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Set of subroutine definitions, protocols, and tools for building software and applications

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Latest podcast episodes about API

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Renovando las renovables

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 13:21


Récord solar+eólica en España / Electrificando el Mar del Norte / ¿Dónde está Twyp? / Twitter actualiza su API principal / Windows 11 listo relisto / Éxito de la Boeing Starliner / Salto de Ethereum en agosto ⚡ La UE creará un macro-centro de eólica marina en el Mar del Norte. Alemania, Bélgica, Dinamarca, y Países Bajos se alían para instalar una red capaz de extraer un mínimo de 65 GW en 2030, y 150 GW en 2050, suficiente para más 200 millones de hogares. — El Mar del Norte tiene gran potencial, pero menos que la zona británica.

TestTalks | Automation Awesomeness | Helping YOU Succeed with Test Automation

Wondering how to get started with API Contract Testing? In this episode, Lewis Prescott, an experienced QA Lead specializing in API testing, will explain. Discover what contract testing is, why it's needed, test tools, and other API testing awesomeness. Listen up!

Off the Chain
#972 Will The Bitcoin Bear Market Continue Through The Summer?

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 10:41


In today's episode, I break down Bitcoin On-Chain Analytics. I'm usually joined by WiIl Clemente on Saturdays to discuss his research through articulating his weekly newsletter. Unfortunately, Will was unable to join us this week. Instead, I go through the Blockware Newsletter to help you understand why Bitcoin continues to struggle around $30k, the macro environment, and how long this market downtown may last. To see the video with the corresponding charts referenced throughout the interview, go to my Anthony Pompliano YouTube Channel posted every Saturday morning EST. ======================= Today's episode is brought to you by Coinbase Wallet, your key to the world of crypto. Crypto wasn't made to just buy, sell, and hodl. With Coinbase Wallet, you can do so much more: Collect more NFTs, earn more with DeFi, and trade more than 4,000 tokens. Whether you're looking to play, stake, spend, or just explore a trending new protocol — Coinbase Wallet is your key to more. Long-time HODLers already know that wallets are a must-have if you want complete control of your crypto. That's why Coinbase Wallet makes self-custody simple, while providing the safety and security of the most trusted name in crypto. Visit http://coinbase.com/wallet to learn more. ======================= If you're a regular listener of the podcast, I would bet that two things are true: First: You're passionate about Web3 and protecting your personal data And two: that you're a human.   If I'm right, then congratulations! You're entitled to all the benefits of the decentralized web. But there's a catch: As Web3-enabled tech — like NFTs, smart contracts, and DAOs — drive more elements of our “real world” lives online, proving that you're a person – without surrendering personal data – becomes exponentially more valuable. And exponentially more difficult.   This is why Unstoppable Domains launched Humanity Check.    Humanity Check proves that you're, well, you – without revealing personal data. No matter where you go on the web, you'll have total control over which apps you want to share data with…and which ones you don't.   Prefer to be completely clouded in mystique? No worries - Humanity Check is 100% opt in. If you want to feel alive, or at least prove you are, head to http://UnstoppableDomains.com and get your NFT domain with Humanity Check. ======================= Crypto is all about giving the power back to the people and our sponsor, Pipe, is doing that in a big way. Pipe is the world's first trading platform that allows you to trade recurring revenue streams for up-front capital. And with Pipe's new API, companies with recurring revenue can build seamless, embedded financing options into their platforms. One of the most interesting uses for Pipe's new API right now is Compass Mining's “Mine Now, Pay Later” which powers payment plans on bitcoin mining hardware so more miners can start or scale with a smaller up-front investment. Whether you're looking for mining hardware or scaling any business with recurring revenue, check out Pipe to access growth capital with: No loans. No dilution. No restrictive covenants or warrants. Just growth on your terms And right now, Pomp Podcast listeners can access tens of thousands of dollars even millions fee-free for 12 months. Whether you are a bitcoin mining company looking to enable financing for your customers or a SaaS, DTC, or any business that has recurring revenue, sign up at http://pipe.com/pomp to start trading today.

2X eCommerce Podcast
S07 EP12: Extended Warranties to Bolster Margin Growth and Conversions w/ Rohan Shah

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 42:51


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Rohan Shah, Co-Founder of Extend, an API-first company that streamlines the development of extended warranties and product protection in the D2C eCommerce world. As a consumer, it's almost a godsend to have an extended warranty on our loved purchases, especially electronics and furniture when parts suddenly break. They have confidence in the merchant so it makes sense to purchase the warranty. Also, it's a bargain price compared to the prices of repairs these days. As an eCommerce merchant or retailer, should you consider adding extended warranties to your products? Maybe you should. Don't waste your customers' trust and give them what they are looking for, which are extended warranties and protection plans on your products. Extend is your willing partner in the journey. Extend is an API-first company that democratizes extended warranty to any and every merchant, thereby, potentially increasing your average order value and conversions. They are your willing third party who stands behind your product that covers it from accidents and breaks.  In this episode, Kunle and Rohan talk about how warranties and protection plans are driving pure margin revenue to their bottom line. You will get to hear about when a brand should consider extended warranties. This is a great episode for merchants looking to grow their AOV with the use of extended warranties and product protection. -----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:WayflyerAs you continue to grow your eCommerce business, access to growth capital will increasingly play a significant role in achieving and surpassing your financial goals.Why should you give up equity or pay high interest rates to grow your business? There is a new way to access growth capital that transforms eCommerce businesses.Wayflyer has shaken the way eCommerce operators access working capital. With a dedication to only DTC eCommerce businesses, Wayflyer will fund you on a fairer “fund as you grow” model, meaning if your sales slow down, so does the amount you transfer back.. There is just a simple fee and the funds you need to grow are deposited to your account instantly. It's worth checking out – Wayflyer.com Klaviyo  This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.  Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.  Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x. Gorgias  This episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, live chat, and phone into one platform.  This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund, or create an order right from your helpdesk.  Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x eCommerce Podcast for two months free. Recharge This episode is brought to you by Recharge, the leading subscriptions payment solution for Shopify merchants. Recharge helps eCommerce merchants of all sizes launch and scale subscription offerings. Recharge powers the growth of over 15,000 subscription merchants and their communities—turning one-time transactions into long-term customer relationships. Turn transactions into relationships and experience seamless subscription commerce with Recharge. Find out more on rechargepayments.com/2x.

The Tech Humanist Show
Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency for Workers?

