Podcasts about Web development

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  • 625PODCASTS
  • 4,403EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 9, 2022LATEST
Web development

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Best podcasts about Web development

Show all podcasts related to web development

Latest podcast episodes about Web development

Python Bytes
#296 pip: Constrain your excitement

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 32:31


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by the IRL Podcast from Mozilla Brian #1: Pip constraints files by luminousmen You can put some constraints on your dependencies with a constraints file. “Constraints files are requirements files that only control which version of a requirement is installed, not whether it is installed or not. “ Syntax is a subset of requirements.txt syntax but all the restrictions seem reasonable, considering must have a name can't be editable can't specify extras (that one is maybe slightly weird) You can put --constraint constraints.txt right at the top of your requirements.txt file or specify it on command line, pip install --constraint constraints.txt -r requirements.txt Or, my favorite, stick it at the top of requirements.in file. yes. pip-compile correctly handles constraints when generating requirements.txt. Example requirements.in --constraint constraints.txt typer constraints.txt click

Paint ED Podcast
SOP for Web Development: PaintED

Paint ED Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 53:19


Niching down is important to excel. In this episode, Torlando talks with Tim Brown regarding the importance of client reviews and their case studies. Niching down and understanding what really interests you can lead to fantastic results. Tom further opens up about why he chose to work with contractors and where do contractor businesses stand in the current digital market. Key elements addressed: -Stop holding ur self back. -Have a persuasive headline. -Put out unique content. -Add badges, and clients' trustimonials to the website. Watch the episode on PCA Overdrive PCA Overdrive is free for members. Not a member? Try our 30-day, free trial; $5.99/mo after. Download the app on the Apple Store or Google Play. Become a PCA member

Simple Programmer Podcast
951 I HATE Web Development! Can I Still Be A Successful Programmer? - Simple Programmer Podcast

Simple Programmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 6:30


Simple Programmer is now BACK with a brand new YouTube Channel-SUBSCRIBE HERE: https://simpleprogrammer.com/subscribespyt

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#376: Pydantic v2 - The Plan

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 78:53 Very Popular


Pydantic has become a core building block for many Python projects. After 5 years, it's time for a remake. With version 2, the plan is to rebuild the internals (with benchmarks already showing a 17x performance improvement) and clean up the API. Sounds great, but what does that mean for us? Samuel Colvin, the creator of Pydantic, is here to share his plan for Pydantic v2. Links from the show Samuel on Twitter: @samuel_colvin Pydantic v2 plan: pydantic-docs.helpmanual.io Py03: pyo3.rs FastAPI: fastapi.tiangolo.com Beanie: github.com SQLModel: sqlmodel.tiangolo.com Speedate: docs.rs Pytests running on Pydantic in browser: githubproxy.samuelcolvin.workers.dev JSON to Pydantic tool: jsontopydantic.com Pyscript: pyscript.net Michael's Pyscript + WebAssembly: Python Web Apps video: youtube.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat Microsoft AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Stories from the Hackery
Cory Clark - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:43


Cory Clark graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Nice to meet you, I'm Cory! Prior to my journey with NSS, I was a freelance musician/actor for around 10 years. In other words, I'll still play your weddings and birthday parties. I have always had a long-time interest in technology, and due to recent pandemic related shifts in the performance industry I decided to pursue those interests fully and enrolled at Nashville Software School. Coding so far has become a fantastic outlet for both my creative and logic-based hobbies and former careers. Post-graduation I'm so excited to keep acquiring knowledge as a growth-minded junior software developer.

Stories from the Hackery
Javontae Hardeman - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:32


Javontae Hardeman graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Prior to attending NSS, I was an avid gamer with a lifelong interest in tech, and supporting my college education gaming and doing freelance work as a Thumbnail Designer/Video Editor. My passion for content creation as well as my interest in technology led me to pursue web development as a way to utilize my logical and creative problem-solving skills and learn web development at NSS.

Stories from the Hackery
Tiffani Burk - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:29


Tiffani Burk graduated with Web Development Cohort 55.

Stories from the Hackery
Wesley Mitchell - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:47


Wesley Mitchell graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Prior to beginning my journey as a software developer, I performed professionally as a touring and session musician. I grew up in Rapid City, South Dakota and had many hobbies including skateboarding, playing baseball, and lots of drumming. I studied Music Business in Chadron, Nebraska and moved to Nashville to chase my dreams as a musician after graduating. After many years of hard work and performing, I landed a spot with a local band Bully opening the doors of touring internationally and playing shows I dreamed about including performing at the Ryman. When the pandemic hit in 2020, it proposed a way to look at my career differently and gave me free time to pursue software development. Software development gives me the opportunity to work in a field with continuous growth and education while still being a creative outlet for me.

