Twitter, on Instagram, and on TikTok, although I might be a little bit embarrassed of what I put on TikTok. I put some crazy gnarly stuff out there. But yeah, LinkedIn is probably the best place to find me.Corey: And we will put links to all of it in the show notes, and let people wind up making their own decisions. Thanks so much for your time, Alex. I really appreciate it.Alex: Corey, thank you so much for having me. This was so much fun.Corey: Alex Su, Head of Community Development at Ironclad. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insipid comment talking about how unprofessional everything we talked about is that you will not be able to post for the next six months because it'll be hung up in legal review.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    Real Talk JavaScript
    Episode 196: Developer Experience and Tools with Brian Holt

    Real Talk JavaScript

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 41:50


    Recording date: 7/14/2022John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerBrian Holt @HoltbtBrought to you byAG GridIdeaBladeResources:Stripe API DocumentationPayment GatewayStripe ShellBrian Holt classes on Front End MastersFigmaRust programming languageGo programming languageStripe Multi-Language Documentation/ExamplesPayment Methods APIWhat does a software Product Manager Do?Azure App ServiceSarah DrasnerAzure Developer CLIBrian Holt's AZ EZFrontend MastersTimejumps00:59 Guest introduction02:11 What is it about developer tools that you enjoy?05:19 What problems are you seeing day to day at Stripe?08:24 Sponsor: Ag Grid09:31 How much of developer tooling do you connect with?12:44 Convention over configuration?14:35 What's the hardest part to get right?18:40 How do you know what users really want?22:35 Sponsor: IdeaBlade23:28 What's been your journey to PM role?32:03 In what ways did being an engineer help you as a PM?37:31 Final thoughtsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

    Passive (Aggressive) Perception
    Ep 55 - Storybuilding Vs Storytelling

    Passive (Aggressive) Perception

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 50:11


    This week we talk about the ancient and honored tradition of human storytelling, its base components, what defines a great storyteller, and how all of this applies to the TTRPG experience. We discuss how examining this discipline can improve our games, and how the idea of collaborative storytelling (i.e., story building) has evolved to accommodate the modern gaming paradigm. We try to cut through the haze of  semantic arguments and getting stuck on specific language, and hope to unify some of our perspectives on this contentious topic.Website: https://icastspells.comTwitter: @passive_podcastEmail: passiveaggropod@protonmail.comShow Breakdown:0:00: Intro3:57: TTRPG News4:57: GMs ARE storytellers... but so are players.15:25: Base definition of storytelling and how it applies to TTRPGs.19:09: The 5 tenets a good storyteller, and how these apply to the GMs role at the table.28:54: Who at the table shoulders the most story responsibility is a spectrum.33:33: Thought experiment #1 (actors & playwrights).39:17: Thought experiment #2 (AI copywriters).42:22: Improve your game by re-framing the table experience as one of collaborative story building.45:17: The foundation of gaming is mutual respect. Apply this to your table roles.46:19: Outro. PROMO: Snyder's Return:Interviews with Content Creators, Developers and Publishers for both established and Indie TTRPGsTTRPG Actual Play. Published/Homebrew adventures using a variety of Game Systems helmed by GM, Adam ‘Cosy' PowellAll the best info, and never too serious.SITE:https://snydersreturn.squarespace.comTwitter: @ReturnSnyder

    Sub Club
    Tinder: From Free App to $1B in Revenue — Phil Schwarz, Corazon Capital

    Sub Club

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:59


    On the podcast we talk with Phil about the thesis behind Tinder's monetization strategy, the importance of product differentiation, and why some companies shouldn't use subscriptions.Our guest today is Phil Schwarz, Partner at Corazon Capital, a leading Chicago-based venture fund investing in early stage tech companies. Prior to joining Corazon, Phil served as the Chief Marketing Officer at Tinder during the rollout of subscriptions. He was also previously Head of Growth Initiatives at Match Group.In this episode, you'll learn: 3 key innovations that propelled Tinder's growth Tips for optimizing your paywall strategy How Tinder transitioned to a subscription-based model Links & Resources Corazon's website Follow Corazon on Twitter Corazon's LinkedIn page Contact Corazon Phil's LinksPhil's LinkedIn page Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club

    The Daily Standup
    Is Scrum A Heavy Meeting Machine?

