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Best podcasts about iac

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Latest podcast episodes about iac

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1256 - CEO Builds Amazing Tech Apps that makes Huge Impact to People's Lives

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 16:38


Zach Roseman is CEO of Mosaic Group, IAC's global mobile app studio, which builds and operates hit products like Robokiller, iTranslate, Blossom, Clime and more. Prior to becoming CEO, Zach led Mosaic Group's acquisition efforts, which included the acquisitions of iTranslate, Teltech, and Productive, while also serving as General Manager of Apalon, where he drove the company's shift to subscriptions and a deeper and more focused investment in its product portfolio. Zach joined Mosaic Group from IAC's M&A team, where he worked on numerous acquisitions, investments and sales during his tenure. He started his career working in investment banking as an analyst for RBC Capital Markets, and also served in the Israel Defense Forces. He received a BA in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania, and currently resides in New York City. Website: www.mosaic.co LinkedIn: zacharyroseman

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
Java, Jakarta EE and MicroProfile on Azure

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 51:17


An airhacks.fm conversation with Ed Burns (@edburns) about: expisode with Ed's first computer: "#161 SGI, NCSA Mosaic, Sun, Java, JSF, Java EE, Jakarta EE and Clouds" enabling Jakarta EE servers to run well on Azure, working with IBM and Oracle to support OpenLiberty on Azure and WebLogic on Azure, working with payara cloud, Azure Container Instances the cloud way of "docker run", JBoss EAP on Azure App Service, MicroProfile, Jakarta EE and Java EE application servers on Azure, Lift and Shift with kubernetes and Azure Kubernetes Service, Azure Container Apps - the sweet spot of ACI and ACR, cloud portability with Kubernetes, IaC with ARM Template, WebLogic on Kubernetes was using Bicep, "the complexity tax", Microsoft joins Java Community Process (JCP), Microsoft Build of OpenJDK, Azure Event Bus and Azure Service Bus, "#111 Java / Jakarta Messaging Service (JMS) on ...Microsoft Azure", Payara Cloud on Azure - the serverless server, OpenLiberty on AKS, JBoss EAP on Azure App Service, the Azure Service Connector, Azure Services as a Service -- the anti-corruption layer, Azure ExpressRoute and Azure Virtual Network, Event Driven Architectures and Azure Logic Apps, Ed Burns on twitter: @edburns

Podcast proConf
#117 Лучшее за 2021

Podcast proConf

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 97:01


Доклады: "Impacting Global Policy by Understanding Litter Data" by Sean Doherty ( https://youtu.be/azRe9UV8VJA ) CrystalConf 2021 - Guilherme Bernal - Reaching 200k req/s on a single core with io_uring | Crystal 1.0 Conference ( https://youtu.be/TYq_ohhYZ9A ) A Day in the Life of a Developer: Moving Code From Development to Production Without Losing Control ( https://docker.events.cube365.net/dockercon-live/2021/content/Videos/XmtpJakur8JWQN5r9 ) VS Code Tips and Tricks - Sana Ajani, Microsoft ( https://youtu.be/4qM3R69OzbQ ) The Rising Storm of Ethics in Open Source - Coraline Ada Ehmke ( https://youtu.be/0I70wz9Qa44 ) SmashingConf - HTTP:3 Demo by Robin Marx - Meets for Speed - Sept 2021 ( https://vimeo.com/622883389 ) "Asami: Turn your JSON into a Graph in 2 Lines" by Paula Gearon ( https://youtu.be/-XegX_K6w-o ) Спор о первом языке программирования: окончательное решение / Виталий Брагилевский ( https://youtu.be/OtcKHgkPiyk ) RailsConf 2021 - Keynote: Aaron Patterson ( https://youtu.be/qgZ4YLO0pYE ) Testing Web Accessibility ( https://youtu.be/-dBsgG7L2EQ )

This Week Unpacked
Israel and Antisemitism: Takeaways from IAC

This Week Unpacked

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 9:37


My colleague Sarah Himeles attended the Israeli-American Council conference this weekend in Florida. Here are 8 big ideas we're taking away from it. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked ~~~~ Sources: https://www.israeliamerican.org/ https://www.timesofisrael.com/former-idf-general-bombing-ap-tower-in-gaza-in-may-conflict-was-an-own-goal/

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF
#94 - Edwin Dorsey - Shorting Bad Businesses, Investigating Care.com & Dorsey the ‘Anti-Zuckerberg'

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 62:02


Edwin Dorsey is Founder of The Bear Cave, a short-focused newsletter that investigates and uncovers ‘Bad businesses'. Edwin's passion for investing began in third grade, and when his grandmother funded an E-Trade account for him whilst still in elementary school, he was hooked. Whilst at Stanford, Dorsey shone a spotlight on the nefarious Care.com, having instigated an international investigation, that culminated with a Wallstreet Journal front page, a C-suite overhaul, and IAC's ultimate acquisition of Care.com in early 2020. Edwin relives that story and many more like it, including the equally awe-inspiring tale of Root Insurance's unsavoury practices, and subsequent demise. We discuss how to identify these bad businesses and what red flags investors can look out for, before concluding by talking Twitter, and Edwin's super-fandom of both Dorsey and the company's monetisation potential. Enjoy!Check out The Bear Cave on Substack: https://thebearcave.substack.com/ Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter------------------Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results.CMC Markets is an execution-only service provider. The material (whether or not it states any opinions) is for general information purposes only, and does not take into account your personal circumstances or objectives. Nothing in this material is (or should be considered to be) financial, investment or other advice on which reliance should be placed. No opinion given in the material constitutes a recommendation by CMC Markets or the author that any particular investment, security, transaction or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person.The material has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research. Although we are not specifically prevented from dealing before providing this material, we do not seek to take advantage of the material prior to its dissemination.CMC Markets does not endorse or offer opinion on the trading strategies used by the author. Their trading strategies do not guarantee any return and CMC Markets shall not be held responsible for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein. for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein.

The David Suissa Podcast
Rising Crime, Jewish Pride, Elon Gold and Lots More

The David Suissa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:07


Listen to the full episode on any of your favorite podcast platforms!   In this episode, David and Shanni weigh in on the IAC conference, the latest episode of Succession, the backlash against rising crime, Elon Musk as Time's Person of the Year, picking laughter over fear, an amazing song by Ed Sheeran, and more juicy stuff.    Follow David Suissa on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram & Shanni Suissa on Instagram, Twitter and TikTok.   

If Anyone Cares
67. December Show 2021

If Anyone Cares

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 78:44


Our last show of 2021! @RileyJamesIAC talks about the year that was with IAC, the behind the curtain things about the last 12 months, and runs through the best and worst moments of the show's year. First guest for the Bowl Game was our favourite Canadian, Sabrina Belmonte! Her knowledge about college football is almost nonexistent, but she had a fun time guessing at our list. Third segment is previewing 2022. Some new ideas for different types of episodes, potential guests, and projected growth of the show were all topic of conversation as we head into Year 5 of If Anyone Cares. The second guest for the Bowl Game was Ana Bellinghausen. The sports reporter's intellect about college football is the biggest thing to watch going into that part of the show. Lastly, we thank you for another great year. You're the best and we always care for you. See you in ‘22. Twitters:  @IfAnyoneCares_  @RileyJamesIAC  @SabriB10 @AnaBellMedia  Instagram: @RileyJamesIAC  @Sabri.Belmonte @AnaMarieBell 

ITN Live
1:1 w/ Oliver Wellington, Founder | Creating and Distributing Micro-Content With Headliner

ITN Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 37:55


Oliver Wellington loves building startups from the ground up. He was co-founder at nRelate, a content recommendation engine used by over 100,000 publishers and bloggers. That company exited to IAC in 2012, and he continued to build it until 2015. He co-founded SpareMin in 2015, which was an app to help podcasters and guests connect for interviews. The company rebranded as Headliner, which is now the most popular audio to video creator on the market, currently helping thousands of podcasters create promo clip videos every single day. Use my referral code and get 2 weeks free of Headliner Pro - https://jameshicks.link/headliner --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hicksnewmedia/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hicksnewmedia/support

Daily Check-In with Ned1313
Infrastructure as Data?