Stories from the Hackery
Derick Cravens - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 8:21


Derick Cravens graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I have always been a very knowledge hungry person and that has led me to software development for a professional career. I strive to be the best in everything I do. I have always loved technology, and after finishing college I knew I wanted to move in the direction of software development where I will never stop learning.

Stories from the Hackery
Vishal Trivedi - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 8:52


Vishal Trivedi graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Prior to joining NSS I immersed myself in many different directions associated with the tech industry from sales, operation, and analysis. Realizing that I had a fundamentally strong understanding of these concepts made me come to the conclusion that I wanted to pursue a more hands on and immersive side to the business. I've always loved building computers. It's been a passion! I'm glad that I can now do something similar with code. Besides building I love rock climbing, playing table tennis, music and enjoying classic movies.

Python Bytes
#295 Flutter + Python GUI Apps?

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 36:16


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Michael #1: Faster routing for Flask & Quart Flask and Quart both utilise Werkzeug's HTTP route With the upcoming 2.2 release of Werkzeug this router will be significantly faster, with up to a factor of 5. Better for large sets of routes Micro-benchmarks are unaffected and are unlikely to show a speedup. Started with tree-based radix algorithm Moved to state machine algorithm because of wild cards Brian #2: Quarto: an open-source scientific and technical publishing system built on Pandoc suggested by Paul Mackenzie Power of Pandoc and Jupyter Build documents - html, pdf, word presentations - Revealjs, PowerPoint, Beemer websites books - html, pdf, word, epub journal articles - acm, plos, elsevier, acs, jss Publish GitHub pages, Netlify, … kinda related - Kindle to support ePub Michael #3: Flet UI via Mikael Honkala New and upcoming UI framework by Feodor Fitzner: flet. It has a very interesting stack - a Python client driving a Flutter front-end via a Go server. That sounds complicated, but the developer experience is incredibly simple. Installation is just pip install flet. Here's a quick and stupid but working sample: import time import flet from flet import Column, ElevatedButton, Page, Row, TextField def main(page: Page): text_field = TextField() def clear_field(event): text_field.value = "CLEARING" page.update() time.sleep(1) text_field.value = "" page.update() clear_button = ElevatedButton("Clear the field", on_click=clear_field) page.add(Row([Column([text_field, clear_button])], alignment="center")) page.update() flet.app(target=main) # If you run this, you get a native app window on Mac, Windows or Linux, looking something like this: While the example is simple, it shows the handling of an event, updating the UI, and even doing a little sleeping between the updates, without having to worry about threads and such. What's more important, if you change the last line to: flet.app(target=main, view=WEB_BROWSER) You get the exact same functionality, but as a web application in a browser, with support for multiple users and deep linking to different parts of the app. All without leaving the comfortable Python world, with its access to all Python libraries, and without having to learn 3 extra, completely different languages (yes, HTML, CSS and JavaScript). As this is Flutter, mobile support is in the works, after the basic UI functionality is all there. Check the project front page here: flet.dev Jump directly to the currently available controls: flet.dev/docs/controls Check couple of tutorials here: flet.dev/docs/tutorials Or read the plans for the mobile support here: flet.dev/blog/flet-mobile-strategy Brian #4: Building an authenticated Python CLI Project that uses click, rich, and OAth for using Twitter API Persistent authentication requests secret information from user using getpass and input Client ID, Client Secret, App name fetches bearer token from Twitter API stores token in netrc file I'm not familiar with netrc, so I don't know if this is a good idea or not. So I figured I'd ask Michael Extras Michael: New course: Django - Getting Started Joke: Light touches kingdom

Stories from the Hackery
Houston Smith - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:05


Houston Smith graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Nashville, Tennessee born and raised; creative soul trapped in a logical brain. After four years as a Family Minister, I decided to try my hand at something new. A brief attempt at electrical work followed by a year in plumbing eventually led me to software development. A natural curiosity, passion for creative problem-solving, and a drive to constantly learn made software development the perfect fit! I'm team oriented, adaptable, and ready to join the software development industry!

Stories from the Hackery
Luke Slater - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:44


Luke Slater graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I've always been a lover of, and intruiged by, technology. I built my first PC when I was 13. From there, I basically grew up on the internet, so it was only natural that I would pursue a career in software development, via Nashville Software School. Both the learning experience and the work in-class has been immensely engaging and rewarding. I am very excited to begin my career in the industry.