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:07


This week, we look at a few of the macro trends shaping both the labor market today and the future of work — such as the Great Resignation and collective bargaining — and examine how tech-driven business has both brought them about and potentially given workers more freedom and leverage. We also consider what all of that means for you if you're the one tasked with managing workers or leading a workplace forward, as well as what these trends might mean overall for humanity. Guests this week include Giselle Mota, Christopher Mims, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Dorothea Baur, John C. Havens, and Vanessa Mason. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Kate: The global workforce is experiencing an unprecedented level of change. The Great Resignation may look like a direct result of the COVID Pandemic, but the drivers behind this large-scale trend come from deep-rooted and centuries-old issues in employer-employee dynamics that have been amplified by evolving technology. So in this episode, we're exploring the lessons we've learned from the technologization — the impact of technology on work, as well as how the changing work landscape is pushing people to crave and demand more agency over our work and our lives. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Giselle Mota, Principal Consultant on the Future of Work at ADP, who offered some insight into the emotional human factor behind these changes. Giselle: “I think it's more about us realizing that work is not all that we are. Some people have left their very high-paying roles because they had stress about it, or because they need to be at home caregiving, or now they have issues with their own healthcare or mental health that came up, and they're prioritizing self over this idea of ‘I live to work I live to work I live to work,' right? The value system of humanity globally has shifted a lot, and people have been reassessing, ‘how do I want to spend my time?' ‘How do I want to live my life?' Work should not be driving all of that, our lives should be driving work experience. The ability to think about choosing when you're gonna work, ability to work from different places, how long is my work week, can I come in and out of my shifts throughout the day, can I work on projects, can I destructure and break down what work is and work at it my way? I think that's what we've been seeing.” Kate: Before we can fully understand why this is happening, we have to look at where we are and how we got here. Trends like the Great Resignation follow many years of jobs being automated or shipped overseas. Fewer people are needed to fill the remaining roles, so demand for workers in certain markets is disappearing, while in other markets, the supply of workers for a given job is so high that people aren't paid a living wage. With the rise of the ‘gig economy,' it's becoming less clear what level of education is needed to attain a well-paying job that will still be around in 5 years. Not that this is an entirely new phenomenon. Since at least the dawn of the industrial era, automation caused certain jobs to go out of favor while other jobs sprang up to fill the void. In the 21st century, with the advent of the Internet, algorithms, and ‘big data,' this cycle has been significantly accelerated. More jobs have been “optimized” by technology to prioritize maximum efficiency over human well-being, which is part of what's causing—as I talked about in our last episode—a global mental health crisis. And while the overview sounds bad, there is good news. As long as we can stay open-minded to change, we can work together to design solutions that work for everyone. And if we can do that, the future of work has the potential to be much brighter than the realities of today. To get there, we have to ask ourselves, what assumptions were made in the past to create the modern work environment, and which of those no longer serve us? Rahaf: “If we're gonna move to a more humane productivity mindset, we have to have some uncomfortable conversations about the role of work in our lives, the link between our identity and our jobs and our self-worth, our need for validation with social media and professional recognition, our egos…” Kate: That's Rahaf Harfoush, a Strategist, Digital Anthropologist, and Best-Selling Author who focuses on the intersections between emerging technology, innovation, and digital culture. You may have heard the extended version of this quote in our last episode, but her insight into how questioning our assumptions about work is playing into the changing work landscape felt equally relevant here. Rahaf: “We really have to talk about, ‘growing up, what did your parents teach you about work ethic?' how is that related to how you see yourself? Who are the people that you admire? You can start testing your relationship with work, and you start to see that we have built a relationship with work psychologically where we feel like if we don't work hard enough, we're not deserving. We don't ever stop and say, ‘does this belief actually allow me to produce my best possible work, or is it just pushing me to a point where I'm exhausted and burnt out?” Kate: Outside of our own personal assumptions about our relationship with work, there's also the relationship businesses and technology have with us as consumers, and how their assumptions about what we want are equally problematic. John: “I've read a lot of media, where there's a lot of assumptions that I would call, if not arrogant, certainly dismissive, if not wildly rude… You'll read an article that's like, ‘This machine does X, it shovels! Because no one wants to shovel for a living'!” Kate: That's John C. Havens, Executive Director of the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. Here he's talking about the current belief held by a lot of the people creating modern technologies that everything can be automated, no matter the cost. John: “We've all done jobs that, elements of it you really don't like and wish could be automated, but usually that's because you do the job long enough to realize, this part of my job I wish could be automated. I've done a lot of, y'know, camp counseling jobs for the summer where I was outside, y'know I was doing physical labor… it was awesome! That said, you know, I was like, ‘this is great for what it was, I kind of don't want to do this for my whole life.' Yeah, a lot of people would not be like, ‘give me 40 years of shoveling!' But the other thing there that I really get upset about when I read some of those articles is what if, whatever the job is, insert job X, is how someone makes their living? Then it's not just a value judgment of the nature of the labor itself, but is saying, from the economic side of it, it's justified to automate anything that can be automated, because someone can make money from it outside of what that person does to make money for them and their family. We have to have a discussion about, y'know, which jobs might go away. Why is that not brought up? It's because there's the assumption, at all times, that the main indicator of success is exponential growth. And a lot of my work is to say, I don't think that's true.” In many ways, our society has failed to question the assumption ‘if something can be automated, automate it.' But as the great Ian Malcolm said in Jurassic Park, “your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.” While automation of jobs is frequently thought of in a manufacturing context, more and more we're seeing automating creep into other areas as well, like decision-making and workplace management. The same factories where machines are replacing physical human labor have now been optimized to replace human thought labor and managers as well. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, calls this phenomenon “Bezosism.” Christopher: “Bezosism, it's like the modern-day version of Taylorism or Fordism… the bottom line is, this is how you optimize the repetitive work that people do. This isn't just Amazon, Amazon is just the tip of the sphere. Amazon is the best at doing this, but every other company that can is trying to do the same thing: make workers more productive by managing them with software and algorithms, kind of whatever the consequence is. Emily Gindelsberger talks about how, whether it's an Amazon warehouse, or any fast-food restaurant you can name, or a call center… all of these places are now managed by algorithm, and the workers are monitored by software. Instead of a boss telling them to work faster, it's the software cracking the whip and being like, ‘you're not working fast enough, you need to pick packages faster' in this Amazon warehouse, or ‘you need to flip burgers faster' if you work at a McDonald's. But this is becoming the dominant way that work is organized if you don't have a college degree, if you're an hourly worker. You know, the whole phenomenon of the gig economy, the rise of part-time work, subcontracting, the so-called ‘fissured workplace'—all of that is, as one person put it, do you work above the API, like, are you a knowledge worker who's creating these systems? Or do you work below the API, where, what's organizing your work and your life—it's a piece of software! I mean, it's designed by humans, but your boss is an algorithm. And that is becoming, other than wealth and income inequality, one of the defining characteristics of, almost a neo-feudalism, ‘cause it's like, ‘hey! we've figured out how to organize labor at scale, and extract the most from people and make them work as efficiently as possible… we'll just let the software do it!'” Kate: The acceleration of this style of management is a big part of the driver pushing people to question our assumptions about work and begin to demand more agency. If you've been following my work for a while, you've heard me say, “the economy is people”, and that means we can't talk about the future of work without talking about the future of the worker. The idea that people, especially those doing what is considered ‘unskilled' labor, have little agency over how they work isn't new. AI may have exacerbated the issue, but the problem goes back as far as labor itself. Labor unions arose in the early 19th century in an attempt to level the playing field and allow workers to express their needs and concerns, but as we've seen with the recent Starbucks and Amazon unionization stories, the battle for human rights and agency in the workplace is far from decided. And it isn't just factories and assembly lines—it's happening in every industry. In the tech industry, there's a subset of people known as “Ghost Workers,” a term created by anthropologist Mary L. Gray and computer scientist Siddharth Suri to describe the usually underpaid and unseen workers doing contract work or content moderation. They frequently work alone, don't interact with one another, and often aren't even aware who they're working for, so the idea of collective bargaining feels farther out of reach. Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond, explains some of the human rights issues at play in this phenomenon. Dorothea: “If you look at heavily industrialized contexts or like, heavy manufacturing, or like, textile industry, the rights we talk about first are like the human rights of labor, health and safety, etc. But I mean, trade unions have come out of fashion awhile ago, a lot of companies don't really like to talk about trade unions anymore. So when we switch to AI you think, ‘oh, we're in the service industry, it's not labor intensive,' but the human factor is still there. Certainly not blue collar employees, at least not within the own operations of tech companies, and also maybe not as many white collar employees, in relation to their turnover as in other contexts, but there's a lot of people linked to tech companies or to AI, often invisible. We have those Ghost Workers, gig economy, or people doing low-payed work of tagging pictures to train algo—uh, data sets, etc., so there is a labor issue, a classical one, that's really a straightforward human rights case there.” Kate: Algorithms have worked their way into the systems that manage most of our industries, from factory workers to police to judges. It's more than just “work faster,” too. These algorithms are making decisions as important as where and how many police should be deployed, as well as whether bail should be set, and at what amount. The logical (but not necessarily inevitable) extreme of this way of thinking is that all decisions will be relegated to algorithms and machines. But if people with the ability to make decisions continue to give these types of decisions to machines, we continue to lose sight of the human in the equation. What little decision making power the workers had before is being taken away and given to AI; little by little, human agency is being stripped away. The question then becomes, what if an algorithm tells a worker to do something they think is wrong? Will they have the freedom to question the algorithm, or is the output absolute? Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, elaborates. Rumman: “So if we're talking about, for example, a recommendation system to help judges decide if certain prisoners should get bail or not get bail, what's really interesting is not just how this affects the prisoner, but also the role of the judge in sort of the structure of the judicial system, and whether or not they feel the need to be subject to the output of this model, whether they have the agency to say, ‘I disagree with this.' A judge is a position of high social standing, they're considered to be highly educated… if there's an algorithm and it's telling them something that they think is wrong, they may be in a better position to say, ‘I disagree, I'm not going to do this,' versus somebody who is let's say an employee, like a warehouse employee, at Amazon, or somebody who works in retail at a store where your job is not necessarily considered to be high prestige, and you may feel like your job is replaceable, or worse, you may get in trouble if you're not agreeing with the output of this model. So, thinking about this system that surrounds these models that could actually be a sort of identically structured model, but because of the individual's place in society, they can or cannot take action on it.” Kate: The jury — if you'll pardon the expression — is still out on these questions, but we do know that in the past, worker agency was a key element in the success of our early systems. In fact, in the early days of creating the assembly line, human agency was fundamental to the success of those systems. Christopher Mims again. Christopher: “The Toyota production system was developed in a context of extreme worker agency, of complete loyalty between employer and employee, lifelong employment in Japan, and workers who had the ability to stop the assembly line the instant they noticed that something was not working, and were consulted on all changes to the way that they work. Honestly, most companies in the US cannot imagine functioning in this way, and they find it incredibly threatening to imagine their hourly workers operating this way, and that's why they all—even ‘employee-friendly' Starbucks—uses all these union busting measures, and Amazon loves them… because they just think, ‘oh, god, the worst thing in the world would be if our ‘lazy' employees have some say over how they work. It's nonsense, right? There's an entire continent called Europe where worker counsels dictate how innovations are incorporated. You know, that's how these things work in Germany, but we have just so destroyed the ability of workers to organize, to have any agency… Frankly, it is just disrespectful, it's this idea that all this labor is “unskilled,” that what you learn in this jobs has no real value… I think companies, they're just in this short term quarter-to-quarter mentality, and they're not thinking like, ‘how are we building a legacy? How do we retain employees, and how do we make productivity compatible with their thriving and happiness?' They all give lip service to this, but if you push as hard as Starbucks for instance against a labor union, honestly you're just lying.” Kate: Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Unions were an imperfect but necessary solution to ensuring workers had access to rights, freedoms, and safety in certain workplaces. According to a 2020 report from the Economic Policy Institute, Unionized workers earn on average 11.2% more in wages than nonunionized peers, and Black and Hispanic workers get an even larger boost from unionization. However, it looks like the changing nature of work is changing unionization as well. Unlike the Great Depression, which expanded the reach of labor unions, the Great Recession may have ushered in a period of de-unionization in the public sector. From the 1970s to today, the percentage of U.S. workers in a union has fallen from 25 to just 11.7 percent. In a piece of good news for Amazon employees in New York, they successfully voted for a union in their workplace on April 4th of this year, marking the first victory in a years-long battle for Amazon employee rights and agency. Looking forward, it's hard to say whether unions will be the best solution to worker woes. As more jobs become automated and fewer humans are needed in the workplace, there may be a time when there are only a few employees in a given department, which makes it harder to organize and empower collective bargaining. At the same time, being the only person working in your department may in fact give you more power to influence decisions in your workplace, as Christopher Mims explains. Christopher: “If you reduce the number of humans that work in a facility, it's like a tautology—the ones that remain are more important! Because in the old days, you could hire thousands of longshoreman to unload a ship, if one of them didn't show up, like, who cares? But if you're talking about a professional, today, longshoreman who's making in excess of 6 figures, has these incredibly specialized skills, knows how to operate a crane that can lift an 80,000 lb. shipping container off of a building-size ship, and safely put it on the back of a truck without killing anybody—that person doesn't show up to work, you just lost, y'know, a tenth of your productivity for that whole terminal that day. This is also an example of this tension between, like, it's great that these are good-paying blue-collar jobs, there aren't that many left in America, however, their negotiating power is also why the automation of ports has really been slowed. So that is a real genuine tension that has to be resolved.” Kate: So far in this episode, we've talked a lot about factory workers and the types of jobs that frequently unionize, but the future of work encompasses everyone on the work ladder. In the past, all of the problems regarding lack of worker agency has applied to ‘white collar' jobs as well. The modern office workplace evolved in tandem with factories, and the assumptions about how work should be organized are just as present there. Vanessa: “Our work environments, with who was involved with it and how they were constructed, is something that has been done over a long period of time. And the people who have been involved in that who are not White men, who are not sort of property owners, who are not otherwise wealthy, is a really short timeline.” Kate: That's Vanessa Mason, research director for the Institute for the Future's Vantage Partnership. Here she's explaining how workplace culture evolved from a factory mindset—and mostly by the mindset of a particular subgroup of people. Offices may feel like very different places from factories, but when you look at the big picture, the organizational structures are guided by many of the same ideas. Vanessa: “I think that a lot of organizations and offices are fundamentally sort of command and control, kind of top-down hierarchies, unfortunately. You know, the sort of, ‘the manager does this! Accountability only goes one direction! There's a low level of autonomy depending on what level you are in the chart!' All of those treat humans like widgets. I think that we have to keep in mind that history and that experience, like I still bring that experience into the workplace—basically, I'm in a workplace that was not designed for me, it's not meant for me to succeed, it's not meant for me to even feel as socially safe and as comfortable. There's a lot of research about psychological safety in teams. Like, our teams are not meant to be psychologically safe, they're set up to basically be office factories for us to sort of churn out whatever it is that we're doing in an increasingly efficient manner, productivity is off the charts, and then you receive a paycheck for said efforts. And it's only right now (especially in the pandemic) that people are sort of realizing that organizational culture 1) is created, and 2) that there's an organizational that people didn't realize that they were kind of unintentionally creating. And then 3) if you want your organizational culture to be something other than what it is, you need to collectively decide, and then implement that culture. All of those steps require a sort of precondition of vulnerability and curiosity which people are really frightened to do, and they're trying to escape the sort of harder longer work of negotiating for that to occur.” Kate: And that's what's needed from our managers and leaders as we navigate to a brighter future of work: vulnerability and curiosity. The vulnerability to admit that things could be better, and the curiosity to explore new ways of structuring work to allow more room for agency and decision-making to bring out the best in everyone. If the idea of a union sounds scary or expensive, perhaps there are other ways to allow employees the have more agency over how they work. A world in flux means there's still room to test new solutions. Lately, one of the changes business leaders have tried to make to their organizations is to bring in more diversity of workers. Women, people of color, neurodivergent minds, and people with disabilities have all been given more opportunities than they have in the past, but as Giselle Mota explains, just bringing those people into the workplace isn't enough. Giselle: “I read a study recently that was talking about, even though a lot of diverse people have been hired and promoted into leadership roles, they're leaving anyway. They don't stick around an organization. Why is that? Because no matter what the pay was, no matter what the opportunity was, some of them are realizing, this was maybe just an effort to check off a box, but the culture doesn't exist here where I truly belong, where I'm truly heard, where I want to bring something to the forefront and something's really being done about it. And again it has nothing to do with technology or innovation, we have to go back to very human, basic elements. Create that culture first, let people see that they have a voice, that what they say matters, it helps influence the direction of the company, and then from there you can do all these neat things.” Kate: If you're managing a workplace that has functioned one way for a long time, it may not be intuitive to change it to a model that is more worker agency-driven. How can you change something you may not even be aware exists? Vanessa Mason has a few tips for employers on what they can do to help bring about a new workplace culture. Vanessa: “And so what you can do, is really fundamentally listening! So, more spaces at all hands for employees to share what their experience has been, more experience to share what it is like to try to get to know co-workers. You know, anything that really just surfaces people's opinions and experiences and allows themselves to be heard—by everyone, I would say, also, too. Not just have one team do that and then the senior leadership just isn't involved in that at all. The second thing is to have some kind of spaces for shared imagination. Like all the sort of popular team retreats that are out there, but you certainly could do this asynchronously, at an event, as part of a celebration. Celebrating things like, y'know, someone has had a child, someone's gotten married, someone's bought a house—all of those things are sort of core to recognizing the pace and experience of being human in this world that aren't just about work and productivity. And then some way of communicating how you're going to act upon what you're hearing and what people are imagining, too. There's a bias towards inaction in most organizations, so that's something that certainly senior leadership should talk about: ‘How do we think about making changes, knowing that we're going to surface some changes from this process?' Being transparent, being accountable… all of those sort of pieces that go along with good change management.” Kate: A 2021 paper in the Journal of Management echoes these ideas, stating that communication between employers and their workers need to be authentic, ongoing, and two-directional, meaning that on top of listening to employee concerns, managers also needed to effectively communicate their understanding of those concerns as well as what they intended to do about them. A professional services firm analyzing a company's internal messaging metadata was able to predict highly successful managers by finding people who communicated often, responded quickly, and were action-oriented. Of course another thing many workplaces have been trying, especially in the wake of the COVID pandemic, is allowing employees to work remotely. Giselle Mota again. Giselle: “I think all we're seeing is we're just reimagining work, the worker, and workplace. Now that the pandemic happened, we learned from like Zoom, ‘wait a minute, I can actually work remotely, and still learn and produce and be productive, on a video!' But now, we can add layers of experience to it, and if you so choose to, you can now work in a virtual environment… people are flattening out the playing field. Companies that used to be die-hard ‘you have to work here in our office, you have to be here located right next door to our vicinity,' now they've opened it up and they're getting talent from across the pond, across the globe, from wherever! And it's creating new opportunities for people to get into new roles.” Kate: Although COVID and Zoom accelerated a lot of things, the idea of people working from home instead of the office isn't actually a new one. AT&T experimented with employees working from home back in 1994, exploring how far an organization could transform the workplace by moving the work to the worker instead of the other way around. Ultimately, they freed up around $550M in cash flow by eliminating no longer needed office space. AT&T also reported increases in worker productivity, ability to retain talent, and the ability to avoid sanctions like zoning rules while also meeting Clear Air Act requirements. As remote work on a massive scale is a relatively new phenomenon, the research is still ongoing as to how this will affect long-term work processes and human happiness. It is notable that working remotely is far less likely to be an option the farther you drop down the income ladder. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 9.2% of workers in the bottom quartile of wage-earners have the ability to work remotely. The availability also varies depending on the job you're doing, with education, healthcare, hospitality, agriculture, retail, and transportation among the least-able to work remotely, and finance and knowledge workers among the most-able. Because we aren't entirely sure whether remote work is the best long-term solution, it's worth looking at other ways to attract high-value workers—and keep them around. One idea? Invest in career planning. Technology is making it easier than ever for employers to work with their employees to plan for a future within the company. AI has made it possible to forecast roles that the company will need in the future, so rather than scramble to fill that role when the time comes, employers can work with a current or prospective employee to help prepare them for the job. In my conversation with Giselle Mota, she explored this idea further. Giselle: “A lot of companies are now able to start applying analytics and forecast and plan, ‘okay, if this is a role for the future, maybe it doesn't exist today, and maybe this person doesn't yet have all the qualifications for this other role. But, they expressed to us an interest in this area, they expressed certain qualifications that they do have today, and now AI can help, and data can help to match and help a human, you know, talent acquisition person, career developer, or manager, to help guide that user to say, ‘this is where you are today, this is where you want to be, so let's map out a career plan to help you get to where you should be'.” Kate: She went on to explain that employers don't need to think about jobs so rigidly, and rather than looking for one perfect person to fill a role, you can spread the tasks around to help prepare for the future. Giselle: “I was talking to someone the other day who was saying, ‘y'know, we have trouble finding diverse leadership within our organization and bringing them up,' and I was talking to them and saying, ‘break down a job! Let people be able to work on projects to be able to build up their skillset. Maybe they don't have what it takes today, fully, on paper to be what you might be looking for, but maybe you can give them exposure to that, and help them from the inside of your organization to take on those roles.” Kate: All of these changes to work and the workplace mean that a lot of office workers can demand more from their jobs. Rather than settle for something nearby with a rigid schedule, people can choose a job that fits their lifestyle. As more of these jobs are automated, we are hopefully heading for an age where people who were relegated to the so-called “unskilled” jobs will be able to find careers that work for them. Because it is more than the workplace that is changing, it's also the work itself. I asked Giselle what types of jobs we might see in the future, and she had this to say. Giselle: “As we continue to explore the workplace, the worker, and the work that's being done, as digital transformation keeps occurring, we keep forming new roles. But we also see a resurgence and reemergence of certain roles taking more importance than even before. For example, leadership development is on the rise more than ever. Why? Because if you look at the last few years and the way that people have been leaving their workplaces, and going to others and jumping ship, there's a need for leaders to lead well. Officers of diversity have been created in organizations that never had it before because the way the world was going, people had to start opening up roles like that when they didn't even have a department before. As we move into more virtual experiences, we need creators. We're seeing organizations, big technology organizations, people who enable virtual and video interactions are creating layers of experience that need those same designers and that same talent—gamers and all types of creators—to now come into their spaces to help them start shaping the future of what their next technology offerings are gonna look like. Before, if you used to be into photography or graphic design or gaming or whatever, now there's space for you in these organizations that probably specialize in human capital management, social management… To give you a quick example, Subway! Subway opened up a virtual space and they allowed an employee to man a virtual store, so you could go virtually, into a Subway, order a subway sandwich down the line like you're there in person, and there's someone that's actually manning that. That's a job. And apart from all of that side of the world, we need people to manage, we need legal counsel, we need people who work on AI and ethics and governance—data scientists on the rise, roles that are about data analytics… When Postmates came out and they were delivering to people's homes or wherever it was, college campuses, etc., with a robot, the person who was making sure that robot didn't get hijacked, vandalized, or whatever the case is—it was a human person, a gamer, it was a young kid working from their apartment somewhere, they could virtually navigate that robot so that if it flipped over on its side or whatever, it would take manual control over it, set it right back up, and find it and do whatever it needed to do. So that's an actual role that was created.” Kate: While many people fear that as jobs disappear, people will have to survive without work — or rather, without the jobs that provide them with a livelihood, an income, a team to work with, and a sense of contribution — the more comforting truth is that we've always found jobs to replace the ones that went out of fashion. When cars were invented, the horse-and-buggy business became far less profitable, but those workers found something else to do. We shouldn't be glib or dismissive about the need individual workers will have for help in making career transitions, but in the big picture, humans are adaptable, and that isn't something that looks like it will be changing any time soon. Giselle: “Where we're seeing the direction of work going right now, people want to have more agency over how they work, where they work, themselves, etc. I think people want to own how they show up in the world, people want to own more of their financial abilities, they want to keep more of their pay… If you just wade through all of the buzzwords that are coming out lately, people want to imagine a different world of work. The future of work should be a place where people are encouraged to bring their true full selves to the table, and that they're heard. I think we've had way too much of a focus on customer experience because we're trying to drive profitability and revenue, but internally, behind the scenes, that's another story that we really need to work on.” Kate: The more aware we are of the way things are changing, the better able we are to prepare for the future we want. Even in the face of automation and constantly-evolving technologies, humans are adaptable. One thing that won't be changing any time soon? Workers aren't going to stop craving agency over their jobs and their lives, and employers aren't going to stop needing to hire talented and high-value employees to help their businesses thrive. Hopefully you've heard a few ideas in this episode of ways to lean into the change and make your business, or your life, a little bit better. Even more hopeful is the possibility that, after so much disruption and uncertainty, we may be entering a moment where more people at every stage of employment feel more empowered about their work: freer to express their whole selves in the workplace, and able to do work that is about more than paying the bills. That's a trend worth working toward. Thank you so much for joining me this week on The Tech Humanist Show. In our next episode, I'm talking about why it behooves businesses to focusing on the human experience of buying their product or service, rather than the customer experience. I'll see you then.