Daily Check-In with Ned1313

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 10:54


Continuing my thoughts on the need for a CDK when developing IaC, I came across an interesting post (hat-tip Scott Lowe) about Crossplane and the concept of Infrastructure as Data. While I'm not convinced that Crossplane is the way of the future, it does push me closer to the idea of static IaC files as an artifact of the build process. Blog post: https://hackernoon.com/infrastructure-as-code-the-next-big-shift-is-here ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Website: https://nedinthecloud.com Pluralsight: https://app.pluralsight.com/profile/author/edward-bellavance GitHub: https://github.com/ned1313

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:09


There are a lot of good things you can do with Infrastructure as Code (IaC) for automation, repeatability, and ease of operations and development. But there are also code and infrastructure pitfalls where you can tumble into a hole, break your leg, and get eaten by spiders. OK, maybe not  that bad, but on today's episode we talk about potential IaC pitfalls and how to avoid them with guest Tim Davis. The post Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:09


There are a lot of good things you can do with Infrastructure as Code (IaC) for automation, repeatability, and ease of operations and development. But there are also code and infrastructure pitfalls where you can tumble into a hole, break your leg, and get eaten by spiders. OK, maybe not  that bad, but on today's episode we talk about potential IaC pitfalls and how to avoid them with guest Tim Davis. The post Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Day 2 Cloud
Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls

Day 2 Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:09


There are a lot of good things you can do with Infrastructure as Code (IaC) for automation, repeatability, and ease of operations and development. But there are also code and infrastructure pitfalls where you can tumble into a hole, break your leg, and get eaten by spiders. OK, maybe not  that bad, but on today's episode we talk about potential IaC pitfalls and how to avoid them with guest Tim Davis. The post Day Two Cloud 127: Avoiding Infrastructure As Code (IaC) Pitfalls appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Screaming in the Cloud
“Snyk”ing into the Security Limelight with Clinton Herget