Stories from the Hackery
Alex Levy - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:55


Alex Levy graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I have always been addicted to learning. My favorite moments growing up were getting lost in Wikipedia articles, falling down the infinite rabbit hole of citations and references. This manifested as an obsession with all things electronic; I was attracted to the layers of knowledge and innovation that went into these products. In college I chose to focus on areas in which I felt I needed to improve. My educational focus on media and writing was extremely valuable, but left me lacking in the structured knowledge I would need to advance in my field of Medical Technology Repair. I knew I would need to go back to school to further my career. Eager to see where the future takes me.

Stories from the Hackery
Nathan Traczewski - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:38


Nathan Traczewski graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Hockey Player, Disc Golfer, Drummer, CPA and now Software Developer, Nathan is known for his big drives and bigger heart.

Stories from the Hackery
Lee Jennings - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:01


Lee Jennings graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. After working in the different fields of education and draft beer system maintenance I decided to make the jump into software development. I greatly enjoy solving problems every day and working as part of a team. After teaching myself some coding basics and completing the Nashville Software School Jumpstart program I decided to enroll in NSS. Software development combines my favorite parts of previous jobs, my interest in technology, and the opportunity to grow and learn for the rest of my career.

Stories from the Hackery
Christopher Larsen - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:42


Christopher Larsen graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. Software developer. Artist. Welder. My career has changed a bit over time, but one thing has remained consistent: I create things. I've always had an interest in technology but, before Nashville Software School, I did not have the means to pursue it. Analytical-minded, I look forward to growing as a junior software developer.

Stories from the Hackery
Rushay Hays - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 8:52


Rushay Hays graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I am a professional at working harder and now I'm learning to work smarter. I spent some time re-evaluating my place in the market and what I could do to reach my personal goals and realized that transitioning into software development would make better use of my abilities and allow me to offer more to others.

Stories from the Hackery
Olivia Lind - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:08


Olivia Lind graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I'm a Nashville native, software developer, and former legal assistant. From 2017 to 2020, I co-hosted Something's Not Right, winner of the 2018 Reader's Poll for Best Podcast in the Nashville Scene's "Best of Nashville" issue. In 2019, I launched an investigative true crime podcast, Flatrock. I've always maintained a passion for exercising the creative and problem-solving parts of my brain, and it's that passion that drew me into development. I built my first websites as a teenager and remained a self-taught hobbyist. With the latest tools and technology now at my disposal, I can further feed my passion for solving complex problems in a creative way. Most importantly, I have the ability to identify voiceover actors in less than three seconds, I never remember that Heart sang "These Dreams," and my favorite Batman is Michael Keaton.

Stories from the Hackery
Karla Nichols - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:49


Karla Nichols graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. After years of working as a senior Cosmetologist I decided to take the leap into a new career path. I have always had a knack for figuring out how things work and using that knowledge to find new ways to solve problems. Software Development was the perfect direction for me to go with my problem solving abilities, team driven leadership skills and a love for continued learning.

Stories from the Hackery
Siprachanh Chanthaphaychith - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 8:04


Siprachanh Chanthaphaychith graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I am a software developer, recently transitioned legal professional, with command in investigative cyber intelligence and strategic risk analyses of company cybersecurity business posture and appetite. My conflict resolution skills are maximizable in the information technology space. I have experience and preparatory education in IT infrastructure, cybersecurity disputes and risk management, security inventory controls, business environmental and project management.

Stories from the Hackery
Punam Ahire - Web Development Cohort 55

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:47


Punam Ahire graduated with Web Development Cohort 55. I'm a software developer and a loving mother of two girls. Software development has always been my passion as it provides a way for continued learning. It enables me to apply my problem solving skills to build something productive and valuable. I have worked as a software developer in the past from 2007 to 2013. As a former developer and a mother I truly understand how satisfying it is to create something new and amazing. I enjoy working in a team and understand what it takes to be a true team player. The fact about programming that amuses me is that it allows me to be creative at the same time while addressing a problem. Interesting facts about me: You can identify me as a person who can clap with one hand and speak in three different languages.