    The Daily Standup

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 11:56


    In a recent article by David Pereira, he discussed: I'd be a billionaire if I'd get a dime every time a developer complained about Scrum events. Recently, I noticed an increased resistance towards Scrum. Developers challenge whether the framework helps them get their work done or gets in the way. Join V. Lee Henson as we explore the keys to optimizing meetings. Don't forget to go to the AgileDad Website where you can download The Agile Meetings Playbook! https://medium.com/@scrummastered/scrum-master-vs-agile-coach-what-8217-s-the-difference-2f1ba5051ba8

    UX Cake
    Designing With Developers - Abhishek Nayak

    UX Cake

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 42:48


    Great digital products don't just happen. They're the result of a strong designer-developer relationship. That is because the two groups bring different but complementary skill sets. By understanding and respecting each other's strengths, the designer and developer can work together to create user-friendly and technically sound products. In this episode, Abhishek Nayak talks about how their company, Appsmith, addresses some of the common issues in the designer-developer relationship and how they have set up both sides for success. Abhishek is the CEO and Co-founder of Appsmith, an open-source low-code tool that helps developers build dashboards and admin panels very quickly.Abhishek also shared with us Appsmith's design system in a bonus video, and showed us how the designers and developers collaborate on files, and get feedback on work-in-progress from customer in real time: View video on our Youtube channelLinksAppsmithUX Cake – YouTubeAbhishek Nayak – Twitterhttps://www.Linkedin.com/in/AbhishekNayak/https://GitHub.com/AppsmithOrg/AppsmithIf you enjoy this podcast, there are some really simple ways you can help us: follow us on twitter - like and reshare our postssubscribe to the newsletter for updates and bonus contentshare this episode, or any of our episodes, with a friend. rate & review us on Apple Podcast or iTunes on desktop!Connect with UX Cake!UX Cake Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Linked In | Email - we love feedback!Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/uxcake. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Programming Throwdown
    140: Developer Burnout and Infrastructure as Code with Ronak Rahman

    Programming Throwdown

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 59:27 Very Popular


    00:00:57 Introductions00:01:51 How Ronak got started in programming00:06:03 The first encounter with burnout00:11:49 Double-edged benefits00:17:23 Spoon theory00:19:07 Why relationship clarity matters00:25:11 A cold room story00:30:59 Context switching's relevance00:35:45 QTorque's solution to monitor cloud automation costs00:39:19 Setting up lifetimes00:42:17 Bom lists00:49:19 How Quali helps with the challenges00:54:40 What to do to actualize your true self00:58:00 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode: Ronak Rahman:    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ofronak Quali:          Website: https://www.quali.com/          Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/qualisystems/          QTorque Free Tier: https://www.qtorque.io/pricing/          Join QTorque: https://portal.qtorque.io/joinIf you've enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown's website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

    Game Dev With a Shot of Jameson
    Ted Dinola Returns! - Developer Relations Engineer at Meta

    Game Dev With a Shot of Jameson

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 103:22


    Today I'm joined by Ted DiNola - Developer Relations Engineer at Meta! He's returning to continue our discussion about Game Dev, Production, and ADHD. We discuss how Meta's work environment lets him feel like he can truly be himself, some thoughts about the Metaverse, and how ADHD impacts finishing games but is a Conference super power! Credits include: Blade & Sorcery: Nomad Zenith YouTube VR Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners Vox Machinae Virtual Virtual Reality 2 Population: One Vacation Simulator Pistol Whip Garden of the Sea Pixel Ripped: 1995 Eleven Table Tennis Electronauts Be sure to join us LIVE every Wednesday night from 7-9pm EST using the link below! JOIN US LIVE▹ https://www.twitch.tv/jamesondurall JOIN THE DEV TEAM DISCORD▹ https://discord.gg/Xp6WsYVszS JAMESON'S PODCAST▹https://anchor.fm/jamesondurall/ JAMESON'S YOUTUBE▹ https://www.youtube.com/jamesondurall JAMESON'S TWITTER▹ https://twitter.com/jamesondurall JAMESON'S INSTAGRAM▹ https://www.instagram.com/jamesondurall/ #GameDev #youtubevr #youtube #meta #Zenith #WalkingDead --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jamesondurall/support

    Made In Mississippi
    Developers breathe new life into Fondren

    Made In Mississippi

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 65:54


    Since this episode aired in May, 2018, Robert St. John has revitalized a community and created a catalyst for economic development in Mississippi's capital city.  St. John is one of the managing partners of the development that includes The Capri, The Pearl Tiki bar, and the Highball Lanes restaurant, bar, and 10-lane bowling alley.  St. John's story is a testament to the wisdom and insight of entrepreneurship in Mississippi.

