Podcasts about Sold

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  • 4,653PODCASTS
  • 7,166EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Sold

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Latest podcast episodes about Sold

The Chet Buchanan Show
Was there really a man named 'Harry Potter' before the books?

The Chet Buchanan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 6:26


Yes! And his dad got him an original copy of the book when it first came out in 1997 because the title was the name of his son. The book was just turned around and SOLD for a good chunk of change.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ramie Show
4PM: Are you starting to be sold on this Packers defense?

The Ramie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:59


Ramie Show 4PM: Are you starting to be sold on this Packers defense? Plus, Ramie and Sam talk about tomorrow's home opener for the Bucks & more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ADV Podcasts
Top Celebrities Who Sold Their Souls to China - Episode #80

ADV Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 141:36


John Xina, and so much more. Use Cultivate for Free! It tells you where products are made, and more!Chrome: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/chrome?campaignId=advFirefox: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/firefox?campaignId=advSafari: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/safari?campaignId=advNamewee song - https://youtu.be/-Rp7UPbhErEShillbusters Episode - https://youtu.be/UAyquFm7aHAZach P - No Foreigners Allowed in the Marathons in Chinahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5GnLL8h0s0Support the show here - https://www.patreon.com/advpodcastsSupport us and the channel on Paypal!http://paypal.me/advchinaOur personal Patreon accountsSerpentZA: http://www.patreon.com/serpentzaC-Milk: http://www.patreon.com/laowhy86ADVChina Subreddit -https://reddit.com/r/ADVChinaFor Motorcycle adventures around the world, and a talk-show on two wheels go to ADVChina every Monday 1pm ESThttps://www.youtube.com/advchinaFor a no-nonsense on the street look at Chinese culture and beyond from China's original YouTuber, join SerpentZA on Friday at 1pm ESThttps://www.youtube.com/serpentzaFor a realistic perspective on China and world travel go to Laowhy86 Wednesday 1pm ESThttps://www.youtube.com/laowhy86Living in China for so long, we would like to share some of the comparisons that we have found between China and the west, and shed some light on the situation.Every week, we take you to a new place in China on our bikes, cover a topic, and reply to your questions.⚫ Watch Conquering Southern China NOW!Winston and I ride 5000 km across 5 Chinese provinces and discover crazy food, people and customs!Discount Promo Code: RIDEWITHUShttps://vimeo.com/ondemand/conqueringsouthernchina⚫Watch Conquering Northern China10,000 km. on motorcycles across China's unexplored northern provinces. The Russian border, Inner Mongolia, and even North Korea!http://vimeo.com/ondemand/conqueringnorthernchinaTune in, hop on, and stay awesome!http://www.facebook.com/advchinaCartoon feat. Jüri Pootsmann - I Remember Uhttps://soundcloud.com/nocopyrightsoundsTrack : Cartoon feat. Jüri Pootsmann - I Remember U

WhatCulture
10 Castings For Upcoming Movies That MUST Happen - Liam Neeson In The Expendables 4! Timothy Dalton As Moriarty! Regé-Jean Page As Superman! Keanu Reeves As Shadow The Hedgehog?!

WhatCulture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 10:41


Sold. Will Earl presents 10 Castings For Upcoming Movies That MUST Happen... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast
10-18 6am Hour - Ben And Woods Open SOLD OUT + Eric Adelson

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 42:10


Ben & Woods kick off Monday's show welcoming Woodsy back from his bout with strep throat. The guys then make the announcement that tickets to the Ben & Woods Open are on sale this morning...only to find out that the entire event sold out in MINUTES!! And at the bottom of the hour, Eric Adelson returns for his weekly NFL Insider Report. Listen here! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ReCreate Church's Podcast
Recreate Church, Pastor Michael Shockley—Service, Sunday, October 17, 2021

ReCreate Church's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 39:23


Decked Out to Sold Out! Today Pastor Michael is continuing his study on Joseph and his crazy family situation.  The story picks up with Joseph searching for his brothers, who have moved their flock to Dothan and let's just say they that when he found them, they weren't exactly glad to find him!  His brothers took off his coat (the special one that, as his Dad's favorite, was given only to him) and cast him into a pit.  They then plotted to sell Joseph to the Midianites and sold him for 20 pieces of silver and the traders took him to Egypt. Sold out!   Joseph had to feel he was doing right, following what God wanted him to do and then it all fell apart.  What then? What about those down-in-the-hole moments, when we're dealing with ruination of our plans? Three things to consider when it seems like everything is going wrong: The presence of God.  Did God leave Joseph?  No, God was just as present as he would EVER be. The promises of God.  It looks bad, but the promises of God are just as true in the bad times as they are in the good times. The provision of God.  A dead-end can be a portal.  Bad times can be portends to good times.   Realize, God is always the same and never leaves us.  Good times or bad. Like Joseph, there is much more to your story than where you are at, right now, today!  Trust God while you're in the hole and God will come through! Today's verses are found in Genesis 37: 12-36.

Lehto's Law
Her House Was Sold for $236 (Mistakes Were Made)

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 10:26


Someone thought she lived on the lot next door - where there was no house. http://www.lehtoslaw.com

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans
Bucketheads: A not-so-secret scrimmage, NutHouse sold out, the coach who loved to bare it all (10/17/21)

Land-Grant Holy Land: for Ohio State Buckeyes fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 40:40


Land-Grant Holy Land's newest podcast, ‘Bucketheads' takes you on a journey across the college basketball landscape every episode. The only basketball-focused podcast in the LGHL family of podcasts, co-hosts Connor Lemons and Justin Golba give the latest scoop on the Ohio State Buckeyes as well as all the other happenings in the college hoops world. During this week's episode, Connor and Justin recap some of the things we learned from Ohio State's media day last week, including injury updates and the progression of some of the younger players. They also talk about Ohio State's opponent for this year's “secret” scrimmage, which is not —and is never — actually a secret. The guys also discuss why the Buckeye Nuthouse selling out student tickets in one hour is such a remarkable feat. Finally, Connor closes with a raunchy and slightly concerning story about former Utah and St. Louis head coach Rick Majerus, who was... well... not shy about his body, we can say. Connect with the Podcast: Twitter: @BucketheadsLGHL Connect with Connor: Twitter: @lemons_connor Connect with Justin: Twitter: @justin_golba Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
PART 1: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 39:25


PART 1: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
PART 2: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 37:11


PART 2: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thomas Paine Podcast
PART 3: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 37:43


PART 3: DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB -- Doctors Have Sold You Out -- Outsmart the Crooked COVID Medical Community & Stay Out of the ICU at All Costs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MrCreepyPasta's Storytime
I Sold Myself on the Deep Web by Drechenaux

MrCreepyPasta's Storytime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 17:54


Only good can come from this.The Author: https://www.reddit.com/user/Drechenaux/posts/Video!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cG5DVHOd_7URead along!: https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/q4o94z/i_sold_myself_on_the_deep_web/Check out my new books! A collection of Creepypasta compiled by some of my all time favorite authors and friends!

Divine Living
Dismantling Disappointment (Pleasures In Piedmont No.15)

Divine Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 18:40


Well, that dream Italian farmhouse on the countryside I've been talking about has since been SOLD...and not to me!Of course I felt disappointed at first. Then I redirected my focus to gratitude and all that is currently manifesting in this moment. As I stepped into this frequency, the disappointment dissolved and I was able to lean into trust. If you're currently experiencing disappointment about a circumstance, tune into this episode. I'm certain you'll hear some inspiration to carry you through!EPISODE RESOURCESPurchase your event ticket to Divine Direction! (early bird pricing expires today- Oct. 15, 2021)Join the Q Club!Buy my book, The Audacity to be QueenSign up to receive Gina's Journal Apply for private coachingADDITIONAL RESOURCES⭐ I'd love to hear your big takeaways! Screenshot this episode and tag me on Instagram at @ginadevee.⭐Be sure to follow the Divine Living Podcast, leave a review, and tune in every week for new episodes.⭐ Purchase my book, The Audacity to be Queen, and receive the FREE companion e-course at https://www.divineliving.com/audacity⭐ Desire Queenhood + community at your fingertips? Download the Q Club app for access to my exclusive social network for women globally: https://www.divineliving.com/tryqclub 

Lessons of a Lashpreneur
How 2 Women Sold their Lashbiz for 7-figures

Lessons of a Lashpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:05


In today's episode I'm interviewing two incredible women who founded Lash Bee Pro and who I credit to being the ones who breathed life back into the Lashpreneur because they reached out to me about a week after I announced I was stepping away from The Lashpreneur and wanted to discuss acquiring the business. Erin Soletski and Anjali Bhatia are the Co-founders of Lash Bee Pro - whose mission is to empower lash artists to succeed both as artists and as professionals through superior products, comprehensive education, and community support as part of the LashBeePro family. In our interview today, Erin and Anjali are sharing their journey to selling their brick and mortar business for a hefty price AND give you some tips on what you can start to do to get the foundations of your business ready to grow OR sell if that's something you're hoping to do some day and the incredible importance of clean financials and documenting processes to be able to create a Money Making Machine as a business.  They've also been very generous to our Lessons of a Lashpreneur show by offering 20% off your first purchase of any of their LashBeePro Products! Just use code “Lashpreneur20” at checkout to receive 20% off your first order at www.lashbeepro.com.  Anjali and Erin recommend trying out their Honey-Do Lash Shampoo and their Retention Queen Super Bonder (link to https://lashbeepro.com/collections/bestsellers )  for anyone looking to try out some of their Bestsellers. Alright - let's dive into today's episode with Erin and Anjali of Lash Bee Pro.   Episode Highlights: [6:22] Understanding the business before diving into the lash industry is key [9:15] The good and the bad of getting a business ready to sell [14:12] Why processes are crucial in a business [17:54] Having a standard lash service process will help build your business foundation [20:16] Bad reviews are a reflection of your processes [22:40] The sale process Anjali and Erin followed in selling their business [25:26] Having clean financials is crucial   Happy business building! Have a good one!

RAD Radio
10.14.21 RAD 11 Turkey Brine SOLD OUT Online

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:17


Turkey Brine SOLD OUT OnlineSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

My Amazon Guy
Amazon FBA Journey: Beast Gear, Sold to Thrasio in 3 Years, Ben Leonard Tell All

My Amazon Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:13


Best known as the founder of Beast Gear, Ben Leonard is the classic millennial entrepreneur. He built a business on a laptop, in a cupboard, in his spare time. The difference? Ben grew an international 7-figure business and successfully exited after 3 years; the business holy grail.Now Ben is doing it all over again, and helping others to do the same with his ecommerce brokerage (www.ecombrokers.co.uk)00:00 Intro00:11 Introducing Ben Leonard01:03 First product sold: Beast Rope02:01 How did come up with the idea03:45 What was the biggest challenge10:10 What advice would you give Amazon sellers 12:48 How did you exit15:53 Transition from a product business to a brokerage19:46 What are core things that sellers can't go alone21:50 5-minute hack that can improve sales23:18 How to get in touch with Ecom Brokers23:47 Where to follow Ecom BrokersSupport the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/myamazonguy)

Female Startup Club
Contour Cube™'s Sarah Forrai sold 20k worth of product during her launch after her TikTok video went viral amassing (6M views!)

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:47


Today we are learning from Sarah Forrai, the female founder of Contour Cube™ which you might be familiar with on TikTok. From 3D printed prototype to sell out success the revolutionary facial icing product Contour Cube is now TikTok famous having been viewed by over 25M people, gaining a global customer base and a following of over 150K. The Australian designed Contour Cube™ is a facial icing tool that has been uniquely designed to sculpt your face, de-puff eye bags and address your facial skincare needs from breakouts to fine lines.We're talking through her launch where she generated 20k and sold out of her products, how she's capitalising on her TikTok strategy and what she's doing when it comes to copycats. LINKS WE MENTION:Contour Cube's InstagramSarah's Instagram Female Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.comFemale Startup Club $1000 Monthly Cash Give AwayWebsite: World Intellectual Property OrganizationWebsite: Ted Talks

Lords of the Long Box
CovrPrice Top 10 Hot Comic Books Sold Week Ending Oct 10th 2021!