Shopify Across the Pond
How new tools are driving change in the online commerce space

Shopify Across the Pond

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 37:59


Specifically, Luke discusses:Why eCommerce is at the end of an eraWhat are the new tools that Shopify brands should be picking up?Which are the tools we should be dropping?To find out more about Luke and the tools he made reference to, see below:alvio.network Making direct commerce partnerships easy!guild.co (easily create your own branded communities)Kimonix.com (Merchandising)Nibbletechnology.com (AI Chat Bot)Conjura.com - actito.com (Making Sense of big Data)

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
Nucamp Coding Bootcamp Review In 2022

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 56:15


Should you go to the coding bootcamp, Nucamp, in 2022? I brought 2 recent graduates and 1 person that just completed the backend program to help you answer that question. As usual, this is a no-BS review of the program. They shared their unfiltered experiences of the program. We went over the good AND the bad. Enjoy!Katy Senia (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/katydevelopsInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/katydevelopsTwitter - https://twitter.com/katydevelopsRoss Gordon (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/rossagordonChristina Slocumb (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/christina-slocumbTwitter - https://twitter.com/nyubossmom---------------------------------------------------

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#375: Python Language Summit 2022

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 58:31 Very Popular


Every year, the Python core developers and a few other key players in the Python ecosystem meet to discuss the pressing issues and important advancements at an event called the Python Language Summit. While Python is a community known for openness, this meeting is typically held behind closed doors mostly for efficiency's sake. On this episode, we'll give you a look behind that door. We have Alex Waygood here on this episode to break it down for us and give a look inside the summit. Links from the show Alex on Twitter: @alexwaygood 2022 Python Language Summit: pyfound.blogspot.com Individual Talks Python without the GIL: pyfound.blogspot.com Reaching a per-interpreter GIL: pyfound.blogspot.com The "Faster CPython" project: 3.12 and beyond: pyfound.blogspot.com WebAssembly: Python in the browser and beyond: pyfound.blogspot.com F-strings in the grammar: pyfound.blogspot.com Cinder Async Optimizations: pyfound.blogspot.com The issue and PR backlog: pyfound.blogspot.com The path forward for immortal objects: pyfound.blogspot.com Sponsor: Reflect.run demo video: youtube.com Sponsor: Reflect.run sign up: app.reflect.run Sponsor: Microsoft for Startups Founder's Hub: startups.microsoft.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Reflect.run Microsoft AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
How To Escape Tutorial Hell (For Developers)

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 24:50


Have you ever finished a developer course, went to try and use what you learned to build something, and felt like you completely forgot everything you just learned? This is much more common than you think. Most importantly, it does NOT mean that you're incapable of becoming a developer.You most likely got trapped in tutorial hell. In this podcast episode, I not only shared advice on how to escape this but also how to be as efficient with your learning as possible as you progress forward with your journey of learning how to code.---------------------------------------------------

Design Domination for Graphic Designers
Accessible WordPress Themes: What to Know

Design Domination for Graphic Designers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 7:31


#130 Many web designers and developers think using an accessibility-ready WordPress theme means a website will be accessible. But many themes have accessibility issues, and there is more to building an accessible website than using an accessible theme.

COMPRESSEDfm
72 | Working with Storybook

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 45:00


In this episode, Amy shares her experience with working with Storybook, the pros and cons, and how it's changed her developer workflow.SponsorsZEALZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit codingzeal.comVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 IntroductionEpisode 32 - Getting Started with TypeScript7:17 Quick Rant: Wired Headphones8:49 Design SystemsEpisode 46 - Everything You Ever Wanted to know about Design SystemsBootstrapZurb Foundation10:36 Supports Multiple Libraries and Frameworks12:28 Sponsor: ZEAL13:13 How do you enter all the information into Storybook?Frontend Masters: Design Systems with React & Storybook - Emma Bostian18:24 Storybook in the Wild: Building out Frontend Components for Backend DevelopersEpisode 54 - Why RedwoodJS is the App Framework for Startups with David Price Redwood.js with David Price22:17 Comparing Storybook to Testing25:31 Sponsor: Vercel26:39 Breaking Down a Component29:29 Add-Ons with Storybook31:28 Storybook and Figma Integration31:46 Sponsor: DatoCMS32:40 Do you use Storybook at work?33:39 Do you think Redwood is an option that you'll use more of going forward? Or, do you think Storybook is something that you implement outside of Redwood in some of your existing setups?35:05 Is Redwood something teams should be looking at for new projects?36:32 Grab Bag Questions39:16 Picks and Plugs39:26 James's Pick: Spike Ball41:07 James's Plug: TikTok42:25 Amy's Pick: PARA Method43:42 Amy's Plug: Everything Svelte

Python Bytes
#294 Specializing Adaptive Interpreters in Full Color

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:26


Wireframe
Courtney Quinn and Brandon Groce Help Will on a Whim Rethink His Website

Wireframe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 21:53 Very Popular


This episode pairs Will with Courtney Quinn - a prolific online content producer you might know as Color Me Courtney. Find her on Instagram, TikTok and YouTube. Courtney used her own website as inspiration to help Will think through color theory, and how different tones and shades could prompt consumer behavior on the merch page.For a professional designer's perspective on web design, we connect with Brandon Groce. He's a designer, speaker, content creator and friend of Adobe. You can check out Brandon's design portfolio here. And check out Will's website as he continues to think through some design choices and try out new ideas.This season is supported by Adobe Express - a new web and mobile app that helps anyone create great content from thousands of templates. Learn more about the podcast at adobe.ly/wireframe. (Most of the guests appearing in this season are part of Adobe's CoCreate program.)Find a transcript of this episode here.