    Mining Stock Education
    Gold Stocks Will Soar When This Happens says Fund Manager Lawrence Lepard

    Mining Stock Education

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 40:03


    Gold stock fund manager and Austrian economist Larry Lepard shares what needs to happen before gold stocks will begin to soar. He shares key breakout levels for gold and silver. Larry discusses how he has positioned his fund for the gold bull market. He reveals numerous stocks he is investing in and which he likes. Lawrence Lepard runs Equity Management Associates, LLC, an investment partnership which has focused on investing in precious metals since 2008. Prior to EMA, Mr. Lepard spent 25 years as a professional investor and venture capitalist. From 1991 to 2004 he was one of two Managing Partners at Geocapital Partners in New Jersey which managed six venture capital partnerships, the last of which was $250 million. Geocapital was very active in technology, software and computer investing and invested heavily in the internet starting in 1993. Geocapital was the lead investor in Netcom, Inc., the first internet service provider to complete an IPO in 1996. Prior to Geocapital Mr. Lepard spent 7 years as a General Partner at Summit Partners in Boston, MA. Summit is a large venture capital and private equity firm. He was employee number 4, joining 1 year after Summit was launched. Mr. Lepard holds an MBA with Academic Distinction from Harvard Business School and a BA in Economics from Colgate University 0:00 Introduction 0:58 Battered Gold Stock Bull Syndrome 2:30 40% of portfolio in producers 4:24 Developers in an inflationary environment 6:18 Private placements or buying in open market? 7:30 Jurisdictional risk 12:00 Larry likes Africa as a mining jurisdiction 15:10 Not many pure play silver stocks 18:35 Key breakout levels for gold & silver 24:40 Twenty-year commodities uptrend 32:09 Stack the probabilities in your favor Lawrence's contact info and Twitter handle: llepard@ema2.com Larry's Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/gOf1dT https://twitter.com/LawrenceLepard Sign up for our free newsletter and receive interview transcripts, stock profiles and investment ideas: http://eepurl.com/cHxJ39 The content found on MiningStockEducation.com is for informational purposes only and is not to be considered personal legal or investment advice or a recommendation to buy or sell securities or any other product. It is based on opinions, SEC filings, current events, press releases and interviews but is not infallible. It may contain errors and MiningStockEducation.com offers no inferred or explicit warranty as to the accuracy of the information presented. If personal advice is needed, consult a qualified legal, tax or investment professional. Do not base any investment decision on the information contained on MiningStockEducation.com or our videos. We may hold equity positions in and/or be compensated by some of the companies featured on this site and therefore are biased and hold an obvious conflict of interest. MiningStockEducation.com may provide website addresses or links to websites and we disclaim any responsibility for the content of any such other websites. The information you find on MiningStockEducation.com is to be used at your own risk. By reading MiningStockEducation.com, you agree to hold MiningStockEducation.com, its owner, associates, sponsors, affiliates, and partners harmless and to completely release them from any and all liabilities due to any and all losses, damages, or injuries (financial or otherwise) that may be incurred.

    Bite Size Sales
    150: Wias Issa, CEO of Ubiq Security, on how Ubiq's GTM for their API encryption for developers

    Bite Size Sales

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:53


    On today's episode, I sat down with Wias Issa, CEO and founder of Ubiq Security, to discuss the genesis of his product and how he has tailored both the product itself and its messaging based on listening to what his consumers were asking for. Wias is a great example of someone who listened to his customers and developed a solution they were asking for in a market that sorely needed it. When cybersecurity gets technical and complicated, Wias brings it down to earth and simplifies the process, showing you what to focus on, what to ignore, and how to find the best engineers, product developers and team members to make your product the best it can be. You'll Learn:Why a Killer Story for one group may work for one group but not another, and how to tailor it for the audience you're targeting. How to simplify your messaging to feel more accessible to the average consumer you serve. The importance of listening to your consumer in order to tailor your messaging so that they ask less questions and understand quickly what you are about. What makes an innovative, in-demand prospective engineer or product developer, where to find them, and how to vet them and hire the best people. If you are a sales leader at a startup, or you're in the sales team, and you're searching for your repeatable scalable sales process to grow sales faster, then please get in touch with me at andrew@unstoppable.do or you can also go to my site at www.unstoppable.do.Sign up for our newsletter (https://www.salesbluebird.com)We want your questions and topic suggestions for future episodes. Send them to  andrew@unstoppable.do or send us a voice/video at https://zipmessage.com/unstoppableSupport the show