Startup Insider
Open-Banking-Platform Yapily übernimmt deutsches Fintech finAPI (Open Banking API • Finanzdienstleistung)

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:49


In der Nachmittagsfolge sprechen wir mit Dr. Florian Haagen, Co-Founder und CEO von finAPI, über die Übernahme von Yapily. FinAPI ist eine Open Banking API, die als Plattform eine Schnittstelle zwischen Banken, Unternehmen und Usern herstellt. Unternehmen haben beispielsweise die Möglichkeit, im Kundenauftrag auf Kontodaten zuzugreifen und Zahlungen auszulösen. Außerdem verfügt das Münchner Startup über ein Data Intelligence Module, welches eine umfangreiche Analyse von Finanzdaten auf Basis von Data Enrichment, künstliche Intelligenz und Machine Learning Systeme ermöglicht. Die privatwirtschaftliche Wirtschaftsauskunftei SCHUFA hat sich im Jahr 2019 eine 75%-Mehrheit an finAPI gesichert und ist der größte Kunde der Open Finance Plattform. Das Münchener Startup wurde bereits 2008 von Dr. Florian Haagen und Dr. Martin Lacher gegründet und mit einer Neuausrichtung im Jahr 2016 wurde die innovative Banking-API entwickelt. Das Londoner Unternehmen Yapily, welches ebenfalls eine Schnittstellen-Lösung zwischen Unternehmen und Banken anbietet, wir das Münchner Unternehmen übernehmen. Nachdem Yapily im Frühjahr 2020 eine Finanzierungsrunde abgeschlossen hat, haben sie bereits eine Expansion nach Deutschland angekündigt. Mit dem Kauf der deutschen Open-Banking-Plattform wird Yapily laut Unternehmensangaben zufolge zur größten Open-Banking-Zahlungsplattform in Europa. Nach diesen Angaben haben die beiden Fintechs in den letzten 12 Monaten 39,5 Milliarden US-Dollar abgewickelt und mehr als eine Million monatlich aktive User bedient. Laut der Vorstandsvorsitzenden der SCHUFA Tanja Birkholz wird die Kooperation mit finAPI weiterhin aufrechterhalten bleiben. Das Münchener Startup erweitert Yapilys Portfolio um ca. 300 Kunden, wie beispielsweise die Hypo-Vereinsbank, die ING Deutschland und die DKB. Die Übernahme steht unter dem Vorbehalt der behördlichen Genehmigungen und wird voraussichtlich im zweiten Halbjahr 2022 abgeschlossen sein. Über den Kaufpreis haben sich die Parteien nicht geäußert. Laut Konzernabschluss der SCHUFA im Jahr 2019, wurde der 75%-Anteil von finAPI einem Buchwert von 19,5 Millionen Euro zugeschrieben. Die Bewertung von finAPI wird demnach bei ca. 25 Millionen Euro gelegen haben. Branchenkenner schätzen die Bewertung im Jahr 2022 auf 60 bis 80 Millionen Euro.

The Scoop
Digital collateral "changes everything," says Abra CEO Bill Barhydt

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:06


As the crypto market matures, owners of “pristine” digital assets will increasingly be able to use their holdings as collateral for an array of financial services, according to Bill Barhydt, CEO of Abra. Founded in 2014, crypto wealth management platform Abra closed a $55 million Series C last September led by IGNIA and Blockchain Capital. In this episode of The Scoop, Barhydt explains why the recent Terra blow-up has no impact on crypto's disruptive potential, and how a new wave of crypto-backed financial products promises to unlock more utility for long-term holders. As Barhydt explains, “Most banks won't recognize crypto — I don't even know any that will recognize crypto when they're trying to figure out your financial status, when you're trying to qualify for a mortgage…” Just last month, Abra announced a partnership with Propy — the company who sold a Florida home for $650,000 using an NFT — allowing crypto holders to apply for loans using their crypto as collateral. While Abra is “not financing homes yet,” allowing long-term crypto holders to use their digital assets as collateral for down payments on property is a sign of maturity for the asset class, according to Barhydt. If crypto can become pristine digital collateral like Barhydt imagines, he believes the implications will be felt around the world: “The banking system knows that I have this much bitcoin, it lends me this amount of money to complete my payments, and that's debited later — that's a much more efficient way to process credit transactions in countries where there is no credit scoring system, which is most countries, so having a kind of digital collateral changes everything.” Episode 44 of Season 4 of The Scoop was recorded remotely with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Bill Barhydt, CEO of Abra. Listen below, and subscribe to The Scoop on Apple, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. Email feedback and revision requests to podcast@theblockcrypto.com. This episode is brought to you by our sponsors Fireblocks, Coinbase Prime & Cross River Fireblocks is an enterprise-grade platform delivering a secure infrastructure for moving, storing, and issuing digital assets. Fireblocks enables exchanges, lending desks, custodians, banks, trading desks, and hedge funds to securely scale digital asset operations through the Fireblocks Network and MPC-based Wallet Infrastructure. Fireblocks serves over 725 financial institutions, has secured the transfer of over $1.5 trillion in digital assets, and has a unique insurance policy that covers assets in storage & transit. For more information, please visit www.fireblocks.com. About Coinbase Prime Coinbase Prime is an integrated solution that provides institutional investors with an advanced trading platform, secure custody, and prime services to manage all their crypto assets in one place. Coinbase Prime fully integrates crypto trading and custody on a single platform, and gives clients the best all-in pricing in their network using their proprietary Smart Order Router and algorithmic execution. For more information, visit www.coinbase.com/prime. About Cross River Cross River is powering today's most innovative crypto companies, with banking and payments solutions you can rely on, including fiat on/off ramp solutions. Whether you are a crypto exchange, NFT marketplace, or wallet, Cross River's API-based, all-in-one platform enables banking as a service, ACH & wire transfers, push-to-card disbursements, real-time payments, and virtual accounts and subledgers. Request your fiat on/off ramp solution now at crossriver.com/crypto.

Storie dal Polo Digitale
3Bee, la tecnologia che tutela l'ambiente

Storie dal Polo Digitale

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:32


Spesso tutela ambientale e progresso tecnologico sembrano non andare verso la stessa direzione. I più moderni dispositivi tecnologici portano innovazione ma causano riscaldamento globale, inquinamento e depauperamento di risorse già limitate. In occasione della Giornata mondiale delle api, abbiamo voluto riflettere sullo stato attuale della biodiversità, dando spazio a sistemi di ultima generazione che permettano di trovare un nuovo benefico equilibrio per la sostenibilità ambientale. Ce ne parlano in questo #PoloPodcast Niccolò Calandri, CEO di 3Bee, assieme alla Marketing Manager del Polo Digitale Camilla Menozzi.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
All'Ambasciata italiana di Canberra si festeggia il World Bee Day

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 12:55


Il 20 maggio del 1734 nasceva Anton Janša, uno dei pionieri dell'apicoltura moderna. Dal 2017 le Nazioni Unite hanno proclamato questa data come la Giornata Mondiale delle Api.

Into the Bytecode
Henri Stern: Privy, building for data privacy and security

Into the Bytecode

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 75:41


Here is my conversation with Henri Stern who is building Privy.Henri was previously a research scientist at Protocol Labs and worked on Filecoin's consensus protocol. And after many years of thinking through problems related to data privacy and security, he recently co-founded a new company called Privy where they provide a suite of API tools to store and manage user data off chain.In this conversation, we talked through a set of topics that Henri has a unique point of view on — starting with the question around the seeming trade-off between privacy/security on the one hand and UX/convenience on the other. We talked about principles he has in mind in designing an off-chain data system; how privy does encryption and key management; how they do permissioning; and how they think about data storage.Timestamps: 2:30 - designing the product/protocol roadmap 10:30 - privacy/security vs. convenience 19:27 - building an web3 application 23:20 - decentralizing Privy 32:09 - key management architecture 46:11 - verifiability, transparency as a disinfectant 59:02 - building a product with private data 1:07:08 - cofounder relationship

Daily Tech News Show
Putting Your Face On A Refrigerator – DTNS 4279

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


TikTok has plans to get into gaming by conducting tests in Vietnam, a company has released a new API to make reading any piece of text faster, and we get into the details of a new Senate bill called “The Competition and Transparency in Digital Advertising Act”. Starring Tom Merritt, Justin Robert Young, Roger Chang,Continue reading "Putting Your Face On A Refrigerator – DTNS 4279"

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
Putting Your Face On A Refrigerator – DTNS 4279

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


TikTok has plans to get into gaming by conducting tests in Vietnam, a company has released a new API to make reading any piece of text faster, and we get into the details of a new Senate bill called “The Competition and Transparency in Digital Advertising Act”. Starring Tom Merritt, Justin Robert Young, Roger Chang, Joe MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

API Intersection
Tips From Microsoft on Creating a Flourishing API Program feat. Balan Subramanian

API Intersection

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 26:16


This week on the API Intersection podcast, we chatted with Balan Subramanian, Partner Director of Product for Azure App Platform Services at Microsoft. At Microsoft, he leads the product team that works on the Azure app platform. This includes microservices frameworks such as Dapr, cloud services such as Azure API platform, Azure Logic Apps for integration, Azure Cache for Redis, Azure Spring Apps and a few other services. Additionally, Balan is responsible for ecosystem enablement for Azure developers–meaning he works with some of the well-known names in the developer community such as Elastic, Confluent, Redis, Nginx etc. and enables them to bring their SaaS to developers with Azure-native integrations.Balan provided a few insights on how Microsoft works to create an enticing partner environment, how they use the design-first approach internally, and how they help customers think of their APIs as products (even when they're not monetized!). Do you have a question you'd like answered, or a topic you want to see in a future episode? Let us know here: stoplight.io/question/

Defense in Depth
Who Investigates Cyber Solutions?

Defense in Depth

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 27:53


All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series Cyber professionals, who is responsible on your team for investigating new solutions? Check out this post and this post for the discussion that are the basis of our conversation on this week's episode co-hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), the producer of CISO Series, and Steve Zalewski. Our guest is Nick Ryan, director of enterprise technology security and risk, Baker Tilly. Thanks to our podcast sponsor, Votiro Can you trust that your content and data is free of malware and ransomware? With Votiro you can. Votiro removes evasive and unknown malware from content in milliseconds, without impacting file fidelity or usability. It even works on password-protected and zipped files. Plus, it's an API, so it integrates with everything – including Microsoft 365. Learn more at Votiro.com. In this episode: We ask cyber professionals, who is responsible on their team for investigating new solutions? If it's a collaborative effort, how is that handled? What are CISOs looking for in a solution? And we discuss using existing solutions before purchasing and implementing more solutions.

Business Casual
What Impact Entrepreneurship Really Means with Gold House President Bing Chen

Business Casual

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 44:54


Nora and Scott chat with Bing Chen, an impact founder, investor, and entrepreneur. Bing is the President and Co-Founder of Gold House, a non profit collective of 300 of the top API leaders that aims to enhance the successes of API folks across creative and business industries. Previously, he served as YouTube's Global Head of Creator Development And Management, where he led the buildout of the influencer ecosystem that we know today. Bing discusses how his “impact” title guides the projects he works on, why he took a chance on everyday YouTube creators early on, and the four major goals that guide Gold House's work. Presented by Policygenius. Hosts: Nora Ali & Scott Rogowsky Fact Checker: Holly Van Leuven  Video Editors: Mckenzie Marshall and Christie Muldoon Producer: Bella Hutchins  Production, Mixing & Sound Design: Daniel Markus Music: Daniel Markus & Breakmaster Cylinder Senior Producer: Katherine Milsop VP, Head of Multimedia: Sarah Singer  Full transcripts for all Business Casual episodes available at https://businesscasual.fm

Bank On It
Episode 510 Mark Scafaro from Afficiency

Bank On It

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 26:25


This episode was produced remotely using the ListenDeck standardized audio & video production system. If you're looking to jumpstart your podcast miniseries or upgrade your podcast or video production please visit www.ListenDeck.com. You can subscribe to this podcast and stay up to date on all the stories here on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio. In this episode the host John Siracusa chats remotely with Mark Scafaro, Co-founder & CEO of Afficiency.  Afficiency provides life insurance products via API to digital distributors.   Tune in and Listen. Subscribe now on Apple Podcasts, Google , Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio to hear next Tuesdays episode with Al Goldstein from Stoic Lane. About the host:   John, is the host of the  ‘Bank On It' podcast recorded onsite in Wall Street at OpenFin and the founder of the remotely recorded, studio quality standardized podcast production system ListenDeck. Follow John on LinkedIn, Twitter, Medium

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 16:11


Today's sponsored Tech Bytes dives into HashiCorp's Consul product to learn how it's evolved from its humble beginnings to become a service networking platform with features including a service mesh, service discovery, network infrastructure automation, an API gateway, and more. The post Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief
Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 16:11


Today's sponsored Tech Bytes dives into HashiCorp's Consul product to learn how it's evolved from its humble beginnings to become a service networking platform with features including a service mesh, service discovery, network infrastructure automation, an API gateway, and more. The post Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 16:11