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
What I Loved And Hated About Being A Developer

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 46:07


In this podcast episode, I shared my unfiltered experience of what being a developer has been like - emphasis on “unfiltered”. You've been warned.---------------------------------------------------

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Every year, the PSF and JetBrains team up to do a Python community survey. The most recent one was Fall of 2021. For this episode, I've gathered a great group of Python enthusiasts to discuss the results. I think you'll really enjoy the group discussion on this episode. Links from the show Guests Gina Häußge: @foosel Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel: @emilyemorehouse Tonya Sims: @TonyaSims Brett Cannon: @brettsky Jay Miller: @kjaymiller Paul Everitt: @paulweveritt 2021 Survey Results: jetbrains.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON RedHat AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Python Bytes
#293 And if I pull this open source Jenga block...

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 47:34


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Special guest: Ashley Anderson Ashley #1: PSF security key giveaway for critical package maintainers Giving away 4000 2FA hardware keys Surely a team effort but I found it via @di_codes twitter (Dustin Ingram) links to previous talks on PyPI/supply chain security Interesting idea for helping with supply-chain vulnerabilities At least one dev pulled a critical package in response Previously: I don't have any critical projects Armin Ronacher has an interesting take Michael #2: PyLeft-Pad via Dan Bader Markus Unterwaditzer was maintaining atomicwrites More on how this relates to a project (Home Assistant) I wonder if PyPI will become immutable once an item is published Brian #3: FastAPI Filter Suggested and created by Arthur Rio “I loved using django-filter with DRF and wanted an equivalent for FastAPI.” - Arthur Add query string filters to your api endpoints and show them in the swagger UI. Supports SQLAlchemy and MongoEngine. Supports operators: gt, gte, in, isnull, it, lte, not/ne, not_in/nin Ashley #4: Tools for building Python extensions in Rust PyO3 pyo3 - Python/Rust FFI bindings nice list of examples people might recognize in the PyO3 README Pydantic V2 will use it for pydantic-core maturin - PEP 621 wheel builder (pyproject.toml) pretty light weight, feels like flit for Rust or python/Rust rust-numpy (+ndarray) for scientific computing setuptools-rust for integrating with existing Python projects using setuptools Rust project and community place high value on good tooling, relatively young language/community with a coherent story from early on Rust macro system allows for really nice ergonomics (writing macros is very hard, using them is very easy) The performance/safety/simplicity tradeoffs Python and Rust make are very different, but both really appeal to me - Michael #5: AutoRegEx via Jason Washburn Enter an english phrase, it'll try to generate a regex for you You can do the reverse too, explain a regex You must sign in and are limited to 100 queries / [some time frame] Related from Simon Willison: Using GPT-3 to explain how code works Brian #6: Anaconda Acquires PythonAnywhere Suggested by Filip Łajszczak See also Anaconda Acquisition FAQs from PythonAnywhere blog From announcement: “The acquisition comes on the heels of Anaconda's release of PyScript, an open-source framework running Python applications within the HTML environment. The PythonAnywhere acquisition and the development of PyScript are central to Anaconda's focus on democratizing Python and data science.” My take: We don't hear a lot about PA much, even their own blog has had 3 posts in 2022, including the acquisition announcement. Their home page boasts “Python versions 2.7, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7 and 3.8”, although I think they support 3.9 as well, but not 3.10 yet, seems like from the forum. Also, no ASGI, so FastAPI won't work, for example. Still, I think PA is a cool idea, and I'd like to see it stay around, and stay up to date. Hopefully this acquisition is the shot in the arm it needed. Extras Michael: Python becomes the most sought after for employers hiring (by some metric) Ashley: PEP691 JSON Simple API for PyPI Rich Codex - automatic terminal “screenshots” Joke: Neta is a programmer

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
Linkedin Tips For Aspiring Developers