    Python Bytes
    #296 pip: Constrain your excitement

    Python Bytes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 32:31


    Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by the IRL Podcast from Mozilla Brian #1: Pip constraints files by luminousmen You can put some constraints on your dependencies with a constraints file. “Constraints files are requirements files that only control which version of a requirement is installed, not whether it is installed or not. “ Syntax is a subset of requirements.txt syntax but all the restrictions seem reasonable, considering must have a name can't be editable can't specify extras (that one is maybe slightly weird) You can put --constraint constraints.txt right at the top of your requirements.txt file or specify it on command line, pip install --constraint constraints.txt -r requirements.txt Or, my favorite, stick it at the top of requirements.in file. yes. pip-compile correctly handles constraints when generating requirements.txt. Example requirements.in --constraint constraints.txt typer constraints.txt click

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles
    Why Hackathons can help prepare you for success, Dmitry Radkovskiy, Marsbase the First Defi OTC Desk

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 1:58


    We catch up with Dmitry Radkovskiy to learn more about his journey and the exciting new project he is working on as CTO of Marsbase. Dmitry Radkovskiy, Marsbase, Defi OTC Desk Dmitry Radkovskiy's brief biography CTO of dOTC Marsbase. Developer and engineering manager with 15+ years of experience, open source contributor. In DeFi since 2018, winner of multiple web3 hackathons, including 0x + Coinlist Hackathon and EOS Global Hackathon Hong Kong. The first decentralized OTC desk. Make large crypto transactions while skipping order books and decentralized liquidity pools with smart contacts of Marsbase We gather more and more useful content about Marsbase and the OTC market. Here we have made a list of articles that can help you dive deeper and learn more on the matter. Read, use and follow the advice in articles and guides -> See more podcasts here. More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help promote your business. Why not drop us a line at Info@IrishTechNews.ie now to find out more about how we can help you reach our audience. You can also find and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat.

    Business of Architecture Podcast
    425: Overcoming Challenges as Architect Developer with Drew Lang

    Business of Architecture Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 59:44


    Drew Lang, founding principal of LANG Studio in New York, shares the challenges of being an architect developer and how many of those challenges were solved with a unique approach to the award-winning development in the Catskills, Hudson Woods. Drew is an active advocate for positive collaboration in community and getting more readily to a place of joy in our work within the industry. With this philosophy in mind, Drew launched the newly reimagined social-media platform Brick & Wonder in 2020, to provide an online community where real estate and design professionals can go to connect, support, and network. As an architect, Drew has been tapped to bring his design sensibility to even more new homes in the works in upstate New York. He can speak to trends in the housing market, as well as to the power of design and community-building in this new pandemic-shaped era. To see more about Drew, visit his website at: https://langarchitecture.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drew-lang-0655b16 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/langarchitecture/?hl=en ► Feedback? Email us at podcast@businessofarchitecture.com ► Access your free training at http://SmartPracticeMethod.com/ ► If you want to speak directly to our advisors, book a call at https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/call ► Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for updates: https://www.youtube.com/c/BusinessofArchitecture ******* For more free tools and resources for running a profitable, impactful, and fulfilling practice, connect with me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/businessofarchitecture Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/enoch.sears/ Website: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BusinessofArch Podcast: http://www.businessofarchitecture.com/podcast iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/business-architecture-podcast/id588987926 Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9idXNpbmVzc29mYXJjaGl0ZWN0dXJlLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz ******* Access the FREE Architecture Firm Profit Map video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Download the FREE Architecture Firm Marketing Process Flowchart video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Carpe Diem!