Today's sponsored Tech Bytes dives into HashiCorp's Consul product to learn how it's evolved from its humble beginnings to become a service networking platform with features including a service mesh, service discovery, network infrastructure automation, an API gateway, and more. The post Tech Bytes: Solving Service Networking Problems With HashiCorp's Consul (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

The Scoop
Wintermute's CEO on why Terra's blow up was inevitable, and what happens next

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 48:15


The demise of the Terra blockchain sent a ripple effect throughout the crypto ecosystem last week, as the market absorbed over 80,000 BTC deployed in a failed attempt to keep the UST "stablecoin" pegged 1:1 with the US dollar. “If you're a market maker and you don't make money in those kinds of days, then yeah — you're doing something wrong,” said Evgeny Gaevoy, CEO of Wintermute — an algorithmic crypto market maker with nearly $2 trillion in cumulative volume, according to the firm's website. In this episode of The Scoop, Evgeny Gaevoy recounts the Terra meltdown from a market maker's perspective, and explains how future decentralized yield-bearing stablecoins can innovate where Terra's UST failed. According to Gaevoy, the 20% annualized yield promised to users who deposited UST into Terra's Anchor Protocol was more debt than could be paid by the protocol's revenue: “What was really wrong about LUNA is they had that 20% yield which was coming out of nowhere,” he said. “It was backed by future growth of the protocol, which could have happened, but didn't.” Although UST has proven to be a failure, Gaevoy thinks an interest-bearing stablecoin is possible, as long as the promised yield is equivalent to the issuing protocol's revenue.  To illustrate, Gaevoy proposed a hypothetical protocol that brings in $500,000 a year in revenue and seeks to raise $5 million through offering interest-bearing stablecoins: “Let's say they have cash flows of $500,000 per year — they can issue $5 million worth of stablecoins with 10% yield, and then suddenly they have $5 million and they can pay this yield because they actually generate this income. So they can offset these interest payments with what they generate from their own protocol — that model can work, and that model I think is really interesting to explore for a lot of protocols.” Wintermute is in the process of launching its own stablecoin, according to Gaevoy, who said the firm “just needs to iron out the regulatory details.” Episode 43 of Season 4 of The Scoop was recorded remotely with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Evgeny Gaevoy, CEO of Wintermute. Listen below, and subscribe to The Scoop on Apple, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. Email feedback and revision requests to podcast@theblockcrypto.com.   This episode is brought to you by our sponsors Fireblocks, Coinbase Prime & Cross River Fireblocks is an enterprise-grade platform delivering a secure infrastructure for moving, storing, and issuing digital assets. Fireblocks enables exchanges, lending desks, custodians, banks, trading desks, and hedge funds to securely scale digital asset operations through the Fireblocks Network and MPC-based Wallet Infrastructure. Fireblocks serves over 725 financial institutions, has secured the transfer of over $1.5 trillion in digital assets, and has a unique insurance policy that covers assets in storage & transit. For more information, please visit www.fireblocks.com. About Coinbase Prime Coinbase Prime is an integrated solution that provides institutional investors with an advanced trading platform, secure custody, and prime services to manage all their crypto assets in one place. Coinbase Prime fully integrates crypto trading and custody on a single platform, and gives clients the best all-in pricing in their network using their proprietary Smart Order Router and algorithmic execution. For more information, visit www.coinbase.com/prime. About Cross River Cross River is powering today's most innovative crypto companies, with banking and payments solutions you can rely on, including fiat on/off ramp solutions. Whether you are a crypto exchange, NFT marketplace, or wallet, Cross River's API-based, all-in-one platform enables banking as a service, ACH & wire transfers, push-to-card disbursements, real-time payments, and virtual accounts and subledgers. Request your fiat on/off ramp solution now at crossriver.com/crypto.

The Leadership Podcast
TLP307: How to Transition from a ‘Knower' Mindset to a ‘Learner' Mindset

The Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 42:08


Joe Schurman teaches from his deep experience in the software, machine learning, AI, and processes that organizations need today as they transition to data-driven technology companies. He names some of the cloud services and tech tools he uses to lead clients to start with a user case, break it into stories,  build a team led by the solution owner, assign the stories to developers to build, and iterate product demos until the Minimum Loved Project (MLP) is achieved. Joe offers observations on investing the “right” amount of time in projects, and wisdom on developing a learner mindset.   Key Takeaways [2:06] Joe Schurman is a 2nd-degree black belt in Kung Fu. He once judged a competition in Las Vegas. He has four children; two daughters and two sons. [2:57] Joe is an expert on the fringes of what we can do with computing technology. What we can do changes every day. In the past couple of years, from an AI perspective, with data and automation, it's taken leaps and bounds. [4:30] We're still pretty far away from general AI, despite Sophia, an AI robot that was granted Saudi Arabian citizenship in 2017. Today's AI depends on the programming we give a machine and its interpretation and output. Joe's focus is narrow or weak AI. His business colleagues call it magic. Computer vision is an area he loves. [5:45] Joe uses a lab environment across Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure, and Amazon Web Services. The capabilities that have come up in the last year are “just insane” with what you can do with computer vision and building libraries of what the machine can see. [6:06] Joe loved seeing a computer vision capability demonstration at AWS re:Invent of tracking every NFL player on the field and predicting injuries and other types of output and insights in real-time. The machine used narrow AI to access a library seeded with “a ton” of data to interpret the action. [7:15] What you can do with this technology comes down to the data that you feed the engine. Think about the amounts of data that organizations have to sift through to generate reflective or predictive insights. Auto machine learning helps organize the data into useful information such as anomaly detection in software engineering. The data can also come from tools like GitHub and Jira. [8:25] Joe did a fun computer vision project on UAPs for the History Channel, working with some of the nation's top military leaders, building a library of video and audio data to be able to detect unidentified aerial phenomena that were not supposed to be entering our airspace, and curating that library. [10:06] AI started with the idea of speeding up processes, such as getting an app to market faster or gathering insights quicker to make business decisions more timely. [11:28] AI can enhance human performance. Joe starts by finding people who know how to fail fast; to get a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) out the door. Solutions such as quality engineering automation, test automation, and monitoring services for DevOps detect bugs and performance issues quickly and ensure that the quality of the team is sound.[12:47] Joe notes the importance of individuals performing, contributing to, and collaborating as a team. Set your organization and standards governance up first. Look for a platform of technology to leverage that enables you to build and tinker. Finding the latest and greatest tool is no good unless it provides the right level of collaboration with their platform and connection to different processes. [14:53] When introducing ML to an organization, start with discovery, to understand the culture and talent within the organization. How are they communicating today? Joe sees the biggest gap between data scientists and data engineers. Projects tend to fail without collaboration, regardless of the tech. If the data scientists don't understand the domain, then the platform is irrelevant,[17:28] Joe stresses the need for a methodology in place to make any of these aspirations work for your organization. After discovery, there's an align phase. Focus on the outcome and the use case. The solution owner is crucial. The solution owner leads the technology team and brings them together around the client's outcome to develop that use case.[18:12] If you can't take an actual use case and break it down into bite-sized chunks or user stories, then the project will never be on the right track. Start with the use case to mitigate risks. Break the use case into user stories. Match the user stories with the number of engineers that can develop a number of user stories within a given time frame. [18:38] Those user stories given to the engineers are deducted into Story Points, in the Agile Process of engineering software. Price Waterhouse Coopers (PcW) has taken it to the next level, being able to do Engineering as a Service, being able to do it at scale, and being able to pivot quickly.[18:58] Joe explains what can happen if you have a great idea, take three to six months to break down the use case, and fill all the requirements, but hand it off to the Dev team that has no idea what the use case is: you get irrelevant software that doesn't tie back to the outcome! [19:22] Keep the solution team engaged in building the bridge between the subject matter expert stakeholders and the engineers. Every two weeks, demonstrate the iteration or program increment you have built. Does it match the outcome? Does it provide any relevance? Then take the feedback and figure out what happened in that iteration. Fix errors. You will build a product that has value to launch. [20:45] Communicate a lot, so all the people are on the same page! When you have stovepiped organizations where the departments don't talk to one another, you waste time, effort, and money building a product no one will use. One of Joe's colleagues, José Reyes, uses the term Minimum Lovable Project (MLP), where people rally around the outcome, not just the tech. [22:33] What skills and knowledge will the leaders of PwC need to endure for the next five years? Joe says first are character and attitude; people that have a hunger to build something, with a fail-fast mentality, and that are excited to learn constantly, that read every day and learn new technology. [24:27] Then know the tools. Documents exist on the internet for every solution and there is access to services like GitHub to download projects and starter templates without being an expert but just reading the README file and installing the base-level template, learning as you go, and as you tinker. That's way more valuable than coming in as a book-smart expert in a specific product or technology. [24:57] When it comes to tooling, there are products like the Atlassian platform with Confluence and Jira. For an AI stack, Joe typically works with AWS, GPC, and Microsoft, more so on the Amazon side with AWS AI tools, like Rekognition, Glue DataBrew, Redshift ML, Comprehend, and more. Amazon, Microsoft, and Google produce so much documentation and certification to get you up to speed. [26:30] Judgment, wisdom, and character will not be replaced by AI anytime soon. There's still room for philosophy in leadership. There are tools and technologies to speed up the processes, but not the individuals. There are no general AI solutions out yet to replace a pod of application developers, designers, and solution owners to execute a successful MVP or MLP out the door for a client. [27:55] Advice to CEOs: Be patient and understanding. Be willing to fail fast. Support tinkering and R&D, even if the project doesn't work out. Organizations are generally realizing that today they need to be data-driven, technology companies but there is still hesitance over the risk that needs to be taken. [30:03] Why would an insurance company or other traditional company need R&D? Look at Loonshots, by Safi Bahcall for some ideas about R&D. [30:56] Joe shares how he got to this point in his career. He wanted to play baseball but started at Compaq (now HP) when he was 18, writing scripts in Unix and other environments. Just being able to make certain changes to help clients get products faster and seeing the quick response from the outcomes felt like a home run to him! [31:49] Years later, Joe went on his own, with a vision to create telehealth before telemedicine was a thing, using Skype for Business and Microsoft Lync, enabling an API for that. Seeing people connect through a technology he had built, replaced the need to be a baseball star! Joe is grateful for the break he got at a young age and enjoys his work. [33:22] When Joe first started, he was trying to be the smartest person in the room, seeing the instant gratification of making code snippets that tested successfully. Eventually just building the app wasn't enough for him. He got the dopamine hit from seeing users interacting with his code and seeing its value. [34:58] Joe's mentors include many people he worked with. X. D. Wang at Microsoft Research inspired him to tinker, build, and focus on the short-run more than the long-run. Randeep Sing Pal at Microsoft Unified Communications was another great mentor. Also Steve Justice and Chris Mellon, in terms of character and collaboration. Joe shares how they mentored him. [37:23] Jan says something we forget about technology is that there are a lot of failures and attempts before the success hits. We have to be mindful of that as leaders to give people time and space to do really creative, cool things. [38:01] Joe appreciates the opportunity to discuss these things. Joe spent a lot of his career building software solutions that were way ahead of their time. It's frustrating to see telemedicine so successful now, but not when he attempted it. He had to learn to let go. It's not just about releasing bleeding-edge tech; you've got to find some value associated with it to resonate with the end-user. [39:31] Always think about the outcome and understand your audience first. And then be able to supplement the back end of that with bleeding-edge technology, development, tinkering, failing fast, and all the things that go with software engineering. Also, be humble! Get perspective from outside your bubble to build a better solution and be a better person. [40:49] WHenever you're setting out to build anything, start with a press release! Write a story of what it would look like if it were released today. Then just work back from there!   Quotable Quotes “There are so many new and cool technologies and innovations that are coming out at the speed of thought, which are pretty fascinating.” “I've been in real cloud engineering for about a decade, and from an AI perspective, with data and automation, over the past five to 10 years, in terms of running on a cloud environment, and it's just taken leaps and bounds.” “You've got to be able to connect that [data] environment to a use case or an outcome. If you can't do that and you can't enable a data scientist to understand the domain, then the data platform is irrelevant. I see a lot of performance issues occur because of that disconnect.” “If you can't take an actual use case and break it down into bite-sized chunks or user stories, then the project will never be on the right track.” “In this industry, you're constantly learning; constantly reading. I'm reading every day and learning about new technology every day and how to apply it and how to tinker with it. I need people on the team … that have that ability or that hunger to tinker and learn.” “Transitioning from a ‘knower' mindset to a ‘learner' mindset was the biggest shift for me.” “Always think about the outcome and understand your audience first. And then be able to supplement the back end of that with bleeding-edge technology, development, tinkering, failing fast, and all the things that go with software engineering.”   Resources Mentioned Joe Schurman, PwC Joe Schurman on LinkedIn PwC Sophia robot granted citizenship I, Robot film Weak AI Google Cloud Platform Microsoft Azure Amazon Web Services AWS re:Invent GitHub Atlassian Jira Unidentified, The History Channel José Reyes, PwC The Shackleton Journey Atlassian Confluence AWS Rekognition AWS Glue DataBrew AWS Redshift ML AWS Comprehend Steve Justice on LinkedIn Chris Mellon Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries, by Safi Bahcall  

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Building out a managed Kubernetes service is a bigger job than you think

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 26:21


You may be running your code in containers. You might even have taken the plunge and orchestrated it all with YAML code through Kubernetes. But infrastructure as code becomes a whole new level of complicated when setting up a managed Kubernetes service. On this sponsored episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Ben and Ryan talk with David Dymko and Walt Ribeiro of Vultr about what they went through to build their managed Kubernetes service as a cloud offering. It was a journey that ended not just with a managed K8s service, but also with a wealth of additional tooling, upgrades, and open sourcing. When building out a Kubernetes implementation, you can abstract away some of the complexity, especially if you use some of the more popular tools like Kubeadm or Kubespray. But when using a managed service, you want to be able to focus on your workloads and only your workloads, which means taking away the control plane. The user doesn't need to care about the underlying infrastructure, but for those designing it, the missing control plane opens a whole heap of trouble. Once you remove this abstraction, your cloud cluster is treated as a single solid compute. But then how do you do upgrades? How do you maintain x509 certifications for HTTPS calls? How do you get metrics? Without the control plane, Vultr needed to communicate to their Kubernetes worker nodes through the API. And wouldn't you know it: the API isn't all that well-documented. They took it back to bare necessities, the MVP feature set of their K8s cloud service. They'd need the Cloud Controller Manager (CCM) and the Container Storage Interface (CSI) as core components to have Vultr be a first-class citizen on a Kubernetes cluster. They built a Go client to interface using those components and figured, hey, why not open-source this? That led to a few other open-source projects, like a Terraform integration and a command-line interface. This was the start of a two-year journey connecting all the dots that this project required. They needed a managed load balancer that could work without the control plane or any of the tools that interfaced with it. They built it. They needed a quality-of-life update to their API to catch up with everything that today's developer expects: modern CRUD actions, REST best practices, and pagination. All the while, they kept listening to their customers to make sure they didn't stray too far from the original product. To see the results of their journey, listen to the podcast and check out Vultr.com for all of their cloud offerings, available in 25 locations worldwide.