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 64:16


LINKEDIN! It's such an important social platform for aspiring developers, and quite the controversial one as well. Some people love it. Some people hate it.I think most developers actually use Linkedin very ineffectively. If you're using it the wrong way and not getting much out of it, why would you like the platform? I get it.In this podcast episode, my goal is to solidify your strategy of using the platform to give yourself a competitive edge at landing that first dev job. I invited Shaily on, who has helped several people build up their Linkedin presence.We didn't just dive into advice on how to present your Linkedin profile. We also shared resume tips, integrating your past experience with future dev jobs, networking tips, content creation tips, and even our frustrations with the platform. Enjoy!Shaily Hakimian (guest):Website - https://www.yoursocialmediasherpa.comYoutube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsbk3e9sGJe7AK8hBhTmj8ALinkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/hakimian45---------------------------------------------------

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
Are Coding Interviews ACTUALLY Broken?

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 73:21


People are FRUSTRATED with the current state of coding interviews. Down with data structures and algorithm interviews! Why am I being tested ON THE SPOT in the interview, only to have my anxiety spike? Do hiring managers even know what the hell they're doing!?We've landed on a controversial topic for sure in this video! I brought on 2 hiring managers and put them on the spot with many of the common concerns I've heard about the interview process. One has extensive experience training and hiring in the startup world. One has a tremendous amount of experience doing the same at FAANG companies.I think these 2 were the perfect people to bring on for this. I challenge them with many of these frustrations developers have. Both are VERY honest, so I hope you're ready. They may challenge a couple of your assumptions about the hiring process. Try to keep an open mind during this episode. Enjoy!Scott Ferguson (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottfergDaniel Tomko (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/danieltomko---------------------------------------------------

Building Livewire
To over-engineer or not to over-engineer

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 10:59


PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Welcome to PodRocket, LogRocket's podcast created to bring you in-depth interviews with experienced engineers like Guillermo Rauch, updates on new releases like Node 18 with Beth Griggs, and conference talks with speakers like Jenn Creighton. So follow PodRocket and tell your friends; we have a lot more coming your way. Links https://podrocket.logrocket.com/ https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

With React 18 now officially released, Shruti Kapoor comes to give us the rundown on the updated UI features, concurrency, how to install 18, and more! Links https://twitter.com/shrutikapoor08 https://shrutikapoor.dev https://docs.github.com/en/discussions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-NCLePa2x8&ab_channel=RealWorldReact https://github.com/shrutikapoor08 Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Shruti Kapoor.

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
Treat Your Web Development Portfolio Projects Like Products | Landing Page Tips

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 54:12


Whether you're an aspiring developer building out portfolio projects, or a software engineer building out their website or app in hopes to get users, an effective landing page will go A LONG WAY in helping convince users that what you've built is worth their time.A long time ago, we used to get away with just being code monkeys, but nowadays, being able to code is only part of your job. You're not just a coder, you're a problem solver.What problem are you solving? Well, you have to take the time to understand what problems people are having and what type of solutions could make those peoples' lives easier.A secret that some of the higher quality bootcamps don't share with you is that they teach their students to build products, not just random personal projects. Your portfolio projects should be driven around building something that solves at least one problem for someone and gives them the result they're looking for. This demonstrates a user-centered mindset that is highly valued by almost any company.This is a different way of thinking for many software engineers, but this is key not only to exponentially increasing your value as a software engineer but also to making it much more likely that your side project could eventually bring in additional profit one day.Jennifer Westbrook (guest):Website - https://www.jenwestwriting.com/freebies ---------------------------------------------------

Building Livewire
Nothing is static, everything is a wave

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 10:57


Building Livewire
Don't settle

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 10:57


You can produce results greater than your abilities if you simply choose to not settle.

Building Livewire
I'm a builder

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 9:53


If I had to identify with one thing, it'd be that.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#373: Reinventing Azure's Python CLI

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 66:30 Very Popular


Deploying and managing your application after you create it can be a big challenge. Cloud platforms such as Azure have literally hundreds of services. Which ones should you choose? How do you link them together? In this episode, Anthony Shaw and Shayne Boyer share a new CLI tool and template they've created for jump starting you use of modern Python apps and deploying them to Azure. We're talking FastAPI, Beanie and MongoDB, async and await, Bicep DevOps, automated CI/CD pipelines and more. Plus we catch up on other Python work happening that Anthony is involved with. If you're interested in deploying or structuring modern Python apps, you'll find some interesting take aways from our conversation. Links from the show Anthony on Twitter: @anthonypjshaw Shayne Boyer: @spboyer Azure azd CLI tools: aka.ms Beanie ODM: github.io Pydantic: helpmanual.io Give me back my monolith article: craigkerstiens.com Python creator Guido van Rossum joins Microsoft: techcrunch.com Making Python Faster with Guido and Mark episode: talkpython.fm Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON NordVPN AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Svelte Radio
The Svelte Documentary is out!