    The Desi VC: Indian Venture Capital | Angel Investors | Startups | VC
    E80: Sandeep Patil (Partner, QED Investors)

    The Desi VC: Indian Venture Capital | Angel Investors | Startups | VC

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 57:37


    Sandeep Patil is a partner at QED Investors, and heads the fund's investments in Asia. Founded in 2007, QED Investors has invested in more than 120 companies, including 13 unicorns, and has more than $1.8 billion under management. Notable investments include Nubank, SoFi, Credit Karma, Klarna, GreenSky, Avant, Flywire, Remitly, QuintoAndar, Creditas, ClearScore, and Konfio.He has extensive consumer internet experience and is a global banking and financial services industry veteran. Over the course of his career, he has helped launch consumer and SME lending businesses at Flipkart, as well as contributed to the company's fundraising and eventual sale to Walmart. He was also the Managing Director and CEO for India at Truecaller, where he oversaw the Adtech, Payments, FinTech, SME/Enterprise, and Developer businesses, doubling revenue and achieving net income profitability despite the pandemic.Sandeep brings extensive consumer credit experience from Capital One in the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as experience serving global investors, banks, and insurers at McKinsey & Company. Sandeep holds a B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay and an MBA from the London Business School (LBS).In this episode, we will cover: 1. How and why did Sandeep become a venture capitalist? (3:03)2. What are the parallels and differences between the 2007/08 crisis and the post-pandemic economic slowdown? (14:56)3. QED's assessment of the current market and its implications for venture investing (24:15)4. What is the balance between founder-market-fit and investor-founder-fit? (31: 37)5. Consumer vs. enterprise in Indian fintech: where is the opportunity? (40:00)6. From where will the winners in Indian fintech emerge? (46:55)7. How easy is it to keep an eye on Asian markets from the UK? (51:15)

    Indie Game Business
    IndieDev and Kickstarter - All Packed Up with Jasper Cole, developer of Backpack Hero

    Indie Game Business

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 70:27


    Today we have the developer of Backpack Hero, Jasper Cole! Backpack Hero SMASHED their $20k goal on Kickstarter and raised $200k +! We are going to be discussing Kickstarter, of course, and a few other things including. Backpack Hero Kickstarter and Early Development Inventory Management in Games Gamejams and releasing free games on Itch Backpack Hero Early Access starting August 15th To learn more about the show or our online business matchmaking events for indie developers visit: indiegame.business Indie Game Business is produced by The Powell Group: powellgroupconsulting.com Watch the official live stream: twitch.tv/indiegamebusiness Join the Indie Game Business Discord: discord.gg/indiegamebusiness The Twitters to follow - Indie Game Business: twitter.com/BusinessIndie Powell Group Consulting: twitter.com/PowellGrp Jay: twitter.com/Powell_Jay INDIE: twitter.com/TheRealIndie Thank you so much to Trip Wire Presents for sponsoring Indie Game Business! Follow TripWire Presents on Twitter: https://twitter.com/twpresents Check out TripWire Presents website: https://www.tripwireinteractive.com/#/ #gamedev #indiegamedev #gamedeveloper #indiegamedeveloper #gamebusiness --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/indiegamebusiness/support

    My life as a programmer
    Under what circumstances does a frontend developer need to know Docker?

    My life as a programmer

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 10:41


    Video content can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0BAd8tPlDqFvDYBemHcQPQ/

    The Capital Raiser Show
    Mandy McAllister Preview: Buy From Developers

    The Capital Raiser Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 0:58


    Mandy breaks down her percetpion on wealth creation as a mom shares her opinions on syndications too!   https://www.mandymcallister.com/    

    CruxCasts
    ValOre Metals (VO) - Uranium, Palladium & Platinum Developers

    CruxCasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 13:35


    ValOre Metals Corp. is a Canadian exploration company focused on the advancement of its projects in Brazil and northern Canada. The company has a market cap of approximately CAD$ 75 million. 