Lords of the Long Box

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:04


We analyze the sales data and delve deeper into the books and see what made them the hottest selling back issues of the week ending Oct 10th 2021! 0:00 Intros and sponsors 07:23 Top 10 *The Weekly Top 10 Hot Comic book back issue sales sponsored by https://www.covrprice.com/ *Go to https://www.covrprice.com for all your Comic Collecting Needs! Show is Sponsored by http://www.krscomics.com use discount code of LOTLB to get 15% off any KRS comics Exclusives. Find us on Audio only podcasts on these platforms! Itunes https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lords-of-the-long-box/id1433149382 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/1gZiemcW5G49ohLZUiSC2E SoundCloud http://www.soundcloud.com/tim-vo1/ Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/lords-of-the-long-box #ComicBooks #LOTLB #Comics

ThePrint
CutTheClutter: Why Air India sold to Tata signals big shift from 70 yrs of economic destruction masked as socialism

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 22:52


As Ratan Tata says "Welcome back, Air India". Shekhar Gupta analyses the tumbling flight taken off by Air India led by Nehru and all other governments to follow. What was the mindset of Indian government over the years and why is this privatisation so significant. Episode 856 of CutTheClutter. Additional Research by Sukriti Vats and Amogh Rohmetra Brought to you by  @Kia India  ----more----Read Gautam Chikermane's article here: https://www.orfonline.org/expert-speak/as-air-india-flies-to-the-tatas-a-brief-history-of-indias-biggest-policy-failure/----more----Read Anil Swarup's article here: https://theprint.in/opinion/coal-india-has-become-the-whipping-boy-in-coal-crisis-but-modi-govt-cant-escape-blame/749808/----more----Read Shekhar Gupta's articles on CAG here: https://theprint.in/opinion/2g-not-vinod-rai-cag-air-india/24334/ ----more----https://indianexpress.com/article/news-archive/web/unfair-india/----more----Read the CAG report here: https://cag.gov.in/uploads/download_audit_report/2011/Union_Performance_Civil_Aviation_Ministry_of_Civil_Aviation_18_2011.pdf

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia
117 - Don't Let ‘The Great Resignation' Impact Your Salesforce

Catapulting Commissions with Anthony Garcia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:58


Welcome back to the Cataptuling Commissions Sales Talk with your host, Anthony Garcia. Today, we're sitting down with Anthony for a monologue episode in which he's discussing a recent blog he wrote entitled “Don't Let ‘The Great Resignation' Impact Your Salesforce.” We'll break down why is turnover important, and how you can prevent its impact.    “The Great Resignation” is a term that was first coined by Philip Kane in an article from 2019. He writes about its impact today and how it continues to happen. In June 3.9 million people voluntarily quit their jobs. A survey of over 30,000 workers conducted by Microsoft found that 41% of the people are considering quitting. In his article that the cost of turnover is expensive, especially at this rate. The bottom line here is if you feel this way, you're not alone. But let's dive into why it's happening.    The reality of corporate America is businesses want to provide revenue and pay their shareholders. The disconnect between caring for people over profit can be helped by prioritizing the people. If you're acting in a narcissistic, quota-first mentality, there's a good chance your team is thinking of joining the resignation movement. You may get a short-term burst by putting profit over people, but in the long-term, it'll lead to burnout.    Every sales corporation claims to put people over profit, but the time is now to walk the walk. People want to perform at a high level. If you exploit and take this for granted, they'll take that foundational talent elsewhere. We're talking about a heightened level of empathy. Sales professionals have families, and their worlds are turned upside-down right now. Their lives are filled with uncertainty. Let people know it is okay to take some time for your family first because we're always going to be here, we're always going to drive the number we're always going to get it. You always find a way to succeed, you just need someone to support you along the way. When it happens, people will run through a brick wall.    It's also important to realize all your reps are consuming news in today's age that can absolutely suck the life out of them. No matter where they fall on the political spectrum, information is out there and easy to find, and it can be overwhelming. Empathize and touch-base to see how people are doing mentally. Listen to what they have to say and connect with them on a human level first. Compassionate listening is how you can demonstrate how much you care about your team as people first. Remember--any time you give a command, consider what's in it for your team. Don't stop holding people accountable for their responsibilities, but also take into account the compliment sandwich. Put your ask between two opportunities to improve. Sometimes it's less about an iron fist and more about a compassionate heart.     

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How an Agency Grew Fast to Over $4 Million and Sold Quick

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:33


Hollis Carter is an entrepreneur and avid skier who, after founding many companies in his career, recently became the co-founder of the Baby Bathwater Institute, a membership-based community of entrepreneurs with a focus on cultivating natural, mutually beneficial relationships. Since his business relied on many in-person events, it was quite affected by the Covid 19 pandemic and subsequent restrictions. During this time of cancellations and being stuck at home, Hollis thought of a way to add value to the members during this new situation and started to offer a series of services with a performance-based model. This model quickly grew and he ended up selling it before actually having to fully build an agency. In this interview, he talked about the process of building and growing an agency to over $4 million and then selling it, all during a pandemic. 3 Golden Nuggets Growing an agency during Covid. Before the pandemic, Hollis was organizing many in-person events. Once they were canceled because of this new situation, he realized he had a perfect opportunity to offer a new service that would offer value to members of his mastermind. There was already a business relationship and he knew their products and believed in them. So he got ready to work under a performance-based model. “It was really very simple,” he says. The offer included podcast interviews, email lists, and content sites. He spent on setting up all the automation and tracking and found someone to handle that. And of course, under this model he was working with clients, not for them. Simplifying the offer. How can you make things simpler for you? First of all, don't just take a good deal. This agency had the advantage of having a group of companies whose product they trusted. Even then, our guest says, they took people who were so product-focused that we were going to get the content and the angles they needed. People who knew they needed to be told how to market this product. They also let clients use the work they were creating and focused on the 10% that drove revenue. However, there are some things they would do differently a second time around: setting a flat fee and, instead of complicated spreadsheets just telling the client “here's the number that came in, this is our cut,” would save a lot of time. Finally, figuring out how to set expectations of timeline, having a written document with a timeline that the client can reread instead of emailing you questions. Pulling from other industries. Hollis believes in taking knowledge from other industries into your own. He makes sure to have participants from different types of businesses in his masterminds and sustains there's always nuggets that you can pull from other industry practices that might not exist in a niche that you're opening, like what he has learned about hiring from the hotel space. He encourages others to give themselves a chance step outside what they know and learn something new that they can implement in their business from an unexpected source. Sponsors and Resources Ninja Cat: Today's episode is sponsored by Ninja Cat, a digital marketing performance management platform where you can unify your data, create beautiful, insightful reports and presentations that will help you grow your business. Head over to ninjacat.io/masterclass to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Growing an Agency Fast to Over $4 Million and Selling Quick Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here. I have another amazing show guest. We're going to talk about how when COVID hit, they formed an agency and ramped it up to over $4 million and sold it, during COVID. So it's a really cool episode and you're going to enjoy my guest. So let's go ahead and get into it. Hey, Hollis. Welcome to the show. Hollis: [00:00:29] Hey, man. Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:30] Pleasure to have you on. So for the people that have not heard of you or met you at one of your cool events, tell us who you are and what do you guys do? Hollis: [00:00:39] Yeah. My name is Hollis Carter. Living in Boulder, Colorado, but originally from Georgia, where I kind of got my first start in internet marketing stuff. I was like early in college and built a couple of online businesses and luckily had one that did pretty well and sold that. And then I moved to Colorado and did this skiing thing for a while and, uh, living in the mountains and it was great, but I could only talk about skiing and snowboarding and mountain biking with people. So, I'm now a front ranger living in Boulder and enjoy it and got back in the mix of things. Our main business is called the Baby Bathwater Institute. You've come out to one of our events that we had at out mountain. And, uh, I started, my other businesses based on the thing that I use to learn… Like no one was really teaching relevant stuff in the late nineties, early two thousands. So to do it, I thought let's sit at the bar and a lobby at a conference and got most of my nuggets. And so when we had some free time, me and my now business partner who were lobby con buddies for like a decade… We started hosting these events and the whole idea was curating nice people who are in the grow and scale phase and the actual founders of their business. And in a lot of different industries that we could draw knowledge from different places, less of a kind of echo chamber mastermind of people doing the same thing. Cause there's a lot of value in those, but it's very linear. This was more of organic group meetings to have fun and, um, draw things from other industries and stuff. But we have agency people, we've got guys from hotels, we've got guys from e comm businesses… I guess I say people, not guys, cause we have plenty of girls too. We've been doing it for about eight years and I love it. Compared to the businesses I've done before, it's probably the dumbest business model. Cause it's overhead-intensive, time-intensive, relationship intensive. But I actually like it. So we're doing it for years and we'll probably do it for a very long time and really enjoy it. Jason: [00:02:37] Very cool. And COVID hit you guys really hard because your whole thing is about live experiences and that kind of stuff, uh, which are a lot of fun. And so tell us about like… cause we were talking a couple of weeks ago, you were like, man, I couldn't do these live events and that's really what the membership was for. So we gave all this money back to the members because we couldn't do live events. But I started an agency kind of by accident and it quickly grew. So talk about how did you grow the agency so quick? What did you do? Because a lot of people are looking at going, and I've seen a lot of growth in agencies over during COVID, but yours was really pretty, pretty good. So tell us a little bit more about that. Hollis: [00:03:18] I think it was, it was different because much of it was born out just starting that momentum sort of grew versus sitting with a very particular plan. Where Baby Bathwater came less out of need more out of want, this came out of need. And so there… Also, we are locked in our house and I could stay focused on, cause I wasn't doing… Going to conferences or traveling or doing things. But I think the main frame was okay, just postpone slash canceled, who knows a handful of events. We basically lost about two and a half million bucks in that decision. Which happened before people in the states even believed that this COVID thing was gonna affect us because our president was in Italy. And so we saw it a little early. We knew we didn't want to let people go. There was no PPP stuff yet. And me and my partner, Michael, we always knew we could always fall back on our marketing skills, which is kind of what got us to a place to even know what people wanted from a mastermind. So our personal interests has been in the health and wellness sort of space. We see lots of stuff that's crap. And we see lots of stuff that's good. And we happened to know a few people who have amazing products that are members. But they're product guys, they're not marketing people at all. And so we kind of went in with the thesis of how do we enhance the people who are already members value and we can't do anything for 'em, but also don't run any risk of screwing up the relationship if we get in bed with them and do something different than what we already have a good relationship with. So, I mean, it basically started with four products. I knew we had people in the group who had platforms. That love the products, cause they give them out at events. They love them. And I know they have a lot of traffic and I knew these people have great products. Didn't even know what I'm talking about. Like you should just set up this campaign and get them on the podcast and set up an email. You can track it with affiliate links… And all like, can you just do that for me? Kind of thing. So, I mean, it was actually super, super simple. Essentially, out of a network license for post affiliate pro so that we could track all of the clicks and conversions and build it very slowly, not a lot of overhead. It costed maybe like five grand or something we spent getting set up and all that automation and tracking. We did have a really hard time finding someone to help us run that once it worked. We ended up finding the guy who made the tutorial videos for the original version of it and tracked him down. And it was the first hire because it was complicated and how he set up the company structure. But the basics of it was we had people get podcast, email lists and content sites. I mean, people have great products that had a unique hook. It couldn't just be like, like we did have a CBD, which is a crowded market with a bunch of people at all look the same. But this had clinical trials, some studies, so I could go get functional medicine doctors to say something unique about it and they could write a real piece of content. So really we just took the friction out of the middle, which was, it's hard for the product owners to focus on these things that are ancillary. Then buy an ad that are not doing very diligent tasks that can scale these like one-off promotions and managing people is hectic. Like if I had a brand, I wouldn't want to do stuff we were doing because I know the costliness of managing all these relationships and getting it on the calendar and getting all the stuff they need. But in our unique situation, we had time. We… the money. We wanted to serve the people who we wanted to have back when things came back online. And so it made sense to keep calling them chatting and working it out and figuring it out. So our deal is that we took... it's very minimal, it's just an average, about 10% of the revenue for 12 months of the customer. And we would do a, you know, a multi-tiered campaign where, you know, perhaps the person to get on a podcast and do an interview about the product that was very educational and content-heavy. So it didn't just come out of the blue of this promotion. It was like ease into with good questions and then we'd do an article. And then eventually kind of like an email with a special offer and a landing page just for that person. And like something I've been back in early on was when one big person promotes the rest. So we usually just go for, you know, one or two people we have a good relationship that have a big audience and then their affiliates would see it happen. And we'd get a few more of those. But we did, because it was so hands-on, mess around with people who could send, you know, thousands and thousands and thousands of clicks and had an audience that already trusted them. So very boutique, very niche, but where it worked, very effective. I'd say the biggest bottleneck was calendars. You could lock in a deal and they might not have three months so they could do it. But we hit a point where we were going to have to start hiring more people, we had a tech guy, an administrative helper in an industry that me and Michael were putting together. Then we hired someone to go start recruiting more promoters, and then we need to start hiring writers and creatives. At that point, we actually ended up selling the business so that we didn't have to build an agency. The hard part of building an agency, managing the creatives, training, we never really hit that point. Although it looks like I'll go back to the trough and do it again. But I mean, really it was about that simple. It was like performance-based so we couldn't mess up relationships. And also we didn't want anyone to ever tell us, hey, you have to do this for me. Uh, it usually mostly came from the merchants with the products. They'd be like, hey, where are the traffic? And we're like, hey, we don't, we don't work for you. We're not on a retainer, but it's coming, it's coming. Then we'll get paid. Well, we only get paid when we make sales. So that helped us not get stress out. Jason: [00:09:32] Do you feel like you have to comb through mountains of data, jumping between multiple platforms to spreadsheets, to slide decks and backing in, in order to create performance reports for your clients? It's a constant drain on your agency's time and resources. And that's where our friends at Ninja Cat can help. Ninja Cat is a digital marketing performance management platform that really unifies your marketing data and empowers your agency to automate insightful, beautiful client reports that scale. Now Ninja Cat cat keeps your marketing performance and presentation tools in one place, freeing you up from manual data wrangling. And it really gives your team more time to focus on strategy and growing your business. And for a limited time, my smart agency podcast listeners will receive $500 ninja credit. When you go to ninjacat.io/masterclass to claim your offer and schedule a demo. That's ninjacat.io/masterclass. Yeah, I see a lot of people going the performance route. You know, one of our mastermind members, David, he was always constantly under the million mark and just trying to figure out how to get over it. And he switched to this model and got a million dollars last year during COVID, just from one client for the performance deal. Kind of like what you guys are doing, or you guys did or about to do again. I guess we can talk about that. But I liked how, when you're the performance model, they can't tell you what you can and can't do, or a timeline. You're just like, I'm putting a campaign together on our own dime, our own resources. This is what you're agreed to pay. I really like that. But I also like too, that, you know, this is a home run. Like it's a good product. I want people to not kind of overlook that and just don't go up to anybody and go give me 10% of all your sales. And plus too, you guys had relationships with them so you knew you could trust them. Because it gets really tricky sometimes when you're like, yeah, give me 10% of sales and they could the books however they want. Hollis: [00:11:54] Yes. So that was an interesting piece of... The one thing that I guess is there is we did have these relationships we've built over almost 20 years now. Which, if you just do it on the street, we couldn't start from scratch with that. So that was like our one… competitively used to do something here, but the book side of things, we actually knew how bad that can get. So we control that this was a bottleneck and business model, as far as administration and just workload. I kept everything clean, but we were starting to get super risky. So we invoiced the merchant for the payments and wrote to the affiliates. We did everything. So we essentially became a bank taking the money, moving the money versus paying out of their own affiliate program. It started to get pretty hectic. You get one monthly payment. We're trying to keep the relationships paying on time. We never ran into any issues, but you could see it coming as things got more complex. Jason: [00:12:52] Well, I'm sure the IRS probably set up red flags of all the money moving around. Hollis: [00:12:57] Oh, it was crazy that was passing through and yeah… And so like in hindsight, if we do this again, won't do the complicated equation where we have 12 months tail customer. We also calculated a refund risk thing. You know, now it's going to be one time upfront with a small fee for us that continues, but like the calculating the refund piece to try to mitigate risks. Like I think we went into it wanting to be like a no-brainer where it's like, hey, we've taken all the risks where X, Y, and Z, that you won't have to do anything for. Our contract is like the nicest thing in the world. If this was the only thing we were doing, and we were focused on it that thing would have sort of bit us in the ass, as it started to grow. But it worked well. It was boutique small. And we only did this from March to October. So it was like a significant period of time, but you can see all the forethought we didn't put into it with, oh man, the amount of time to calculate these things if I would've... There's a bunch of things we do if we really want to scale it simpler. If we do this again, you know. Jason: [00:14:05] What are some of the other things that you do simpler. Because most people listening here, this is their full-time gig. They weren't just looking at like, well, let's just try this project out, which that's really pretty cool that you guys are able to do that. Hollis: [00:14:19] Yeah. I think, you know… fed the horse because we had all the relationships and we knew this I'd stayed up drinking wine with every person in the thing all night. I knew we could do well with good products, which you highlighted, is like products that kind of sell themselves. And then the owner of those products, I think this is the simplest thing is don't just take a good deal. We only took people who were so product-focused that we were going to get the content and the angles we needed. All they cared about is being the best. But they didn't care about was telling us how to market it, that they actually wanted us to tell them. They would use the campaigns to inform all of the rest of their staff. One thing we did do well and make it easy was, hey, use the work we're creating. We don't need any cut of it. You can take our landing pages, reuse them. If you get your own affiliates, you can run them through your program. You know, just do that. Cause we only focused on that 10% that drove our revenue. The things we probably would have done different or not such a complicated calculation of the things. I remember when I first started in some of the affiliate stuff, people would hold back a percentage for refunds. There was like a whole equation. But we made everything else so simple for them. We didn't need to go, that… We could have just said here's a flat fee. Here's a number. Honestly, it would have saved one employee 40 hours a month in weird stuff. And in places where ambiguity… where also the customer on both sides has to read a spreadsheet that's complicated versus like here's the number that came in and here is the cut… over. I think simplicity would have helped a lot in that sense. And then other simplicity things, I think just figuring out how to set expectations of timeline. Even though we didn't work for those people, said it on the phone, in the conversations of like, hey, we might get a campaign locked in that's going to be out this far. But then they get in their own world. Like, where's the stuff? And I'm like, no, we already told you this. And so, one outline. Here's how this works, one the phone. Before you email me any questions, reread this. This is the rules of engagement and how it works. But that I would say once it worked and had momentum, changing the relationships from I work for you to we work together changed the whole dynamic of it versus, you know, just collecting a flat fee. Jason: [00:16:49] Yeah. I love that of like we work together rather than you're the dog barking orders to me. And even if you don't do a performance model. Hollis: [00:16:58] Yeah. It feels like you kind of got to do that sometimes. Cause I feel like that's how we like learned. If you worked in a restaurant going up or we… Whatever, like that's how it was. When you're getting paid, you just got to say yes, please, and as you wish. Which honestly doesn't even serve the client that well. Sometimes you're doing shit that they don't even need to get done. They just wanted to show that they tell you to do something. But we're only going to focus on brings in dollars. It doesn't bog down either of our teams. And that's why we switched the contract that you can leave whenever you want. You know, the psychology there was great because it was like, we're paying equally versus that, you know, walked into some long retainer and some big set up fees and things like that. Obviously you have to have some results for that to be worth it, um, for the relationship to stay. But if you know you can deliver on it, then it's probably better to be in a, a mutual relationship where either party can leave in 30 days notice versus trying to lock in really long-term deals. Jason: [00:17:58] Yeah, exactly. Well, awesome. Well, this is amazing, Hollis. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience listening in? Hollis: [00:18:05] Listen, I mean, it's funny just because it's a friend of mine that just got off a call with one of our members who, who set them up on like a little dinner in the same town. And I forget the book references basically it's about taking knowledge from other industries and bringing them into your own. So what I saw was great was a lot of the product companies who were here like some of them were in retail and other things. They just didn't know how to pull stuff from other areas. There's always like these levers that you can pull from other industry practices that might not exist in a niche that you're opening that you're trying to mark it as that in. And so I was really, all we did was just start reaching into other tools that there's no way they're ever going to get to this. So obviously we can take over this part for them and we're not also dealing with the dynamics. So there's someone in the house already being paid to do this or anything like that. It's pretty clean that way. But I think we just learned that from sitting in these events from people like, you know, we have some hiring stuff we've learned from guys in the hotel space, which I never would have thought to learn that until I sat into that at one of these events or whatever. So I've never seen through blinders. Like it's good to be focused and linear, but I think there's just so many cool nuggets in different industries you can pull and bring in that we all just kind of forget to take a glance at. Jason: [00:19:30] Awesome. Well, cool. Well, what's a website people go and check you guys out? Hollis: [00:19:35] Just babybathwater.com. Jason: [00:19:37] Awesome. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show. If you guys enjoyed this episode, make sure you go to their website. They have really cool events. I went to the one in, in Utah. And it was really pretty amazing. And if you guys want to really grow and scale your agency faster, what got you here is not going to get you to the next level and you need to do a number of different things. Because probably what got you to this level is from referrals and word of mouth, or maybe you selling, or maybe one salesperson. The biggest thing that you need is systems in place in order to grow and scale faster and get to the point where you can pick and choose. If you want to do that, I want you guys to check out our agency playbook. Go to jasonswenk.com/playbook and check it out. And it might just be the thing that will get you to the next level. So go do that now. And until next time, have a Swenk day.