Svelte Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 27:05


SponsorThis week's episode is sponsored by... Svelte Summit! Get your tickets for the upcoming in-person event in Stockholm before it's too late! We already have some confirmed speakers: Rich Harris,

Python Bytes
#292 Thursday, it's always a Thursday

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 28:36


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Brian #1: rich-codex by Phil Ewels suggested by Will McGugan “A GitHub Action / command-line tool which generates screen grab images of a terminal window, containing command outputs or code snippets.” Generate images from commands embedded in markdown files, like README.md, for example. Searches through markdown files for stuff like: ![cat cat.txt | lolcat -S 1](img/cat.svg) then runs the command, and generates the image. Can be done within a GitHub action Can also send code snippets or json to rich-cli, then generate an image. You can also have commands in a config file, Very easy to use, makes very professional looking images for documentation, that's always up to date. Michael #2: Pydastic via Roman Right, by Rami Awar Pydastic is an elasticsearch python ORM based on Pydantic. Core Features Simple CRUD operations supported Sessions for simplifying bulk operations (a la SQLAlchemy) Dynamic index support when committing operations More on Elasticsearch here Brian #3: 3 Things to Know Before Building with PyScript by Braden Riggs Package indentation matters Local file access is possible. [HTML_REMOVED] - numpy - pandas - paths: - /views.csv [HTML_REMOVED] DOM manipulation has interesting conventions For buttons, you can include pys-onClick=”your_function” parameter to trigger python functions when clicked. For retrieving user input from within the [HTML_REMOVED] tag document.getElementById(‘input_obj_id').value can retrieve the input value. And Finally pyscript.write(“output_obj_id”, data) can write output to a tag from within the [HTML_REMOVED] tag. Michael's Pyscript videos Python + pyscript + WebAssembly: Python Web Apps, Running Locally with pyscript Python iOS Web App with pyscript and offline PWAs Michael #4: disnake via Sean Koenig disnake is a modern, easy to use, feature-rich, and async-ready API wrapper for Discord. Features: Modern Pythonic API using async/await syntax Sane rate limit handling that prevents 429 errors Command extension to aid with bot creation Easy to use with an object oriented design Optimized for both speed and memory Quickstart Commands API Extras Michael: Scholarships for upcoming FastAPI + MongoDB live course Humble Bundle for Python 2022 Michael's crazy earbuds (UE Fits) Joke: Better than a wage increase

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#372: Applied mathematics with Python

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 75:44 Very Popular


Often when we learn about or work with Math, it's done so in a very detached style. You might learn the rules and techniques for differentiation, for example. But how often do you get to apply them to meaningful and interesting problems? In this episode, we have Vince Knight and Geraint Palmer on to discuss solving a wide variety of applied and approachable math problems using Python. Whether you're deeply into math or not so much, I think there is a lot to enjoy from this episode. Links from the show Applied Mathematics with Open-Source Software: taylorfrancis.com Book source files: ithub.com Vince on Twitter: @drvinceknight Geraint on Twitter: @geraintpalmer Traces Package: traces.readthedocs.io A Beautiful Mind: wikipedia.org Nashpy: github.com e: The Story of a Number: amazon.com SymPy episode: talkpython.fm 8451: 8451.com Stack Overflow Trends: stackoverflow.com PYCON UK 2017: Python for conducting operational research in healthcare: youtube.com Ciw package: github.com Python ternary: github.com Michael's in-person FastAPI course: maven.com Reimbursement templates for our courses Expense a Course at Talk Python: zoho.com Expense Course Bundle at Talk Python: zoho.com Expense Cohort Course at Talk Python: zoho.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Python Bytes
#291 Wait, you have how many licenses?!?

