Podcasts about Web development

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  • 565PODCASTS
  • 3,809EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
Web development

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Best podcasts about Web development

Show all podcasts related to web development

Latest podcast episodes about Web development

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

MUI (formerly Material-UI) provides a robust, customizable, and accessible library of foundational and advanced components. The creator of MUI, Olivier Tassinari joins us to talk about MUI, UI design, React components, MUI's open-source library, and design tools. Links https://twitter.com/olivtassinari https://mui.com https://mui.com/core https://mui.com/x https://mui.com/pricing https://mui.com/careers Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Olivier Tassinari.

Self-Made Web Designer
The Best Way to Learn Web Development Without Getting Stuck

Self-Made Web Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 27:10


Web Designer Starter Kit CourseUltralearning by Scott YoungPlaces to LearnCodecademyFree Code CampYouTubeBootcampsStack Overflow

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

The authentication strategy of the past isn't optimized for the new world of development. Colin Sidoti and his team at Clerk are building authentication for the modern web. Links https://twitter.com/tweetsbycolin https://clerk.dev https://github.com/clerkinc https://clerk.dev/startups https://apply.workable.com/clerk-dev Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Colin Sidoti.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#349: Meet Beanie: A MongoDB ODM + Pydantic

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 80:50


This podcast episode you're listening to right now was delivered to you, in part, by MongoDB and Python powering our web apps and production processes. But if you're using pymongo, the native driver from MongoDB to talk to the server, you're doing it wrong. Basing your app on a foundation of exchanging raw dictionaries is a castle of sand. BTW, see the joke at the end of the show about this. You should be using an ODM. This time we're talking about Beanie which is one of the exciting, new MongoDB Object Document Mappers which is based on Pydantic and is async-native. Join me as I discuss this project with its creator: Roman Right. Links from the show Roman on Twitter: @roman_the_right Beanie ODM: github.com Tutorial: roman-right.github.io Beanie Relations, Cache, Actions and more!

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Getting started with Golang with Johnny Boursiquot

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 41:30


Johnny Boursiquot hosts the Go Time podcast, runs Go Meetups, and is super involved in the Go community. Today he joins us to talk about how to get started with Go, how Go compares to Rust, and his current role as a Platform Observability Engineer at Heroku. Links https://twitter.com/jboursiquot https://gotime.fm https://www.heroku.com https://go.dev https://go.dev/doc/effective_go https://gobyexample.com https://github.com/golang/go/wiki/CodeReviewComments https://twitter.com/gotimefm https://twitter.com/Heroku Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Johnny Boursiquot.

Python Bytes
#267 Python on the beach

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 32:50


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Michael #1: Box: Python dictionaries with advanced dot notation access Want to treat dictionaries like classes? Box. small_box = Box({'data': 2, 'count': 5}) small_box.data == small_box['data'] == getattr(small_box, 'data') == small_box.get('data') There are over a half dozen ways to customize your Box and make it work for you: Check out the new Box github wiki for more details and examples! Superset of dict See Types of Boxes as well Brian #2: Reading tracebacks in Python Trey Hunner “When Python encounters an error in your code, it will print out a traceback. Let's talk about how to use tracebacks to fix our code.” Brian's commentary Tracebacks can feel like brick wall of error telling you “you suck”. But they are really meant to help you, and do, once you know how to read them. Probably should be one of the earliest things we teach people new to coding. Like maybe: hello world tracebacks testing Anyway, back to Trey Start at the bottom. Read the last line first That will have the type of exception and an error message The two lines above that are The exact filename and line number where the exception occurs a copy of the line Those two lines are a stack frame. Keep going up and it's other stack frames for the callstack of how you got here. Trey walks through this with an example and shows how to solve an error at a high level stack frame using the traceback. Michael #3: Raspberry Pi: These two new devices just went live on the International Space Station The International Space Station has connected new Raspberry 4 Model B units to run experiments from 500 student programmer teams in Europe. From the education-focused European Astro Pi Challenge These are new space-hardened Raspberry Pi units, dubbed Astro Pi The AstroPi units are part of a project run by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the Earth-focused Mission Zero and Mission Space Lab. The former allows young Python programmers to take humidity readings on board ISS while the latter lets students run various scientific experiments on the space station using its sensors. Brian #4: Make Simple Mocks With SimpleNamespace Adam Johnson Who's crushing it recently, BTW, lots of recent blog posts SimpleNamespace is in the types standard library package. Works great as a test double, especially as a stub or fake object. “It's as simple as possible, with no faff around being callable, tracking usage, etc.” Example: >from types import SimpleNamespace >obj = SimpleNamespace(x=12, y=17, verbose=True) >obj namespace(x=12, y=17, verbose=True) >obj.x 12 >obj.verbose True unittest.mock.Mock also works, but has the annoying feature that, unless you pass in a spec, any attribute will be allowed. The SimpleNamespace solution doesn't allow any typos or other attributes. Example: >obj.vrebose Traceback (most recent call last): File "[HTML_REMOVED]", line 1, in [HTML_REMOVED] AttributeError: 'types.SimpleNamespace' object has no attribute 'vrebose'. Did you mean: 'verbose'? Michael #5: Extra, extra, exta Marak Squires, supply chain issues (NPM), and terrorism? [npm issues] css outlines! python 3.10.2 Python Shorts YouTube series #1 Parsing data with Pydantic #2 Counting the number of times items appear with collections.Counter Stream Deck + PyCharm video, github repo Brian #6: 3 Things You Might Not Know About Numbers in Python David Amos Most understated phrase I've read in a long time: “… there's a good chance that you've used a number in one of your programs” There's more to numbers than many people realize The 3 things numbers have methods integers have to_bytes(length=1, byteorder="big") int.from_bytes(b'x06xc1', byteorder="big") class method bit_length() and a bunch of others floats have is_integer(), as_integer_ratio() and a bunch more use variables or parentheses, though. 5.bit_length() doesn't work n=5; n.bit_length() and (5).bit_length() works numbers have hierarchy Every number in Python is an instance of the Number class. so isinstance(value, Number) should work for any number type Then there's 4 abstract types encompassing other types Complex: has type complex Real: has float Rational: has Fraction Integral: has int and bool Where's Decimal? It's not part of those abstract types, it directly inherits from Number Also, floats are weird Numbers are extensible You can derive from numeric classes, both abstract and concrete, and create your own However, to do this effectively, you gotta implement A LOT of dunder methods. Joke:

Self-Made Web Designer
How to Navigate Tough Times in Your Freelance Business and Come Out On Top

Self-Made Web Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 25:52


Web Design Starter Kit CourseSign up for a time to chat with meEpisode with Tom Ross on CommunityCreative Mornings

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Curious about Web3 but not sure where to start? Noah Hein joins us to share some blockchain and Web3 fundamentals. Links https://twitter.com/NHeinDev https://twitter.com/QuickNode https://www.quicknode.com https://www.quicknode.com/guides Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Noah Hein.

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Framer Motion and Motion One with Matt Perry

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:03


Framer Motion is a production-ready motion library for React and Motion One is a new animation library, built on the Web Animations API for the smallest file size and the fastest performance. We speak to Matt Perry about Framer Motion, Motion One, animations, and open source. Links https://www.framer.com/motion https://motion.dev https://twitter.com/mattgperry Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Matt Perry .