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 37:12


About ClintonClinton Herget is Principal Solutions Engineer at Snyk, where he focuses on helping our large enterprise and public sector clients on their journey to DevSecOps. A seasoned technologist, Clinton spent his 15+ year career prior to Snyk as a web software engineer, DevOps consultant, cloud solutions architect, and technical director in the systems integrator space, leading client delivery of complex agile technology solutions. Clinton is passionate about empowering software engineers and is a frequent conference speaker, developer advocate, and everything-as-code evangelist.Links:Try Snyk for free today at:https://app.snyk.io/login?utm_campaign=Screaming-in-the-Cloud-podcast&utm_medium=Partner&utm_source=AWS TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode features Clinton Herget, who's a principal solutions engineer at Snyk. Or ‘Snick.' Or ‘Cynic.' Clinton, thank you for joining me, how the heck do I pronounce your company's name?Clinton: That is always a great place to start, Corey, and we like to say it is ‘sneak' as in sneaking around or a pair of sneakers. Now, our colleagues in the UK do like to say ‘Snick,' but that is because they speak incorrectly. We will accept it; it is still wrong. As long as you're not saying ‘Sink' because it really has nothing to do with plumbing and we prefer to avoid that association.Corey: Generally speaking, I try not to tell other people how to run their business, but I will make an exception here because I can't take it anymore. According to CrunchBase, your company has raised $1.4 billion. Buy a vowel for God's sake. How much could it possibly cost for a single letter that clarifies all of this? My God.Clinton: Yeah, but then we wouldn't spend the first 20 minutes of every sales conversation talking about how to pronounce the company name and we would need to fill that with content. So, I think we're just going to stay the course from here on out.Corey: I like that. So, you're a principal solutions engineer. First, what does that do? And secondly, I've known an awful lot of folks who I would consider problem engineers, but they never self-describe that way. It's always solutions-oriented?Clinton: Well, it's because I worked for Snyk, and we're not a problems company, Corey, we're a solutions company.Corey: I like that.Clinton: It's an interesting role, right, because I work with some of our biggest customers, a lot of our strategic partners here in North America, and I'm kind of the evangelist that comes out and says, “Hey, here's what sucks about being a developer. Here's how we could maybe be better.” And I want to connect with other engineers to say, “Look, I share your pain, there might be an easier way, if you, you know, give me a few minutes here to talk about Snyk.”Corey: So, I've seen Snyk around for a while. I've had a few friends who worked there almost since the beginning and they talk about this thing—this was before, I believe, you had the Dobermann logo back in the early days—and I keep periodically seeing you folks in a variety of different contexts and different places. Often I'll be installing something from Docker Hub, for example, and it will mention that, oh, there's a Snyk scan thing that has happened on the command line, which is interesting because I, to the best of my knowledge, don't pay Docker for things that I do because, “No, I'm going to build it myself out of popsicle sticks,” is sort of my entire engineering ethos. But I keep seeing you in different cases where as best I am aware, I have never paid you folks for services. What is it you do as a company because you're one of those folks that I just keep seeing again and again and again, but I can't actually put my finger on what it is you do.Clinton: Yeah, you know, most people aren't aware that popsicle sticks are actually a CNCF graduated project. So, you know, that's that—Corey: Oh, and they're load-bearing in almost every piece of significant technical debt over the last 50 years.Clinton: Absolutely. Look at your bill of materials; it's there. Well, here's where I can drop in the other fun fact about Snyk's name, it's actually an acronym, right, stands for So, Now You Know. So, now you know that much, at least. Popsicle sticks, key component to any containerized infrastructure. Look, Snyk is a developer security company, right? And people hear that and go, “I'm sorry, what? I'm a developer; I don't give a shit about security.” Or, “I'm a security person”—Corey: Usually they don't say that out loud as often as you would hope, but it's like, “That's not true. I say that I care about security an awful lot.” It's like, “Yeah, you say that. Therein lies the rub.”Clinton: Until you get a couple of drinks in them at the party at re:Invent and then the real stuff comes out, right? No, Snyk is always been historically committed to the open-source community. We want to help open-source developers every bit as much as, you know, we're helping the engineers at our top-tier customers. And that's because fundamentally, open-source is inextricably linked to the way software is developed today, right? There is nobody not using open-source.And so we, sort of, have to be supporting those communities at the same time. And that fundamentally is where the innovation is happening. And you know, my sales guys hate when I say this, right, but you can get an amazing amount of value out of Snyk by using the freemium solution, using the open-source tooling that we've put out in the community, you get full access to our vulnerability database, which is updated every day, and if you're working on public projects, that's going to be free forever, right? We're fundamentally committed to making that work. If you're an enterprise that happens to have money to spend, I guess we'll take that too, right, but my job is really talking to developers and figuring out, you know, how can we reduce the amount of pain in your life through better security tooling?Corey: The challenging part is that your business, although I confess is significantly larger than my business, we're sort of on some level solving the same problem. And that sounds odd to say because I focus on fixing AWS bills and you're focused on improving developer security. But I'm moving up about six levels to the idea that there are only two big problems in the world of technology, in the world of companies for that matter. And the problem that we're solving is the worst one of the two. And that is reducing risk exposure.It is about eliminating downside. It's cost optimization, it's security tooling, it is insurance, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And the other problem, the one that I've always found, that is the thing that will get people actually excited rather than something they feel obligated to do is speeding up time to market, improving feature velocity, being able to deliver the right things sooner. That's the problem companies are biasing towards investing in extremely heavily. They'll convene the board to come up with an answer there.That said, you stray closer into that problem space than most security companies that I'm aware of just because you do in fact, speed up the developer process. It let people move faster, but do it safely at least is my general understanding. If I'm completely wrong on this, and, “Nope, we are purely risk mitigation, then this is going to look fairly silly, but it wouldn't be the first time I put my foot in my mouth.”Clinton: Yeah, Corey, it sounds like you really read the first three words of the website, right? “Develop fast. Stay secure.” And I think that fundamentally gets at the traditional alignment, where security equals slow, right, because risk mitigation is all about preventing problematic things from going into production. But only doing that as a stop gate at the end of the process, right, by essentially saying we assume all developers are bad and want to do bad things, and so we're going to put up this big gate and generate an 1100 page PDF, and then throw it back to them and say, “Now, go figure out all of the bad things you did and how to fix them. And by the way, you're already overshooting your delivery target.” Right? So, there's no way to win in that traditional model unless you're empowering developers earlier with the right context they need to actually write more secure code to begin with, rather than remediating after the fact when those fixes are actually most expensive.Corey: It's the idea of the people who want to slow down and protect things and not break are on the operation side of the world, and then you have developers who want to ship things. And you have that natural tension, so we're going to smash them together and call it DevOps, which at least if nothing else, leads to interesting stories on stages. Whether it actually leads to lasting cultural transformation is another thing entirely. And then someone said, “Well, what about security?” And the answer is, “We have a security department?” And the answer is, “Yeah, you know, those grumpy people that say no all the time whenever we ask if we could do anything.” “Oh, that security department. I ignore them and go around them instead.” And it's, “All right, well, we need help on that so we're going to smash them in, too.” Welcome to DevSecOps, which is basically buzzword-driven cultural development. And here we are. But there is something to be said for you can no longer be the Department of No. I would argue that you couldn't do that successfully previously, but at least now we're a little more aware of it.Clinton: I think you could certainly do that when you were deploying software a couple times a year, right? Because you could build in all of the time to very expensively and time consumingly fix things after the fact, right? We're no longer in that world. I think when you're deploying every few seconds or a few minutes, what you need is tooling that, first of all, runs at that speed, that gives developers insights into what risk are they bringing on board with that application once it will be deployed, but then also give them the context they actually need to fix things, right? I mean, regardless of where those vulnerabilities are found, it still ultimately is a line of code that has to be written by a developer and committed and pushed through a pipeline to make it back into production.And that's true, whether we're talking about application security and proprietary code, we're talking about vulnerabilities in open-source, vulnerabilities in the container, infrastructure as code. I mean, it used to be that a network vulnerability was fixed by somebody going into the data center, unplugging a Cat 5 cable and plugging it in somewhere else, right? I mean, that was the definition of network security. It was a hardware problem. Now, networking is software-defined. I mean [laugh]—Corey: Oh, the firewall I trust is basically a wire cutter. Yeah, cut through the entire cable, and that is the only secure firewall. And it's like, oh, no, no, there are side-channel attacks. It's not completely going to solve things for you. Yeah.Clinton: You know, without naming names, there are certainly vendors in the security space that still consider mitigation to be shutting down access to a workload, right. Like, let's remediate by taking this off of the internet and allowing it to no longer be accessible.Corey: I don't think it's come from a security standpoint, but that does feel like it's a disturbing proportion of Google's product strategy.Clinton: [laugh]. Absolutely. But you know, I do think maybe we can take the forward-looking step of saying there are ways to fix issues while keeping applications online at the same time. For example, by arming engineers with the security intelligence they need when they're making decisions about what goes into those applications. Because those wire cutters now, that's a line in a YAML file, right?That's a Kubernetes deployment, that's a CloudFormation template, and that is living in code in the same repo with everything else, with all of the other logic. And so it's fundamentally indistinguishable at the point where all security is really now developer security, except the security tooling available doesn't speak to the developer, it doesn't integrate into their workflow, it doesn't enable them to make remediations, it's still slapping them on the wrist. And this is why I think when you talk about—to invoke one of the most overused buzzwords in the security industry—when you talk about shifting left, that's really only half the story. I mean, if you're taking a traditional solution that's designed to slow things down, and shifting that into the developer workflow, you're just slowing them down earlier, right? You're not enabling them with better decision-making capacity so they can say, “Oh, I now understand the risks that I'm bringing on board by not sanitizing a string before I dump it into a SQL, you know, query. But now I understand that better because Snyk is giving me that information at the right time when I don't have to context switch out of it, which is, as I'm writing that line of code to begin with.”Corey: When I look at your website—and I'm really, really hoping that your marketing folks don't turn me into a liar on this one between the time we have recorded this and the time it sees the light of day in a week or so—it's notable because you