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business
SPS 127: Traditional vs. Self Publishing: Dropping The Mic On Which You Should Choose with Ruth Soukup (And How I Sold 500,000 Copies Of My Self Published Book)

Self Publishing School : Learn How To Write A Book And Grow Your Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:09


One of the most asked questions when it comes to publishing is whether to go the traditional or self publishing route. Ruth Soukup has done both and is here to share both her experiences and her recommendations.  Ruth is a New York Times Best-Selling author, founder of Elite Blogging Academy, and host of the Do It Scared Podcast amongst so many other things. After blogging for several years she decided to write a book and so started her journey into publishing. A friend of hers referred her to an agent and after paying thousands to have a book proposal written up, her blog exploded. While she was in the process of pitching one book, she decided to write and self publish, How to Blog for Profit. She kept being asked the same question over and over again and the book was born. She received amazing feedback on the book and later built Elite Blogging Academy to further help her audience learn to create a source of income from their blogs. By the time her traditionally published book came out, she'd written and self published another book. Ruth signed a contract with her publisher for two books and after she fulfilled her obligations, swore she would never go the traditional route again. Later on she did end up going the traditional publishing route one more time, but is now completely done with it. She has more control over her self published books and she receives almost 100% of her royalties.  Listen in as she shares her experiences from both sides of the publishing world and why, for her, self publishing makes the most sense. She stresses that the way in which you publish your book needs to align with your overall goal for that book.  Is your book meant to be an introduction to your company or are you publishing so that you can be labeled an author? Do you plan on writing more than one book and want to be able to use earlier books in your marketing? Are you building a business rather than JUST becoming an author. If you're on the fence about which publishing journey you want to take, then you need to listen to this episode. Ruth lays it all out there so that you can truly make an informed decision!   Show Notes [00:41] Welcome back to the show New York Times Best-Selling author Ruth Soukup. [03:24] What's the difference between traditional and self publishing?  [04:27] If you want to do traditional publishing, you have to have an existing platform. [07:41] During the process of trying to propose her book to a publisher, her blog exploded and she wrote a new book and self published it. [09:59] Traditional publishing is a much longer process than self publishing. [10:56] What was the most difficult part of the traditional publishing route?  [13:23] The experience has gotten worse and worse with each new book. [16:26] Were her self published books outselling her traditionally published books?  [18:16] All this said, why did she decide to traditionally publish a third book?  [20:23] One thing traditionally published books do is make it easier to make the lists. [23:08] Learn more about “list” practices and why they mean nothing.  [24:37] Why will Ruth never traditionally publish again?  [26:56] How you can use your book in your buyer's journey when you self publish. [29:45] Which path does Ruth recommend for someone who has never published a book? [31:48] Is there a good reason to traditionally publish?  [35:25] How has How to Blog for Profit helped boost Elite Blogging Academy? [38:21] Putting the book before the course has absolutely worked best for Ruth. [39:33] Has the free + shipping funnel been successful in generating leads for EBA?  [43:33] If you want to see Ruth's funnel go to www.elitebloggingacademy.com/book. [44:29] Which marketing strategy has moved the most copies of her book? [46:43] Ruth gives one last amazing tip to take away from this conversation. [48:05] What advice would she give to the earlier version of herself?  [48:56] Connect with Ruth.   Links and Resources Self-publishingschool.com Spsfreetraining.com Circle of Profit   Ruth's Website Ruth Soukup Omnimedia Elite Blogging Academy Do It Scared Do It Scared Podcast Living Well Planner Living Well Spending Less SPS 008: Creating a Thriving Business, Blog, and Raving Fans with Ruth Soukup Living Forward by Michael Hyatt Author Advantage Live 2020   Ruth's Books: Do It Scared Living Well Spending Less  How to Blog for Profit 31 Days of Living Well & Spending Zero 31 Days to a Clutter Free Life Unstuffed

Let’s Buy a Business
Keeping Your Day Job While Buying an Online Business + Exit - Jennifer Anderson Interview

Let’s Buy a Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 23:49


Jennifer Anderson is a listener of the podcast. She's super cool and has a traditional career but on the side has bought, built, and now SOLD an online business. Jennifer packs in the value and gold nuggets in this short episode. Episode Resources https://quietlight.com/ https://empireflippers.com/ https://feinternational.com/ https://www.bizbuysell.com/ https://flippa.com/ http://webequityshow.com/ https://investing.io/patey/ Connect with Ryan Condie http://linkedin.com/in/ryancondie http://letsbuyabusiness.com/ https://forms.gle/RRcXpe3dK7pNGqv16 Live Oak Bank is a seasoned SMB lender providing SBA and conventional financing for search funds, independent sponsors, private equity firms, and individuals looking to acquire lower middle-market companies. www.liveoakbank.com Lisa Forrest - Lisa.forrest@liveoak.bank 10 Step Video series to Finding a Company to Buy - http://letsbuyabusiness.com/video Ryan Twitter - https://twitter.com/RyanPaulCondie 