    9to5Mac Happy Hour
    iPhone 14 always-on details, more App Store ads, iPadOS 16 delayed

    9to5Mac Happy Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 67:34 Very Popular


    Benjamin and Zac catch up on Apple's quarterly earnings results from last week, and bemoan the ongoing expansion of Apple's ad business. iPadOS 16 will also reportedly be delayed until October for the first time. There are also iOS 16 always-on display leaks and Apple Studio Display woes to discuss. Sponsored by Kolide: Is your Service Desk struggling with remote work and a mix of Mac, Windows, and Linux devices? Kolide can help. Learn more here. Sponsored by Ladder: Go to Ladder.com/HappyHour today to see if you're instantly approved. Sponsored by MindNode: MindNode is the most delightful mind mapping and outlining app for your Mac, iPad, iPhone & Apple Watch.  Featured as Apple's "Editor's Choice" & "App of the Day", MindNode is a free download on the App Store & Mac App Store. Sponsored by Pillow: Pillow is an all-in-one sleep tracking solution to help you get a better night's sleep. Download it from the App Store today. Follow Zac Hall @apollozac Benjamin Mayo @bzamayo Read More Apple Studio Display firmware 15.5 drops amid speaker problem complaints Rumored 10th-generation iPad schematics show new rear camera module design, flat edge chassis, no headphone jack? Apple delaying iPadOS 16 release to October; iOS 16 still expected in September Hiring trends indicate Apple plans to significantly expand its ads business AAPL investors need to see inside the company's “$70 billion black box,” say analysts Apple preps Android switchers for iPhone 14 with new explainer video $50 gift card with Apple TV purchase promotion available again at the US Apple Store, also launches in other countries Apple overhauls iPhone checkout experience with larger images, focus on trade-ins, more Apple expanding App Store ads from search to ‘Today' tab and more Listen to more Happy Hour Episodes Subscribe Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Listen to more 9to5 Podcasts Apple @ Work Alphabet Scoop Electrek The Buzz Podcast Space Explored Rapid Unscheduled Discussions Enjoy the podcast? Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Happy Hour or shop 9to5Mac Merch!

    Remote Ruby
    Gem Mining & Advice on Mentoring Developers

    Remote Ruby

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:04 Very Popular


    [00:02:46] Andrew tells us about being on the Rubber Duck Dev Show livestream with Collin Jilbert. [00:05:14] Have you ever used Alfred? Andrew fills us in on the app and Raycast. [00:12:15] Chris explains the “gem mining” he's been doing.[00:16:38] Andrew and Chris chat about using SQLite.[00:20:41] Andrew asks Chris if he ever thinks how much extra code it is to have to support all these different things. Chris explains why he doesn't think it be a whole lot. [00:23:20] We find out when Chris is evaluating these types of decisions, if he ever tries to write performance tests, benchmarks, or something to evaluate those assumptions and he explains how he thinks about performance in a gem. [00:27:04] Andrew mentions since RBS is becoming better with more integrations and more tools, he asks Chris if he's ever considered adding some typing support.[00:31:30] We hear about an issue Andrew had when rewriting their checkout at Podia and Chris tells us about an issue he ran into with Stripe. They also talk about issues they were having with the new element on Google Pay, Apple Pay, and Afterpay.[00:37:39] Andrew does a shoutout to CJ, Developer Advocate at Stripe, who helped him with some things that weren't working for Andrew and his team, and Chris tells us why he likes Stripe so much. [00:39:12] Chris tells us about his first job as a Rails developer, Andrew shares one more thing about Stripe that they do that's cool, and Chris shares something related to bank accounts on Stripe and the demos they have.[00:43:50] Find out the story about Bruce Wayne. [00:46:15] If you're using RBS, want to talk about it and what's happening in the RBS world, Chris and Andrew would love to talk with you. [00:47:28] Chris does a shout out to firstrubyfriend.org, and if you're a Junior or want to be a Ruby Developer, go to this website.[00:48:25] Andrew and Chris go in depth about mentors and mentees, they explain how there's a lot more aspects to being a developer than coding, and why it's so important to take initiative if you are a mentee. [00:59:57] Andrew highlights something Chris said about promoting the community as a mentor.Panelists:Chris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Chris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterJason Charnes TwitterRubber Duck Dev Show Episode 51 with Andrew Mason and Collin JilbertAlfred RaycastSQLiteStripeCJ Avilla TwitterFirst Ruby FriendRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

    Podcasting 2.0
    Episode 96: Foie Gras

    Podcasting 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 95:50


    Podcasting 2.0 for August 5th 2022 Episode 96: "Foie Gras" Adam & Dave discuss the week's developments on podcastindex.org and are joined by Michael and Moritz from Alby Michael Bumann & Moritz Kaminski - Alby V4V is the new international lifestyle Chapter Images full screen Rss.com has a solid roadmap Alberto ams Sam PIMP for verify tag Dame Jennifer hackathon Trending by number of streaming transactions. Whoops, Peacock added no new paid subscribers over the last quarter Last Modified 08/05/2022 14:29:41 by Freedom Controller