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#348: Dear PyGui: Simple yet Fast Python GUI Apps

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 61:32


I'm always on the look out for a good Python UI framework. This episode focuses on Dear PyGui. Dear PyGui: A fast and powerful Graphical User Interface Toolkit for Python with minimal dependencies, created by Jonathan Hoffstadt and Preston Cothren. They are here to tell us all about it. Links from the show Jonathan Hoffstadt: @jhoffs1 Preston Cothren: @toulaboy3 Dear PyGUI source: github.com Video tutorials: dearpygui.readthedocs.io Getting started tutorial: dearpygui.readthedocs.io OpenFOAM: openfoam.org Vulkan: vulkan.org Michael's Python Shorts video series The playlist: talkpython.fm/python-shorts Michael's YouTube Channel: youtube.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON TopTal AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

eCommerce Badassery
Official Trailer: eCommerce Badassery with Jessica Totillo Coster

eCommerce Badassery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 2:31


How do I get more traffic and sales for my eCommerce business? If you're asking yourself this question, you're in exactly the right place!   Jessica Totillo Coster, a 20+ year retail veteran and manager of a 7-figure eCommerce business, shares actionable steps and strategies to grow your online store.   After building her multi-six figure brick + mortar boutique and working with the top experts in SEO, Web Development, Email, and Digital Marketing, she's spilling all the secrets like the straight-talking no bullsh*t New Yorker she is.   Each week, hear from Jessica and the occasional guest to learn what it takes to take your eCommerce business to the next level.   FREE Resource Library  Every freebie I've created to help you grow the traffic, sales, and profit in your eCommerce Business, all in one place! http://ecommercebadassery.com/freestuff   Want More Badassery? Join the eCommerce Badassery Facebook Group and connect with other eCommerce entrepreneurs just like you!  http://ecommercebadassery.com/facebook Let's connect on Instagram @ecommercebadassery https://instagram.com/ecommercebadassery   Ready to Level Up Your Email Marketing & eCommerce Business? Try the Klaviyo Email Marketing Platform - Built specifically for eCommerce, serving entrepreneurs, and iconic brands. https://ecommercebadassery.com/klaviyo Work With Me Interested in getting my brain focused on YOUR business? Learn more about my services… Email Marketing Help: https://ecommercebadassery.com/email-marketing eCommerce Help: https://ecommercebadassery.com/ecommerce-help   Rate, Review, & Subscribe Like what you heard? I'd be forever grateful if you'd rate, review and subscribe to the show! Not only does it help your fellow eCommerce entrepreneurs find the eCommerce Badassery podcast; it's also valuable feedback for me to continue bringing you the content you want to hear.  Review Here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ecommerce-badassery/id1507457683 This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:  Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Founder Friday: Chris Burns of Everfund

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 39:24


Chris Burns is one of the hosts of the FSJam podcast and also the Cofounder and CEO of Everfund, a plug-and-play donation solution making donations easier. He joins us today to tell us about Everfund, what technologies he used to create it, and lessons learned in the process of starting his own company. Links https://twitter.com/BurnedChris https://everfund.io https://twitter.com/_everfund https://twitter.com/everfunddevs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVcsvhq4kQI https://podrocket.logrocket.com/fsjam https://fsjam.org Review us Reviews are what help us grow and tailor our content to what you want to hear. Give us a review here (https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket). Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/podrocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Christopher Burns.

Python Bytes
#266 Python has a glossary?

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 26:46


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Datadog: pythonbytes.fm/datadog Brian #1: Python glossary and FAQ Inspired by a tweet by Trey Hunner that referenced the glossary glossary All the Python and programming terms in one place Often refers to other parts of the documentation. Forget what an “abstract base class” is? Just look it up FAQ Has sections on General Python Programming Design and History Library and Extension Extending/Embedding Python on Windows Graphic User Interface “Why is Python Installed on my Computer?” Some decent reading here, actually. Example What is the difference between arguments and parameters? - that's under Programming Michael #2: Any.io Learned about it via asyncer AnyIO is an asynchronous networking and concurrency library that works on top of either asyncio or trio. It implements trio-like structured concurrency (SC) on top of asyncio Works in harmony with the native SC of trio itself Check out the features AnyIO also comes with its own pytest plugin which also supports asynchronous fixtures. Brian #3: Vaex : a high performance Python library for lazy Out-of-Core DataFrames suggested by Glen Ferguson “Vaex is a python library for lazy Out-of-Core DataFrames (similar to Pandas), to visualize and explore big tabular datasets.” out-of-core: “The term out-of-core typically refers to processing data that is too large to fit into a computer's main memory.” - from machinelearning.wtf, a Machine Learning Glossary site. nice tie in, right? Vaex uses memory mapping, a zero memory copy policy, and lazy computations. There's a great intro in the form of a presentation from SciPy 2019 Michael #4: Django Community Survey Results Only 15% of Django developers use it ONLY for work, while two thirds use it both for work and for personal, educational, or side projects. Majority use latest Django Most devs upgrade every stable release Postgres is the primary DB (MongoDB is nowhere in sight) Most sites have Redis caching tiers Michael #5: Extra, Extra, Extra, Extra: Django security releases issued: 4.0.1, 3.2.11, and 2.2.26 Static Sites with Sphinx and Markdown course by Paul Everitt is now out CalDigit Thunderbolt 4 Element Hub review (more info Video by Doc Rock, get it on Amazon here) StreamDeck setup for our live streams Michael's PyBay HTMX talk is up Python Web Conf 2022 - I'll be speaking there and we're media sponsors of the conference so use code PythonBytes@PWC2022 for 15% off, March 21-25. PyCascades 2022 is also happening soon, February 5th-6th, 2022 Joke:

Beyond 8 Figures
Helping Employees Thrive in Tech Sector with Joseph Fung, Uvaro

Beyond 8 Figures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 39:24


Tech sales is an industry with a surprisingly high turnover due to the lack of sufficient training. A better system for finding the right candidates and providing adequate training will help business owners find employees who are in it for the long run and ready for more fulfilling careers. Today's guest, Joseph Fung from Uvaro specializes in making this whole process easy and effective for business owners and employees. Tune in to hear more about the process of finding the right employees for your company and how to keep them long-term. About our guest: Joseph Fung is the founder of Uvaro, a company that creates a better way to grow careers. He is known for his skills and knowledge in Entrepreneurship, SEO, Business Development, User Interface Design, Web Development, Startups, and others. On Today's Episode:  Where Joseph sees himself on his own entrepreneurial journey-2:23  The importance of pushing boundaries in business for growth. -4:48  Recognizing boundaries in business and chances to bring your A-game. -6:23  How to improve the process of meetings to make them more effective. -10:44  The series of events that have made the biggest impact on Joseph's career as an entrepreneur. -13:05  What a good business coach can do for you. -16:05  The process Joseph's company uses to find the right people and train them to perform and succeed. -18:50 The power of forming a peer group or network when job searching and how Joseph provides that for his customers. -23:15 The difference between direct hires for companies and Uvaro members. -26:11 ● How Uvaro gives members an advantage when transitioning into the tech industry. -28:17  The new set of problems businesses are seeing and what we need to pay attention to. -30:27  How Joseph defines success in his business. -32:45  Key Takeaways:  As entrepreneurs, sometimes we need to strategically pump the breaks so that the outcome is stronger, especially when hiring. Paying extra attention to the details will help you focus on the qualities you need in an ideal candidate.  To have more effective team meetings, go into them with a specific outcome in mind and plan accordingly. This will help you stay on task and complete the meeting in a timely manner.  Sometimes it's the negative interactions that make you a better entrepreneur and leader because they end up being learning experiences.   A network or circle can be a huge benefit for your employees because they get support and build long-lasting careers.  As entrepreneurs, we must pay attention to societal or economic realignments going on in the world so that we can adjust and come up with new opportunities.  Empowering our employees to succeed is a key component of retention. Pushing boundaries and finding new ways to do things is a great way to do this. [4:51] “I like to play with those edges and push those boundaries. Sometimes you fall, but sometimes you surprise yourself with greatness.” How do you inspire greatness in your employees? Tell us in the comments, and don't forget to say hello if you would like to share your entrepreneurship story on our podcast. Connect with Joseph Fung:  Website: https://uvaro.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/uvaro.life  Twitter: https://twitter.com/josephfung  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/uvaro.life/  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/josephfung Follow Beyond 8 Figures: Website: Beyond8Figures.com Twitter: @beyond8figures  Facebook: Beyond 8 Figures Instagram:@b8fpodcast Email: team@b8fpodcast.com Connect with Insights Lab:  Website: https://insightslab.ai/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheInsightsLab/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/insightslab.ai/ Email: weare@insightslab.ai LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/insightslab-ai/

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast
The Power Of The Mindset With Donna Galloway