Energy Week
194 - Aramco reports record profits | Domestic flights fall by 17$ | Dr. Dean Foreman with the API

Energy Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:11


Oil giant Aramco reports record first quarter as oil prices soarhttps://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/15/aramco-worlds-largest-company-reports-record-first-quarter-as-oil-prices-soar.html- Aramco not doing share buybacks like other oil companies. Awarding 1 share for every 10- increasing capacity to 13 million bpd by 2026/2027 but will they ever produce that much?- the longer Saudi Arabia fails to produce up to its OPEC quota the more people will believe they can't. Damaging narrative could push oil prices up more.Domestic flight bookings fell by 17% in April as air fares continued to risehttps://www.businessinsider.com/domestic-flight-bookings-fell-17-in-april-as-fares-continue-to-rise-2022-5- can't go anywhere for less than $700?!- will this crimp the economy and demand?Can China preserve both its economy and its zero-tolerance COVID-19 policy?https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2022-05-06/can-china-preserve-both-its-economy-and-its-zero-tolerance-covid-19-policy- Will China just never open up again?- Will it keep its people inside China?- Impact on Belt Road initiative. Tourism to places. What does it mean to US companies with offices in China?- How much of global oil demand is based on global travel between China and rest of world?Dr. Dean Foreman and API - highest quarter of US petroleum demand in history. but US economy contracted in Q1.- Tale of 1st 2 months and last 2 months. January and February were very high. Pulled back in March and April data shows big drop. 19.3 million bpd demand.- Biggest change is in intermediate products in petrochemicals. Consumer goods are slowing down. - Motor fuels and price repression: seeing some of that. gasoline demand has leveled off even though seasonally it should be going up. Distillate demands going down. Over $6/gallon for diesel in some states is causing fuel substitution.- Supply side: would suspect that given drilling activity increases should see more oil and did see that - increase of 100,000-200,000 bpd but NLGs went DOWN.- Demand outpacing supply, which didn't increase on whole.- Fewer DUCs, rig activity not increasing. Oil services costs are escalating.- All of this means need even more drilling activity to get back to 2019 production levels. Demand is back at 2019 levels.- Started year as net importer. But with Russia/Ukraine now having record pull for US exports. Crisis period with global refiners pulling oil and product out of US, adding to price pressure. Normally being an exporter is a good story, but when you are short on product that's bad for prices.- Trade is working great on West coast, but East coast not doing well because they generally trade products with Europe, and that's under pressure in Europe.- Historically has been very resilient system but unprecedented times and discontinuities and uncertainties about how much Russian crude is lost from market. - Likely we are seeing demand destruction. Summer driving season increase will be muted. But with airline prices up, people may drive more (fuel substitution).- lowest commercial crude oil inventories since 2014. normally through April 2022, year to date, you would be building up inventories as refiners draw on inventories to spool up for summer driving season. Average build over decade (excluding 2is 020) 40 million barrels. This year 1.8 million barrels. - SPR. DoE wants to replenish SPR soon. Signaling to market that starting in fall would like to replenish. Expect supply response. - EIA thinks less than 1 million bpd lost. But IEA saying as much as 3 million bpd lost by May.- Price reaction to uncertainty over how much Russian oil is lost to market.- If we release 180 million barrels from SPR over next several months will have lowest inventories since 1983.- Political reactions to high prices: NOPEC legislation (lift anti-trust legislation) Price controls (unlikely to get much political support), proposals to re-ban oil exports from US.- No US policies are supporting return to big production

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition
Modernize or Die® - CFML News Podcast for May 17th, 2022 - Episode 148

Modernize or Die ® Podcast - CFML News Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 58:30