    Ruff Talk VR
    Interview with Bocce Time! Developer Anthony

    Ruff Talk VR

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:21


    On this episode of Ruff Talk VR our hosts Dscruffles and Stratus interview the developer of Bocce Time, Anthony! Bocce time is a hit new game on the Oculus Quest/Meta Quest app lab store that we reviewed the other week. We talk with Anthony about his background as a developer, the future of Bocce Time!, some general banter and more!If you enjoy the podcast be sure to rate us 5 stars and subscribe! Maybe even become a podcast supporter and help us make the dream of full-time podcasting become a reality! Join our official subreddit at https://www.reddit.com/r/RuffTalkVR/Ruff Talk VR Discord: https://discord.gg/9JTdCccucSBocce Time Discord: https://discord.gg/B9Sq9JReueThis podcast was sponsored by Kiwi Design - the premier company for Oculus Quest accessories. Visit our affiliate link below to shop for your VR accessories including knuckle straps, lens protectors, head straps, link cables, and more while also supporting the podcast!Affiliate Link: https://www.kiwidesign.com/?ref=RuffTalkVRGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code RUFFTALKVR at MANSCAPED.com!*We are paid a commission through affiliate links to help support the podcast on the Kiwi links abovePodcast support link: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rufftalkvrBocce Time! Store Link: https://www.oculus.com/experiences/quest/7851829064831043/Store Description:In Bocce Time! you'll head down to a beautiful park with a half dozen different bocce courts. You can jump into a quick match to 1v1 a random opponent online, create and join private rooms with up to 4 players, or play against AI across 3 difficulties to unlock additional ball customization options. With full cross-play, everyone's invited to join the fun! It's Bocce Time!Bocce ball is an ancient and simple game about getting your balls closest to the target. Players throw out a small ball called a pallino and then two teams take turns trying to get their balls closest to it, blocking, knocking, and blasting each others' balls in the process.The pallino can land anywhere in bounds and every ball can impact the others, resulting in an ever shifting playing field where the target can change with every throw. It's easy to learn, but difficult to master, and when millimeters can make the difference between defeat and victory, individual skill really shines!*We are paid a commission through affiliate links to help support the podcast on some links above Support the show

    The Real Estate Syndication Show
    WS1384: How To Spot A Good Developer | Bob Voelker

    The Real Estate Syndication Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 34:23


    A real estate developer oversees the development of a property. In real estate, it is important to spot a good developer to make sure that your property will be spot on. Today, we speak with real estate developer and author Bob Voelker who shares the ins and outs of real estate development.Bob starts by discussing density in the real estate space and why it is important to consider this when building a property. Bob also shares his advice to younger multifamily developers and that is not to go where you are not wanted, and so it is important to get to know the place from inside out and to figure out if you belong with them or not. He then discusses what makes a good developer, what Mezz debt is, and his favorite project he did in Dallas. Click the play button now!

    GRTiQ Podcast
    Derek Meyer (Data Nexus) - Indexer, Subgraph Developer, Curator, and Delegator

    GRTiQ Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 71:00


    Today I'm speaking with Derek Meyer (Data Nexus). Ever since joining The Graph community, Derek has become a highly engaged and thoughtful contributor. Derek is one of the unique participants within The Graph whose been able to participate in various stakeholder roles effectively – Delegator, Curator, Subgraph Developer, and now with an Indexer, with the recent launch Data Nexus. He also helped launch Curation Station, a highly active Telegram group dedicated to Curation, for which he was previously featured on this podcast (Episode 29). A lot Derek's background was covered during our prior interview (Ep. 29), so today we spend most of our time talking about Derek's journey from an entrepreneurial subgraph developer to Indexer. We explored a lot of interesting themes during the interview, including how Derek approached the decision to become an Indexer, his advice to those who want to do the same thing, his experience at Graph Day, and his participation in Graph Advocates and Graph AdvocatesDAO. Show NotesThe GRTiQ Podcast takes listeners inside The Graph (GRT) by interviewing members of The Graph's community and ecosystem.  Please help support this project and build the community by subscribing and leaving a review.Twitter: GRT_iQwww.GRTiQ.com