are a security vendor, but you almost wouldn't know that from your website. And that is a compliment because at no point, start to finish, on the landing page at snyk.io do I see anything that codes to, “Hackers are coming to kill you. Give us money immediately to protect yourself.”You're not slinging FUD. You're talking entirely about how to improve velocity. The closest it gets to even mentioning security stuff is, “Ship on time with peace of mind.” That is as close as it gets to talking about security stuff. There is no fear based on this, and you don't treat people like children and say, “Security is extremely important.” “Thank you, Professor, I really appreciate that helpful tip.”Clinton: Yeah, you know, again, I think we take the very controversial approach that developers are not bad people who want to make applications less secure, right? And I think again, when you go into that 40-year trajectory of that constant tension between the engineering and the security sides of the house, it really involves certain perceptions about what those other people are like: security are bad and want to shut everything down; developers are, you know, wild cowboys who don't care about standardization and are just introducing a bunch of risk, right? Where Snyk comes in is fundamentally saying, “Hey, we can actually all live together in a world where we recognize there's pain on both sides?” And look, Corey, I'm coming to you after essentially waking up every day for 20 years and writing code of some kind or other, and I can tell you, developers are already scared enough, man. It is a fearful and anxiety ridden experience to know that you're not completely in command of what happens to that application once it leaves your IDE, right?You know at some point you're going to get that PDF dumped on you; you're going to have a build block, you're going to have a bug report come in from a very important customer at three o'clock in the morning and you're going to have to do something about it. I think every software engineer in the world carries that fear around with them. They don't have to be told you have the capacity to do bad stuff here and you should be better at it. What they need is somebody to tell them here's how to do things better, right? Here's not necessarily even why a cross-site scripting attack is dangerous—although we can certainly educate you on that as well—but here's what you need to do to remediate it. Here's how other developers have fixed that in applications that look like yours.And if you get that intelligence at the right point, then it becomes truly—to go back to your original question—it becomes about solutions rather than about problems, right? The last thing we ever want to do is adopt that traditional approach of saying, “You did a bad thing. It's your fault. You have to go figure out what to do. And then by the way, you have to do all the refactoring on top of that because we didn't tell you you did the bad thing until three weeks later when that traditional SaaS tool finally finished running.”Corey: Exactly. It's a question of how much can you reduce that feedback loop? If I get pinged 60 seconds after I commit code that there's a problem with it, great. I still have that in my head. Mostly. I hope. But if it's six months later it's, “Who even wrote this?” And I pull up git blame and, “Ah, crap, it was me. What was I possibly thinking back then?” It's about being able to move rapidly and fix things, I guess, as early in the process as possible, the whole shift-left movement. That's important. That's valuable.Clinton: Yeah, the context switching is so expensive, right, because the minute you switch away from that file, you're reading some documentation. You're out of that world. Most of the developer's time is spent getting into and out of different contexts. Once you're in there, I mean, you could rattle off 40 lines of code in a sitting and actually clear a ticket and you feel really good about yourself, right? The next day, when that comes back from QA saying you did something wrong here, that's the painful part of having to get back in.And by the time you've already done that, you've doubled the amount of time you've spent on that feature. So, it's all about integrating the right intelligence in the right context at the right time, and doing so in such a way that we're not throwing around blame, that we're not saying, “You should have known better.” We're saying, “We want to help you do this better because, you know, ultimately, you're going to write another SQL query. That's okay. We hope that maybe this will inspire you to sanitize those strings properly, and we're going to give you some suggestions on how to do that.”Corey: Yeah. Developer time is way more expensive than the infrastructure. That is, I think, a little understood facet of how this works from an engineering perspective because an awful lot of us came up in this industry considering our time to be free. Because we were doing this as a hobby in some cases, it was. When I was in my dorm room back many years ago, as I was basically in the process of being expelled from boarding school, it was very clearly my time was not worth a whole hell of a lot to anyone at that point.Speaking of expensive things, I want to talk for a minute about your pricing. And what I like about this is, let me be clear here. I am a big fan of taking shortcuts wherever I can, and one of the shortcuts I love doing—and I don't know if I've talked about it on this show before—is when I'm talking to a company and I need to figure out do they know what they're doing or are they clowns, I cheat and I go to the pricing page. And there are two big things that I look for, and you have them both.The first is that over on the far left side of the spectrum, it's do you have a free option? And yes, you do. And, “Click here to get started immediately.” Great because it's three in the morning, I need to get something done, I'm under a deadline, I do not have time for a conversation with sales, and as an engineer, I absolutely don't want to deal with that type of sales process because it feels weird to go and ask my boss to go ahead and sign off on something because I feel like my spending authority is capped at $20. Now that I have a little more context, I understand exactly why [laugh] my spending authority was capped at $20 back when I was an engineer.Clinton: Yeah, exactly right. And so it's not only that commitment to ensuring every software engineer in the world can have access to Snyk immediately by making one click because, you know, ultimately, we're committed to that community, right? There's 3 million developers using Snyk currently. That's about 10% of all engineers in the world. We're very proud of that number.We expect that to continue to grow and I think it shows that there is need out there, right? And if we can enable every engineer who's up at 3 a.m. faced with some security prospect to say, you know, it is as simple as getting a free account and getting a vulnerability report, getting the remediation advice, being able to sleep easier. I think we're successful as a company, regardless of what the bottom line is. But when you look at how to scale that into the enterprise, the way security solutions are priced, I mean, it's like throwing a bunch of wet noodles at the wall and seeing what sticks, right?Corey: Yes. And that's the other piece of your pricing that I like is a lot of people are going to be listening to that, what I'm saying right now about, “Oh, well, we have a free tier. Why do you think we're clowns?” It's, “Ah. Because the other end is just as important if not more so, which is there has to be an enterprise tier, and the price for that has got to be, ‘Click here to have a conversation.'” And the reason behind that is if you work in procurement, which is very often who's going to be reaching out on something like this, you are going to need custom contracts; you are going to want a long-term enterprise deal, and if the top tier is X dollars per thing that's already there, it reeks of unsophisticated vendor to a buyer in that position, and it makes the people a big blue chip companies think, “Oh, they don't know how to deal with someone at our scale.” Pricing his messaging, and I think people lose sight of that. You absolutely say the right things on both ends. I look at this, and there's nothing I would change or improve about your pricing page, which to be honest, is really rare.Clinton: I'm not sure all of our sales leaders would agree with you there, but I will pass that feedback along. Well, and the other thing I would add to that is, what everyone who's in a pricing conversation wants is predictability about what is this going to be in the future, right? And so we base our pricing on how many developers are in your organization, right? That's probably a number you know; that's probably a number that you can predict over time. We're not going to say, “How many CPUs are we using, right? What's the footprint of the cloud resources we're deploying to scan your stuff?” These are all things that you have very little control over and there is alchemy there that introduces a financial risk into that situation. And we're all about risk mitigation at scale, right?Corey: You don't pop up halfway through a cycle of, “Oh, you've gone on a hiring spree. Time to go ahead and pay us a bunch more money you didn't plan for or budget for.” I've had vendors pop up a quarter after I signed a deal—repeatedly—and it drives me up a wall because back in my engineering days, it was, great, now I have to spend time on this that I hadn't planned for; I have to go to my boss and ask for more money, never a great conversation, and as a cherry on top, I get to look like I don't know how to manage vendors for crap. It's just everyone is angry about those conversations. And even the salespeople reaching out had the decency to act a little sheepish about having to have that conversation with me.Clinton: The best ones do, at least. Well, and on top of that, you know, maybe that tool has been capped so that now your bills are breaking because you went one over your cap, right? So, I—Corey: Yeah. I love it. When I fail in production. That's my favorite thing. It's like, “All right, we're going to wind up not scanning for security stuff anymore. And if you go five beyond your cap, we're going to start introducing vulnerabilities.” It's, “That's awesome. Just, great plan.” But I'm kidding. I'm kidding. I want to be very clear, I have never heard a whisper of an actual vendor doing that, on purpose anyway.Clinton: Exactly. Right. And you know, look. We want to make it as easy as possible, and that's why, for example, we're on AWS Marketplace. You can use your existing EDP program to, you know, buy Snyk, just as—Corey: At 50% of your spend on Snyk then winds up counting toward your spend commit, which is always an interesting approach that some people are like, “Ooh. So, we can wind up transferring the money that we're spending on a vendor to count toward our commit?” But in many cases, it's how much are you spending on other third-party vendors in this space because you're getting excited about a few tens of thousands in most cases, and you have a $50 million annual [laugh] commit. What are you doing there, buddy? That's like trying to become a millionaire via credit card points. It doesn't usually pan out that way.Clinton: Fair enough. Yeah. And then look, we're very proud of that partnership with Amazon. And look if hey, if they can lock some of our customers into $15 million a year spend contracts, we'll take a few pennies on that, right?Corey: Oh, yeah, as a vendor, you'd be silly not too. It makes sense. But you're doing significantly more than that. As of this week being re:Invent week, you are—well, tell me about it.Clinton: Yeah, Corey, we are thrilled to announce this week that AWS is now integrating with Snyk's vulnerability database within Amazon Inspector. And this is going to bring the best-of-breed security intelligence with a curated vulnerability database, including all of our proprietary research around things like exploit maturity, reachability, vulnerable conditions, social trends on vulnerabilities, all available within Amazon Inspector to any developer utilizing it. We also have an AWS code pipeline integration that makes it easy for anyone utilizing AWS for your CI/CD to get immediate feedback on vulnerabilities in your applications as they move through that pipeline. And remember, we're never just going to say, “We've identified a vulnerability. Now, you need to figure out what to do with it.” We're always going to integrate the remediation advice because our audience at the end of the day is the developer whose job it is to make the fix and who has such a wide variety of responsibility these days, the best we can do is say to them, not just, “We found something wrong,” but, “Here's the solution that we think you should implement to get that secure code back out into production.”Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at CloudAcademy. That's right, they have a different lab challenge up for you called, “Code Red: Repair an AWS Environment with a Linux Bastion Host.” What does it do? Well, its going to assess your ability to troubleshoot AWS networking and security issues in a production like environment. Well, kind of, its not quite like production because some exec is not standing over your shoulder, wetting themselves while screaming. But..ya know, you can pretend in fact I'm reasonably certain you can retain someone specifically for that purpose should you so choose. If you are the first prize winner who completes all four challenges with the fastest time, you'll win a thousand bucks. If you haven't started yet you can still complete all four challenges between now and December 3rd to be eligible for the grand prize. There's only a few days left until the whole thing ends, so I would get on it now. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. That's cloudacademy.com/C-O-R-E-Y, for god's sake don't drop the “E” that drives me nuts, and thank you again to Cloud Academy for not only promoting my ridiculous non sense but for continuing to help teach people how to work in this ridiculous environment.Corey: First, congratulations. It's neat to have a first-party integration like that with an AWS service, as opposed to, you know, their somewhat storied approach of, “Hey, it's an open-source project. We're just going to implement something that's API compatible ourselves, and irritate people.” Now, to be clear, my problem is not that you should expect to build anything and not face competition. My concern is a little bit more along the lines of, “Huh. Why is that same company always the first in line to compete with something.” Which is neither here nor there.Security is also one of those areas where I think competition is important. You want it continual background level of investment in the space because this stuff is super important. What I like about Snyk and a number of companies in this space is I know exactly where you stand. Let's contrast that for a second with AWS. You're integrating with Inspector, which is a great service, but you're not, I don't believe, integrating with their other security services such as [big breath in] Amazon Detective, the Audit Manager—if you want to consider that one of them—Amazon Macie, AWS Firewall Manager, AWS Shield, the Network Firewall, IoT Device Defender, CloudTrail, Config.Amazon Inspector is in one you're there, but not really Security Hub, or GuardDuty, or IAM itself. And I look at all of these services—I mean, IAM is free, of course, but the rest are very much not—and I do some basic arithmetic and I'm starting to realize that if I can figure all the various AWS security services together and what that's going to cost me, it turns out the answer is more than the data breach. So, on some level, it's one of those—at what point is it so confusing and it starts to look like a cross-sell deal between all of the different services, and turn them all on because you could ever have too much security, we still have to ship things eventually. And their security messaging has been extraordinarily confused for a long time. At some level, the fact that you are now integrating with them on the Inspector side means that for the first time, I think I understand what Inspector does now, which is more than a little messed up. But here we are.Clinton: Indeed. Well, the first thing I would say on that is, you know, stay tuned. As we move into the new year. I think you're going to see a lot more announcements both, you know, on the AWS side, but also kind of industry-wide and terms of integration with Snyk. That Vulnerability Database feed also, as you mentioned earlier, in use in Docker Hub, so anyone with Containers and Docker Hub can get advantage by scanning with our Snyk container tool.We have other integrations with Red Hat, for example. And there are actually many other companies utilizing that DB feed to, again, get access to that best in breed vulnerability data. When you talk about that model of, you know, being outcompeted on the security front, I think that's more difficult to do when you're actually talking about data, right? Like tooling, on some level—and I might get in trouble for saying this—but tooling is commodity, right? Somebody tomorrow is going to come out with a better tool to do a thing a little bit faster in a little bit more intuitive way. What can't be easily replicated is the data and intelligence behind that, right? And so that's why—Corey: Yeah, the secret sauce that makes you folks work is not the fact of, “Ah, we can fire off or catch a web hook, and then run the following command against the codebase.” That is—sure it's handy and it's useful and you're good at that, but that is not the reason that people become your customer.Clinton: Exactly right. Look, there's a lot of tools that can resolve the dependency tree within your open-source application, right? We can do that as well. We leverage a lot of open-source to do that, you know, we're very open with that. As I mentioned earlier, a lot of Snyk tooling is available on GitHub, you can see how it works, that code is public.Really the value we're providing is in that curated security research that our dedicated team is working on day in and day out and verifying public security data that's out in CVEs. Is this actually accurate? Do we agree with the severity rating? Might there be other factors that could modify that severity rating? What happens when you are scanning an application that might have some vulnerable conditions versus others? Don't you want to prioritize those vulnerabilities differently? What happens at runtime, right? If you're deploying an application to an EC2 instance with an OpenSSH ingress into your security group, that's going to make certain vulnerabilities a lot bigger risk than if you've got your IAC configured correctly, right? So, the really the overall mission of Snyk as we move into this broader, kind of, ASPM application, you know, security posture management space, is to say, how many different signals across the SDLC can we combine in intuitive ways for the developer to understand that risk at the right time with the right context and armed with the remediation advice to make a better decision as they're writing their code, you know, rather than after the fact? If I could sum it all up, kind of, that's the vision of where we are both today and ultimately where we're going.Corey: There also needs to be an understanding of who the customer is. If I go through the launch wizard and spin up in a brand new account, my first EC2 instance, and I spin up an instance by going through the wizard, the first thing it does is yell at me. Because, “Ah, that SSH port is open to the world.” Which you need to get into it, once it's there. So, it sets that up for me and yells at me all in the same breath. And it's, this is not a promising start; I kind of need that to get into it.Conversely, if you're not someone learning this stuff for the first time, and you're, oh I don't know, a production engineer at a bank, you care quite a bit differently in that use case about things like OpenSSH groups, it's security posture, et cetera, et cetera. An awful lot of the tooling is, “Ah, you're failing this benchmark, and this benchmark, and this benchmark,” from CIS and the rest of all these rules of, oh, you're not encrypting your data at rest. Well, it's in an AWS data center environment. Yeah, if someone could break in and steal the drives from multiple facilities and somehow recombine them together and get out alive, yeah, that's really not my threat model.But it's easy to turn it on and check a box and make an auditor go away. But that's not where I would spend the bulk of my energies if I'm trying to improve my security posture. And it turns into rote checklists super easily. The thing I've always appreciated about the stuff that you're tooling in the open-source world has highlighted is it's not nonsense. And I really can't understate just how valuable that is.Clinton: Absolutely. And that comes from a combination of signals across that SDLC, from the open-source, from the container, from the proprietary code, from the IAC, but then also what's happening at runtime, right? Like, how are those containers actually deployed onto EKS? What ports are open? What running binaries are on the container that might influence, you know, what packages you choose to upgrade, versus not?All of that matters, and what—you know, the issue I think now is getting that visibility to the developer at the right time so that they can make it actionable. And the thing about infrastructure as code, that I think that's really interesting and not super well understood is a lot of those defaults are really insecure. And developers have no idea, right? Like, they might not be aware that if you don't define that encryption for your S3 bucket, it'll happily deploy unencrypted, right? Yes, that's a compliance problem, but that's also potentially exacerbator have other vulnerabilities that might be in that application.But you only see those when you can combine and have a single pane of glass that gives you the runtime signaling plus everything that's happening in the application, armed with the correct information to actually remediate that at the time, and say, “Don't you think you wanted to add, you know, AES encryption to this bucket? Don't you think you wanted to close down port 22?” And also, combine that with your internal business logic, right? Like maybe for an internal only application that never transits beyond your VPC perimeter, sure, it's fine to have port 22 open, right? There's just going to be people within your zero-trust environment authenticating to it. But for your production web application, that might be a different story.Corey: There are other concerns, too. For example, I'm sitting here complaining about the idea of encrypting at rest in an AWS environment, but if you've signed customer contracts that state that you're doing it, you'd better freaking do it, as opposed to, “Well, I know what the actual security risk is and it's no big deal.” Yeah, don't make that decision. If you are contractually obligated to do a thing. Don't YOLO it; do what you say you're going to do. That's that whole integrity thing.Clinton: Oh, sure. And look in a battle between security and compliance. Compliance always wins, right? But from a developer perspective, I don't know that we on the front lines writing code actually differentiate, right? That certainly is a matter for the people defining the policies and, you know, creating their gating mechanisms in CI to figure out.What I want to know as a developer is, is my build going to succeed, right? Or am I going to get shut down and get the nastygram that says, you know, “We couldn't launch this for x, y, and z reason.” Now, everybody on my team hates me, my lead dev is on me, now there's a bunch of merge conflicts because my branch is behind. I want to get that out into production, but in order to do that, I need information on how are all these signals going to be compiled together in a way that, you know, creates that red light or green light on the risk dashboard later on. But up until I think, you know, relatively recently, I don't have visibility into that except to launch the commit, you know, start the build and see what happens, and then I have that context-switching problem, right, because it's hours or days later, that I finally get that signal back.So yes, I think we have a compliance story to tell from the Snyk perspective as well. A lot of those same issues, you know, we're detecting, especially with regard to infrastructure as code, but it ultimately is up to various parts of the organization to work together and say, “What balance do we want to strike between security and velocity,” right? Understanding that those are not mutually opposed. What we need is tooling and more importantly a culture that takes both into account and allows us to develop securely and fast at the same time.Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about all this. If people want to learn more, where can they find you? And for God's sake, please don't say in your booth at re:Invent.Clinton: [laugh]. I will not be at re:Invent this year. I've had a little bit too much of the Vegas Strip here recently.Corey: No, I hear you. Right now, the people going are those whose employers find them expendable, which is why I'm there.Clinton: I wouldn't say that Corey. I think you'll do great, and you know, just make sure to bank all your vacation for a couple weeks after. Look, come to snyk.io start a conversation, but more importantly, just start using it, right?I don't want to give you the sales pitch; I want you to see the value in the tooling, and the easiest way to do that as an engineer is just to start using it. And if there is value there, you want to bring it to your enterprise. I would love to have that conversation and move forward. But engineer to engineer, like, figure out if this is going to work for you: does it make your life easier? Does it reduce the pain and anxiety you feel before making that commit into the production branch? And if so, then yeah, we'd love to talk.Corey: I will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:33:22]. Thank you so much for speaking to me today. I really appreciate it.Clinton: Thank you, Corey. Glad to do it.Corey: Clinton Herget, principal solutions engineer at Snyk. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment yelling at Snyk about how they're a terrible company because they continually refuse to patronize your side business down at the Vowel Emporium.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