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Andy Dunn (Bonobos) - How he created Bonobos, why they sold to Walmart, the current state of DNVBs, and a sneak peek of what he's doing next

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:59


Presented by Ferret: Ferret is the first relationship intelligence tool for all business savvy investors to know, for the first time, who they can trust Click Here to jump to the top of the waitlist. Presented by Gorgias: Gorgias is the #1 helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce stores, and can turn your customer support into a profit center.If you're looking to increase your retention for your business, mention Consumer VC and get 2 months of Gorgias for free. Head Here to get started. Thank you Susan Lyne for the introduction to our guest today, Andy Dunn, the founder of Bonobos. Bonobos was one of the first digitally native brands to exist. They eventually sold to Walmart for over $300 million. In this episode, Andy shares the founding journey of Bonobos, how he thinks about the current state of digitally native brands and a clue about what he's up to next. Without further ado, here's Andy. Some of the questions I ask Andy: What was your initial attraction to entrepreneurship? You started Bonobos at Stanford. How did you meet your co-founder Brian Spaly? Did you have other business ideas? How did you land on pants? What was the insight? What was the customer feedback? What was first step for testing out this idea? Why did you decide to move the business to New York instead of staying the bay have access to tech talent? How did you find your first customers and gain early momentum? We talk on this podcast about doing things that don't scale in the early days. What were some of the activities you did that wouldn't have scaled? When did you decide to sell online? When did you decide to raise capital? Who was your first investor? What are the aspects of Bonobos that resonated with them? Who was your target customer? How were you able to get to your customer? Why did you decide to move the company to New York? Why weren't you ready for a Series A? Was it hard to recruit tech talent in New York? How did you approach hiring? How were you able to attract talent? How did you build culture? How did you approach growth vs. profitability? When did you decide (if you decided) to focus on profitability? Didn't know how to build the tech stack? How did you approach hiring tech talent? When and how did you develop the concept for guideshops? What was your omnichannel strategy? What was your approach to leadership? When and how did you develop the concept for guideshops? What was your omnichannel strategy? When was the moment when you knew the trajectory of Bonobos was looking good? What was your approach to leadership? When did you decide to do paid marketing? What were some of the challenges and trials you had to face while you were building Bonobos? What were some of the mistakes that you made during Bonobos? What was the process like selling to Walmart? I know you also invest as well. How do you describe the current landscape of DNVBs?How do you evaluate brands and founders? What's one thing you would change about the fundraising process? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally? What's one piece of advice that you have for founders currently building? What are you currently working on?

Master Passive Income Real Estate Investing in Rental Property
Sold His Company to Microsoft and Became A Real Estate Investor

Master Passive Income Real Estate Investing in Rental Property

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:36


Real estate investing is something anyone can do. Here I interview a Master Passive Income Student who became a successful real estate investor AND sold his company to Microsoft. Get your free real estate investing course: http://www.masterpassiveincome.com/freecourse  Real Estate Wealth Builders Membership: https://masterpassiveincome.com/builders // WHAT TO WATCH NEXT How to Use Owner Financing to Make Loads of Money https://youtu.be/qAOpCOWvj6Q How to Analyze a Real Estate Investing Deal in 5 Seconds https://youtu.be/SqA1HcAW4EI How to Set Up Your LLC for Your Business https://youtu.be/B9RzLkAZI9s Everything You Need to Know about Real Estate Comps https://youtu.be/wMZ_We-wlrg //BEST REAL ESTATE INVESTING RESOURCE LINKS Get Business Funding https://masterpassiveincome.com/fundandgrow Great High Interest Savings Account: https://masterpassiveincome.com/cit Accurate Rental Rates: https://masterpassiveincome.com/rentometer Self Directed IRA for Real Estate Investing: https://masterpassiveincome.com/rocketdollar Learn more about Dustin and find resources to build an automatic real estate investing business: https://masterpassiveincome.com/ Join our free private Facebook group! https://masterpassiveincome.com/group NOTE: This description may contains affiliate links to products we enjoy using ourselves. Should you choose to use these links, this channel may earn affiliate commissions at no additional cost to you. We appreciate your support!  

Niche Pursuits Podcast
How Stephen Hockman Sold a 1 Year Old Affiliate Site for Over $100k

Niche Pursuits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:11


In today's episode, I interview Stephen Hockman of SEO Chatter and we discuss everything about starting up new websites the right way, internal linking, SEO, site structure, and a whole lot more. He's grown many affiliate sites, been through Google penalties, recently sold a niche site, written a book, and is currently building an SEO site in public, all the while sharing his strategies.

SalesLife
32: Why I Sold My Podcast to TrainYo

SalesLife

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 37:19


In today's episode, we sit down with the Co-Founders of TrainYo, Sunil Kumar and Omar Sadik!Topics Covered: -The backstories of Sunil and Omar and why they started TrainYo- TrainYo's mission to bring equality and high-quality sales candidates into the tech market.- Why the current education system is broken and what the future looks like--------------Want to be on the show? Reach out to Marcos Serna on LinkedIn (link below)https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcosserna/

The GallowgateShots Podcast
SOLD ! Here Comes The Money | The All With Smiling Faces Podcast

The GallowgateShots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:50


It's a historic day for Newcastle United Football Club as the Premier League announces the £300m sale of the club to the Public Investment Fund of Saudi Arabia. Amanda Staveley and The Rueben brothers. WHAT A MOMENT. Join your drunken podcasters; Kris your host alongside Deka, Mark and Roger as they take in this unbelievable moment.  The GallowgateShots YouTube channel is now proudly part of the 90MIN Football Network as their go to Newcastle United Podcast provider. You can follow GallowgateShots across social media on YouTube, Twitter, Instagram  A huge thanks to our 2021/22 season sponsor PT-4-YOU.co.uk PT4You is a revolutionary new system carefully designed to match you with your ideal personal trainer. Embarking on a journey towards total health and fitness can be daunting, and you want to be sure that you're choosing a trainer that's completely and totally right for YOU! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The James Suckling Wine Podcast
TASTING NEW RELEASES FROM PHILIPPONNAT, THE FIRST CHAMPAGNE TO BE SOLD VIA LA PLACE DE BORDEAUX

The James Suckling Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:13


James sits down with Chairman and CEO Charles Philipponnat of French Champagne House Champagne Philipponnat, who reflects on the 2021 harvest, effects of the ever-changing weather conditions, and his plans to introduce cuvées and other wines.In this conversation Charles also explains why he decided to sell his Champagnes through La Place de Bordeaux, becoming the first Champagne to take this distribution route, and why they decided to do the disgorgement for the 1996 Clos des Goisses.Philipponnat Champagne Clos des Goisses Extra Brut L.V. 1996Philipponnat Champagne Clos des Goisses Extra Brut 2012

Jazz Focus
Sold American - first Glenn Miller Orchestra recordings 1937-1938

Jazz Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 61:46


Sold American - first Glenn Miller Orchestra recordings . . these are early, almost prototype records made by Miller in 1937 and 1938 when he was "getting it together" - more jazz than later featuring Sterling Bose, Pee Wee Erwin, Johnny Austin, Irving Fazola, Hal McIntyre, Jerry Jerome, Tex Beneke and others. Also, three early live recordings of his early band. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-clark49/support

RTÉ - Arena Podcast
Film reviews - Squid Game - Gallery of Photography Ireland

RTÉ - Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:23


Aingeala Flannery & John Maguire review new films, Deadly Cuts, Sweetheart & The Man who Sold his Skin, Darryl Jones on the South Korean TV sensation streaming on Netflix, Prix Pictet Hope features photographs from 12 different photographers from around the world, Olan McGowan reports on the exhibition, at The Gallery of Photography Ireland.

wellRED podcast
BUBBA SHOT THE PODCAST - "Sold" by John Michael Montgomery

wellRED podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 58:29


Today on Bubba we discuss the quirky, auction inspired, almost rap like country song "Sold (Grundy County Auction)" by John Michael Montgomery. The Amish, Rodeo Dancin', and Japanese Businessmen. We got it all. 

New Life Church Bastrop
THE LIFE OF JOSEPH: 03, Sold by His Brothers

New Life Church Bastrop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 47:50


The 3rd message from the series "The Life of Joseph"

Live Iconic
Episode 33: How I sold my first 100k package

Live Iconic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 20:36


Hey ladies!!! In todays show I am detailing how I sold my first 100k package, what it took and why its important. 

Lords of the Long Box
CovrPrice Top 10 Hot Comic Books Sold Week Ending Oct 3rd 2021!

Lords of the Long Box

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:35


We analyze the sales data and delve deeper into the books and see what made them the hottest selling back issues of the week ending Oct 3rd 2021! 0:00 Intros and sponsors 07:23 Top 10 *The Weekly Top 10 Hot Comic book back issue sales sponsored by https://www.covrprice.com/ *Go to https://www.covrprice.com for all your Comic Collecting Needs! Show is Sponsored by http://www.krscomics.com use discount code of LOTLB to get 15% off any KRS comics Exclusives. Find us on Audio only podcasts on these platforms! Itunes https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lords-of-the-long-box/id1433149382 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/1gZiemcW5G49ohLZUiSC2E SoundCloud http://www.soundcloud.com/tim-vo1/ Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/lords-of-the-long-box #ComicBooks #LOTLB #ComicsdsOfTheLongBox

Pep Talks for Side Hustlers
Ep. 359 - Creating Sold-Out Services for Coaches with Tavona Denise

Pep Talks for Side Hustlers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 58:34


Get access to our free trainings for web designers and DIYers at https://shannonmattern.com/free Leave a Rating + Review! Get the full transcript at shannonmattern.com/359 Bio: TaVona Denise is on a mission to help you create a life you love and a business on your terms. She's the voice behind the Breaking Protocol podcast, author of Unstoppable Success and she teaches Type A entrepreneurs how to achieve their goals, without the hustle overwhelm and burnout. Connect with TaVona: Website Breaking Protocal Podcast Instagram Linkedin

The Ernie Brown Show
The Ernie Brown Show, Folgers coffee jingle sold for $90K

The Ernie Brown Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:12


Would you? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wealth Management - Financial Growth And Money Tips With Hunter Lowry
I Sold My Home! How Should I Invest The Proceeds?

Wealth Management - Financial Growth And Money Tips With Hunter Lowry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


With the red hot housing market, a lot of money is in motion. Make sure you handle these funds appropriately!

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA
Case Study: Life Insurance Policies Are Being Sold to Private-Equity Firms

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:59


Research Analyst Jacob Keen, CFA, is joined by Director of Insurance Planning, Jim Crone, CLU®, CFS®, and Associate Michael Griffin, CFP® to discuss the trend in the life insurance marketplace where large insurers are selling existing policies to private-equity firms and asset managers. Jim highlights the concerns that policyholders may be exposed to riskier underlying investments. Read the article: https://www.henssler.com/life-insurance-policies-are-being-sold-to-private-equity-firms/ 

AP Audio Stories
$699.8M Powerball jackpot won, ticket sold in California

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 1:26


RTÉ - Liveline
Ambulance Wait Times -Wexford Racial Attack-Sold: The Eircom Shares Saga - What a difference two weeks make

RTÉ - Liveline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 69:48


Callers discuss ambulance waiting times, Dane Tadgh told Joe about a horrific racist attack in Wexford, Eddie and Breda, who bought shares in Eircom reacted to the latest documentary looking back at the story and Joe checks in with Dublin Fire Brigade, District Officer, Peter Navan who is about to Marry his Fiancée Carmel tomorrow.

Best of US Investors's Podcast
This Is Why I Sold All My TESLA Stock Today

Best of US Investors's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 17:25


Watch to get an understanding of what is about to happen in the stock market:5 movies that explain what caused the 2009 financial crisis, and what happened after:The Big Short (2015)Margin Call (2011)Too Big to Fail (2011)99 Homes (2014)Inside Job (2010)Read these books to build your knowledge on how the markets work and what the future is going to look like.RECOMMENDED BOOKS (Affiliate Links)1.  The Accidental Super Power by Peter Zeihan:  https://amzn.to/3dEl9tL2.  The Big Nine by Amy Webb: https://amzn.to/2yOJmPe3.  The Code Breaker, Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race by Walter Isaacson. https://amzn.to/2WNi6wfLink to our Discord: https://discord.io/bestofusThe Power of a Tribe: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B096TWBDM3/...Get Surfshark VPN at  https://surfshark.deals/INVESTORS and enter promo code INVESTORS for 83% off and 3 extra months for free!  Help Kerry and Nita win the race against Childhood Cancer and keep their daughter Shay's memory alive. Your support makes a direct impact in the fight against Pediatric Cancer at Children's of Alabama by helping advance research in finding a cure for cancer. http://give.childrensal.org/bestofus

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation
688: Falun Dafa News – October 4, 2021

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 16:26


-Human Rights Experts: Forced Organ Harvesting Is a Hidden Genocide -France: Report from Ministry of Armed Forces Highlights CCP's Persecution of Falun Gong -Law Enforcement in Communist China: An Abused System that Persecutes the Innocent and Brings Consequences -New York: Practitioners Call to End Decades-Long Persecution in China During U.N. General Assembly -Shen Yun Concludes Texas Tour with Sold-out Added Performance: “Inspirational and Hopeful” -Poland: “Everyone Needs Truthfulness, Compassion, Forbearance”

Rage Against The Mainstream
S4 Ep. 10: Nickelback Sold More Than Van Halen?