2022-05-17 Weekly News - Episode 148Watch the video version on YouTube at https://youtu.be/ArUgrF-YL9k Hosts:  Gavin Pickin - Senior Developer at Ortus Solutions Daniel Garcia - Senior Developer at Ortus Solutions Thanks to our Sponsor - Ortus SolutionsThe makers of ColdBox, CommandBox, ForgeBox, TestBox and all your favorite box-en out there. A few ways  to say thanks back to Ortus Solutions: BUY SOME ITB TICKETS - COME TO THE CONFERENCE Like and subscribe to our videos on YouTube.  Help ORTUS reach for the Stars - Star and Fork our Repos Star all of your Github Box Dependencies from CommandBox with https://www.forgebox.io/view/commandbox-github  Subscribe to our Podcast on your Podcast Apps and leave us a review Sign up for a free or paid account on CFCasts, which is releasing new content every week Buy Ortus's Book - 102 ColdBox HMVC Quick Tips and Tricks on GumRoad (http://gum.co/coldbox-tips)  Patreon SupportGoal 1 - We have 36 patreons providing 100% of the funding for our Modernize or Die Podcasts via our Patreon site: https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutions. Goal 2 - We are 46% of the way to fully fund the hosting of ForgeBox.io PATREON SPONSORED JOB POSTING!Hagerty - MotorSportReg2 Job Opportunities for Senior Software Engineer, Motorsport - more in the job section.Watch this video with Brian Ghidinelli from Hagerty MotorsportReg Ready to get in the driver's seat? Join us!https://bit.ly/3985J3U News and AnnouncementsINTO THE BOX - UpdatesAnnouncing Speakers and Sessions for Into the Box 2022 - Round 1We are excited to announce the first set of speakers and sessions. We have a great mix of Ortus Speakers and Community speakers too. We'll be announcing round 2 later this week, and then we'll be finalizing the last few spots next week as we confirm some special items (hopefully). Here is the first 12 speakers and their sessions.https://www.intothebox.org/blog/announcing-speakers-for-into-the-box-2022-round-1 Into the Box 2022 - First Workshops Announced Async Programming & Scheduling Containerizing & Scaling Your Applications Legacy Code Conversion To The Modern World! TestBox: Getting started with BDD-TDD Oh My! https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/into-the-box-2022-first-workshops-announced/The final Workshop - decided by Twitter poll - VueJs SPA and Mobile App with Rest APIsDear Amazing Boss - I would like to ask for your approval to attend Into The Box 2022http://www.intothebox.org/blog/dear-amazing-boss-i-would-like-to-ask-for-your-approval-to-attend-into-the-box-2022 Computer Know How - Sponsors Into The Box 2022http://www.intothebox.org/blog/computer-know-how-sponsors-into-the-box-2022 TryCF has started a PatreonYou can now contribute to the project by sending a one-time gift of any increment of $25 or support the project monthly by becoming a Patron. Your gifts are much appreciated and will help keep TryCF.com the awesome resource it is!https://www.patreon.com/trycf/posts StackOverflow QuestionaireHey CF devs, fill out this year's Stack Overflow survey, and make sure you write in your CFML engine and frameworks into all the write-in spots :)  https://stackoverflow.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5jeoE1pq9sFcwIe ICYMI - CFWheels Guides Moved to GitBookWe are glad to announce that the CFWheels Guides have been moved to GitBook.com. The good folks at GitBook are proud to support CFWheels and have granted us an Open Source Community account. We have migrated all the guides from our old provider to GitBook and will be making some more changes as we review all the links now that the domain has been switched.https://cfwheels.org/blog/cfwheels-guides-moved-to-gitbook/New Releases and UpdatesAdobe CF Engine Updates are in CommandBox nowAdobe CF engines 2018.0.14+330003 and 2021.0.04+330004 are now available on ForgeBox for your usage.  When started on CommandBox 5.5, ACF 2021 is finally free of Log4j 1.x.  ACF 2018 seems to still be using Log4j 1.x however.CFWheels 2.3.0 Stable ReleasedThis is the official v2.3.0 release. It is dropping a little over a week from Release Candidate 1. We simply wanted to make sure the new CI/CD workflow was functioning before calling the release final. We feel confident that we're good to mark this release as final. There are no new enhancements or bug fixes in this release from 2.3.0.rc.1.Blog: https://cfwheels.org/blog/cfwheels-2-3-0-released/ Lucee 5.3.9.141-RC ReleasedFollowing up on our 5.3.9.133 stable release, we found a number of regression which have now all been addressed. We are doing a quick 5.3.9.141-RC before releasing the second stable 5.3.9 release on Monday.https://dev.lucee.org/t/lucee-5-3-9-141-rc-released/10162 Lucee - Has the ForgeBox and Docker Builds triggering Automatically Nowhttps://github.com/lucee/Lucee/runs/6401534261?check_suite_focus=true#step:17:2517 ICYMI - ColdFusion 2021 and 2018 May Security Updateshttps://coldfusion.adobe.com/2022/05/coldfusion-2021-and-2018-may-security-updates/ICYMI - cbElasticSearch v2.3.0 ReleasedWe are pleased to announce the release of cbElasticsearch version 2.3.0. cbElasticsearch is the Elasticsearch module for the Coldbox platform, and provides a fluent CFML API for interacting with, searching, and serializing to Elasticsearch servers.This release includes documentation updates and and enhancements to core functions of the Document, SearchBuilder and IndexBuilder components, as well as additional error handling for async tasks.https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/cbelasticsearch-230-released/WEBINARS / MEETUPS AND WORKSHOPSOrtus Webinar - May - Clearing the Fuzzies on Fuzzy Search with Michael BornMay 27th 2022: Time 11:00 AM Central Time ( US and Canada )Take a walk through the world of search in this webinar which will show why your database search is not smart enough, explain the basics of how fuzzy search works, and show how to use CBElasticsearch to bring the power of fuzzy searching to your CF application.https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIqd-6ppz0qGtGPJxmywPST06e74ExsmshB/ View all Webinars: https://www.ortussolutions.com/events/webinars ICYMI - Online ColdFusion Meetup - “Code Reuse in ColdFusion - Is Spaghetti Code still Spaghetti if it is DRY?” with Gavin PickinThursday, May 12 20229:00 AM to 10:00 AM PDTFind out the difference between DRY code and WET code, and what one is better, and more importantly, WHY.We write code once, but we read it over and over again, maintaining our code is 90% of the job... code reuse is our friend. You are already Re-using code, even if you didn't know you were.We'll learn about the different types of Code Reuse in ColdFusion, and the pros and cons of each.https://www.meetup.com/coldfusionmeetup/events/285524970/ Recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnOW6G5MVqE&list=PLG2EHzEbhy0-QirMKgSxhjkUyTSSTvHjL&index=1Adobe WorkshopsJoin the Adobe ColdFusion Workshop to learn how you and your agency can leverage ColdFusion to create amazing web content. This one-day training will cover all facets of Adobe ColdFusion that developers need to build applications that can run across multiple cloud providers or on-premiseTUESDAY, MAY 24, 20229:00 AM CETAdobe ColdFusion WorkshopDamien Bruyndonckx (Brew-en-dohnx) https://workshop-cf.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 202210AM PTWebinar - Exploring the CF Administrator: pt1Mark TakataIn part one of exploring the capabilities of the ColdFusion Administrator, Mark will explore the GUI of this powerful, unique ColdFusion tool, explaining how to use many of the capabilities exposed and available for tuning.https://exploring-coldfusion-administrator-1.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 20229:00 AM EDTAdobe ColdFusion WorkshopBrian Sappeyhttps://1-day-coldfusion-workshop.meetus.adobeevents.com/ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 20229:00 AM CETAdobe ColdFusion WorkshopDamien Bruyndonckx (Brew-en-dohnx) https://adobe-cf-workshop.meetus.adobeevents.com/ FREE :)Full list - https://meetus.adobeevents.com/coldfusion/ CFCasts Content Updateshttps://www.cfcasts.comNews Several ITB 2021 Videos are now Free so you can watch them and get in the mood for ITB 2022. https://cfcasts.com/series/into-the-box-2021  All of the Publish Your First ForgeBox Package Videos are now Free Just Released Gavin Pickin - Publish Your First ForgeBox Package How to update a package via the CLIhttps://cfcasts.com/series/publish-your-first-forgebox-package/videos/how-to-update-a-package-via-the-cli  How to use Box Scripts and CommandBox Command Lifecycle Eventshttps://cfcasts.com/series/publish-your-first-forgebox-package/videos/how-to-use-box-scripts-and-commandbox-command-lifecycle-events  How to update a package via the Web UIhttps://cfcasts.com/series/publish-your-first-forgebox-package/videos/how-to-update-a-package-via-the-web-ui  2022 ForgeBox Module of the Week Series - 5 new Videoshttps://cfcasts.com/series/2022-forgebox-modules-of-the-week 2022 VS Code Hint tip and Trick of the Week Series - 5 new Videoshttps://cfcasts.com/series/2022-vs-code-hint-tip-and-trick-of-the-week  Coming Soon More… Gavin Pickin - Publish Your First ForgeBox Package LogBox 101 More ForgeBox and VS Code Podcast snippet videos Conferences and TrainingICYMI - DockerConMay 10, 2022Free Online Virtual ConferenceDockerCon will be a free, immersive online experience complete with Docker product demos, breakout sessions, deep technical sessions from Docker and our partners, Docker experts, Docker Captains, our community and luminaries from across the industry, and much more. Don't miss your chance to gather and connect with colleagues from around the world at the largest developer conference of the year. Sign up to pre-register for DockerCon 2022!https://www.docker.com/dockercon/ On Demand https://docker.events.cube365.net/dockercon/2022 MS BuildMay 24-26, 2022Come together at Microsoft Build May 24–26 2022, to explore the latest innovations in code and application development—and to gain insights from peers and experts from around the world.Regional Spotlights, One on One bookings available and more.https://mybuild.microsoft.com/en-US/home Ioniconf  (Free Online Ionic conference)May 25, 2022Join us for a full day of talks from experts and leaders in the web community, showing how the web is pushing the boundaries of mobile app development. Get insights on the latest web libraries, frameworks, and tools that are empowering web developers to build stunning mobile and cross-platform apps using the power of the web.https://ionic.io/ioniconfUS VueJS ConfFORT LAUDERDALE, FL • JUNE 8-10, 2022Beach. Code. Vue.Workshop day: June 8Main Conference: June 9-10https://us.vuejs.org/Speakers and Schedule Announced https://us.vuejs.org/schedule/ THAT ConferenceHowdy. We're a full-stack, tech-obsessed community of fun, code-loving humans who share and learn together.We geek-out in Texas and Wisconsin once a year but we host digital events all the time.WISCONSIN DELLS, WI / JULY 25TH - 28TH, 2022A four-day summer camp for developers passionate about learning all things mobile, web, cloud, and technology.https://that.us/events/wi/2022/ Our very own Daniel Garcia is speaking there https://that.us/activities/sb6dRP8ZNIBIKngxswIt Adobe Developer Week 2022July 18-22, 2022Online - Virtual - FreeThe Adobe ColdFusion Developer Week is back - bigger and better than ever! This year, our experts are gearing up to host a series of webinars on all things ColdFusion. This is your chance to learn with them, get your questions answered, and build cloud-native applications with ease.Note: Speakers listed are 2021 speakers currently - check back for updatesI heard speakers were being contacted, and info coming very soon!!! Wink wink nudge nudgehttps://adobe-coldfusion-devweek-2022.attendease.com/registration/form CF SummitIn person at Las Vegas, NV in October 2022!Official-”ish” dates:Oct 3rd & 4th - CFSummit ConferenceOct 5th - Adobe Certified Professional: Adobe ColdFusion Certification Classes & Testshttps://twitter.com/MarkTakata/status/1511210472518787073VueJS Forge June 29-30thOrganized by Vue School_The largest hands-on Vue.js EventTeam up with 1000s of fellow Vue.js devs from around the globe to build a real-world application in just 2 days in this FREE hackathon-style event.Make connections. Build together. Learn together.Sign up as an Individual or signup as a companyCompany Deal - $2000 for a team of 5, includes VueSchool annual membership and guaranteed seat at the workshops at VueJS Forge as well… and you can pick your teamhttps://vuejsforge.com/Into The Box 2022Solid Dates - September 6, 7 and 8, 2022One day workshops before the two day conference!Early bird pricing available until May 31st, 2022Conference Website:https://intothebox.orgFirst round or two of Speakers and Session Descriptions are being announced this week!ITB 2021 Videos - Several videos are now Free so you can watch them and get in the mood for ITB 2022. https://cfcasts.com/series/into-the-box-2021 ITB Blog has new updates almost every day!Into the Box Latam 2022Actual Date - Dec 7thMore information coming very soon.CFCampNo CFCAMP 2022, we're trying again for summer 2023TLDR is that it's just too hard and there's too much uncertainty right now.Heading into winter with a date around October is less than ideal from a Covid point of viewat the same time hotels in Germany have already removed the "no questions asked" cancellation policies. So, yeah - that's not great. And then there's a war going on 2 countries down the road, which adds at least some economic uncertainties and concerns about sanctions, people willing to travel and spend money on events etc. Then there is all of the general annoyances around international travel - the organizers are being very careful and "wanting to do everything to avoid international travel for anyone when running an event" side of things when it comes to Covid.So, a lot of energy would have to be spent on making the event safe enough from our own point of view… so best to wait until hopefully Summer 2023More conferencesNeed more conferences, this site has a huge list of conferences for almost any language/community.https://confs.tech/Blogs, Tweets, and Videos of the Week 5/17/22 - Blog - Into the Box - Announcing Speakers for Into the Box 2022 - Round 1We are excited to announce the first set of speakers and sessions. We have a great mix of Ortus Speakers and Community speakers too. We'll be announcing round 2 later this week, and then we'll be finalizing the last few spots next week as we confirm some special items (hopefully). Here is the first 12 speakers and their sessions.https://www.intothebox.org/blog/announcing-speakers-for-into-the-box-2022-round-1 5/17/22 - Blog - Adam Cameron - If yer a CFML dev, you should consider financially supporting trycf.comIf you are a CFML developer, you will be aware and likely use trycf.com. Whenever I have an issue with some CFML that needs to be demonstrated to someone else; eg: I'm asking for help on Slack or Stack Overflow, or demonstrating an answer to someone else's question: I create a portable / repeatable repro case on trycf.com. I use it to demonstrate bugs and behavioural differences to Adobe or Lucee when both vendors don't give the same result from the same code. I use it every day.I believe trycf.com is the handiest resource available to CFML developers.https://blog.adamcameron.me/2022/05/if-yer-cfml-dev-you-should-consider.html 5/16/22 - Blog - Peter Amiri - CFWheels - CFWheels Announces a Bug BountyWe are happy to launch a new program that we hope will lead to a more stable framework for all of us. Effective immediately we are launching our Bug Bounty program. When we first conceived of the bounty program we were looking at programs from IssueHunt and BountySource and the main goal was to widen the field of contributors to the CFWheels project as well as crush some of the long standing bugs in the framework.https://cfwheels.org/blog/cfwheels-announces-a-bug-bounty/ 5/16/22 - Blog - Gavin Pickin - Ortus Solutions - Into the Box - Updates as of May 16th, 2022Into the Box is sneaking up closer and closer. With so many announcements, we can't post them all to the Ortus Solutions blog, so we're going to just give you updates when we can. To read all of our blog posts from ITB, visit the site or subscribe to RSS https://intothebox.org/blog This week we're going to be announcing the first set of Sessions, some of the Speakers, and some more sponsors. Last week was a big week for Into the Box too, check out the highlightshttps://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/into-the-box-updates-as-of-may-16th-2022/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=podcast 5/16/22 - Blog - Into the Box - Computer Know How - Sponsors Into The Box 2022We are excited to announce the bronze sponsorship of Computer Know How for the Into The Box 2022 Conference this coming September. We have been partners with CKH for several years and they are an amazing web application development company. Thank you for your patronage, and continuing support. We are excited to see them in Houston this September!https://www.intothebox.org/blog/computer-know-how-sponsors-into-the-box-2022/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=podcast 5/13/22 - Blog - Ortus Solutions - Ortus Content Digest for week of May 13thWe were busy this week, we released a lot of content for you... on the podcast, cfcasts, youtube, and our blog. Here's the summary in bite size pieceshttps://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/ortus-content-digest-for-week-of-may-13th 5/12/22 - Podcast - Wicked Good Development - Developer and Open Source Contributor Stories at Devnexus Part 2 - Brad WoodMagic happens when we learn and have honest conversations. @bdw429s thank you for coming on Wicked Good Development and discussing #ColdFusion and what it takes to be a maintainer or contributor #jvm https://anchor.fm/wickedgooddevelopment/episodes/Developer-and-Open-Source-Contributor-Stories-at-Devnexus-Part-2-e1if4g1 5/12/22 - Blog - Into the Box - Dear Amazing Boss - I would like to ask for your approval to attend Into The Box 2022We think you should come to the conference but may need some help convincing your boss to send you. To assist with that, we created a draft letter, inspired by Smashing Magazine, VueJS Conf, and many others, which you can use to send to your boss to help convince them why attending Into the Box in 2022 is going to be a great thing for you and your company.Please use the below letter to convince your boss to let you attend the best ColdFusion Conference of the Year! Remember, the Super Early Bird prices end soon. Hope to see you in September!https://www.intothebox.org/blog/dear-amazing-boss-i-would-like-to-ask-for-your-approval-to-attend-into-the-box-2022/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=podcast 5/12/22 - Blog - Matthew Clemente - Quick and Dirty CFML Slack Notifications with HyperWhile there may be times you need a full-featured Slack integration, just being able to send messages to a channel can be a win for many applications. I recently needed to alert a Slack channel whenever an application was deployed, and found that using Eric Peterson's module Hyper along with Slack's Incoming Webhooks did the trick nicely.I'll share how to do this with a FW/1 application - just know that with ColdBox it would be even easier, and the general approach could even be modified to work without a framework.https://blog.mattclemente.com/2022/05/12/cfml-slack-incoming-webhook-hyper/ 5/12/22 - Blog - Gavin Pickin - Ortus Solutions - Tips, Tricks and Tools to write DRYer more Reusable Code in ColdFusionIn the last blog post, we learned many reasons why we wanted DRYer more reusable code in ColdFusion. This blog post will talk about some of the different tools ColdFusion / CFML gives you to achieve that.https://www.ortussolutions.com/blog/tips-tricks-and-tools-to-write-dryer-more-reusable-code-in-coldfusion/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=podcast Adam Cameron Corner 5/12/22 - Blog - Adam Cameron - CFML: Adding beforeEach handlers to my TinyTestFramework. Another exercise in TDDI have to admit I'm not sure where I'm going with this one yet. I dunno how to implement what I'm needing to do, but I'm gonna start with a test and see where I go from there.Context: I've been messing around with this TinyTestFramework thing for a bit… it's intended to be a test framework one can run in trycf.com, so I need to squeeze it all into one include file, and at the same time make it not seem too rubbish in the coding dept. The current state of affairs is here: tinyTestFramework.cfm, and its tests: testTinyTestFramework.cfm. Runnable here: on trycf.comhttps://blog.adamcameron.me/2022/05/cfml-adding-beforeeach-handlers-to-my.html 5/12/22 - Blog - Adam Cameron - CFML: for the sake of completeness, here's the afterEach treatmentThis immediately follows on from "CFML: Adding beforeEach handlers to my TinyTestFramework. Another exercise in TDD".Having done the beforeEach implementation for my TinyTestFramework, I reckoned afterEach would be super easy: barely an inconvenience. And indeed it was. Took me about 15min, given most of the logic is the same as for beforeEach.https://blog.adamcameron.me/2022/05/cfml-for-sake-of-completeness-heres.html 5/13/22 - Blog - Adam Cameron - CFML: adding aroundEach to TinyTestFramework was way easier than I expectedI'm still pottering around with my TinyTestFramework. Last night I added beforeEach and afterEach handlers, but then thought about how the hell I could easily implement aroundEach support, and I could only see about 50% of it, so I decided to sleep on it.After a night's sleep I spent about 30min before work doing a quick spike (read: no tests, just "will this even work?"), and surprisingly it did work. First time. Well except for a coupla typos, but I nailed the logic first time. I'm sorta halfway chuffed by this, sorta halfway worried that even though what I decided would probably work - and it did - I haven't quite got my head around how it works, or even quite what it's doing. So let's blog about that.https://blog.adamcameron.me/2022/05/cfml-adding-aroundeach-to.html 5/15/22 - Blog - Adam Cameron - CFML: fixing a coupla bugs in my recent work on TinyTestFrameworkLast week I did some more work on my TinyTestFramework:CFML: for the sake of completeness, here's the afterEach treatmentCFML: adding aroundEach to TinyTestFramework was way easier than I expectedOn Saturday, I found a bug in each of those. Same bug, basically, surfacing in two different ways. Here's an example:https://blog.adamcameron.me/2022/05/cfml-fixing-coupla-bugs-in-my-recent.html CFML JobsSeveral positions available on https://www.getcfmljobs.com/Listing over 83 ColdFusion positions from 46 companies across 40 locations in 5 Countries.4 new jobs listedFull-Time - Senior Coldfusion Developer WORK |LATAM| at Colon, PA - United States Posted May 15https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/Senior-Coldfusion-Developer-WORK-LATAM-at-Colon-PA/11470 Full-Time - ColdFusion Developer at Cleveland, OH (Remote) - United States Posted May 13https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/united-states/CFDev-at-CL-OH-Remote/11464 Full-Time - Coldfusion Developer at Bengaluru, Karnataka - India Posted May 11https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/india/Coldfusion-Developer-at-Bengaluru-Karnataka/11465 Full-Time - ColdFusion Developer at India - India Posted May 10https://www.getcfmljobs.com/jobs/index.cfm/india/ColdFusion-Developer-at-India/11466 PATREON SPONSORED JOB POSTING!Hagerty - MotorSportRegSenior Software Engineer, MotorsportWe are seeking a Senior Software Engineer to work primarily with Node/Vue.js, ColdFusion, and AWS to improve our platform and build greenfield experiences.We are a 25-person team supporting 1,600 organizations with our SaaS CRM, commerce and event management platform. With 8,000 events managed in our marketplace annually by our customers, our goal is to be the number one software platform for automotive and motorsport events.Ready to get in the driver's seat? Join us!https://bit.ly/3985J3U Other Job Links Ortus Solutionshttps://www.ortussolutions.com/about-us/careers There is a jobs channel in the cfml slack team, and in the box team slack now too ForgeBox Module of the WeekFacebook Leadgen Forms - CFMLA CFML wrapper for the Facebook Leadgen Forms API. Create and manage Facebook's lead forms via their marketing API.Feel free to use the issue tracker to report bugs or suggest improvements!https://www.forgebox.io/view/fblgfcfml VS Code Hint Tips and Tricks of the WeekVue 3 SnippetsThis extension adds Vue 2 Snippets and Vue 3 Snippets into Visual Studio Code.Including all of the API of Vue.js 2 and Vue.js 3. The code snippet of the extension is shown in the following table. You don't need to remember something, just write code as usual in vscode. You can type vcom, choose VueConfigOptionMergeStrategies, and press ENTER, then Vue.config.optionMergeStrategies appear on the screen.https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=hollowtree.vue-snippets Thank you to all of our Patreon SupportersThese individuals are personally supporting our open source initiatives to ensure the great toolings like CommandBox, ForgeBox, ColdBox,  ContentBox, TestBox and all the other boxes keep getting the continuous development they need, and funds the cloud infrastructure at our community relies on like ForgeBox for our Package Management with CommandBox. You can support us on Patreon here https://www.patreon.com/ortussolutionsDon't forget, we have Annual Memberships, pay for the year and save 10% - great for businesses. Bronze Packages and up, now get a ForgeBox Pro and CFCasts subscriptions as a perk for their Patreon Subscription. All Patreon supporters have a Profile badge on the Community Website All Patreon supporters have their own Private Forum access on the Community Website https://community.ortussolutions.com/ Patreons Brand new Big Patreon SponsorBrian Ghidinelli - Hagerty MotorsportReg  John Wilson - Synaptrix  Eric Hoffman Gary Knight Mario Rodrigues Giancarlo Gomez David Belanger  (Bell-an-jer) Dan Card Jonathan Perret Jeffry McGee - Sunstar Media Dean Maunder Joseph Lamoree  (Lah-more-ee)? Don Bellamy Jan Jannek  (Yan Yannek) Laksma Tirtohadi  (Lah-ksma Turt-o-hah-dee) Carl Von Stetten Jeremy Adams Didier Lesnicki Matthew Clemente Daniel Garcia Scott Steinbeck - Agri Tracking Systems Ben Nadel  Brett DeLine Kai Koenig Charlie Arehart Jonas Eriksson Jason Daiger Shawn Oden Matthew Darby Ross Phillips Edgardo Cabezas Patrick Flynn Stephany Monge  (Monghee) John Whish Kevin Wright Peter Amiri You can see an up to date list of all sponsors on Ortus Solutions' Websitehttps://ortussolutions.com/about-us/sponsors ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Apache Kafka 3.2 - New Features & Improvements