A Rational Fear
Labor's 2022 Election Strategy: Rhyming — Matt Okine, Alex Dyson, Dom Knight, Andy Lee, Lewis Hobba, Dan Ilic + Tim Bailey

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:33


Iceberg de Valor
#180 - Facebook vs Meta

Iceberg de Valor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 13:10


0:00 - IAC 1:50 - UBER, LYFT 3:18 - CDAY 3:45 - IT 4:26 - FND, SITE 4:56 - LYV, CHGG 5:16 - CPRI 5:54 - BILL

Amelia's Weekly Fish Fry
The Indy Autonomous Challenge

Amelia's Weekly Fish Fry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:56


On your mark. Get set. Let's fry some fish! In this week's podcast I am happy to bring in Joe Speed from ADLINK to talk all about the Indy Autonomous Challenge, the first autonomous race car competition at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway! Joe and I dig into some of the behind-the-scenes work at this first of its kind autonomous challenge including details of the ADLINK AVA-3501 series rugged edge platform that was supplied to each of the teams, the IAC base vehicle software, and more!  

TechCheck
Bitcoin's Tumble, Tesla Bull Turns Bearish & Qualcomm CEO on Investor Day

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 42:52


Our anchors start off the morning with today's sell-off in crypto and comments from Twitter CFO Ned Segal that it doesn't make sense for the company to put crypto on its balance sheet. Then, Wedbush Securities' Joel Kulina is here to discuss fintech stocks, metaverse plays and much more. Plus, we're diving into quantum computing today— CNBC's Eamon Javers covers its importance to America's security, while CNBC's Kate Rooney breaks down investor appetite in the space. Later, CNBC's Robert Frank is here to explain why Elon Musk is selling shares of Tesla. Then, Elazar Advisors Analyst Chaim Siegel joins after he downgraded Tesla to neutral. Also, CNBC's Julia Boorstin gives us an update on the trial between IAC and Tinder's Co-Founders. And don't miss a first on CNBC interview with Qualcomm CEO Cristiano Amon live from the company's investor day today in New York.

De quoi jme mail
De quoi jme mail 12 Novembre 2021

De quoi jme mail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 53:30


Chaque semaine, De Quoi Je Me Mail ouvre le débat sur l'actu high-tech ! En compagnie de journalistes, mais aussi de personnalités spécialistes du numérique, nous analysons, décortiquons les grandes tendances du moment. Ce vendredi, nous commentons l'actu avec Anthony Morel de BFM Business et Emmanuel Torregano de electronlibre.info. Module 1 : Bientôt des magasins Facebook : pourquoi faire ? DQJMM (1/2) - Esport : la folie League of Legends - Bientôt des magasins Facebook ? - Booba et Quentin Tarentino proposent des oeuvres en NFT - Le patron de l'AutoPilot de Tesla arrive chez Apple Module 2 : Thomas Pesquet, salon IAC : l'actu spatiale du moment DQJMM (2/2) François Sorel reçoit ce vendredi Antoine Meunier, rédacteur en chef de La Chronique Spatiale. On évoque avec lui le retour sur terre de Thomas Pesquet et le salon IAC de Dubaï consacré aux innovations spatiales qui s'est déroulé fin octobre.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Supply Chain: Cash or Trash with Seth Page

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 71:27


Supply Chain: Cash or Trash with Seth Page Seth Page and Joe Lynch discuss supply chain: cash or trash. Seth is the COO of TroughPut.ai, an artificial intelligence (AI) supply chain pioneer that enables companies to detect, prioritize and alleviate dynamic operational bottlenecks in real-time. Webinar - Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza About Seth Page Seth Page is a senior technology executive, 8x entrepreneur, operator and cross-border deal-making expert who seamlessly bridges the worlds of technology, operations and finance. An expert in equity investments and scaling start-ups to venture-capital backed high-growth companies and into successful exits, divestitures, and IPO trajectories. Deep, hands-on technology roots underpin over two decades of business development, operations and venture activity. Tech pioneer and founder providing deal flow origination for angels, venture capital firms, corporations and family offices in diverse yet interconnected areas including Industrial AI, IOT, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Science, Operations Technology, Enterprise, Telecommunications,  Security & Access Control. He has founded, funded, scaled and exited multiple start-ups for investors, including: ThroughPut.ai; DataRPM (acquired: Progress); UniKey; PV Media Group (acquired: RhythmOne / Blinkx); RayV (acquired: Yahoo); Oyster Optics (acquired: Techquity); AdOnNetwork (acquired: PVMG); Trade.com (acquired: ABM AMRO); as well as deals including Xoom.com (IPO & acquired: NBC); LendingTree (IPO & acquired: IAC); Fetchback (acquired: eBay / GSI); Samsung (acquired: mSpot); xanox (joint acquisition by Axel Springer and PubliGroupe); Litronic (acquired Pulsar & IPO), and many other transactions. Seth earned an Executive MBA with honors in International Business from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, as well as a BS in Economics and a BS in German Linguistics & Literature, both from the University of California, Irvine, as well as a scholarship to study Volkswirtschaft and Germanistik at the Georg-August-Universität in Göttingen, Germany. About ThroughPut Inc ThroughPut.ai is a Silicon Valley-based Supply Chain AI leader that puts Industrial Material Flow on Autopilot by leveraging existing Enterprise Data to achieve superior Business, Operations, Financial and Sustainability Results. ThroughPut's AI-powered Supply Chain software predicts Demand, reorients Production Capacity, reassigns Warehouse Space, and reorders Materials optimally, so businesses minimize overpromising and under-delivering. By way of ThroughPut's Supply Chain AI Orchestration software that sits on top of existing data architectures, ThroughPut improves material flow and free-cash-flow across the entire end-to-end value chain more than 5-times faster than leading contemporary solutions. The founding team is led by seasoned serial entrepreneurs with real-world AI, Supply Chain, Manufacturing, Transportation and Operational experience, from the shop-floor to the top-floor, at leading Fortune 500 Industrial Companies & pioneering Enterprise Technology companies. Key Takeaways: Supply Chain: Cash or Trash Seth Page is the COO of ThroughPut.ai, an artificial intelligence (AI) supply chain pioneer that enables companies to detect, prioritize and alleviate dynamic operational bottlenecks in real-time. In the podcast interview, Joe and Seth discuss the enormous waste in supply chains. While supply chains create all the wonderful goods and services we enjoy, they also produce a lot of waste. Approximately one-third of supply chain output is waste – it adds no value for anyone. The waste is horrible for bottom lines and the environment. According to Boston Consulting Group's recent report, 80% of greenhouse gases are created by supply chains so to improve sustainability and profitability, companies must address the waste in the supply chain. The waste occurs because supply chain data is in separate silos and decisions are made to optimize locally – not globally. In other words, each player in the supply chain makes a rational decision based on the information that they have. While that decision might be good for their organization, it might be a bad for the end-to-end supply chain. Supply chain practitioners make decisions using faulty forecasts, old assumptions, and outdated tools. ThroughPut provides an integrated view of company-wide operations by pulling data from all of your disparate systems. Throughput can identify and manage constraints to free cash flow, while meeting revenue targets with output. To make better decisions, supply chain practitioners need demand sensing with real-time intelligence that can be used to create better demand forecasts. With demand sensing, companies can easily predict near-future demand patterns to streamline the flow of materials, processes, output, and free cash flow across your integrated supply chain. Seth and the team at ThroughPut unlock operations agility and efficiency, to meet unpredictable customer demands, while creating uninterrupted flow of materials through supply chain networks. This approach minimizes waste and maximizes profitability. Learn More About Supply Chain: Cash or Trash Seth Page LinkedIn Throughput.ai The New Retail Paradigm with Ali Raza Putting Supply Chains on Autopilot with Ali Raza Webinar - Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Marketing Trends
Smart and Scalable Affiliate Marketing with Kevin Osborne, SVP of Client Strategy at Acceleration Partners