Rage Against The Mainstream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:35


Join Bill and Steve as they talk about Lucifer, Darius Rucker, Nickelback's "All The Right Reasons", and artists that made a total 180 degree genre change.   Follow us on social media https://www.facebook.com/ratmpodcast https://www.instagram.com/ratmpodcast/ https://twitter.com/ratmpodcast AVAILABLE ON ALL STREAMING PLATFORMS https://smarturl.it/RATMpodcast?fbcli...  

Built to Sell Radio
Ep 306 Jay Gould - Once Bitten, Twice Shy: The (Real) Reason Jay Gould Sold Yashi for $33M

Built to Sell Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 87:27


Jay Gould co-founded Yashi, a platform that helped advertisers buy ads on video content. Yashi grew to more than $25 million in revenue and more than $5 million in EBITDA when Gould received an offer of $33 million from Nexstar Broadcasting. The offer represented around 6 x EBITDA and Gould was conflicted. He knew he could probably get more, but he had also seen how quickly a successful company can go to zero.

Real Estate Coaching Radio
Your Monday to Friday Social Media System

Real Estate Coaching Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:52


Tim and Julie Harris make it simple for you in this podcast about how to systematize and monetize your social media posts:Rules: Provide VALUE with each post, and include a CALL TO ACTION. Keep it simple. Don't over-engineer. Don't pay someone else to do this for you. Do this systematically each week.   MONDAY:   Market update. What's hot and what's not? A simple 'absorption study' showing facts that everyone wants to know: -Average sale price for your metro area -Average days on the market...up or down? Month over month or Quarter over Quarter. -Average list to sell price ratio...up or down? Month over month or Quarter over Quarter. -What are the best selling price ranges? -What are the best selling zip codes?   *You can split the above into several different posts.   *Call to action: For a specific analysis on YOUR neighborhood and a comparative market analysis to see what your home is worth in today's market, contact me here:   TUESDAY:    Coming soon (with your listing going in MLS following the rules)...About to hit the market, be the first to see it! (call to action)   WANTED WEDNESDAY:  Your home for my highly motivated and pre-approved (or cash) buyers. Record a video of what your buyers need. Be specific. Call to action: Who do you know who is a match for my anxious buyer clients?   *Mention your buyers can be flexible with closing dates and possession. *Mention they would consider a seller lease back. etc.   THURSDAY Thrilled Clients:   Client testimonial video. Ideally this is in front of the listing you just sold with a SOLD sign, detail about the transaction and what a great job you did for them. Call to action: 'I'd love for you to be my next happy client! Call me here:'   FRIDAY  Charity events you're sponsoring, attending, etc. INVITE them to see you there or donate, etc. Buy or Sell with me and adopt a pet for free is a great promotion. -and / or- Open house announcement: Sneak preview neighbor's open, followed by public open house. Who do you know who would LOVE to buy this house? Here's how to find me : Schedule A Free Coaching Call Listen on iTunes Listen on Spotify Listen on Stitcher Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Solarpreneur
Can Solar be Sold as a Summer Sales Program - Suli Zinck