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 17:56


In this episode, I talk to Donna Galloway, the co-founder of 746 Shop, a seasonal destination location in Karwatha Lakes that provides a relaxing place to enjoy Karwatha daily Ice Cream treats, Food Truck, shop for apparel, and gifts. She is also the Marketing Vice President of Portfolio+ company that offers innovative and mission-critical solutions to banks and other financial institutions.   Donna shares with us the power of the mindset and some recommendations for entrepreneurs. Tune in to listen to Donna's journey, the challenges she has faced and how she solved them, and other exciting topics.   “I'm a good listener and I'm able to make people feel heard.”   Why Kawartha? Donna says that they grew in the area, so they were familiar with the area. They also knew a lot of people there. She also added that Kawarthas has a lot of lakes and tourist attractions.   Effects of Covid-19 in the industry Donna tells us that they had to create in and outdoors due to Covid-19. They also had late openings. They had to move their ice-cream scooping site to an external window where people could stand in line. Online shopping also increased.   Challenges Donna says that the biggest challenge in business is to divert from the plan and chase another. Instead, they decided to make plans for each year, stick to them, and hold each other accountable.   Recommendations Donna says that to open a business, someone has to have a passion for the idea. Be honest with yourself, what things will cost and how long it will take. Have a good plan, understand it and divide it into pieces and accomplish them.       In this episode: [00:30] About Donna Galloway and 746 Shop [04:00] Why Karwatha? [05:00] Has COVID-19 affected the industry? [07:03] Is 746 shop a passion or business? [08:30] The fairy village [09:18] Is Donna still focussing on her Web Development background? [10:42] Donna's biggest challenge and how she overcame it [12:50] 746 shop products [13:57] Donna's superpower [15:02] Recommendations for the entrepreneurs [16:38] The power of the mindset     Notable Quotes As an entrepreneur, you tend to create many businesses within the business. It's interesting to watch people who truly have a passion for an idea and then bring it into action and make sure it keeps going. Connect with Donna Website: https://shop746.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/7and46shop Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shopsevenfortysix/ LinkedIn:  https://ca.linkedin.com/in/donna-galloway-3300335

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Community is the future with Rosie Sherry

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:50


Rosie Sherry, Community Lead at Orbit, is an expert at community building. Rosie joins us to talk about how she created and grew the Ministry of Testing community, the future of communities, and much more. Links https://twitter.com/rosiesherry https://www.ministryoftesting.com https://orbit.love https://rosie.land https://twitter.com/ministryoftest https://twitter.com/RosielandHQ https://twitter.com/orbitmodel https://discord.com/invite/kQpqkNwtbF Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Rosie Sherry.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#347: Cinder - Specialized Python that Flies

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 71:04


The team at Instagram dropped a performance bomb on the Python world when they open-sourced Cider, their performance oriented fork of CPython. It contains a number of performance optimizations, including bytecode inline caching, eager evaluation of coroutines, a method-at-a-time JIT, and an experimental bytecode compiler that uses type annotations to emit type-specialized bytecode that performs better in the JIT. While it's not a general purpose runtime we can all pick up and use, it contains many powerful features and optimizations that may make their way back to mainline Python. We welcome Dino Viehland to dive into Cinder. Links from the show Dino on Twitter: @DinoViehland Cinder Python Runtime: github.com/facebookincubator Dino's PyCon talk: youtube.com IronPython: ironpython.net Sam Gross's NoGil work: github.com/colesbury/nogil Pyjion: trypyjion.com uWSGI: uwsgi-docs.readthedocs.io Configuring uWSGI at Bloomberg: techatbloomberg.com Locust perf testing: locust.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON TopTal AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Anvil is a way to build full-stack web apps with nothing but Python. It's easy enough for beginners, but powerful enough for pros. Meredydd Luff joins us to talk about creating web apps with Python, accessibility, the future of Anvil, and more. Links https://twitter.com/meredydd https://anvil.works https://anvil.works/pricing https://twitter.com/anvil_works Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Meredydd Luff.

Business Over Beer
#102 | Lacey Faught, Part 1| The Right Way To Social Media

Business Over Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 30:06


On this episode of Business Over Beer, we welcome Lacey Faught, owner of Spry, a Social Media Marketing Agency in Vancouver, WA. As a young Entrepreneur in her early 20s, Lacey started Spry about 10 years ago after working for a digital marketing agency and seeing that clients were being underserved. She launched her business as an SEO and Web Development company and only got into Social Media because it was part of the SEO process. Over time, Spry has niched down, focusing their business on social media, working specifically with clients on community building and making human connection through social media.  Prost!   Guest Beer Headless Mumby Brewing Company - Olymipia, WA Oktoberfest, Marzen, 6% abv "Autumn in a glass. Dark copper/amber in color with a distinctive bready/toasty maltiness."    

Sam's Business Growth Show
#202 Why Hiding Things on Your Website Is Harming You

Sam's Business Growth Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:22


► Why you should be crystal clear on your website! Sam shares why leaving key details off your website such as processes and pricing could be harming your business and revenue! ⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹ ✔ Never miss an episode + get free marketing tips + guides + bonus resources to your inbox Monday: http://businessgrowth.email Please check out our sponsors... ⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹ Chili Piper - Advanced scheduling software that helps B2B revenue teams double their conversion rates, increase customer satisfaction, and reach new levels of productivity - https://www.chilipiper.com/ ⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹ Web Choice - We Build Custom Websites & SEO Strategies That Generate Leads & Sales: https://www.webdesignchoice.co.uk/ ⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹⇹

Building Livewire
Getting rich off teenagers

Building Livewire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:07


Python Bytes
#265 Get asizeof pympler and muppy

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 47:46


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Matt Kramer (@__matt_kramer__) Michael #1: Survey results Question 1: Question 2: In terms of too long, the “extras” section has started at these times in the last 4 episodes: 39m, 32m, 35m, and 33m ~= 34m on average Brian #2: Modern attrs API attrs overview now focus on using @define History of attrs article: import attrs, by Hynek predecessor was called characteristic. A discussion between Glyph and Hynek in 2015 about where to take the idea. attrs popularity takes off in 2016 after a post by Glyph: ‌The One Python Library Everyone Needs In 2017 people started wanting something like attrs in std library. Thus PEP 557 and dataclasses. Hynek, Eric Smith, and Guido discuss it at PyCon US 2017. dataclasses, with a subset of attrs functionality, was introduced in Python 3.7. Types take off. attrs starts supporting type hints as well, even before Python 3.7 Post 3.7, some people start wondering if they still need attrs, since they have dataclasses. @define, field() and other API improvements came with attrs 20.1.0 in 2020. attrs 21.3.0 released in December, with what Hynek calls “Modern attrs”. OG attrs: import attr @attr.s class Point: x = attr.ib() y = attr.ib() modern attrs: from attr import define @define class Point: x: int y: int Many reasons to use attrs listed in Why not…, which is an excellent read. why not dataclasses? less powerful than attrs, intentionally attrs has validators, converters, equality customization, … attrs doesn't force type annotation if you don't like them slots on by default, dataclasses only support slots in Python 3.10 and are off by default attrs can and will move faster See also comparisons with pydantic, named tuples, tuples, dicts, hand-written classes Matt #3: Crafting Interpreters Wanting to learn more about how Python works “under the hood”, I first read Anthony Shaw's CPython internals book A fantastic, detailed overview of how CPython is implemented Since I don't have a formal CS background, I found myself wanting to learn a bit more about the fundamentals Parsing, Tokenization, Bytecode, data structures, etc. Crafting Interpreters is an incredible book by Bob Nystrom (on Dart team at Google) Although not Python, you walk through the implementation of a dynamic, interpreted language from scratch Implement same language (called lox) in two interpreters First a direct evaluation of Abstract Syntax Tree, written in Java Second is a bytecode interpreter, written from the ground up in C, including a compiler Every line of code is in the book, it is incredibly well-written and beautifully rendered I highly recommend to anyone wanting to learn more about language design & implementation Michael #4: Yamele - A schema and validator for YAML via Andrew Simon A basic schema: name: str() age: int(max=200) height: num() awesome: bool() And some YAML that validates: name: Bill age: 26 height: 6.2 awesome: True Take a look at the Examples section for more complex schema ideas. ⚠️ Ensure that your schema definitions come from internal or trusted sources. Yamale does not protect against intentionally malicious schemas. Brian #5: pympler Inspired by something Bob Belderbos wrote about sizes of objects, I think. “Pympler is a development tool to measure, monitor and analyze the memory behavior of Python objects in a running Python application. By pympling a Python application, detailed insight in the size and the lifetime of Python objects can be obtained. Undesirable or unexpected runtime behavior like memory bloat and other “pymples” can easily be identified.” 3 separate modules for profiling asizeof module provides basic size information for one or several Python objects muppy is used for on-line monitoring of a Python application Class Tracker provides off-line analysis of the lifetime of selected Python objects. asizeof is what I looked at recently In contrast to sys.getsizeof, asizeof sizes objects recursively. You can use one of the asizeof functions to get the size of these objects and all associated referents: >>> from pympler import asizeof >>> obj = [1, 2, (3, 4), 'text'] >>> asizeof.asizeof(obj) 176 >>> print(asizeof.asized(obj, detail=1).format()) [1, 2, (3, 4), 'text'] size=176 flat=48 (3, 4) size=64 flat=32 'text' size=32 flat=32 1 size=16 flat=16 2 size=16 flat=16 “Function flatsize returns the flat size of a Python object in bytes defined as the basic size plus the item size times the length of the given object.” Matt #6: hvPlot Interactive hvPlot is a high-level plotting API that is part of the PyData ecosystem, built on HoloViews My colleague Phillip Rudiger recently gave a talk at PyData Global on a new .interactive feature Here's an announcement in the HoloViz forum Allows integration of widgets directly into pandas analysis pipeline (method-chain), so you can add interactivity to your notebook for exploratory data analysis, or serve it as a Panel app Gist & video by Marc Skov Madsen Extras Michael: Typora app, recommended! Congrats Will Got a chance to solve a race condition with Tenacity New project management at GitHub Matt: Check out new Anaconda Nucleus Community forums! We're hiring, and remote-first. Check out anaconda.com/careers Pre-compiled packages now available for Pyston We have an upcoming webinar from Martin Durant: When Your Big Problem is I/O Bound Joke:

Self-Made Web Designer
How to Start a Web Design Project the Right Way and Save Yourself Trouble

Self-Made Web Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 20:35


Starter Kit CourseFree Client QuestionnaireFree Trello BoardEpisode Web Page

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Rocket Surgery: 2021 year in review and 2022 predictions

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:33


Happy New Year! In this episode, we revisit the predictions we made last year for 2021, we reflect on the most significant trends in web development in 2021, including updates, dev tooling, programming languages, and more. We also make some predictions for 2022. Links https://podrocket.logrocket.com/4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpCf6H8mMMU https://v3.vuejs.org https://recoiljs.org https://yew.rs https://github.com/yewstack/yew https://seed-rs.org https://dotnet.microsoft.com/en-us/apps/aspnet/web-apps/blazor https://logrocket.com https://podrocket.logrocket.com/rome https://ipfs.io Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr)

Azure DevOps Podcast
Jimmy Engström on Blazor - Episode 174

Azure DevOps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 36:21


This week, Jeffrey is joined by Jimmy Engström, a Senior Developer, author, and speaker.   Since he was 7 years old and got his first computer, Jimmy has been on the cutting edge of technology, always developing, and trying new things. When he got wind of Blazor, he immediately realized the potential and adopted it when it was only in beta. Since then, he has been running Blazor in production since it was launched by Microsoft.   Jimmy's passion for the .NET industry and community has taken him all around the world and has even earned him the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional award for the last 8 years in a row. Additionally, Jimmy is the author of Web Development with Blazor and the co-host of Coding After Work; a podcast and stream.   In this episode, Jimmy shares what he thinks every developer should know when it comes to Blazor, his favorite Blazor components, insights regarding integrating Blazor into a DevOps environment, his career journey in Blazor, and about his book, Web Development with Blazor, A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#.   Topics of Discussion: [:36] About The Azure DevOps Podcast, Clear Measure; the new video podcast Architect Tips; and Jeffrey's offer to speak at virtual user groups. [1:15] About today's episode with Jimmy Engström. [2:20] Jeffrey welcomes Jimmy to the show and congratulates him on his book on Blazor. [2:50] Jimmy shares his career background and his professional body of work. [6:55] When did Jimmy become interested and invested in Blazor? What led him to writing a book about it? [11:29] What should every developer know about Blazor? [18:44] A word from Azure DevOps Podcast's sponsor: Clear Measure. [19:16] Jimmy talks Blazor architecture and APIs. [21:59] Blazor components that Jimmy and his team especially love using. [25:15] Jimmy's opinions on Radzen and Telerik. [26:25] Jimmy shares when he first adopted Blazor and the big changes he has noticed as he's moved from .NET 5 to .NET 6. [29:36] Jimmy's insights regarding integrating Blazor into a DevOps environment. [32:50] Where to find Jimmy online. [35:09] Jeffrey thanks Aaron Stannard for joining the podcast.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer's Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! bit.ly/dotnetdevopsebook — Click here to download the .NET DevOps for Azure ebook! Jeffrey Palermo's YouTube Jeffrey Palermo's Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Jimmy Engström's Microsoft Profile Jimmy Engström's Twitter @EngstromJimmy EngstromJimmy.com Jimmy Engström's LinkedIn Web Development with Blazor, A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#, by Jimmy Engström (on PacktHub) Web Development with Blazor: A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#, by Jimmy Engström (on Amazon) Jimmy Engström on Sessionize CodingAfterWork.com Blazor SignalR Blazm.net Infragistics Telerik Radzen   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Alpine.js with Caleb Porzio (Repeat)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 30:38


Originally published on March 2nd, 2021 We are taking some time off from production. We will be back with new episodes on January 4th. We talk to Caleb Porzio about Alpine.js and what to expect in 2021. We also get into some of Caleb's other creations like Laravel Livewire and makevscodeawesome.com. Links https://calebporzio.com https://twitter.com/calebporzio https://github.com/alpinejs/alpine https://twitter.com/Alpine_JS https://twitter.com/youyuxi/status/1262075462651609088 https://github.com/livewire/livewire https://makevscodeawesome.com Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr). Special Guest: Caleb Porzio.

Self-Made Web Designer
REPLAY: 6 Tools Every Web Designer Needs to Know About w/ Jesse Showalter

Self-Made Web Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:48


RESOURCESFree Web Designer Starter Kit CourseEpisode PageJesse's WebsiteJesse's YouTube ChannelAdobe XDFigmaSketchNotionVS CodeVue JSCodekit

The Psychic Coffee Shop
The Psychic Coffee Shop Dec 28 2021

The Psychic Coffee Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 117:51


Sharing current events with a psychic perspective, we often feature special guests stopping by to have a cup of Joe, good conversation, and talk about their unique gifts with us. From influential and inspiring writers and prominent members of the psychic community, we cultivate a lively discussion from all walks of life. Aeson Knight is a master psychic of more than 22 years, a certified clairvoyant, and a certified life coach who advises a diverse clientele from average housewives to government officials, all around the world. Joseph “Techy Joe” Arrington is a Technologist with a degree in Information Systems and Operations Management with a love of writing and experience in Web Development and Journalism, and a passion for photography and graphical design, he acts as PCSP Network Manager and Business Manager for Aeson Knight Reading. To Keep Up with Our Hosts and For More Information Visit: http://aesonknight.com/ http://pcspnetwork.com/ http://mysticpcwv.com/ Support the PCSP Network: https://www.patreon.com/PsychicCoffeeShopNetwork

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Component-driven development with Zoltan Olah (Repeat)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 26:02


Originally published on January 12th, 2021 We are taking some time off from production. We will be back with new episodes on January 4th. Ben Edelstein sits down with the CEO and Founder of Chromatic, Zoltan Olah. Ben and Zoltan discuss frontend testing, the philosophy of component-driven development, Storybook, and more. Links https://www.chromatic.com https://storybook.js.org https://www.chromatic.com/blog/component-driven-development https://twitter.com/zqzoltan Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Zoltan Olah.

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Continuing education with Eve Porcello (Repeat)

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 40:32


Originally published on June 1st, 2021 We are taking some time off from production. We will be back with new episodes on January 4th. In this episode, we talk to Eve Porcello about her experience teaching web development. We also talk about Moon Highway, a training and curriculum development company she runs with her husband, Alex Banks. Links https://twitter.com/eveporcello https://moonhighway.com https://www.linkedin.com/learning https://graphqlworkshop.com https://www.howtographql.com https://odyssey.apollographql.com https://graphql.org Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Eve Porcello.