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:55


You may have some fear or feel a sense of resistance when you hear the phrase “affiliate marketing.” Especially if you had ever been burned by this form of marketing in the past.. Like most sectors, a lot  has improved in the affiliate space and that development has stemmed from the creation of tech tools.  On this episode of Marketing Trends, Kevin Osborne, the Senior Vice President of Client Strategy at Acceleration Partners, gave us  the low-down on how affiliate partnerships can be thought of as more than a last-ditch effort to milk remaining dollars out of the market. Management, implementation and fraud resistance are all areas of modern affiliate marketing that have vastly improved as of late. “People tend to pigeonhole “affiliate marketing” as the last mile. Get that last click drive, that last sale. But again, we really encourage these bigger brands that have a broader perspective on what this channel can do and how it can operate across other traditional media channels already running.” But a successful affiliate marketing strategy is' more than just having the right tools, or the best new gadgets. A big part of the value that Acceleration Partners brings to its customers is by providing guidance on best practices as you roll out your program. Kevin and I dove into how using data, tapping into tried-and-true marketing channels, and reducing friction on the back-end have given modern affiliate marketing the power to be a key tool in your marketing mix, not just an afterthought. Main Takeaways:Old School Affiliate Marketing Systems are Out: The time and labor intensive old school model of affiliate marketing was a big lift, even for bigger companies to pull off successfully. Now with evolving technology, the launching and management of a profitable affiliate marketing program is much more cost effective and less staff intensive. The affiliate system is now more efficient and scalable. Direct Mail can be an Affiliate: Don't limit yourself to the old way of thinking about affiliate partnerships, even in terms of where that initial impression comes from. With some businesses, such as the restaurant industry, direct mail can be the most effective affiliate lead tool. Re-engaging with existing customers: As you think about reigniting that affiliate marketing program, look at your existing customer base as the first well to tap into. Re-engaging with existing customers through affiliate marketing can bring them back to new products or services you offer.   Key Quotes:“We look at brands that are trying to acquire subscribers, sign ups, sell shoes, whatever it may be, and at the end of the day, affiliate is simply a channel that's able to pay partners once an outcome takes place. Once a sale takes place at the end of the day, I think a lot of marketers are trying to get to that final accountable metric, which is, ‘does this drive sales?' “You could use this tool, partnership marketing and the different players that are involved in it to drive any part of the consumer journey that you want. You can drive awareness, you can drive engagement, you can drive conversion.”“People tend to pigeonhole “affiliate marketing” as the last mile. Get that last click drive, that last sale. But again, we really encourage these bigger brands that have a broader perspective on what this channel can do and how it can operate across other traditional media channels already running.” “There's some sophisticated technology platforms out there that are great at looking at these deeper analytics. Whether that's attribution, whether that's certain measurement systems based on the partner type, whether it's different commissions based on the interaction that a customer has with the brand, that technology enables us to actually push forward a lot of these new strategies that encompass broader marketing.”“One of the key elements of our services partner development.  We have guys that are going out there and forging new relationships based on a brand strategy. We worked with a food delivery app that was trying to acquire new restaurants. There's certain ways that those restaurants engage with media and take action, and direct mail was actually one of those. So working with direct mail service to actually get that brand's message in front of those restaurant owners was really effective.”“One of the spaces that's most interesting, that's been growing the fastest, is B2B, especially the SMB. They have these teams that are business development teams and business development. And that universe is pretty old school, right? It's guys with a Rolodex that are calling up certain partners or certain individuals that might run an accounting firm that are trying to get people to sign up for QuickBooks. And it's pretty disjointed and it's a big world, right? Some of these firms have 20, 30 people on these business development teams and they're willing to invest because they're really efficient, right? These partners can really drive a significant amount of sales for a pretty reasonable cost.”“As far as the industries that are growing the fastest within affiliate marketing there's these traditional, direct to consumer These guys were living off social and SEM for years.  They were maximizing those channels. They were driving new customers. They were doing it really cost efficiently.fn the last year or two years, it's become inefficient There is a point of diminishing returns where your bids have to go up and the value goes down. And at some point you need to explore other channels. Over the last three, four years, we've seen a huge adoption by those specific companies coming into a failure because it provides scalability, cost efficiency and new audiences that's where we've seen massive growth with those companies moving into affiliates and really changing the landscape and bringing on new innovation.”Bio:Kevin has served in a variety of sales roles at renowned companies, including AOL, Openbay and IAC. He has received numerous accolades for his leadership, sales training, and mentorship along with his digital industry expertise. His passion for startups and entrepreneurship has led to his working with some of the best and brightest companies in the startup space. Through his passion, charisma, determination and win-win approach to problem-solving, Kevin consistently earned the trust and respect of his clients.Prior to his successful career in sales, Kevin volunteered as a teacher with Citizen Schools and played professional hockey in Paris. If you catch him in the right mood, he may even tell you his favorite French expression.To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

L8ist Sh9y Podcast
You need an IaC Pipeline! [KubeCon & VMworld retro]

L8ist Sh9y Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 54:39


We talk about Infrastructure as Code through a Kubernetes filter. We started with a check in on KubeCon and VMworld, both of which had just ended. Both of those shows are very relevant in our IaC discussion and considerations because we dig into how we build on those platforms. Ultimately, that lead to the idea of pipelines and processes for building sustainable automation and operations. That got into very interesting places! Transcript: https://otter.ai/u/O1UZds25tjCKUr0337HHOo-hxu4 Photo by Evan Velez Saxer from Pexels [ID 7417579]

The Direct Farm Podcast
Conservation, Development, and Use of Agricultural Resources for the Betterment of Native Farmers with Kelsey Scott and Kari Jo Lawrence of the Intertribal Agriculture Council

The Direct Farm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:56


In this episode of the Direct Farm Podcast, we're thrilled to host Kelsey Scott and Kari Jo Lawrence of the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC). Listen as Kelsey and Kari Jo discuss the programs and resources IAC offers its members, along with their own journeys and roles within the IAC.Show Notes:Intertribal Agriculture CouncilBarn2Door Resources

Sub Club
026: Eric Crowley, GP Bullhound - Optimizing Your Subscription App for Growth