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:33


Tune in now and don't forget to sign up for www.solciety.co!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:42):What's going on. Solarpreneurs Taylor Armstrong, your host here, and we have the first female guest ever on the Solarpreneur podcast. I'm super excited. So we got a Suli Zinck. Can I say your last name? Right. Zinc. Okay, so, so will you, thanks for coming on the show, I'm so excited to finally have a girl knocker on, so appreciate it. Appreciate you coming on,Speaker 3 (01:07):But I'll be honest. Taylor, yours was one. When I was looking into the solar industry, yours is one of the first ones that I like found. And I was like, oh, he there, there's not like a ton of like episodes, not a ton of people. This is definitely where I'm going to start because it's going to be like, he's going to be methodical and he's going to give you tips. And it's exactly been that since like what, when I started listening to you back in November. SoSpeaker 2 (01:32):Yeah, no, I appreciate that. And I've been following your podcast too, and your story and, um, pretty amazing stuff. So yeah, I will say we've been, yeah, I've, I think I've scheduled a one or two other girls to come on and both of them like fell through, um, um, one of them, one of them like just no showing me and then like one responds. I'm like, all right, maybe I'm not going to chain get girls on if they do this. So maybe I left kind of bad days, my mother, but yeah. But God, we made it work and no, um, you guys are crushing it with your team and I know there's some powerhouse ladies in the industry, so I think it's important. And actually, I remember now that I think back, I remember one of my like lower reviews on the PA I think it was like three stars or something, but, um, one of the reviews was like, Taylor focuses so much on like guys, Neil, he just says, here's the thing guys. And like, he never brings on me in girl.Speaker 3 (02:27):They was like, that is going to be my one full year. And then we like failure by two of us. Go see.Speaker 2 (02:35):So yeah, that's when I realized, like, I, I gotta be, uh, you know, conscious that the ladies listen to the show and not, you know, just suggest everyone by guys and stuff like that. So glad we're making it happen though. Um, but yeah, so slowly, do you want to maybe get into your story a little bit? I know you just did an awesome interview on the, uh, the door knocker podcasts. So we probably won't go quite as in depth as you went on that podcast. So people go listen to that to you, if you want to hear kind of her full in-depth story, which was awesome. But I, yeah. Do you want to give us just a little bit of the background for people who don't know you on the podcast or?Speaker 3 (03:12):Yeah, so I'm Sui, Juliana, Zuli all the weird games. People call me on the doors, whatever floats your boat. But, um, I started in the door to door industry 13 summers ago. This is my 13th summer. Um, I just came in with like the mindset. If I was going to give up, you know, a good job, I was going to make it count. And I ended up my first summer, I just asked the team, they're like, Hey, what is the number one girl did, uh, how many accounts pest control accounts that she serviced the summer. And, and when he told me it was like three 11, I was like, all right. And, uh, but originally the person who recruited me, it was like, look, if everything fails and sucks, like I'll at least pay for your plane ticket, everything. So at least you had like fun while you're out here.Speaker 3 (03:58):And so those three weeks ended up turning into 13 years. Like later I ended up, uh, that girl had did three, uh, 3 0 9 and I finished with three 16 that summer. And then there was just no turning back for me in the door to door to industry. When I saw that there was just no cap on, on basically, uh, my pay, there's just a cap with companies. And so, um, once I realized that I was like, there's no way that I was going to go to a nine to five. And, um, two summers in, I get married to my husband of 10 years now. And then I recruited him to be my service pro and then I got in trouble for having to be a service pro because I would have him work through his lunch breaks. I would be calling him on Sundays. Like, Hey, we're going to go to these homes. And we're not even supposed to like, is a W2 employee.Speaker 2 (04:55):Like I'm a church, let me go to church.Speaker 3 (04:59):And so my branch manager was like, sweet. You can be doing this. Like, there's, this is, he works for us, not for you. And, and then the following summer, um, I, we had our first kid AMA I knocked until I gave birth to her on the doors, like eight months pregnant and still did more than like my team leader on the team. And it was just no turning back. Like I just, I just have one of those like mindsets. I just feel like I'm a little bit different in the sense, like, I, I I've seen the money. I've seen the success. I've seen what this industry can do. And I just now want to have a lot more women be in the same space.Speaker 2 (05:40):That's incredible. And no, I got mad respect because my wife she's actually, I think, seven months pregnant right now. So, um, yeah, but she's not, she's not moving much. Like I can't even imagine trying to get her out on a door. Yeah. Just imagining that, just blow my mind that you would even, you know, attempt to knock eight months pregnant. Um, so pretty incredible. Yeah. Um, have you, but yeah, I was wondering, have you always been like that competitive because I see, I don't think there's a lot of girls. They're like, oh, what's the, what did the top girl female rap do? And then want to beat it? Is it always just been like super competitive your whole life? Or where did that come from?Speaker 3 (06:22):Yeah. And so that's like one of the tips that I give to like men or people in general and the door to door to industry when they are looking at female reps in the sense of like who they're wanting to recruit, like any woman who's like been in like sports for more than one year, or I've done piano lessons for more than a year have been in karate for more than a year, or have done anything consistent that, that had a little bit of competition for more than a year. Those are definitely the people that definitely the girls that you do want to want to start with. And yeah, I was super competitive period, but, um, it's, it's weird because in the industry, like, I, my husband says it all the time. He's like, you're humble in public, but in private, you're not. And I was like, well, not like, you know, I'm just like, oh, good job. And like, whatever. And I'm like, how did they get right. That's how I have to do that tomorrow or whatever. But yeah. So those are definitely a quality that you want to look in, look for when you're looking for girls to recruit.Speaker 2 (07:24):Yeah. And I bet I can only imagine like Sunday game night at your house, you're gonna have to invite me over to one of those things. That's just likeSpeaker 3 (07:31):Been, and I are not allowed to play games together. We just don't do games because like he doesn't care enough and it bugs me. Like he won't even like compete in like UNO or anything like that. So we just don't do card games.Speaker 2 (07:49):Yeah. I won a competition. That's funny. Yeah. Well you can come next time. You're in San Diego, let us know because me and my wife, we get, we get into it quite a bit. So we'll play monopoly or something.Speaker 3 (08:02):I known to just pop up when people tell me like, Hey, just come over here at any time. I typically just go up.Speaker 2 (08:09):Okay. Well, let's do it. We'd love to have you, but no, that's awesome. So w what was your background? Were you like a sports background then? Or music or?Speaker 3 (08:20):Yeah, so I did soccer for a few years, actually got like a full ride scholarship to go and play soccer. I was just, uh, I played goalie, but I play like Ford. I also did basketball too, but I was like more of like the sucky offense player, but I was going to be like the best defense player. Like typically they were just always calling me just play events, but I wasn't that great of a shooter. I wasn't that great of an athlete. I was just competitive plus all.Speaker 2 (08:47):Yeah. That's awesome. Well, no, that's good. And yeah. I mean any, um, yeah, I think that applies to, you know, girls and anyone with a sports background. Um, yeah, you've probably seen it too, but guys that have like wrestled and done just those like kind of endurance sports too, I think are great at this because especially out on the doors, it's a mental grain, you know, andSpeaker 3 (09:11):Tracking McNeil piano, like anything consistently. Yeah.Speaker 2 (09:15):Yeah. So yeah, definitely a nugget right there as you're recruiting. Um, but no, that's cool. And so PEs, um, yeah, again, you can go listen to the other interview. I think you went pretty in depth in that soil, but, um, just the short version. Why did you decide to switch from a pest to solar then? And what was because I came from a pest background too. I don't know if you knew that, but I did it too, as summer's a pest control. And, um, you were much better than me. I would've, you would have destroyed me and pest. I think my best summer is like 120 accounts or something. SoSpeaker 3 (09:53):Yeah.Speaker 3 (09:54):They're low maintenance. Um, no, that's it, it was funny. That's actually how female knockers started. And so I did my first summer three 16, and then my very last summer, before I transitioned into solar, I was the number one rep in the company. I had serviced 1,012, uh, past accounts in like 156, uh, knocking days. But before that summer, before that summer, um, had started, I, you know, basically went to like the leadership about how we needed to have a program for women, uh, in the company. And it wasn't even like, you know, I'm not even trying to say like, Hey, girls are better than guys. Guys are better than girls. It's more of just like a space. And, um, just a little bit of awareness that I just saw. A lot of regionals and team leaders were flying to Vegas and Arizona and all these other states to basically recruit more men.Speaker 3 (10:53):And I'm like, why don't you just make this space a little bit more inviting for the 40% of people we're not even tapping into who are returning from their missions, who are doing all these things. And they're literally in our back yards. And, um, but basically I was just kind of dismissed a little bit. And so I was like, and this was before I did the thousand accounts. And so when I came home in September, just throughout the summer, I just seen how many women were rooting me on that didn't even know me. And they were just like texting me. And they were just like keeping track of like what I was doing during the summer, because I would just post weekly updates. And the amount of like women would just like reach out to me. I was just like, so like, it kept me going and I'm on a team where there's not even like women period.Speaker 3 (11:38):And so that was like the biggest thing for me. So I swore once the summer ended that I was going to do something to give back. And so I'm not a social media guru. I am not the, I don't even dress fancy. I don't even feel like I fit in with like the cool, proud, but I'm like, I'm going to start something. Even if it means that I just pay like out of my own pocket. And so I started, I finished knocking for pest control in September, and then I was like, I'm going to create a coaching program or a coaching platform for women in the industry. And it doesn't matter what the shirt that they're wearing, but I want to teach concepts that could be used in alarms that can be used in Bish that could be used in solar and whatever industry, basically for women.Speaker 3 (12:19):Because when we're going into a lot of these teams, a lot of the men are focusing their training. And it's just kind of like we forget about the emotional side. And I used to actually not want women on my team. And I thought, this is a way of me giving back and making up for that mindset that I bought into, of not wanting women on my team. And so in October, when I basically started this platform, I started recruiting, um, women just from different, I don't know, I wasn't recruiting. I basically created this coaching program and I put it out there and I was surprised at how many people I signed up and I wasn't doing it to be rich or anything like that. I think I had like 15 people and, um, I had some from vivid or alarms at some from past and, uh, some from dish and then from solar.Speaker 3 (13:07):And I'm coming from the highest summer that I've ever had in pest control, like off of this high, doing financially great. Like everything's great. And I felt like a hypocrite. I'm like, I'm over here, coaching women in the industry. And I only know pest control. So I was like, screw it. I'm going to go and do blitzes, like with everyone, just for it as a learning tool to be a better coach and to be a better mentor. And so I fell flat on my face when it came to alarms and bless the hearts of the people who do alarms. I'm never going to do that again. And then I wanted to dish and I was like, okay, you guys do not get paid enough. This is way too easy. And then I had this one girl who was on this team doing solar and crap. That's probably going to sound crappy on your and try to be on your, on your team.Speaker 3 (14:02):Yeah. And so I was like, you know what? Um, this girl had told me that, uh, she was the only girl and, um, no one on her team had made a cell for solar like that month. I, and I literally overheard teaching her concepts about like mental toughness. And the only reason that you're not going to get a deal is because you're not going out there, you know, on the doors. So I was like, all right, well, I've got to go do a blitz, um, with them. And so I ended up going and doing a blitz, um, with their team. And I basically fell flat on my face on, uh, the first three days. And I was like, what am I doing? And, uh, it was basically the competitiveness in me that I was like, there's no way that I can't like make this happen.Speaker 3 (14:48):Like I am telling this girl that I am like mentally tough and I can do all these things. Like I'm going to have to figure it out. There was no pitch for solar. There's no manual, there's no nothing. I basically wrote up a pitch. I basically just put everything together and I was all right. Um, and then finally, day three, I set a bunch of appointments before lunch and I ended up closing one and I closed one every day for the next three days. And I left with like 30 grand and was like, Chad, that was a fluke I have to do again. And so I invited a couple of my pest control buddies. We didn't tell anyone, it was just about five of us. And we would meet up every morning, just like we did in pest control. And like, again, there's no training, no nothing.Speaker 3 (15:30):We just do like, our role plays with each other. We shared our pitch and then we'd go set appointments before lunch. We were on the doors by like 11:00 AM, like every single or 10 30. And then every day each one of us comes on with a deal and we're going home with like 50 plus K a week, all of us. And I'm like, what? The crap. Yeah. Yeah. And then, um, it was from there that basically my solar journey started, but basically my, uh, female knockers page just kind of like evolved from that mindset. And from that little accident, like I always tell people that I got into solar by accident and hearing themSpeaker 2 (16:06):Wow, crazy. That's a cool story. And yeah, I mean, it's awesome. You're able to connect and cause I think that's a big issue with like, I don't know, maybe guy manager, stuff like that is maybe the girls feel like they can't understand their perspectives. Point of view. I know that's how it was for me. I brought out my sister-in-law actually, um, she really struggled. I wish this was like three years ago. So I wish, um, you would have been training in the solar space at that time because I was just like, I was like, all right, just get out there, knock harder. Just do it. She was, yeah. I mean, she was pretty emotional girl and I just, I didn't really know what to do. I'm just like, I dunno, just get out there and just go knock doors. So it was rough and um, you know, it didn't have a very good summer and everything, but yeah. What do you think like for you, what you've seen solely as your coach, all these female reps and, um, leading knockers and all that, have you seen that there's like, I don't know, maybe a way that they like to be coached or treated that's different than like the guy reps or what have you seen that? Uh, well I guess from a female perspective,Speaker 3 (17:18):Yeah. Well, one we're not teaching the concept of just, uh, how to compartmentalize our emotions because a lot of times we're talking about like women and how emotional we are, but men are just as emotional. But what you guys are really good at is compartmentalizing. Like you guys can put things aside and emotions and just go do what you gotta do. Whereas us as women, that's one thing is just, we're just not being taught how to put our emotions aside for how to put them in a box just for a short time, while we focus on what we need to do in front of us. And so I spent a lot of time just working on the mindset aspect in the sense of like how we compartmentalize, like how we can overcome anxiety, how is it that we can overcome like the negative things that are happening?Speaker 3 (18:03):Because once women can figure that out on your teams who like the, the success is going to be endless. And so like my whole goal in female knockers is not to have all of us women knocking on freaking ones on one team. But my whole goal is all of us, no matter what shirt that we're wearing, because we're all gonna ha we're going to be in different phases of our lives. But to be able to have that unity and know like, Hey, I'm going to have someone who's going to understand and have my back and root me on where I'm at exactly where I literally want to be a big sister in the industry for women in every aspect of like, you're there in pest control. Like let's figure out how you can level up in pest control, but you're going to have to start with your emotions.Speaker 2 (18:46):Yeah, no, I think that's huge because for me, I don't know if this is wrong, but what I've seen is pretty much any girl that can figure out the emotional part of it. I see them have success like that. The teams I've been on. Cause it's like, I don't know for me, it's like, it seems like people are nicer to girls. It seems like bill here at Mount Moore. Um, I was always jealous of that. I remember doing pest control. I'm like, man, you can get through like way more easier pitch than I can see.Speaker 3 (19:15):And it's true. And I focus on the reasons I, I focus on the things that we have a leg up on w w as women in the industry and that we can look at them as like strengths rather than, you know, rather than weaknesses. And I feel like in solar, especially for me, my emotional side and how emotion and like how much emotion I put into, like my deals. Like people feel it, like, it's, it's just a different dynamic than a guy who's just, you know, just going through it.Speaker 2 (19:42):Yeah. A hundred percent. But yeah. Um, for you to slowly, do you have any, I dunno, like stories or examples of times where you coach like some girl reps that maybe were struggling or super emotional and I don't know, I wanted to go home, things like that and like specific things you did to turn it around. I don't know if you have any examples of people you've coached or anything like that.Speaker 3 (20:03):So I'll be honest. Um, so I've actually had like a, a couple of girls actually just on my team. Um, and, uh, they have been in another industry and they'd been with another company and, um, they basically always do use their emotions and the negativity to get in their cars and to go home and to let it bleed over to the next to the next day. And then we worked together again and I actually had her come out and we started just focusing on all the positive things. We actually took away, all the things that, that was negative for her in her life. And the biggest thing was having a car. The biggest thing was being a driver. It was being the driver and how easy it was for her to be able to get back in the car, get over here, taking that one thing away because we recognize that that was like one of her weaknesses and where, what she would use to be able to, um, let it bleed over to the next day.Speaker 3 (20:59):She ended up being one of the top producers this year, just by focusing on that one little thing. Is she still emotional? Yes. Do we still have rough days? Yes. But we were able to see a lot, a lot more success just by taking away a couple of the little things that were triggers for her. And so I, and so a lot of the girls who reach out to me who are having emotional days and things that, that stink, we, we basically just work on, find out like what some of their triggers are. We remove some of those triggers and it just makes it a little bit better to focus on the things that they can control.Speaker 2 (21:31):Um, yeah. That I love that I reminds me of that you grid the power of habit, that book they talked about. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Super important principle. And it's so true. Um, I think a lot of people struggle with that being the driver and whatnot, but it's like, if you're on a diet, you need to get the Oreos out of the kitchen. Right. Get the stuff that's tempting out of the way. It's not tempting, tempting anymore. This is the same thing. If you're struggling to knock the door or whatever, it might be that trigger, like you're saying, see if you can figure out a way to eliminate it because a lot of people just solves a problem instantly. Yeah. So, yeah. That's powerful. Um, and what about like for guys, let's say you're, um, uh, you know, a guy who's managing a team with girls, um, maybe you seen guys be super successful with it. And what would you say to like, like me, for example, if I manage a team I'm trying to help the ladies out. Um, would you have any tips for like a guy trained to manage the ladies on his team and help them coaching?Speaker 3 (22:32):Yeah. It's just going to be like focusing on the little things like, whoa, what a lot of people don't understand. It's like, women are not, we're not like, yes, we're, we're wanting equal pay and all these things, but the little things like really like, matter to us, like a shirt that actually fits a girl, like actually having incentives that doesn't include a freaking wallet. That's just a one or a pocket knife or like the little things just really go a long ways in the sense of like texting and actually calling like what I do and why I don't have a car partners as a leader and in my car, because I also use that time to be able to follow up on reps. Like I'm always like driving in from like an appointment or to a house or whatever. So I'm thinking about that rep who may have had like a bad day.Speaker 3 (23:22):And I'm thinking about that girl who talked to me about this and I'll shoot her a text or a call, or like, Hey, how are you feeling today? Like using that time in, that's a focus on the business in front of me, but take care of that. People around me as well. So every night, like when I'm coming home, I'm reaching out to someone on my team to just ask them how their day was to just to ask them like what it is that I can train on that would help them personally. And it's every day it's gonna be like a new rep. And so every one knows that I'm going to reach out and at some point or time and another, and it's just something so small as like calling them regularly and like, Hey, how was your day?Speaker 2 (23:59):Hmm. That's awesome. Yeah. How do you like, remember, do you have a system set up to like, I dunno, remember, oh, this is having a hard time or keep track of all their, I dunno how big your team is, but you have, I dunno, a system in place to remember, oh, I need to call this your app. Or they were struggling with this or their numbers are down or you just going to come to you while you're driving.Speaker 3 (24:20):So one it's my, I have a good relationship with all the girls that they're just like coming to me, but two, we have a group chat. So like on our group, me, if I see that someone doesn't have a set or if like someone's numbers, like is enough or, um, or it's, I just don't see like any doors knock or anything, like I'll reach out to that person and be like, Hey, what time today? Can I come and knock with you? Or like, Hey, and so I, I, based the day, like when it's, if I have like a no show or an appointment, that's not there, I'll go and look at group me and see who's produced and who isn't. And I'll just start from there. And then at the end of the night, when I am going home, I'm just starting with someone who actually texted me and reached out to me about like an issue or problem or something.Speaker 2 (25:02):Okay. I love that. And I like this. I like your point about the little things, the shirts and the incentives and stuff like that. Um, yeah. I didn't even think about that, but I can see why that'd be a big thing. It's like a shirt that fits.Speaker 3 (25:19):Yeah. Even just that, like I had some girls come over here from another company and they're like, what? The, like, they're different from them. Like these are actually like women's shirt. And I didn't realize like how big of a deal, like it was to them. And it was literally an $11 shirt.Speaker 2 (25:36):Yeah. No, that's true. Yeah. I'm just thinking of, I don't know if you watch the office, do you watch the office? I'm just, I'm just thinking of the one where Michael takes model to them, all the girls, like, like to the mall and take small than Victoria's secret. I remember that upset. So maybe not to that level, but I think that is really important. Just being, um, you know, aware that girls probably, maybe they don't want to go, uh, dirt biking for the day or whatever. Maybe they want to get.Speaker 3 (26:12):Maybe they don't want to go on a golfing trip for like a lot of little things.Speaker 2 (26:18):Yeah. Yeah, no, that's important. Um, so cool. No, that helps a lot. Um, and yeah, I guess I wanted to ask you too. How many people are you managing right now?Speaker 3 (26:31):So at the beginning of this summer, so like our whole team, there was probably for the whole summer, about 35 of us. And, um, so I had another co-manager and then there was like another guy on the team. We're just kind of like, I had recruited him, but he had like a bunch of guys. So we were just because we all came from pests, we just kind of wanted to stick together. And so, yeah, I think he had about a 15 and then I had about 25 of like my own. So we can kind of just like combine and ran the summer together.Speaker 2 (27:05):Yeah. Big team. And, and, sorry, I guess I, I know before we started the call here, um, yeah. We're just talking about how you don't like to call yourself the boss and stuff, but you're just almost like,Speaker 3 (27:17):Yeah. I like, yeah. I just want to be the sister. Like, even when I have the, the girls like introducing me and we're like, yeah, like this boss you see now my, no, I'm just like a team member. I was like, I never want to look at myself as above them. I truly look at them as like, especially on solar. Like my, my mindset is just a lot different. Like I truly feel that I'm an employee of them, but like, I need to continually like take care of them obviously to take care of myself first. But like they come first.Speaker 2 (27:49):Yeah. I'm sure that's a huge key to your success and they can feel, um, you know, that you really care about them. Appreciate them. Um, I'm sure you learned this on your mission and everything, but speaking of missions, I think that was one of the keys to success we saw in like our missions is the more you care about people, the more they're going to respond because it's like, oh, they actually want me to get baptized or whatever. Cause they love me. And they like for like, believe in this.Speaker 3 (28:18):Exactly. I probably kept people longer, you know, just because they're not a number then who I should have. And I have like some reps who are super protective of me or just like, why don't you let them leave? Like, you're