How To Code Well
EP 141 - Web Development Guide for 2022

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 58:59


Web Development Guide for 2022 Web assembly won't replace JavaScript. TypeScript won't replace JavaScript. GitHub actions won't replace you. Next.JS won't replace PHP. PHP won't replace Python. AWS will continue to build more stuff that you don't need but will be require you to use it for unrelated but coupled tasks. Google Cloud will keep playing catchup. Docker will continue to be the containerisation tool of choice. Podman will not replace Docker. Microsoft will sell developer focused laptops. Dell has done this but Microsoft could bundle the laptops with pre installed developer software tools. Microsoft will attempt to by a Linux laptop manufacturer. Kubernetes will continue to dominate the cloud. Web 3 will not replace web 2. Web services that offer subscriptions will introduce their own block chains and wallets. A games manufacturer will release their own wallet and coins/tokens which can be exchanged for in game purchases or game expansions. Open source could be funded by crypto. A Spotify like company that focuses solely on podcasts could pay artists/creators based on the number of listeners or listen time. This could be done via the blockchain. We will see more JavaScript frameworks with "meta" and "web 3" buzzwords their titles. More NPM hacks. More developers will try and downsize their dependancies using micro frameworks. GraphQL won't replace REST. NoSQL won't replace relational databases. Job requirements will start to require experience with the blockchain and dapps. Serverless won't replace servers but serverless technology will become more popular and it will be a sought after skill. CI/CD will become the norm. In the next Covid lockdown or the next set of restrictions, the job market will be better then it was during the first lockdown Remote working will become the default for all levels of developer. VR will improve but we won't need to put a helmet on to go to a meeting. FaceBook or Twitter will start selling promoted adverts with crypto currencies. API's will still be king. Headless CMS's will become more popular. Let me know your thoughts or get something read out on air. My web development courses ➡️ Learn How to build a JavaScript Tip Calculator ➡️ Learn JavaScript arrays ➡️ Learn PHP arrays ➡️ Learn Python ✉️ Get my weekly newsletter ⏰ My current live coding schedule (Times are BST) Thursdays 20:00 = Live Podcast YouTube Sundays 14:30 - Live coding on Twitch

Niche Pursuits Podcast
How to Ranking #1 for High Volume Keywords, Information Gain Score, and Other SEO Strategies with Steve Toth

Niche Pursuits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 52:01


SEO expert Steve Toth is the latest guest on the Niche Pursuits podcast. Steve has a long history in the SEO industry. He started in 2010 as a copywriter running a web development company blog, which led him on his journey into search engine optimization.  

Python Bytes
#264 We're just playing games with Jupyter at this point

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 53:02


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Kim van Wyk Michael #0: Take our survey: Should we try to shorten the episodes? Please fill out the 3 question Google Form here We'll be taking a break so see you in two weeks. Also feedback / rate us in your podcast player app Brian #1: Jupyter Games Thorsten Beier “Making their own tiny video games can be a great way for kids to learn programming in a playful matter.” For 2D physics-based games, Box2D, (written in C++), is a 2D rigid body simulation library One Python binding, pyb2d, is from Thorsten Game examples use Ipycanvas, Ipywidgets, and Ipyevents for a place to draw and input events. There are Box2D examples for physics simulations, like internal combustion and a wind tunnel. Game examples, with code, and not that much code billiards Angry Shapes (like Angry birds) World of Goo homage Rocket Color Mixing (it's oddly satisfying to play with, and it's like 73 lines of code, including blank lines and docstring) several more examples Demo games/examples in binder Being able to play with a game engine through Jupyter is kind of amazing. Cool teaching/learning tool. Michael #2: Canary Tokens First, what are canaries (from Thinkst)? These tokens might be useful for finding fallout of Log4Shell But also generally useful Kim #3: pywinauto and PyAutoGUI - libraries for programmatically controlling a GUI-based tool. These can be very handy for simplifying the use of complex GUIs with dozens of options you need to set every time you run them and also for automating GUI tooling as part of a pipeline. Brian #4: A reverse chronology of some Python features Brett Cannon Partly for people wishing for the “good old days” of some old version of Python Brett recommends going down the list and stopping at the first feature you can't live without. If you can't go very far, better not complain about language bloat. I had to stop at 3.10, since I really like the new error messages. Here's an abbreviated list of new features in different Python versions. (And I'm abbreviating it even more for the podcast) Python 3.10 Better error messages, Union operator for types, paraenthesized context managers, match statement (pattern matching) Brett notes that the match statement required a new parser for Python the new parser made better error messages possible so, you can't toss pattern matching without being willing to give up better error messages Python 3.9 dict support for | and |=, type hinting generics for built-in collections Python 3.8 f-string support for =, f``"``{val=}``", := walrus operator (assignment expressions) Python 3.7 dictionaries preserve insertion order, breakpoint() Python 3.6 f-strings, (need we say more) also underscores in numeric literals, async generators and comprehensions, preserving keyword argument order … goes back to 3.1 Michael #5: Hyperactive GCs and ORMs/ODMs Does Python do extremely too many GCs for ORMs? Hint: yes During the execution of that single query against SQLAlchemy, without adjusting Python's GC settings, we get an extreme number of GC collections (1,859 GCs for a single SQLAlchemy query of 20k records). Our fix at Talk Python has been to increase the number of surviving allocations required to force a GC from 700 to 50,000. What can be done to improve this? Maybe someday Python will have an adaptive GC where if it runs a collection and finds zero cycles it backs off and if it starts finding more cycles it ramps up or something like that. For now, test adjusting the thresholds Here are a few presentations / resources: Michael's presentation at Python Web Conf 2021 Talk Python Memory Deep Dive course allocations, gen1, gen2 = gc.get_threshold() # GC every 50K not 700 surviving container allocations. allocations = 50_000 gc.set_threshold(allocations, gen1, gen2) Kim #6: DockerSlim- A tool to reduce the size and improve the security of Docker images. I've used it a little and got some 1Gb Ubuntu-based images down to 50Mb and that was barely scratching the surface. Extras Michael: Emojis for comments Kim: python -m http.server - a small reminder to people that this is a quick way to get files off a Python-equipped system by standing up a simple web server. Mess with DNS - Julia Evans released this really impressive learning tool last week to let people explore DNS settings without breaking real sites. Magit - a slightly tongue-in-cheek addition to last week's discussion on git via both CLI and by mashing buttons in VS Code. Anyone using emacs should strongly consider magit for git - I've kept emacs open even while trying to use other editors because I find magit so indispensable. I've included these just as small items off the top of my head that may or may not be worth a mention. Joke: We use cookies candle (and I don't care about cookies extension) Little Bobby Jindi And more Log4Shell memes

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Jon Kuperman, Developer Advocate at Cloudflare, takes us through Cloudflare's product portfolio, including the DNS provider, DDoS protection, Cloudflare workers, video streaming, and more. Links https://www.cloudflare.com https://twitter.com/jkup https://workers.cloudflare.com Review us https://ratethispodcast.com/podrocket Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup?pdr) Special Guest: Jon Kuperman.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Do you enjoy the "final 2 questions" I always ask at the end of the show? I think it's a great way to track the currents of the Python community. This episode focuses in on one of those questions: "What notable PyPI package have you come across recently? Not necessarily the most popular one but something that delighted you and people should know about?" Our guest, Antonio Andrade put together a GitHub repository cataloging guests' response to this question over the past couple of years. So I invited him to come share the packages covered there. We touch on over 40 packages during this episode so I'm sure you'll learn a few new gems to incorporate into your workflow. Links from the show Antonio on Twitter: @AntonioAndrade Notable PyPI Package Repo: github.com/xandrade/talkpython.fm-notable-packages Antonio's recommended packages from this episode: Sumy: Extract summary from HTML pages or plain texts: github.com gTTS (Google Text-to-Speech): github.com Packages discussed during the episode 1. FastAPI - A-W-E-S-O-M-E web framework for building APIs: fastapi.tiangolo.com 2. Pythonic - Graphical automation tool: github.com 3. umap-learn - Uniform Manifold Approximation and Projection: readthedocs.io 4. Tortoise ORM - Easy async ORM for python, built with relations in mind: tortoise.github.io 5. Beanie - Asynchronous Python ODM for MongoDB: github.com 6. Hathi - SQL host scanner and dictionary attack tool: github.com 7. Plotext - Plots data directly on terminal: github.com 8. Dynaconf - Configuration Management for Python: dynaconf.com 9. Objexplore - Interactive Python Object Explorer: github.com 10. AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK): docs.aws.amazon.com 11. Luigi - Workflow mgmt + task scheduling + dependency resolution: github.com 12. Seaborn - Statistical Data Visualization: pydata.org 13. CuPy - NumPy & SciPy for GPU: cupy.dev 14. Stevedore - Manage dynamic plugins for Python applications: docs.openstack.org 15. Pydantic - Data validation and settings management: github.com 16. pipx - Install and Run Python Applications in Isolated Environments: pypa.github.io 17. openpyxl - A Python library to read/write Excel 2010 xlsx/xlsm files: readthedocs.io 18. HttpPy - More comfortable requests with python: github.com 19. rich - Render rich text, tables, progress bars, syntax highlighting, markdown and more to the terminal: readthedocs.io 20. PyO3 - Using Python from Rust: pyo3.rs 21. fastai - Making neural nets uncool again: fast.ai 22. Numba - Accelerate Python Functions by compiling Python code using LLVM: numba.pydata.org 23. NetworkML - Device Functional Role ID via Machine Learning and Network Traffic Analysis: github.com 24. Flask-SQLAlchemy - Adds SQLAlchemy support to your Flask application: palletsprojects.com 25. AutoInvent - Libraries for generating GraphQL API and UI from data: autoinvent.dev 26. trio - A friendly Python library for async concurrency and I/O: readthedocs.io 27. Flake8-docstrings - Extension for flake8 which uses pydocstyle to check docstrings: github.com 28. Hotwire-django - Integrate Hotwire in your Django app: github.com 29. Starlette - The little ASGI library that shines: github.com 30. tenacity - Retry code until it succeeds: readthedocs.io 31. pySerial - Python Serial Port Extension: github.com 32. Click - Composable command line interface toolkit: palletsprojects.com 33. Pytest - Simple powerful testing with Python: docs.pytest.org 34. testcontainers-python - Test almost anything that can run in a Docker container: github.com 35. cibuildwheel - Build Python wheels on CI with minimal configuration: readthedocs.io 36. async-rediscache - An easy to use asynchronous Redis cache: github.com 37. seinfeld - Query a Seinfeld quote database: github.com 38. notebook - A web-based notebook environment for interactive computing: readthedocs.io 39. dagster - A data orchestrator for machine learning, analytics, and ETL: dagster.io 40. bleach - An easy safelist-based HTML-sanitizing tool: github.com 41. flynt - string formatting converter: github.com   Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Coiled TopTal AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