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:27


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us! Support our work through: Our courses at Talk Python Training Test & Code Podcast Patreon Supporters Michael #1: Python License tracker by Tom Nijhof/Nyhof Every package depends on other package with sometimes different licenses. Tom made a tool to find out what licenses you all need for a project: PyTest alone needs 4 different licenses for itself and its dependencies. Tensorflow is even worst Brian #2: undataclass Trey Hunner As a teaching aid, and to show how much dataclasses do for you, this is a module and an application that converts dataclasses to normal classes, and fills in all of the dunder methods you need. Example in app: from dataclasses import dataclass @dataclass() class Point: x: float y: float z: float Converts to class Point: __match_args__ = ('x', 'y', 'z') def __init__(self, x: float, y: float, z: float) -> None: self.x = x self.y = y self.z = z def __repr__(self): cls = type(self).__name__ return f'{cls}(x={self.x!r}, y={self.y!r}, z={self.z!r})' def __eq__(self, other): if not isinstance(other, Point): return NotImplemented return (self.x, self.y, self.z) == (other.x, other.y, other.z) Note on NotImplemented: It just means, “I don't know how to compare this”, and Python will try __eq__ on the other object. If that also raises NotImplemented, a False is returned. The default is the above with @dataclass(frozen=True, slots=True) and adds the methods: fronzen=True gives you implementations of __hash__, __setattr__, __delattr__, __getstate__, __setstate__, Essentially raises exception if you try to change the contents, and makes your objects hashable. slots=True adds the line: __slots__ = (``'``x', '``y``'``, '``z``'``). This disallows adding new attributes to objects at runtime. See Python docs Trey wrote two posts about it: Appreciating Python's match-case by parsing Python code How I made a dataclass remover Turns out, this is a cool example for AST and structural pattern matching. Notes from the “how I made..” article: "I used some tricks I don't usually get to use in Python. I used: Many very hairy **match**-**case** blocks which replaced even hairier if-elif blocks A sentinel object to keep track of a location that needed replacing Python's **textwrap.dedent** utility, which I feel should be more widely known & used slice assignment to inject one list into another The ast module's unparse function to convert an abstract syntax tree into Python code” Michael #3: Qutebrowser via Martin Borus Qutebrowser is a keyboard-focused browser with a minimal GUI." It's Python powered Whats more important - doesn't force you to use it's Vim-based shortcuts, the mouse still works. But you usually don't need it: Because on any page, a keypress on the "f" key will show, you every clickable think and a letter combination to enter to click this. Brian #4: asyncio and web applications A collection of articles Quart is now a Pallets project P G Jones, maintainer of Quart and Hypercorn “Quart, an ASGI re-implementation of the Flask API has joined the Pallets organization. This means that future development will be under the Pallets governance by the Pallets maintainers. Our long term aim is to merge Quart and Flask to bring ASGI support directly to Flask. “When to use Quart?” “Quart is an ASGI framework utilising async IO throughout, whereas Flask is a WSGI framework utilising sync IO. It is therefore best to use Quart if you intend to use async IO (i.e. async/await libraries) and Flask if not. Don't worry if you choose the 'wrong' framework though, as Quart supports sync IO and Flask supports async IO, although less efficiently.” Using async and await, from Flask docs Flask has some support of async/await since Flask 2.0 But it's still a WSGI application. “Deciding whether you should use Flask, Quart, or something else is ultimately up to understanding the specific needs of your project.” Should You Use AsyncIO for Your Next Python Web Application? Steven Pate A cool “brief history of Python web server interfaces” Discussion of the Python servers and frameworks for both WSGI and ASGI Recommendation: Do you need async? “… most people don't. WSGI servers and frameworks are usually performant enough.” Extras Michael: Python Web Conf Talk: HTMX + Flask: Modern Python Web Apps, Hold the JavaScript browserosaurus Joke: Understanding JavaScript Joke: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Storybook with Chantastic (Repeat)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 51:59


Originally published on April 6, 2022 We are taking some time off from production. We will be back with new episodes on July 6th. Chantastic joins us to talk about Chromatic, component-driven development, testing, Spider-Man, and more. Links https://twitter.com/chantastic https://storybook.js.org https://www.chromatic.com https://www.youtube.com/StorybookJS https://www.youtube.com/c/chantastic https://discord.com/invite/lunchdev https://reactpodcast.com Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form, (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers) and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Chantastic.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#371: pipx - Installable, Isolated Python Applications

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 58:43 Very Popular


I'm sure you're familiar with package managers for your OS even if you don't use them. On macOS we have Homebrew, Chocolatey on Windows, and apt, yum, and others on Linux. But if you want to install Python applications, you typically have to fallback to managing them with pip. Maybe you install them for your account with the --user flag. But with pipx you get a clean, isolated install for every Python application that you use. And if you distribute Python apps, pipx is a definitely worth considering as a channel. Links from the show Chad Smith: @cs01_software Pipx: github.com Entry Points: dev.to Python Packaging Dashboard: chadsmith.dev MKDocStrings: mkdocstrings.github.io gdbgui: github.com termpair: github.com httpie: httpie.io pls (ls-replacement): dhruvkb.github.io Glances: nicolargo.github.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Mergify Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training