just too nice. Like you're just like, and this and that. I'm like, Hey guys, it's a GSpeaker 2 (28:34):Yeah. I know. It's super important though. Like Zig Ziglar says the more people, um, you know, the more people know you care, I forget the quote, but when people see you care, that's how they're gonna, you know, respond to you and, and wanting to do business with you, tune on a team. Yeah. Um, but the point I was, I think what I was going to ask you before I got distracted by that is also like the family aspects of the way. So I know you're a mom. How many kids do you have now?Speaker 3 (29:04):So I have three. I have a nine-year-old I haven't about to be an eight year old and then a two year old. Mr.Speaker 2 (29:11):Okay. Nice, cute, cute. So that's impressive to me. I'm um, you know, I have one kid right now, one on the way here in a couple of months. And, um, so something that I really respect about you is just being able to do all this and have the level of success that you've been all that cheap. Um, while being a mom for three kids, I don't even know cause I'm with the one kid, I feel like I'm, uh, you know, already not there as much as I need to be and not the best dad at times, things that, so, um, maybe this doesn't apply to everyone who isn't a parent, but how do you manage your time being like a mom and being there for your kids and all that, how do you manage like the family aspect of everything?Speaker 3 (29:53):So I'll be honest. And I, one person that I love in this industry is Michael Donal. And, um, one thing that he talks about is seasons. And so I just, I, I no longer, um, you know, have this like guilt of what I used to when I was in pest control and I wouldn't see my kids. So till the, till the evening, but we have the mindset, like my kids understand it. And so to my husband, that there's a season that there's going to be a season for everything. And right now my season is going to be solar. My season is in this industry is basically just like building and being able to set up our family into a position to where that season is going to be just us and still because my, my, my husband is like bought in to like the fact of like seasons. We, we just have like that mindset, like right now, like, like this very second, it's just going to be a season and it's going to end. And I know that there's gonna be a season and a time and a place for me to be with my family and with my kids. And because we both just bought into it, it just, there's no more guilt. Like he's just a thousand percent in. And, uh, it just worked out.Speaker 2 (31:02):Yeah, no, that's true. Yeah. I do remember Michael Donald talking about that too. And anyone that has a family, um, that's a topic I love is like the whole work-life balance, but any successful person I hear, they always, they say pretty much the same thing. There's no like balance. There's just gonna be ups and downs, different seasons times when you're focused on different things. Right.Speaker 3 (31:23):But when we are with our family, it's like, we are with our family. Like my husband has to intentionally like turn off my phones and put things down and, and things like that. So he's like, okay, this second, the season, this time, this moment is for us. And I'm like, you're right. So it's just about communication and working it together.Speaker 2 (31:44):Uh, your husband's name is Walter right of that. What does Walter think of all this is he, uh, I know he's probably used to the old kind of sells life by now, but does he, uh, is he kind of the stay at home dad then while you're off slinging deals? Or how does that,Speaker 3 (32:00):Uh, so it's just kinda like funny, cause people are like, well, you know, they'll try to like, get me to talk to like these women who have kids and like try to recruit them and try to do that on my guys. There's, you know, there's hot buttons and not every woman is as mobile as me, or has like a companion who, who is willing to sacrifice. Like my husband was, he had a great job. Like he loved it. He was going to school. He's making like six figures. He was doing all those things. Um, but he saw that my season was going to get us to our end goal a lot sooner. And so when COVID hit and, uh, he just saw how anxious it was going to be for me to worry about a babysitter for our kids, not being at work, the different things like that.Speaker 3 (32:41):He decided that his season was to be the best day at home dad. Like he legitimately is a lot more patient of a father. He's a great cook. And he freaking takes care of the house a lot better than me. So, you know, roles are, are, are, are different for everyone. And so he enjoys our kids. He enjoys the season, he enjoys cooking. He enjoys, like, he knows my stats better than me. Like he's always kept spreadsheets. He, he knows what I did from like my first year in pest control. Like it's a sport to him. Like he can tell you which rep that I competed with, which month can tell you, he can tell you which company, which rep has the best rep. And like, he it's like the NBA for him, like thrives off of my life. And so he is just so bought into it that he just saw how much less anxiety that I would have by him doing a great job at home with the kids. So we never questioned me being gone and one parent being home with the kids and he's just an all star stay at home dad. So,Speaker 2 (33:44):Wow. He's like the analytic he's he has all this stats and analytics down and it's almost like the side by side announcer for,Speaker 3 (33:52):Yeah. He texted me, Rick texted me the other day and was like, Hey, I'm knocking in Nashville. And I know you, I know you slayed it over here. Like, what cities did you do? Well, and I'm like, I have no clue. Give me a sec. I'm going to text the hubby literally in 30 seconds, that hubby texts me a list of places that I did well. And I sent it through and he's like, oh, whoa.Speaker 2 (34:13):Oh my gosh. That's incredible.Speaker 3 (34:16):So he thrives off of like the door to door industry and he's just the cheerleaders.Speaker 2 (34:22):So do you ever come back to him and like, I don't know, a slower day or anything and he'll like, be slinging off the stats, say, you know, how many doors did you talk to? How many homeowners starts going through stats like that to make sure you,Speaker 3 (34:35):We would get in arguments. Like it had to get to the point where like, he, because I would be in like competitions for the past and whatnot. And like, I do not pay attention to numbers. That's like one thing about me. Like, I will not look at stats. I will not check them throughout the day. And when I come home, just like, you know, if you would've only did one more account, I'm like, he's secretly like it because he knows that I don't check it. It like stresses him out because he's like wanting you to win. And he knows that I just care less than he knows.Speaker 2 (35:11):That's awesome. Here. We might have to have him on the show and go through like the stats to hit, to be successful on the doors or whatever.Speaker 2 (35:23):That's awesome. Well, no, that's, that's good. And always helps a ton to have a supportive spouse and, um, you know, be, make sure you're on the same level one to explain to them that their seasons and make the time. Um, yeah, one of our interviews, Ashton, I don't know if you know Ashton Boswell, but, um, he's over like VP of sales at legacy, but that's one of his big secrets. Is he coaches all his reps just on, um, I think he says having him set aside just like one day a week or one evening, a week, go on your date night or whatever. And that's like his big thing. He's like, yeah, he's like set aside one night. Do your date night, take a break from appointments.Speaker 2 (36:04):So I thought that was cool. And that's like something, he coaches all of his reps. Like I'm sure whether they're married or not. He's like go on a date or whatever I needed to do that I'm here. So, so, so that's cool. And I love to about hearing about people, is that just the way that their seasons and the ways they make at work? Um, so yeah, speaking of seasons Suli I know before the recording, we were just talking about how you sort of brought the whole pest control idea of the summer sprint over to solar and you guys are obviously crushing it. Um, how, how many deals is your team doing on these like blitzes and stuff? What's like an average blitz. How many deals would you say you guys do?Speaker 3 (36:42):So basically my team and a, it was like 136 days. We sold a 4.7 megawatts. Uh, we had 3.9, uh, still in the pipeline to have been installed in. Uh, we've still got 1.9 and that's in a hundred and, uh, 37 knocking days that we have in the summer. So,Speaker 2 (37:07):Oh, again, you guys are just in Texas, right? Or any otherSpeaker 3 (37:11):Just in Texas. Yeah, we just, uh, we just traveled different cities here in Texas. We just call ourself the pure blood squad. And, uh, we do, uh, 18 days on and we'd do a full week off and I make people go home. I'm like, I wasn't supposed to run a team. I was literally going to do one week a month for a whole year and call it good. But the whole team thing came by accident and just organically. And I was like, I'm supposed to be traveling. So if I'm going to do this, we're taking a week off and I'm going to go live my life. And so it's why people see a lot of like traveling stuff like throughout the summer. Cause I'm like, because I'm making the schedule I'm choosing even and make people go home. So it's been kind of night.Speaker 2 (37:52):Yeah. That's cool. And so you have a house out there in Texas or what's like,Speaker 3 (37:57):So we don't, so all of my we've been doing like Airbnbs and so I'm actually closing on a, on a property here, like right now in Texas, because the housing that I've spent on rabbis have just been like crazy. And so I'm basically just setting stuff up to where I'm not having to, to, to worry about housing, but, um, we've been in Airbnbs all summer.Speaker 2 (38:20):Okay. And so when you, when you get your house closed on, is that, are you just going to still be traveling around and then go back to your house for that week still?Speaker 3 (38:29):Yeah, like literally the like, I'm, I'm kind of like in no man's land, I like our, this property that we're going to get, it's literally going to be a rental. It's literally going to be on Airbnb, like the rest of the year. But during the summer it's going to be used to house reps because I'm cheap and don't want to keep spending 20 grand a month on housing. And so I'm like finding a way to like how's reps. And then like my place in Utah is like rented out and I have tenants on the top and bottom and like, our properties are like rented out and I live nowhere. Like I am like thisSpeaker 2 (39:03):[inaudible]. Yeah.Speaker 3 (39:05):And so until I settled down on solar and I kind of want to ride this tax credit, I'm just, I'm just not choosing a place to be, but I'm going to everywhere.Speaker 2 (39:15):Yeah. Might as well that's you guys are crushing it. And so like, is this, you're doing it all year round, just this blitz model though, or you just,Speaker 3 (39:25):So we weren't supposed to do oppose these. And that was another thing. Like, all this stuff just happens. It's like my team grows and people wants different things. And so we were, I was supposed to be done in August and then I had girls on the team. It was like local. I want to transition into closing or I want to like, get a head start for like next summer. And then it's like, Hey, I want to recruit this person. So basically what my post season is, it's just like, it's, they're just low key vivant schedule where I'm just allowing people to come and test it out. And I'm actually like looking and, and sharpening the sob, like people that I want to be leaders to take over next summer, but I only want to be a summer program. The reason people just still see me working right now is because I'm prepping training and recruiting to set up a good next summer model. Oh,Speaker 2 (40:09):Okay. Interesting. That's cool. And I don't, to my knowledge, I don't know if there's anyone else doing just like a pure summer model in solar, is there?Speaker 3 (40:19):No, no, no. It's it's, it's why I refuse to let it fail.Speaker 2 (40:25):Yeah. Pulling up by the teeth. Um,Speaker 3 (40:30):Yeah. So this is my, uh, I'm definitely sharpening things up and putting a lot of things together and place to basically set up for April 1st when we started again. So,Speaker 2 (40:40):Yeah. Wow. And yeah, what's incredible is you guys are in this summer, I'm sure you've done more than most like year round solar gummies. Like there's probably not too many year round solar companies that do that for the entire year, let alone a summer. That's incredible. So what's your arguments, I guess. Would that just come from pest control or what's your argument? Why did you even try to just do that when everyone else in the solar industry's doing all year round, what's your argument for this?Speaker 3 (41:10):So, because I, I actually dabbled in a couple of solar companies before I came here. And again, like, I, I I'm new to this. It's like, I don't even know what I'm doing. It's why I reached out to so many people in solar before I even started. Because like, I know if I'm coaching people who don't know what they're doing, that I need to be taught and be coached, what I don't know. And from the solar places that I've been and the, and the different companies, what I saw is just, it's just a lot easier to be relaxed when you live in the location that you're knocking. It's why I would never knock in Utah when I was doing pest control. The summer that I did, I spent more time at my auntie's house. I spent more time with my grandparents. I spent more times at barbecue than I did like actually knocking doors.Speaker 3 (41:55):And so I just had that same mindset. I was like, look, if I can convince people to leave their homes and come to a place where they have no friends, or they don't have no family members, like, aren't they going to work just a little bit quick? Aren't they just going to work a little bit longer? But the reason I wanted to change it from the way that pest control dynamic was where it was literally just going stay for the full summer is because I felt like there wasn't enough of a break, like mental space, like physical breaks. It was just go, go, go. And I wanted to find like a happy medium. And so I saw when people can see the light sooner, or they can see the end a lot sooner, they're gonna work a little bit harder. So I want it to have end dates every single month that people could be like, look, it's 18 knocking days. Anyone can do anything for 18 knocking days, as opposed to saying, Hey, for 365 days out of the year, and let's just go knock three or four hours every day. Yeah, no, that was what it was for me. I just knew that people were just going to be a lot less laxed when they saw that there was going to be an end date each month. Yeah.Speaker 2 (43:02):No, that makes sense. And yeah, I was telling you before we started the recording, that a lot of this stuff is you're describing like what I do, and I can see that my numbers are just cause in my head, it's like, I'm doing this all year round. I don't need it more than three or four hours a day.Speaker 3 (43:19):So we lived there.Speaker 2 (43:22):Yeah. And I've seen that. I think that's the curse of the solar industry. Is everyone coming like so many lazy reps, that's the big thing. And then solar understanding, because you won't see this level of laziness in it, like any other door knocking companies, but it's,Speaker 3 (43:37):We also like miss out on a lot of things too. Right. There's some people who just need like an extra week to think about it or like, so I feel like we have lost some deals because it's like we are coming in and going from like different cities that we basically set up appointments for like other solar companies to come in and take a bath, you know? So the it's pros and cons, I feel like.Speaker 2 (44:01):Yeah. Yeah, no, that's true. But yeah. I mean, it's just like, if you can get in there close the deals, um, you guys do a lot of like same day appointments. Do things like that as your,Speaker 3 (44:12):Especially. Yes. Like it's like same day or die. It's like same day next day. And like, period. And I just, I just incentivize like so much on same day as the next days that it just like, we, we push it like so hard.Speaker 2 (44:25):Yeah. No, I think it's no secret. I think that's how people do high numbers. Um, in solar that's all Mo fall. I don't know if, you know, morphology keep bringing up these successful people in the industry, but that's basically, I think what he did do, he just brought over what was working in alarms and other industries and apply it at a solar. And now they're doing a similar thing to you blitz and all over the place. And I'm just working hours,Speaker 3 (44:49):Same day tips. I, I remember listening to, I was like, this is money if people aren't doing this and solar they're.Speaker 2 (44:56):Yeah. It helps that done. So, yeah. Um, how would you, like, I dunno, maybe someone that's used to working just a year round model, um, like myself I'm use, I'll be honest. I haven't knocked more than probably four or five hours in a day for, I don't know, probably like six months at least just because that's what I get, you know, book my same day or whatever. And I'm like, sweet. I'm off the doors. Just hit up that appointment, go close it. And so how do you turn around? I don't know if you've brought in recruited people that are used to that model and maybe have some, uh, laziness in them of not knocking as much and coming out and doing a blitz. Do you have any tips for like how to break that or how to, um, shift that mindset to going to like a blitz model versus just doing like three, four hours a day? Maybe like you're used to as a year-round rep.Speaker 3 (45:46):Yeah. So it's hard. I'm actually dealing with that. Like right now it was like people who've been doing like your and, and stuff like that. And so I basically managed the expectation and it's why I like the Airbnb model because I let my reps know at the very beginning, like, Hey, these 18 days are for you to judge me. And for me to judge you at the end of the 18 days, you know, if you feel like this is the team for you, if you feel like, great, Hey, like we're going to move on to the next blitz. But it's also for me to be like, Hey, if I feel like your negativity or your mindset, or you're just not adding value to this team being, it allows me to be able to be like, Hey, the Airbnb ends at this date. Like, that's it.Speaker 3 (46:25):And it's one of the biggest reasons why I want it to have Airbnbs because I just didn't know how well these people were coming and going and what the dynamics would look like. So for one, letting them know that at the very beginning that, Hey, every single blitz is a trial and at the end of the 18 days, if we're going to work together and it's going to be great, Hey, I'll book you another Airbnb. But if it's not, we're going to have to part ways and be friends. And so when people have that expectation that every blitz was going to be a trial and that there was a certain amount of kilowatts. So I actually, every single month in order to not be charged their rent back, they had to hit certain milestones. And so people were always doing at least the minimum and that's all I required minimum as well as a positive attitude.Speaker 3 (47:08):And if they have those two things they could keep coming on. And so when I have like some of the, the year round reps are coming in and they're like, holy cow, I've never knocked six hours in a day. And like, not like, I'm not sure if this is for me. And so it makes it to where the expectations are already there and they can approach me. And I don't have to be the bad guy about like, this is what our team is prepping for next summer. If it works great. If not the solar industry is endless and plenty of people will take.Speaker 2 (47:37):Sure, sure. No, I think that's so important though. In so many solar companies, aren't doing that setting expectations with their reps, especially your own well, yeah, as most companies are a year round, I think that's super important for our listeners. Even if, um, you know, maybe you are doing three, four hours, but set the expectations, the milestones that people need to hit, because it's like, you can go get mad at them for not producing, but if they didn't know they needed to close two deals that week or whatever it was then, I mean, how can you get mad at them? You know, they didn't know what the expectation was. Yes.Speaker 3 (48:10):Yeah. People milestones and give them a, give them something to work towards or else there's going to be like, you know, there has to be like consequences or there has to be something in order to hurt a little bit.Speaker 2 (48:19):Yeah, definitely. And um, yeah, no, we'll, we'll, uh, we're running a little bit short on time. Don't want to keep you super late. I know we're going on like 10 o'clock there your time, which you said you're a night out, so that's cool. Um, but yeah, last couple of things. So we what's your guys' schedule for a blitz. What is your, I know you're saying 18 days on then a week off. What's like your schedule during that Boyd, do you have meetings every day? Or what does that look like?Speaker 3 (48:45):Oh yeah. Like that's like a big thing. Like when I brought other people, they're like you guys meet every day and I'm like, you don't, you guys even learn. So we, uh, we basically meet at 10:00 AM. Every single morning. We train from 10 to 10 45, our reps around the doors between 11 and 1130. We knocked from 1130, till three o'clock. Then we have lunch from three o'clock to four o'clock and then they're knocking from four o'clock to dark Monday through Friday. And then on Saturdays, we only not sell four o'clock now. And then Sundays, no one works unless they want to.Speaker 2 (49:20):Okay. Awesome. Now, are you, uh, for meetings, you guys swap and trainings or, uh, do you kind of run it?Speaker 3 (49:28):No, it's never a guessing game. Like there's some I'm OCD and, uh, that's one thing with women, women, uh, of reps. They, they want to know that there's a little bit of a structure and I feel like I kind of overly structured. So to go into those meetings where like, Hey guys, what do you guys want to learn about today? What do you guys want to look like one it's showing your team that you don't really care. You didn't really put a lot of effort and thought into what it was that they were struggling in the day before. So me and my other co managers, yes. Each single day, we would have like, one of our lead, our lead setters would take one day. We would take a day, uh, and, uh, we would rotate. And so every single day there was going to be a planned lesson, a planned discussion.Speaker 3 (50:10):We going to make sure every single day that everyone had time to be able to role play, but we would have a concept every single day. And then we would incentivize on the doors based on those concepts. Hey, if you go and do like this concept that we taught today or whatnot, you're going to be able to receive XYZ. So every single day we are training, we are role playing. Um, I just don't believe in this once a week, zoom meeting that a lot of solar companies do and just kind of like let their reps come and go like, yeah,Speaker 2 (50:39):Yeah, no, that's, I think that's super important. I noticed that too, actually, I'm with, uh, um, Jason newbie in his squad if you know him, but that's one of the things that he brought over the, I saw like an instant boost in people's numbers. It's just like meeting, because number, I think in my opinion, the main purposes, if you meet people are gonna actually gonna go out and work, right. Like if you're not going to meet the likelihood that people drag themselves out and actually go out like way lower. Yeah.Speaker 3 (51:10):Girls it's like, how do you get out of your car? Like, how do you get to area? Like, how do you do all these things? And like, the biggest thing is they're meeting once a week, so It's not their fault, butSpeaker 2 (51:23):Yeah, no, it's because yeah, I brought other people on that are seen way more success do meaning every day. And it's like, you show up, you got your game clothes on, you got your, a game base, you just get in the right mindset versus you trying to drag yourself out and, and, uh, do it all yourself. So I think that's a big secret for people that are managing teams are trained to boost their numbers, maybe consider meeting everyday, or just doing mini blitzes. Because I think that might be the future. I'm seeing almost more and more people I bring on, even if they are year round, they're doing mini blitzes like that throughout the year and going to different areas and mixing it up because yeah, it is, it is tough.Speaker 3 (52:02):So makes it more fun. Yeah.Speaker 2 (52:05):Well, Zoe, um, we appreciate you coming on the show and, um, don't want to take up your entire evening. Hopefully you got some dinner. Um, but if people want to find out more about, I know you got your own podcast and everything, so do you want to tell people where they can find out more about you and possibly, I dunno, I dunno if you're still running coaching or whatever you're doing. So let's hear about that.Speaker 3 (52:28):So you can find me on female knockers, uh, unite. Uh, I do do coaching, but since solar was just so new and I feel like I'm just trying to put like so many things together for me. I want to be intentional. Um, and so right now I'm just doing a lot more educating just on my female page, my female knockers, you can I'm uh, also my podcast is sales with Suli twice a month, every single month I'll drop some nuggets. Uh, basically the same thing that I teach in some of my coaching calls, um, and things like that. And so, um, you can find me on Spotify and all the same spots. So you can find Taylor for pretty much.Speaker 2 (53:06):No. Yeah. Awesome podcasts. I've been listening to them. They are. So, um, yeah, they play it at home. Guys can listen to them too. Right. It's not just girls.Speaker 3 (53:16):I have them episodes in there just for the guys. So check out the title.Speaker 2 (53:20):Yeah. And I fall a female knockers United page. So I think guys got me if I'm wrong, I guys are allowed to fall that through. Right.Speaker 3 (53:28):It's an open publicSpeaker 2 (53:33):Gopal that is dropping in great content in there. And yeah, I learned a ton from her podcasts and stuff. She shares, so go shoot or a follow. So I slowly thanks for coming on today. And before we let you go, do you have any, like, I dunno, final tips or things you wish you knew first getting in solar industry that you want to share with our solar printers before we say goodbye here.Speaker 3 (53:52):Yes. Definitely find people who have content. I remember the first solar company that I started with one, they basically gave everyone two shirts because they basically planned on you or one shirt because they planned on you never coming back. So that's already like a red flag for me. Um, but two, if you're going to find someone who is going to train you, who is going to basically teach you from a to Z exactly what to do, you're definitely going to find success, just control the controllables and just focus on the little things. It doesn't matter which industry you're in. You're going to find success. If you just focus on the things you can control. So no,Speaker 2 (54:28):I appreciate that. So guys, go give Sulia follow control. The things you can control, like she just mentioned and make sure you find a good mentor. Cause I think those are the keys to having success in the industry for sure. And have meetings every day.Speaker 3 (54:42):Yeah. Thanks so much Taylor for having me like literally, I, I I've found rolled your, your podcast for like a while. It's literally one of the reasons that I have the success that I do and I, I share your podcasts with everyone.Speaker 2 (54:55):Uh, thank you so much. That means a ton then that's like why I've kept it going. So I love hearing comments like that. Appreciate you Suli. So go give Suli follow and Suli we'll be in touch. Thanks again for coming on the show. HaveSpeaker 3 (55:07):A good one. Yeah.Speaker 2 (55:10):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co And join. We'll see you on the inside. 