DonTheDeveloper Podcast
Eleven Fifty Academy Review

DonTheDeveloper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 67:24


I invited on 3 graduates to review their experience with the coding bootcamp, Eleven Fifty Academy. The variety of skill levels the Cares Act brought in really highlighted the challenges of not having a strict screening process and thorough prep work. As usual, we also dove into many things like the instructors, culture, curriculum, etc. Enjoy!Hosts and Guests:Don Hansen (host):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/donthedeveloperWebsite - https://www.donthedeveloper.tvChris Blake (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/cblake35Website - https://www.cblakedev.comSally Mellinger (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/sallymellingerKeisha Mitchell (guest):Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/keisha-mitchell-6323a2150Website - https://www.rootdir.blog---------------------------------------------------❤️ If you find my content helpful, please consider supporting me on Patreon and get access to additional perks. Every little contribution helps and is actually used to pay my bills. You literally are helping me get started with being able to help out aspiring developers, full-time. Thank you! - https://www.patreon.com/donthedeveloper

How To Code Well
EP 140 - Code Iteration time is critical to web development success

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 33:26


Change log We've almost finished the first pass of the documentation for the new PHP course. I have 1 / 2 lessons to go. There are two more passes that I want to do before recording any of the lessons. The next pass will be to create the project from start to finish using the documentation but on a Ubuntu VM. The last pass will be to do the same bu on a Windows VM Last weeks show that was on shopping carts went live earlier this week. I had some internet issues last week so I couldn't do the live stream Your feedback 1) Eric writes in on my hack to check if PHP is working YT short and asks if the next video will be on the PHP 8 match expression and when to use it. I can't promise that it will be the next YT short but I can say that It is on the schedule. 2) Keral writes in on my PHP array sum tutorial and asks how do we sum fields in a database. There is a SUM function in MySQL. It takes one argument and that is the expression that you want to calculate. You can use it to find the sum of a field from several records by suppling the field name as the expression. Then add the reset of the query as usual. For example, To get the sum of a shopping basket you could do something like this; Let's say you had a table of order items with a foreign key linking to an orders table. Each order item record would also have a price field. You could get the sum of the orders price like so: select sum(order_item.price) from order_item where order_item.order_id = 4; Obviously change the table name of order to something else as order is a reserved keyword in MySQL. If you have a comment that you want read out on the show then either write a message on a YouTube video or send me a message on our contact form. Code Iteration time is critical to web development success I want to talk about a blog posted titled 3 lines of code shouldn't take all day https://devtails.xyz/3-lines-of-code-shouldnt-take-all-day by Adam Berg. In the post Adam talks about his time developing video games at Electronic Arts. He mentions that due to the testing tools and development requirements it could take up to a day to write 3 lines of code. This iteration time was greatly reduced when he used 'test beds'. Adam mentions in his article that the test beds focused on particular areas of code which meant the tooling was slimmed down. This allowed him to laser in to the code that needed to be tested and as a result made the code iteration far quicker. He goes on in the post to talk about using unit testing which also made his life a lot easier. These test packages only contained the code which was specific to his teams requirements. Again, this was a slimmed down portion of a game. He mentions that these test packages took less than a second to compile and run. This made him less distracted and he could focus on the task at hand.

Python Bytes
#263 It's time to stop using Python 3.6

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:07


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Laís Carvalho Michael #1: Django 4.0 released Django is picking up speed: 4.0 Dec 2021 (+1) 3.0 Dec 2020 (+3) 2.0 Dec 2017 (+7) 1.0.1 May 2010 Feature highlights: The new RedisCache backend provides built-in support for caching with Redis. To ease customization of Forms, Formsets, and ErrorList they are now rendered using the template engine. The Python standard library's zoneinfo is now the default timezone implementation in Django. scrypt password hasher: The new scrypt password hasher is more secure and recommended over PBKDF2. However, it's not the default as it requires OpenSSL 1.1+ and more memory. Django 3.2 has reached the end of mainstream support. The final minor bug fix release, 3.2.10, was issued today. Django 3.2 is an LTS release and will receive security and data loss fixes until April 2024. Some backwards incompatible changes you'll want to be aware of when upgrading from Django 3.2 or earlier. They've begun the deprecation process for some features. Django 4.0 supports Python 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10. Brian #2: python-minifier Suggested by Lance Reinsmith My first thought was “we don't need a minifier for Python” The docs give one reason: “AWS Cloudformation templates may have AWS lambda function source code embedded in them, but only if the function is less than 4KiB. I wrote this package so I could write python normally and still embed the module in a template.” Lance has another reason: “I needed it because the RAM on Adafruit boards using the common M0 chip is around 192KB to 256KB total--not all of which is available to your program. To get around this, you can either 1) compile your code to an .mpy file or 2) minify it. The second worked for me and allowed me to alter it without constantly re-compiling.” Fair enough, what does it do? All of these features are options you can turn off, and are documented well: Combine Import statements Remove Pass statements Remove literal statements (docstrings) Remove Annotations Hoist Literals Rename Locals, with preserved Locals list Rename Globals, with preserved Globals list Convert Positional-Only Arguments to Normal Arguments Also looks like it replaces spaces with tabs Begrudgingly, that makes sense in this context. You can try it at python-minifier.com Laís #3: It's time to stop using Python 3.6 Python 3.6 is reaching the end of it's life in 1 week and 1 day (Dec 23rd), i.e. no more releases after it. You should care because the Python dev team will no longer release security updates for 3.6 ⚠️ if you use Linux, you have a bit more time BUT security updates will be released and bug fixes will not. also, Python 3rd party libraries and frameworks will drop support for 3.6 soon enough. See the log4j issue and Java. Brian might like this one: Grype - a vulnerability scanner for container images and filesystems Michael #4: How to Visualize the Formula 1 Championship in Python Race Highlights | 2021 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Formula 1: Drive to Survive (Season 3) | Official Trailer Wanting to get into Formula 1 data analysis, the Ergast API is a very good starting point. This tutorial will show you how to use data from the Ergast API to visualize the changes in the 2021 championship standings over the rounds. Introduces fastf1: Wrapper library for F1 data and telemetry API with additional data processing capabilities. Brian #5: nbdime: Jupyter Notebook Diff and Merge tools Suggestion from Henrik Finsberg “you recently covered ‘jut' for viewing Jupyter notebooks from the terminal. Check out ‘mbdime'.” (that was episode 258) So I did. And it looks cool. nbdime provides tools for diffing and merging of Jupyter Notebooks. nbdiff compare notebooks in a terminal-friendly way nbmerge three-way merge of notebooks with automatic conflict resolution nbdiff-web shows you a rich rendered diff of notebooks nbmerge-web gives you a web-based three-way merge tool for notebooks nbshow present a single notebook in a terminal-friendly way Laís #6: Using AI to analyse and recommend software stacks for Python apps thanks Fridolin! Project Thoth: an open source cloud-based Python dependency resolver ML (reinforcement learning) that solves dependency issues taking into consideration runtime envs, hardware and other inputs. Using Markov's decision process. “a smarter pip” that instead of using backtracking, precomputes the dependency information and stores it in a database that can be queried for future resolutions. Using pre-specified criteria by the developer. In summary: Thot's resolver uses automated bots that guarantee dependencies are locked down to specific versions, making builds and deployments reproducible; the aggregated knowledge (reinforcement learning from installed logs) helps the bots to lock the dependencies to the best libraries, instead of the latest. They are in beta phase but welcoming feedback and suggestions from the community. Extras Brian: Pragmatic Bookshelf 12 days of Christmas Today, pytest book is part of the deal, nice timing, right? Michael: My talk at FlaskCon is out Firefox releases RLBox We're all getting identity theft monitoring for 1 year for free :-/ Laís: Python Ireland's speaker's coaching session is on Jan 22nd Learning git the visual way - cool for beginners, thorough explanations Good read for Java devs who want to start with Python (by Real Python) Joke: Janga Python (hellish) virtual envs