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 6:54


Apache Kafka® 3.2 delivers new  KIPs in three different areas of the Kafka ecosystem: Kafka Core, Kafka Streams, and Kafka Connect. On behalf of the Kafka community, Danica Fine (Senior Developer Advocate, Confluent), shares release highlights.More than half of the KIPs in the new release concern Kafka Core. KIP-704 addresses unclean leader elections by allowing for further communication between the controller and the brokers. KIP-764 takes on the problem of a large number of client connections in a short period of time during preferred leader election by adding the configuration `socket.listen.backlog.size`. KIP-784 adds an error code field to the response of the `DescribeLogDirs` API, and KIP-788 improves network traffic by allowing you to set the pool size of network threads individually per listener on Kafka brokers. Finally, in accordance with the imminent KRaft protocol, KIP-801 introduces a built-in `StandardAuthorizer` that doesn't depend on ZooKeeper. There are five KIPs related to Kafka Streams in the AK 3.2 release. KIP-708 brings rack-aware standby assignment by tag, which improves fault tolerance. Then there are three projects related to Interactive Queries v2: KIP-796 specifies an improved interface for Interactive Queries; KIP-805 allows state to be queried over a specific range; and KIP-806 adds two implementations of the Query interface, `WindowKeyQuery` and `WindowRangeQuery`.The final Kafka Streams project, KIP-791, enhances `StateStoreContext` with `recordMetadata`,which may be accessed from state stores.Additionally, this Kafka release introduces Kafka Connect-related improvements, including KIP-769, which extends the `/connect-plugins` API, letting you list all available plugins, and not just connectors as before.  KIP-779 lets `SourceTasks` handle producer exceptions according to `error.tolerance`, rather than instantly killing the entire connector by default. Finally, KIP-808 lets you specify precisions with respect to TimestampConverter single message transforms. Tune in to learn more about the Apache Kafka 3.2 release!EPISODE LINKSApache Kafka 3.2 release notes Read the blog to learn moreDownload Apache Kafka 3.2.0Watch the video version of this podcast

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Chewing Glass - T.J. Littlejohn

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:39


Chewing glass is what Solana developers do. Introducing the fifth episode in a new series on the Solana Podcast, Chewing Glass. Chase Barker (Developer Relations Lead at Solana Labs) talks shop with the most interesting builders in the Solana ecosystem. It's for devs, by devs.Today's guest is T.J. Littlejohn, the founder of MtnPay, which won 1st Prize in the Payments Track of the recent Riptide Hackathon. 01:30 - Origin Story and Background05:12 - MntDAO08:42 - Building with Solana12:04 - MntPay13:25 - The APIs15:43 - Winning at Riptide17:37 - From starting in Solana to winning 20:41 - Starting to build in Solana23:38 - Improving onboarding on Solana25:26 - The Developer ecosystem27:07 - Missing Tooling29:30 - Advice for newcomers DISCLAIMERThe information on this podcast is provided for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness, or fitness for any particular purpose.The information contained in or provided from or through this podcast is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice, investment advice, trading advice, or any other advice.The information on this podcast is general in nature and is not specific to you, the user or anyone else. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading or otherwise, based on any of the information presented on this podcast without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional broker or financial advisor. Chase (00:29):Hey everybody and welcome to Chewing Glass, the show where we talk to developers building in the Solana Ecosystem. Today we have with us, TJ LittleJohn. He is the founder of mtnPay, winner of the most recent Solana Hackathon Payments Track for Riptide. TJ, how's it going, man?TJ (00:55):Dude, it's going good. We're stoked to be here. Thanks for having me on.Chase (01:00):Yeah, man. You and I basically met, I feel like a few months ago when you were building some stuff for iOS. Basically some IDL stuff with Anchor and we were talking about potentially getting you some work going on and then next thing you know, a couple of things happen and here we are. But before we dive too much into that, let's hear a little introduction. I know a lot of people probably don't know a ton about you. Where'd you start your journey and how'd you end up here, building in the Solana Ecosystem?TJ (01:31):Yeah. Wow. For sure. Abridged version. So, I'm from Florida originally born and raised. Grew up in South Florida, went to school in Tallahassee, Florida State Granoles. Originally I was a big Math guy. Always wanted to do pure Math and trying to see how I could make a career out of that. Finance was an option. And so I was exploring that and someone told me I should learn to code. So, I started learning to code, from that found Hackathons, from that found iOS development. And just down the rabbit hole there. At a hackathon, I ended up securing an internship at Apple, which turned into a job. And then I spent four years there doing research and development and experience prototyping. And then about a year ago I decided I was done with that and I wanted to be in startups. And so I left, joined a startup. Five months after that I found Solana through some friends and I just noticed the point in time we were at. And I was just stoked. And so I quit and I just immediately started building.Chase (02:36):Wow. So you don't have a CS degree, you're self-taught programmer and landed an internship at Apple dealing on the development side of things?TJ (02:44):No, I do have a CS degree.Chase (02:46):Oh, you do?TJ (02:46):So, I did both. I did Math and CS, but the CS portion to me was the less interesting one. I loved pure Math. I thought it was so cool. CS was more of the necessity one. And then I thought it was cool when I started doing it. But I think I learned a lot more through just the apps I built outside of class. So, partially self-taught. Because that was the more important part, but my education was super important too.Chase (03:13):You have a CS degree, you ended up interning for Apple. You did that for how long was it again?TJ (03:20):It was four years.Chase (03:22):Four years. And you said research, were you actually doing development while you were there?TJ (03:26):Yeah, so we did data collection for new products. So think how face ID was trained on millions of images. We built the software to facilitate those user studies that captured the data to train the models, to enable face ID. So we were brought in super early product.Chase (03:44):Oh, so I mean, I guess that's a little more interesting, like somebody who's into Math, you're dealing with lots of data and information, or opposed to just writing a high level code or something like that.TJ (03:55):Not exactly. The Math thing, it's like pure Math. I don't do with data and numbers and processing. I just think pure Math is fucking cool. And when I have an itch about something, I just want to dive. And so, that was the Math thing for me. That was just pure. I love it and I think it taught me how to understand stuff, which I think I still, every now and then, I'll see, I have the power to do that, which is really cool. The thing with Apple was that it let me just hack on shit. I had month long projects and software efforts that, because I get bored really quick, which is a blessing and a curse. Historically. Apple just let me work on a project and then a month later I was working on something else.Chase (04:41):Yeah, we've had some conversations, like you said, you get bored really quick, it comes through a little bit in your personality. You get super excited about things and bounce around and that's why I like your energy, it's super crazy and incredible. So it's nice to have people so excited about these things and especially considering the fact of some of the more recent, great things that have happened. I want to really start this whole conversation outside of your past on where it all truly, truly began, which from what I understand was really mtnDAO. That's like, lit this whole fire off. I don't know if everybody knows about it and if they do, maybe not how great of a thing that it turned out to be. Maybe about Barrett and Edgar and what they set up and how it was and then how that whole month went for you, that led to this moment.TJ (05:31):So yeah, mtnDAO, for people that don't know was a month long hacker house in Salt Lake City, Utah, where people from all over just congregated and we spent a month working on whatever it is you want to work on, in this co-working space called The Shop. And like you said, Edgar and Barrett, they're actually the ones that got me into Solana. They were the first people to introduce me and they just threw this hack house to grow the ecosystem out of the kindness of their own hearts and love for co-working and developing and hacking. And so yeah, a bunch of us came through and we just were chilling in Utah. We'd go snowboarding on the weekends. We'd throw parties on Fridays and bring in people from around the City and just strips, just get after it.And that was the best part. We'd be working from like 10:00, 11:00 AM was when I would roll in till like 1:00, 2:00 in the morning, most days. And a good crew of people were always there doing that too. Maybe if you wanted to go grab dinner, you could and people would come back. But yeah, it was just a lot of incredibly focused work and a nice little crew formed out of that. And so I've seen a lot of the same mtnDAO folks at the next hacker houses and stuff, and that's always fun. And you just become friends with these people.Chase (06:51):Yeah, it seems like there was a lot of building going on. I'm not going to lie, I saw that notion that Edgar and Barrett, or I think it might have been Edgar, correct me if I'm wrong, put together this notion. And I was like, a Dev did this? Just because it was so organized and well put together. And then, those guys pretty much put this thing, from start to finish, got this thing going.TJ (07:09):Yeah. There was a lot of people that participated in the setup of it. I know Sam had a big part, Edgar and Barrett had a big part. A lot of those core Salt Lake City people were doing this stuff. But yeah. I mean, they took out the trash. There was, under the tables the first day, taping extension cords. So they, I mean, yeah, they did the stuff.Chase (07:28):Yeah. I talked to him in Miami and he was like, yeah, I have a room and an office that's filled with about a hundred monitors. I can't remember what it is at some point, but it looked like there was tons of building going on there. Whenever I see the community, they didn't really ask for permission. And a lot of people would say, why don't you bring a hacker house to our city or this or that? And the reality is, you don't need that. You have an idea, you execute, you make it known. And people are going to come there and you're probably going to likely get some sponsors to help you put it on because this is like an incubator. And obviously mtnPay came out of this, which is incredible. Let's talk a little bit about that. I'm pretty sure, maybe I'm wrong, is that Solana Pay, was it announced before you got to mtnDAO? Or was it announced while you were there?TJ (08:13):It was actually the same day. February 1st is when I rolled through.Chase (08:19):I was on a phone call with you actually, whenever you showed up, you remember that?TJ (08:22):Really?Chase (08:23):Yeah, you were like, I just got to mtnDAO. Yeah. We were...TJ (08:27):I probably called you from the airport. Yeah. I've been like--Chase (08:29):You did.TJ (08:30):Probably over-committing myself. And I remember we were talking about doing a possible grant or something for that IDL stuff. And I was like, just trying to not lose that. Not doing my end of it. You were like, TJ, if you just write a notion page on your idea, I can move it through. And I was like, ah, I don't know. I'm building. And yeah. So we never got through there, but yeah.Chase (08:55):Well, I think it worked out pretty well. So, you got there, Solana Pay's announced, and you were just like, okay, well I'm just going to build something with this.TJ (09:04):No, not at all.Chase (09:06):Okay.TJ (09:07):There was two funny touch points with Solana Pay that got me rolling. The first one was, I hopped out of mtnDAO to go to the LA hacker house for a two day stint, because I was working with these people. And then as I was about to leave, I remember my friend Greg from Solana News was like, I missed the news cycle on Solana Pay. They must have had insider information, that was a couple of days after it was announced. And I was like, what do you mean, dude? It's been going on. He's like, what? I'm like, yeah. Are you not on Twitter? Do you not see this stuff? So, that was funny.And so, that had top of mind a little bit, but the idea for mtnPay, it was Friday night, it was the night of the first party we were having, we had parties every Friday or Saturday. And I was grabbing a Red Bull from, they had this self-service checkout kiosk, as I do. I just consume just stupid amounts of Red Bull. And I was buying another one and you pay through square, tap your phone. I don't know. I just had a random idea that it was like, yo, wouldn't it be hilarious if we rebuilt this self checkout experience and then just added the Solana Pay stuff, because we're all Solana people here for a month, this the first week and that would just be funny.And I told him, I was like, I'm just going to do it. And they're like, that's hilarious. Do it. And then so on Sunday, my boy Scott was in town and we were at the hacker house just trying to think of things to work on for Riptide. And we were skating through all these different ideas on creator tokens or I don't remember all the different things. And it was like, what if we do that Point of Sale thing? That'd be cool. And whatever, we could probably build this in a two day stint. Not a big deal and yeah, that's why we built it.Chase (11:00):Yeah, I remember starting to see a couple of days after Solana Pay launched, I started to see all these videos of people filming themselves and you guys paying with Solana Pay. I was like, this is crazy. This just came out. I can't believe, well, I could believe that you had put that together already. And then from there, Solana Pay's really gained a ton of traction, but you were really the first person to come out and be like, look, hey guys, I did it. And it's actually live in this place right now. And it's still there to this day? They keep that?TJ (11:32):Yeah. As far as I know. Our customer success could use some work. And so I haven't followed up with them in a couple weeks. But we got them set up on our new version, which was a more self-service thing. So as far as I know, it's still running there. There's even a week where it wasn't working and Barrett was texting me nonstop. Like, bro, you need to get this working again because I need this. And so, that's that classic, build something, people would be upset if it goes away. And so we did that.Chase (12:01):Yeah. So you did this in a short amount of time and since then, there was a lot left in the hackathon to go. So, since that first day or that you got that live, I guess you've been doing a ton of work up until the point where you made your final submission, tell us a little bit about mtnPay and what work was involved and what are the features and maybe what's the future of mtnPay.TJ (12:30):Yeah, for sure. So the first half the gate was just, it's an iOS Point of Sale app that enables users to use Solana Pay to pay. And then the second thing is a square integration. So, we use the square APIs to tie it into your current Point of Sale System. So the transactions show up in line. Chase bought a Red Bull here for $3 with his MasterCard and then he bought a cookie for a dollar using Solana Pay. And so that was the core thing. And we had built it specifically for The Shop. We got a bunch of inbound of like, how can I set this up? How can I do it? So we had to take a step back and use a couple weeks to make it more robust and actually usable in self-service. Which was our base for what we wanted to submit to the hackathon, was just like a usable Point of Sale by everyone, it's still in test flight.And then Solana Pay evolved to a new spec while we were there. And then immediately became gas on that. And ever since the wheels have been turning there and then that initial spec change is what led us to where we are today, which is honestly, and not a lot of people know this, but we're more of an API company now. We're more like SaaS APIs and stuff like that.Chase (13:43):I guess, doing the API side makes it a little more versatile so that anybody can use it and they don't have to use a specific device or framework or anything like that.TJ (13:55):Yeah. I think the APIs, to be honest, they came more out of this idea of defensibility, because with a lot of the attention we got, it was like, what's the opportunity here? Is there something worth building out? And in that, there's a lot of things that could make you super existential, like just square adding Solana pay themselves. And so how do we actually build a moat in this industry or something. And so we were like, this transaction request thing came up, which enables you to use APIs in Solana Pay, what if we open that up to people and then let that be our defensibility and our moat. And so we spent a lot of time thinking about what that API suite would look like and then realize that, that's the bigger opportunity from our point of view, but probably more importantly, it's what we want to build in this space.I think there's a lot of opportunities for a lot of people to participate and building out the client that people would use. There's also a lot of stuff that we weren't interested in building. Like inventory management and tax reporting and accounting. Like, nah. I want to do the Solana stuff. And the APIs is the Solana stuff. And so that's where we're at now.Chase (15:08):Now. Yeah. I mean, it makes sense. Here's the thing, you build a project and you don't want to start taking on things that you don't enjoy because then you probably stop enjoying your job. So you do what excites you and then you offload or allow connection points for other people to build that stuff who see that opportunity. But it makes a lot of sense. I've talked to people who have created businesses and then they pull in, maybe not this specifically, but like the tax stuff and all these different sort of inventory management. And then it becomes like, I don't really like this anymore. This is not what I signed up for.TJ (15:42):That's what was happening. And so it was like, really I had to focus on something specifically in there and that's, we picked the APIs and it's been cool. We've been working with different protocols to add their functionality to our APIs. And yeah, it's been fun since we started focusing there.Chase (16:04):So obviously it was the right move because you, just to circle back to this is, you won the Payments Track of the Riptide Hackathon. There was a lot of competition. There was a lot of good stuff in there. So I'm just curious, how did that feel when you saw that?TJ (16:18):I'm dumb competitive. And so it was so funny because it was like, it started off as people are, oh, you going to submit this to Riptide? And it was like, yeah, probably, but we're not really focused on that. And the closer we got to Riptide, we're like, we want to win. And then so we had been paying a lot of attention to other people that were building in this space, seeing where people's attention was. The whole time we were like, I don't know, fairly confident we would do well to some extent, but then I think it was up to, what did the judges value? You don't know. But we were super proud of what we built and we're hoping other people saw what we saw and seeing that we won the Payments Track, it was just like a pat on the back. It was like, we agree.Chase (17:07):We agree.TJ (17:09):Yeah. That's what it was. And there was some chest pounding, there was something like, yes. But I also think the part I was more stoked on was just the attention that would follow and knowing that we could leverage that to build something. Because I think the attention is just like, it's fuel. And you can't do it with only attention you have to follow it up. But we knew it would empower a lot of the things that we wanted to do.Chase (17:37):Yeah, for sure. And I think these aren't necessarily your classic typical hackathon, where you hack on some little thing for a week or a month. These sorts of events are actually catalysts to build real businesses. And this is meant to be inspirational to developers that are watching this, that may or may not have dipped their toes into Solana. Maybe they have, but they haven't gotten anywhere. These stories are super inspirational. So I want to put it in context. What is the timeframe from the day that TJ wrote his first piece or read his first Solana doc to winning Riptide Payments Track? What's that timeframe?TJ (18:13):September, August. I was reading, I was staying up late. I was still working at the startup and I was staying up till like 3:00, 4:00 in the morning, reading that classic, Paul article on doing an escrow. It was partly that it was partly that Packy podcast.Chase (18:30):Oh yeah.TJ (18:30):On Solana Summer. That was super dope. I remember I was at the gym and I was listening to him talk about the DJ Apes Mint and two weeks prior I was at Miami hack week, it was like, I remember I was chilling with Barrett, I met him for the first time, we had met through our friend Eve, shoutout Eve. And it was just me, Barrett, Edgar and Eve in this apartment and they were just talking about crypto and I knew nothing. So I wanted to fit in and I was like, oh, I bought some Ethereum lately.I thought I would impress him. And he is like, nah, and he's looking at me, he's like, fuck Ethereum. And I was like, what? And just turns around and he goes, Solana. And I was like, what is Solana? I thought it was like some shit coin. And that was just when it got on my map. And then I saw the Packy thing. I did that. And then all these NFT things were popping up and I'm like, all right, what's going on? And then Candy Machine pops up. So I'm like reading that contract and I'm reading the Levi's thing and trying to set one up for myself and it feels like explosions all around me. And I'm like, what is this world? And people are just shipping and I can't keep up. And it was like overwhelming. And then I quit.Chase (19:41):So it's been about, from zero to hero in seven months, basically. Is what I'm hearing right here. Seven or eight months.TJ (19:49):Yeah. Something like that. Yeah. I feel like I got onboarded fairly quick. I feel like I was doing stuff to me that felt like mattered, immediately. All that iOS stuff that I was doing, to me felt groundbreaking.Chase (20:04):Yeah.TJ (20:05):And I felt like a hero then, honestly. That stuff made me feel more of a hero than what I felt like with Riptide.Chase (20:11):Really?TJ (20:12):To be totally honest.Chase (20:12):So it was more so just that you win Riptide, like, wow, I got this thing, but the more part for you was the personal win of actually just starting on this new journey and figuring out how to build on Solana.TJ (20:26):Like I said, I'm dummy competitive. So winning Riptide was great. It was a good job power, but with mtnPay, I don't feel like I've done anything yet. I think there's opportunities too. And we're on a path to actually really contribute to the Solana Ecosystem. But I don't feel like I've had a major accomplishment there yet. But with the iOS stuff, I totally did. I, from native iOS code, minted an NFT through Candy Machine. I figured out how to talk to Anchor programs from native iOS code. And that to me was like, that gave me so much energy.Chase (21:05):So tell me about that. You started building on Solana, did you start messing around with Rust? Did you start messing around with Anchor? Or did you go straight to those SWIFT SDKs that existed? What was your process for getting rolling on Solana?TJ (21:18):Totally. Yeah. That's a great thing to preface here is, I've done barely any Rust. I haven't shipped a smart contract to Mainnet. Mostly client work. So there's massive opportunities in this space to really participate and have impact just doing client work. That being said, the way I really learned it was just wanting to write an iOS app that would work with Solana. And so I found a couple of open source SWIFT packages that was doing iOS transaction stuff. And so, that's how I learned what a transaction object looked like and where you serialize it and how you add accounts to that. And what's an account. And what's [inaudible 00:22:02] coding. All of that stuff I just learned because I had to, to make an iOS app that talked to Anchor. And so me and my friend, Michael, we went to college together, and so we were up till like 4:00 in the morning for weeks just printing out transaction objects in JavaScript, on the Anchor thing and figuring out how do we bridge that to iOS? And that was the coolest.Chase (22:30):And then this is exactly the point we've talked about a couple times on this show. And I say it on my Twitter all the time. You just won Riptide Payments Track and you'd never shipped a smart contract. How? Well it's because not everybody needs to be this guy who writes the smart contracts. You just need to know how to talk to them, using these different APIs, SWIFT, JavaScript. There's a C# SDK, there's a Unity One built on top of that. There's a [inaudible 00:22:57] one, they're all out there and you can learn Solana, and in a way you're comfortable, which is in your native language. And you're talking about just doing print lines and printing out and just reading, what is this object? And now I get it.TJ (23:10):Yeah. That was the process. And it was great. And I think we have a long way to go before developers can step in and build incredibly easily and efficiently, but the process is still fun. And there's a lot of toys you get to use when building this up, a lot of exposure, you feel super low level. And yet, they encourage everyone to just dig in and start building shit.Chase (23:38):In your opinion, what are some of those things that need to improve to make this easier for the new guys or the old guys? It doesn't really matter. What needs to happen? And what do we need?TJ (23:47):Error messages.Chase (23:49):Error messages.TJ (23:52):It is like, you will get like, Error A4, and there's nowhere to go. And you're digging around. I'm like, dude, you literally got to clone the repo and go line by line and figure out what's that error? What are we doing? It's fun. And from when I got into it to like what Armani's done with Anchor now and the Anchor books, that's there, the Solana Cookbook, that's all there now. So it's easier to do it now. And even when I try to do more on-chain stuff or build out stuff that I'm not comfortable with, I'm able to go reference those materials, but they weren't there in September.Chase (24:30):Yeah.TJ (24:31):And that was kind of fun though. It was like a point in time. And I was always envious of people that got to code in machine code, because they had to and what a point in time that must have been to get to be a part of that. And that's why I started building in Solana, I saw that point in time again, I thought Solana was going to pop and I was like, I'm not missing it.Chase (24:53):You were basically like, I see Solana, I see that not everything's been created and there's massive opportunities and I'm going to carve myself out a slice of that and just do it. So it's pretty crazy to be talking about this now.TJ (25:05):Yeah, it's been a journey.Chase (25:07):Yeah. And a lot of this was all Discord Support. It was a huge pain in the ass. You answer the same questions 5,000 times a day. Shoutout to the [inaudible 00:25:16] team at Solana labs that really just spent way too much time in Discord and the core engineers that shouldn't be there all.TJ (25:22):Shoutout Alan.Chase (25:23):Yeah. Alan has actually been obviously incredible.TJ (25:26):Fun story, in that with Alan, we were working on that iOS stuff till dumb hours at night, I think it might have been 2:00 in the morning. And we were having these errors we could not figure out. And so we posted in Discord and Alan answered and we're going back and forth with this guy. Didn't know him at all. This is our first thing. He's like, I'm happy to hop on a call with you to help you sort it out. And we were on that call for three hours. But that to me is such a story of people in Solana. There is so many people that just are cool with just helping you. And they're in the weeds with you and it's that developer ecosystem that attracted me and I think is going to attract so many people after me.):Which to your credit, I think you've set up a lot of it. Being the dev relations at Solana, just creating the environment for those developers to thrive and giving them the resources. I think that's where this has come from, but yeah, that was just a monster classic Solana moment for me that I wanted to highlight.Chase (26:31):Yeah, for sure. And there's a lot of people. It started with Toly and Raj and then that attitude and welcomeness humor came down to me and Armani and so many different people that feels like you can approach anybody in the ecosystem. And I agree, I think this side of tone and vibe is what will attract a lot of younger developers.TJ (26:56):Yeah.Chase (26:57):There's lots of different complaints out there. One of the biggest ones we've been hearing a lot is about tooling. If you agree with that, what web tooling or blockchain tooling are we missing right now at Solana? Do you have anything personally that you would like to see?TJ (27:12):No, I don't have the most robust engineering background. When I was at Apple, we used Apple internal tools. So that was all I really knew. And so, even now, I'll be coding on something with someone at a hackathon and they're like, wait, you're not using this plugin. You're not using the Anchor plugin for VS code. I'm like, no, what is that?Chase (27:34):Here's the old-school.TJ (27:36):Yeah. They're like, baby come here. They would set me up with some stuff. So, that's so cool. I think examples are going to be great. I think just like getting examples out there for people so that they could learn that they can do it too is going to be really cool.Chase (27:48):And self-onboard.TJ (27:48):Yeah. Self-onboarding's massive. And that's one of the ways we want to go with mtnPay, because we're just like a set of APIs. I think we can open up these APIs to iOS native developers to be able to build apps, they don't need to do the exact transaction building. We can have just a normal API that lets them build the transaction themselves. So that's one of the directions we definitely want to go into and we feel like can bring native developers to Solana, hopefully.Chase (28:16):Yeah. It's about giving the tools, the education to onboard people like mtnPay and the rest of the ecosystem who then drives in the users and then that it just spreads outwardly from there. So it's pretty incredible to watch right now, I'm not going to say, like I started last May about, next month will be my one year. And the difference in one year has made, like you said, even in September, you didn't have half the things that are available now. It's happening at the speed of light and it's, who knows? In one year from now it's going to be, again, unrecognizable. So I mean, it'll be unrecognizable in like six months, most likely or less. We'll see.TJ (28:57):Yeah. Just being along for the journey, I feel grateful.Chase (29:00):Yeah.TJ (29:01):Just what a point in time that we're in. I was talking with Edgar the other day, I was like, we got to remember, we're in the good old days right now.Chase (29:08):I guess, to round this off and you kind of already touched on this and I always do this at the end of every single episode of the show is, to just give some advice to whoever you want to give to advice to, maybe it's the new devs looking to come into blockchain that might be scared or intimidated by just the name, blockchain, scares some people.TJ (29:30):I mean, just start. Just start and just build. There's so many opportunities within yourself to push things off and it's so easy to complain or give yourself reasons to not build stuff. Even within myself every day I'd catch myself either complaining or giving excuses or whatever. But reality is, just build because when you just start building, you'll figure it out. You can ask the questions, you'll get there. And then that building really gives you momentum to keep going.Chase (30:09):Yeah man.TJ (30:10):Yeah. And it attracts people to you and then those people are going to give you energy and it just, it all cycles. But you have to be the one to start.Chase (30:21):Yeah. I mean, I don't think anybody's really given that advice and it is, like, we're all engineers, we've all just put things off. We all have 200 projects that we started one night and then never got back to. So it's really just getting started and just following through.TJ (30:35):Yeah. And don't be afraid to chase the energy. There's so many things I've tried doing in Solana that I would work on for a week and then stop. But even now I go back to them and they're just tools in the belt. And you'll be able to leverage learnings later on.Chase (30:51):Yeah. For sure. Well, TJ, congratulations for winning the Riptide Payments Track with mtnPay. Glad to get you on the show. Glad to have a conversation. Love the energy. Just keep it up, man. And thanks again for doing what you do. And thanks for being here.TJ (31:09):Yeah, no, I appreciate the opportunity. I feel there's definitely the longest we've been able to chat for how long we've known each other. It's funny. I feel like we kept missing each other in Miami. So, I'm glad we got this opportunity and hopefully I'll see you in The Bahamas.Chase (31:23):Thanks for coming on. 