Female Startup Club
Omsom is the rowdy Asian pantry brand founded by two Vietnamese-American sisters that sold out in 72 hrs after launch... Here's how with Vanessa Pham

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:52


Today on the show we are learning from Vanessa, one of the co-founders behind Omsom. We chat through how she validated and landed on what their product was going to be, what made them sell out in 72 hours after launch (and multiple times since then) as well as some of her key pieces of advice peppered throughout. If you haven't met Omsom yet, they bring proud, loud Asian flavors into your home kitchen. Vanessa and Kim Pham are first-generation Vietnamese-American sisters who started Omsom to reclaim the cultural integrity of Asian cuisines that are often diluted in the mainstream grocery aisle. They partner with iconic Asian chefs to craft rip-and-pour starters with all the specialty sauces, seasonings, and aromatics needed for specific Asian dishes. LINKS WE MENTION: Omsom's WebsiteVanessa PhamOmsom's InstagramVanessa's InstagramOmsom's TikTokVanessa's LinkedInFemale Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.comFemale Startup Club $1000 Monthly Cash Give AwayCheck out the Secret Leaders Podcast here: https://www.secretleaders.com/

Entrepreneurs on Fire
How We Sold Over $1,000,000 of a Triangle Piece of Fabric in Under 2 Years with Andy Isom

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 32:09


Andy Isom is an entrepreneur and business coach who helped build a $1 Million Pet Brand in under 2 years. His coaching program helps others launch and grow their businesses. Top 3 Value Bombs: 1. With determination, consistency, and patience - anyone can be successful. 2. Being unique and being able to provide quality products helped them stay on top of their competitors. 3. Have a long-term vision, reinvest your profits, and be patient. Grab Andy's Amazon FBA Starter Pack for only $7 - Andy Isom Coaching Sponsors: Thinkific: It's time to stop trading time for money and start reaching more clients and making a bigger impact - with online courses! Try Thinkific for free today at Thinkific.com/eof. Klaviyo: The email and SMS platform built specifically to help ecommerce brands earn more money by creating genuine customer relationships. Give it a try with a free account at Klaviyo.com/fire!

Redditor
r/ProRevenge | My Aunt Sold My PS4... SO I SOLD HER HOUSE!

Redditor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 19:00


3 classic revenge stories for you!This is the Redditor podcast! Here you will find all of Redditor's best Reddit stories from his YouTube channel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.