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#345: 10 Tips and Tools for Developer Productivity

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 76:39


You know that feeling when one of your developer friends or colleague tells you about some amazing tool, library, or shell environment that you never heard of that you just have to run out and try right away? This episode is jam-packed full of those moments. We welcome back Jay Miller to discuss tools and tips for developer productivity. The title says 10 tips, but we actually veer into many more along the way. I think you'll really enjoy this useful and light-hearted episode. Links from the show Jay on Twitter: @kjaymiller More Oh my ZSH plugins: github.com exa: the.exa.website bat: github.com ripgrep/amber: github.com Neovim: neovim.io RUMPS macOS Framework: github.com Black: github.com pypi-changes package: readthedocs.io asdf-python: github.com WAVE Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool: wave.webaim.org Google PageSpeed: pagespeed.web.dev XKCD Commit messages: xkcd.com secure package: github.com OWASP Top 10: owasp.org ngrok: ngrok.com starship: starship.rs Homebrew: brew.sh Chocolatey: chocolatey.org pip-tools: github.com Let's Encrypt: letsencrypt.org Sourcetree Git App: sourcetreeapp.com Oh my ZSH: ohmyz.sh nerd fonts: nerdfonts.com Oh my Posh: ohmyposh.dev Windows Terminal: microsoft.com McFly shell history: github.com Fig IO enhanced shell: fig.io Conduit podcast: relay.fm htmx course at Talk Python: talkpython.fm/htmx Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Coiled CockroachDB AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

HTML All The Things - Web Development, Web Design, Small Business

Like all jobs, web development has its dark side - the side where things aren't so pleasant but are a stark reality for the developers that work in the field. In today's episode, Matt and Mike explore that dark side of web development discussing things like if developers should show pride in their work - even if it's for a client, slogging through slow or outdated software, and dealing with thankless customers despite putting forth your best effort.  Show notes You can find us on... Facebook | Twitter | Instagram RSS | Patreon | Spotify Medium | YouTube | GitHub

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech
Shamira Marshall: From Attorney to Software Developer

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:07


Shamira Marshall is an attorney who learned to code in 2019 and today is a software engineer at GoDaddy. Her interest in tech started in law school and then attended Ada Developers Academy to make the career switch. Which is where she and I met! Resources: Ada Developers AcademyShamira on Dev.to/MiraMarshallShamira on Twitter  @MiraMarshalll We Belong Here Podcast:Follow Lauren on Twitter @LoLoCodingWeBelongPodcast.comSubscribe on AppleSubscribe on SpotifyWe Belong Here Discord CommunityJoin us on Discord Server today! bit.ly/webelongdiscord 

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Developer Tea with Jonathan Cutrell

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 45:44


Developer Tea is a podcast for developers designed to fit inside your tea break. Jonathan Cutrell started the podcast in 2015 and now has hosted over 1000 episodes. We interview Jonathan Cutrell about the early days of Developer Tea, Spec.fm, developer content, and more. Links https://jonathancutrell.com https://twitter.com/jcutrell https://spec.fm/podcasts/developer-tea https://designdetails.fm https://spec.fm https://twitter.com/chantastic https://developertea.com https://twitter.com/DeveloperTea https://www.charitynavigator.org Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today (https://logrocket.com/signup?pdr). Special Guest: Jonathan Cutrell.

WPwatercooler - Weekly WordPress Talk Show
EP408 – Selecting the right solution for your project

WPwatercooler - Weekly WordPress Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 32:34


Show Notes On this episode, we will be discussing the methods we use to find the right solution to a problem we face on a project. Is it a SaaS intregration? WordPress plugin? We're going to walk through knowing what questions to ask and identifying what features are the best fit for the project and for the budget you are working in. We've all been there and there is 100 ways to approach this, here are a few from us. Panel Jason Tucker – jasontucker.blog Steve Zehngut – zeek.com Sé Reed – sereedmedia.com Jason Cosper – jasoncosper.com Show Sponsors WP All Import WP All Import works with any XML or CSV file, you can import images, and can easily import data to plugin and theme fields or anywhere else you need it. With WP All Import import and export with ease, even schedule it too! https://wpallimport.com Weglot Created to simplify your translation process, Weglot gives you a reliable and easy way to take your WordPress website from local to global instantly. With a quick and simple install, Weglot is fully compatible with all WordPress themes and plugins. Weglot works by automatically detecting and translating your website content, no matter where the content is coming from (e.g any plugins you've added). Your content is then displayed without the need for duplicate pages or websites. There's no fiddly manual string by string translations. Once Weglot is installed on your WordPress site, everything is translated instantly. All your translations are then available to edit and manage through your Weglot dashboard. This intuitive interface makes editing your translations effortless – make edits, add your team members to your translation project or even order professional translators to fine tune any nuances. One of Weglot's key benefits is its ‘in context' editor, which allows you to make changes to your translations directly inside your website design and structure – so you can see clearly where each translation is. Features include: Fast 5 minute setup Highest rated translation plugin on the WordPress Directory Automatic and human translations Front-end language switcher automatically added to your store Optimized for multilingual SEO (translated URLs, metadata and added hreflang tags) Compatibility with all themes and plugins (incl. WooCommerce, Yoast etc) A unique dashboard with an ‘in context editor', easily edit translations & invite teammates to collaborate Expert support: a fully dedicated technical support team at your disposal Weglot offers a free trial for 10 days so you can explore the platform. https://dashboard.weglot.com/register Are You Looking For Brand Awareness? You could be a show sponsor. Let people know you're still in business and supporting your products. Supporting podcasts is a great way to repurpose your in-person conference budget. We have been sponsored by big brands such as Kinsta and Cloudways. Why not get your audience in front of the thousands of people who download this show every month? Yes, WPwatercooler has thousands of downloads every month. We're not just a YouTube Show. http://wpwatercooler.com/sponsor

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
Migrating to Next.js with Cory Etzkorn

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 43:40


Have you been thinking about migrating to Next.js? Cory Etzkorn joins us to talk about how his team migrated the Notion marketing site to Next.js. He covers why they wanted to migrate, why Next.js was the best solution for them, and the results of the migration. Links https://www.notion.so/onboarding (https://www.notion.so/onboarding) https://twitter.com/NotionHQ (https://twitter.com/NotionHQ) https://www.notion.so/blog/migrating-notion-marketing-to-next-js (https://www.notion.so/blog/migrating-notion-marketing-to-next-js) https://www.contentful.com (https://www.contentful.com) Contact us https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) @PodRocketpod (https://twitter.com/PodRocketpod) What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup?pdr) Special Guest: Cory Etzkorn.