Bank On It
Episode 509 Kiaan Pillay from Stitch

Bank On It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:39


This episode was produced remotely using the ListenDeck standardized audio & video production system. If you're looking to jumpstart your podcast miniseries or upgrade your podcast or video production please visit www.ListenDeck.com. You can subscribe to this podcast and stay up to date on all the stories here on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio. In this episode the host John Siracusa chats remotely with Kiaan Pillay, Founder & CEO of Stitch.  Stitch is an API fintech that makes it easier for businesses to connect to users' financial accounts to access data and enable payments.   Tune in and Listen. Subscribe now on Apple Podcasts, Google , Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon and iHeartRadio to hear Thursdays episode with Mark Scafaro from Afficiency. About the host:   John, is the host of the  ‘Bank On It' podcast recorded onsite in Wall Street at OpenFin and the founder of the remotely recorded, studio quality standardized podcast production system ListenDeck. Follow John on LinkedIn, Twitter, Medium

Darknet Diaries
117: Daniel the Paladin

Darknet Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 71:38


Daniel Kelley (https://twitter.com/danielmakelley) was equal parts mischievousness and clever when it came to computers. Until the day his mischief overtook his cleverness. Sponsors Support for this show comes from Keeper Security. Keeper Security's is an enterprise password management system. Keeper locks down logins, payment cards, confidential documents, API keys, and database passwords in a patented Zero-Knowledge encrypted vault. And, it takes less than an hour to deploy across your organization. Get started by visiting keepersecurity.com/darknet. Support for this podcast comes from Cybereason. Cybereason reverses the attacker's advantage and puts the power back in the defender's hands. End cyber attacks. From endpoints to everywhere. Learn more at Cybereason.com/darknet.

Pipeliners Podcast
Episode 232: Pipeline Safety and Information Sharing with Shawn Lyon

Pipeliners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:00


This week's Pipeliners Podcast episode features Shawn Lyon discussing the importance of active pipeline safety and how to share safety information throughout the industry. The episode was recorded in person during the 2022 API Pipeline, Control Room And Cybernetics Conference. In this episode, you will learn about the importance of sharing data throughout the industry with other companies and how something similar to the Aviation Safety Action Program would be beneficial to the safety of the pipeliners community. - Access the show notes, video of this interview, and full episode transcript at PipelinePodcastNetwork.com.

Data Protection Gumbo
144: How to Remove Legacy Baggage - MinIO

Data Protection Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:13


Anand Babu Periasamy, Co-Founder, CEO of MinIO, Inc. discusses object storage and the rise of SaaS or Software as a Service, the importance of using microservices in the data protection space, and the role APIs play in data management.