Python Bytes
#262 So many bots up in your documentation

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 43:06


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Leah Cole Brian #1: pytest 7.0.0rc1 Question: Does the new pytest book work with pytest 7? Answer: Yes! I've been working with pytest 7 during final review of all code, and many pytest core developers have been technical reviewers of the book. A few changes in pytest 7 are also the result of me writing the 2nd edition and suggesting (and in one case implementing) improvements. Florian Bruhin's announcement on Twitter “I'm happy to announce that I just released #pytest 7.0.0rc1! After many tricky deprecations, some internal changes, and months of delay due to various issues, it looks like we could finally get a new non-bugfix release this year! (6.2.0 was released in December 2020).” “We invite everyone to test the #pytest prerelease and report any issues - there is a lot that happened, and chances are we broke something we didn't find yet (we broke a lot of stuff we already fixed Smiling face with open mouth and cold sweat). See the release announcement for details: https://docs.pytest.org/en/7.0.x/announce/release-7.0.0rc1.html” Try it out with pip install pytest==7.0.0rc1 For those of you following along at home (we covered pip index briefly in episode 259) to see rc releases with pip index versions, add --pre ex: pip index versions --``pre pytest will include Available versions: 7.0.0rc1, 6.2.5, 6.2.4, and let you know if there's a newer rc available. Highlights from the 7.0.0rc1 changelog pytest.approx() now works on Decimal within mappings/dicts and sequences/lists. Improvements to approx() with sequences of numbers. Example: > assert [1, 2, 3, 4] == pytest.approx([1, 3, 3, 5]) E assert comparison failed for 2 values: E Index | Obtained | Expected E 1 | 2 | 3 +- 3.0e-06 E 3 | 4 | 5 +- 5.0e-06 pytest invocations with --fixtures-per-test and --fixtures have been enriched with: Fixture location path printed with the fixture name. First section of the fixture's docstring printed under the fixture name. Whole of fixture's docstring printed under the fixture name using --verbose option. Never again wonder where a fixture's definition is RunResult method assert_outcomes now accepts a warnings and deselected argument to assert the total number of warnings captured. Helpful for plugin testing. Added pythonpath setting that adds listed paths to sys.path for the duration of the test session. Nice for using pytest for applications, and for including test helper libraries. Improved documentation, including an auto-generated list of plugins. There were 963 this morning. Michael #2: PandasTutor via David Smit Why use this tool? Let's say you're trying to explain what this pandas code does: (dogs[dogs['size'] == 'medium'] .sort_values('type') .groupby('type').median() ) But this doesn't tell you what's going on behind the scenes. What did this code just do? This single code expression has 4 steps (filtering, sorting, grouping, and aggregating), but only the final output is shown. Where were the medium-sized dogs? This code filters for dogs with size "medium", but none of those dogs appear in the original table display (on the left) because they were buried in the middle rows. How were the rows grouped? The output doesn't show which rows were grouped and aggregated together. (Note that printing a pandas.GroupBy object won't display this information either.) If you ran this same code in Pandas Tutor, you can teach students exactly what's going on step-by-step Leah #3: Apache Airflow Workflow orchestration tool the originated at Airbnb and is now part of the Apache Software Foundation author workflows as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) of tasks Airflow works best with workflows that are mostly static and slowly changing. When DAG structure is similar from one run to the next, it allows for clarity around unit of work and continuity. Typical data analytics workflow is the Extract, Transform, Load (ETL) workflow - I have data somewhere that I need to get (extract), I do something to it (Transform) and I put that result somewhere else (load) Airflow has "Operators" and connectors which enable you to perform common tasks in popular libraries and Cloud providers Let's talk about a sample - I work on GCP so my sample will be GCP based because that's what I use most. One common workflow I see is running Spark jobs in ephemeral Dataproc clusters. I'm actually writing a tutorial demonstrating this now - literally in progress in another tab BigQuery -> Create Dataproc cluster -> Run PySpark Dataproc job -> Store results in GCS -> delete Dataproc cluster Airflow has a really wonderful, active community. Please join us. Brian #4: textwrap.dedent Suggested by Michel Rogers-Vallée Small utility but super useful. Also, built in to Python standard library. BTW, textwrap package has other cool tools you probably didn't know Python could do right out of the box. It's worth reading the docs. dedent akes a multiline string (the ones with tripple quotes). Removes all common whitespace. This allows you to have multi-line strings defined in functions without mucking up your indenting. Example from docs: def test(): # end first line with to avoid the empty line! s = ''' hello world ''' print(repr(s)) # prints ' hellon worldn ' print(repr(dedent(s))) # prints 'hellon worldn' Better example: from textwrap import dedent def multiline_hello_world(): print("hello") print(" world") def test_multiline_hello_world(capsys): expected = dedent(''' hello world ''') multiline_hello_world() actual = capsys.readouterr().out assert actual == expected Michael #5: pip-audit via Dan Bader (from Real Python) Audits Python environments and dependency trees for known vulnerabilities Are your dependencies containing security issues? What about their dependencies, the ones you forgot to list in your requirements files or pin? Just run pip-audit on your requirements file(s) Perfect candidate for pipx Leah #6 - Using bots to manage samples Another part of my job is working with other software engineers in GCP to oversee the maintenance our Python samples We have thousands of samples in hundreds of repos that are part of GCP documentation To ensure consistency and that this wonderful group of Devrel Engineers has time to get their work done and also function as a human, we use a lot of automation Bots do things like keep our dependencies up to date, check for license headers, auto-assign PRs and issues to code-owners, sync repositories with a centralized config, and more the GCP DevRel github automation team has an open source repo with some of the bots they have developed that we use every day and we use whitesource renovatebot to manage our dependencies and keep them up to date Extras Michael: Github CMD/CTRL+K command palette Python 3.10.1 is out Joke: HTTP status code meanings http.cat

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

SQLAlchemy is the most widely used ORM (Object Relational Mapper) for Python developers. It's been around since February 2006. But we might be in for the most significant release since the first one: SQLAlchemy 2.0. This version adds async and await support, new context-manager friendly features everywhere, and even a unified query syntax. Mike Bayer is back to give us a glimpse of what's coming and why Python's database story is getting stronger. Links from the show SQLAlchemy: sqlalchemy.org Mike on Twitter: @zzzeek Migrating to SQLAlchemy 2.0: sqlalchemy.org awesome-sqlalchemy: github.com sqlalchemy-continuum versioning: readthedocs.io enum support: github.com alembic: sqlalchemy.org GeoAlchemy: geoalchemy.org sqltap profiling: github.com nplusone: github.com Unit of work: duckduckgo.com ORM + Dataclasses: sqlalchemy.org SQLModel: sqlmodel.tiangolo.com Cython example: cython.org Async SQLAlchemy example: sqlalchemy.org ORM Usages Stats (see ORM section): jetbrains.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors TopTal Talk Python Training AssemblyAI

What is UX?
S4E5 Interview with Jesse Showalter, Full-Stack Designer and Content Creator

What is UX?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 52:38


Jesse Showalter is a Fullstack Designer, Mentor, & Content Creator on a mission to help every creative make an impact on the world. Jesse has a Youtube Channel with over 200k+ subscribers and counting! The channel shares Digital Design & Web Development videos each week focusing on tools, techniques, projects, and more to help creative people make amazing things. If you're an aspiring Web Designer, UI Designer, or Front-End Developer who is interested in creating awesome things in pixels and code, make sure to subscribe for helpful training videos. In this episode, we talked about:Content creation, indie, freelancer and designer journeyHanding off designsHelping creatives learn & growJesse's tips for budding freelancersJesse as a big advocate of self-learning and journey as a self-taught designerDealing with clients as a freelancerStarting his Youtube channelThere is no “overnight success”Jesse's various streams of revenueAnd MUCH MORE!Links and Resources:Jesse Showalter Youtubehttps://www.jesseshowalter.com/Hey Creative Discord Server

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#343: Do Excel things, get notebook Python code with Mito

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 66:14


Here's a question: What's the most common way to explore data? Would you say pandas and matplotlib? Maybe you went more general and said Jupyter notebooks. How about Excel, or Google Sheets, or Numbers, or some other spreadsheet app? Yeah, my bet is on Excel. And while it has many drawbacks, it makes exploring tabular data very accessible to many people, most of whom aren't even developers or data scientists. On this episode, we're talking about a tool called Mito. This is an add-in for Jupyter notebooks that injects an Excel-like interface into the notebook. You pass it data via a pandas dataframe (or some other source) and then you can explore it as if you're using Excel. The cool thing is though, just below that, it's writing the pandas code you'd need to do to actually accomplish that outcome in code. I think this will make pandas and Python data exploration way more accessible to many more people. So if you've been intimidated by pandas, or know someone who has, this could be what you've been looking for. Links from the show Mito: trymito.io Mito summary stats: trymito.io pandas-profiling package: github.com Lux API: pypi.org Hex notebooks: medium.com Deepnote: deepnote.com Papermill: papermill.readthedocs.io JupterLite: jupyter.org Jupyter Desktop App: github.com Jut: github.com Jupyter project: jupyter.org Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Shortcut Linode AssemblyAI Talk Python Training