Sub Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 54:12


Our guest today is Eric Crowley, a tech investment banker with GP Bullhound. With investments in companies ranging from Spotify to Whoop, and clients such as AllTrails, Pinkbike, and Lingoda, GP Bullhound provides transaction advice and capital to many of the leaders in the Consumer Subscription Software space.On the podcast we talk with Eric about his 2021 report on Consumer Subscription Software, the truth about LTV calculations, and the new era of organic user acquisition.In this episode, you'll learn: Was 2020 just a “COVID Bump,” or a shift in consumer behavior? Are the Bumble & Duolingo IPO multiples justified? How savvy developers are adapting to Apple's App Tracking Transparency The truth about LTV The new era of customer acquisition Links & Resources Spotify Whoop AllTrails Pinkbike Lingoda Bumble Duolingo Instacart Match Group Netflix Noom Weight Watchers Tinder The Dyrt Day One Journal Automattic Tech Crunch Scribd Pandora Eric Crowley's Links Follow Eric on Twitter GP Bullhound GP Bullhound insights Eric's LinkedIn GP Bullhound 2021 CSS survey Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club Episode Transcript00:00:00 David:Hello, I'm your host. David Bernard. And with me, as always, RevenueCat CEO, Jacob Eiting. Our guest today is Eric Crowley, a tech investment banker with GP Bullhound. With investments in companies ranging from Spotify to Whoop, and clients such as AllTrails Pinkbike, and Lingoda, GP Bullhound provides transaction advice and capital to many of the leaders in consumer subscription software.On the podcast, we talk with Eric about his 2021 report on consumer subscription software, the truth about LTV calculations, and the new era of organic user acquisition.Hey, Eric, welcome to the podcast.00:00:56 Eric:Hey, David, Jacob. Thanks for having me back. It's always a pleasure. 00:00:59 David:Yeah. Every year you release this report, so we had to get you back. This is the third annual Consumer Subscription Software Report, and I wanted to kick off just asking you a little bit about the motivation, and where your headspace is in thinking about creating this. Who the target is, and what kind of questions you're asking yourself as you prepare this report.00:01:24 Eric:Yeah. The report is the GP Bullhound Consumer Subscription Software Report. I call it CSS, which is kind of a playoff SaaS. This is the third year I've been writing it, and it started back in 2018. I worked with a company called AllTrails that was starting to monetize really well by selling subscriptions.It was like a light bulb went off in my head. I was like, this is a phenomenal way to provide a consistently improving product to consumers, where the margins are pretty good. It's easy to access a ton of different people globally through the app stores or through the web, and I just got really excited about it.I started putting some notes down on my own, and then GP Bullhound really supported me in saying like, “Hey, this is actually a pretty big trend. There's gonna be some amazing companies built around this space,” and companies like RevenueCat, that are supporting CSS companies, are just as exciting.So, we've been slowly educating ourselves. The goal behind the report is really just to force me to do some thinking about the space. What it looks like. What it will be. As a banker, you can quickly focus on transaction, transaction, transaction, and not really do any long-term thinking about where the world's going.It's putting myself in your guys's shoes. You guys are building RevenueCat not for what the world looks like today, but for what the world looks like in three to five years. I try to take the same approach with CSS, and think about where's the world going to go. So I talked to a lot of smart people as I put the report together. Entrepreneurs, investors, get their opinions.You guys can see their interviews in the report, and then ultimately we publish it. The audience I like to think about is entrepreneurs, people that are thinking about starting a CSS company, or already launched one, and they're looking to improve their metrics, or think about their target audience as entrepreneur-rich.By partnering with them, investing in their businesses, it takes them to the next level. The other way I like to think about it, it's my own personal scoreboard. I love to flip back two years ago and see, was I right about this company? You're publishing in public, so people can always come back to you and say, “Man, you were way off.” So, I look forward to that.00:03:26 Jacob:I remember the F finding the first one, the 2018, I guess, reporter 2019, whenever the first one you put out,00:03:33 Eric:2019, I think that's how we met actually.00:03:36 Jacob:Did you reach out to me or? I think I found it, or I don't remember what it was, but00:03:39 Eric:We've had a mutual friend, Nico introduced us and said, Hey, you guys should talk about this. and then I think we just went off on a two hour tangent.00:03:47 Jacob:But yeah, I remember being, it's still, there's still not a ton of like really focused research or writing on this space. and I think that, that, you know, this will probably won't be true for very long, right. As long as it continues to grow, but like going back to like who it's for. I mean, I imagine it as some, you know, end of the day, if you're employing.Pushing into some kind of lead gen. Right. But it does provide a lot of value for, you know, even if you're not interested in a transaction or whatever, just. Some like holistic data on a space. Cause like, I, the same, I mean, Eric, you said we're, we're thinking three and five years in the future. It's like, I wish like a lot of times I'm thinking like three to six weeks in the future.Right. and so it's even useful, I think, you know, even if you're, you know, I, you know, we're, we're in a bit of an interesting place as a infrastructure provider to be at kind of a bird's eye view, but it. Founder on one of these CSS apps, you know, like it is useful for you to know, like what's the meta environment, how's it evolving, you know?And if nothing else to like connect you with other people who have experimented with things and stuff like that. So, yeah, I think it provides beyond, beyond the, the, the lead gen aspect of it. It provides a lot of value for people. So I'm glad, I'm glad you're, you're still doing it. 00:05:04 Eric:Yeah. And just for any of the listeners, it is free. So you just go to the GP, bullhorn.com website. It's all easy to download and then you can see all our past reports as well. So 00:05:12 David:Yeah, and we'll drop it in the show notes. but, yeah. And, and, and speaking of all that, you know, it, it's something we as RevenueCat want to get more into as well. I mean, just seeing how much value you've created in producing these reports, and we're kind of sitting on a, you know, Processing over a billion dollars a year in, subscription revenue.We've got a lot of interesting data that, that we, that I'm very personally excited to share that we haven't, kind of had the infrastructure to, to do yet, but are, are getting there. And, so hopefully we'll, we'll have our own kind of, state of subscriptions that dives into the data and some of the trends and stuff in a different way than, than your kind of, strategy and higher level look at things.But when one thing that has happened, in the actually. It was announced before your last report, but actually implemented since your last report. And that's the app tracking transparency and iOS 14, which didn't actually ship till iOS. What was it? 14.4 or five or something. So, so we're kind of just now starting to see the impacts of it.And, and, you know, you took a couple of slides in your report to start discussing it. And it really is kind of one of the biggest topics and top of mind for subscription app developers, because it really is a huge shift in the landscape. So I want it to. Start with talking about that. And one of the things you shared in the, in the presentation is that you feel like it's a short-term pain, that's ultimately going to lead to a long-term gain.So I'd love to hear your thinking around what that pain is, but then also what you see the long-term game being.00:07:01 Eric:Yeah, it's a, it's a, great point. And, you know, anytime apple or Google make changes to their, their, their app stores, right. It's a seismic shift throughout the industry because it's something that impacts everyone. And so everyone has to be aware of these changes and then ultimately have a plan for them.And so I think that the change you're talking about David is really the. The implementation of, removing tracking for a lot of, a lot of these businesses specifically, like. And so what the change did with IDFA, is it, it really deprecated the ability for, for marketers within some of these CSS businesses to really accurately target people, specifically using Facebook or some of these other social networks.And so what it's doing is it. It's impacting the conversion rates on, CSS, CSS, businesses, marketing to consumers. And so if you just can't find that person that just is in love with, for example, biking, if you're a Strava marketer, it just takes you a lot longer to find that specific subscribers you might have to market to 10 people now to find two subscribers versus before you can market to five people and find two subscribers.And so it just means marketing efficiencies going down. And that can mean. Growth rates. It can impact conversion rates and ultimately impact just financials of these businesses. And so it's a pretty important consideration for any, CEO marketing team on how they go out and get their, their business in front of consumers.If Facebook's no longer as efficient, they have to find other ways. And so. So my, my thought is like, this is a short-term problem, right? It's something that's going to take people two to three months to adapt and find a new way to reach consumers. But ultimately my hope is for the space is you see the long-term game, which is what I was referencing.People really focus on organic ways of acquiring customers. Right? So instead of just pumping ads through Facebook and trying to find someone who fits a profile, you spend a lot more time really narrowly targeting your demographic, your niche, and then finding ways for them to find your product organically either.You know? So like a company that I work with, we sold a company called Pinkbike and so what they do is they partner with, the trade associations for mountain. And those trails associations now act almost as the marketing partner of pink bike to let consumers know about the fact that all the trail details.Is on, is on the pink bike app or it's called trail forks. And so that's, that's a really powerful, organic customer acquisition tool that they don't have to pay for. And so you're seeing, seeing the same thing happen with, like Strava is doing this, pre.com recently partnered with the NFL. So if your team's got a last fourth quarter fuel goal and you need to get something kicked, you can go to pray.com and submit a prayer for your kicker. I wish I was joking. It's a pretty brilliant idea. So I think this is really good for the sector overall, but yeah. Happy to dive into it. It's it's a fascinating00:09:37 Jacob:We it's a callback to a sub club podcast content, but, Greg, this, the plant app, this is something that they were doing, which is like, we're partnering with, plant nurseries. Yeah. To like, get their app into people's hands. And, yeah, I don't know if it's an earned media or. Bought media, but this is more like this is earned, right?This is like building an audience. You've seen it in the maker community, actually a lot, like in the indie SaaS community, more it's a different game when it has to be consumer scale. Right? Like there's a little bit different. You have to build maybe a bit more than you would in like, oh, just blog about.Built this thing and that's enough to get Indies, but you can apply the same thing, right? It's like produce content, produce something like low investment for users to get engaged with your brand because you're not building an app unless you have some, I mean, maybe you are, but you're not going to build something with very high, like multiples.Like if you're, if you don't have something unique to offer in the first place, but put that into like a more like lightly consumable format, start to build that audience and then make that an on-ramp and yeah, I agree. Like that's, that's something you own, right? Like your brand is. your brand doesn't exist on the app store, right?Like your brand can exist outside of these, like shifting sands and regulations and whatnot, and ultimately is like, you know, going to get reflected in your asset value if that's something you care about. Right. So, 00:10:53 Eric:Yeah, that's a key thing we talk about, right. If any business that we look at that's potentially selling or, or thinking about raising capital, right? It's like, how are you finding your. And if you're, if you're one channel is Facebook, and then consequently, like doing Facebook ads or apple ads on the, on the app store, that becomes pretty challenging.And so you want it to be such a good product, right? So it involves more work upfront. And just as you're talking about Jacob, the product's gotta be better. It's gotta be more efficient. It's got to reach consumers where they are with the problem they have. it becomes a lot more viral and a lot more sticky.So I think, I think it's going to be good for the sector.00:11:26 David:You wouldn't want to name names of course, but I am curious if. Had any clients, or just talks about anybody in the space where they were very reliant on Facebook specifically, and then, and have really struggled as things have changed. You know, I've been seeing some tweets around the, the consumer packaged goods space where some of these CPG companies are really struggling.And so I'm just curious. You know, without naming names, if, if there's any kind of high level things you could share around, apps that have struggled in this new paradigm. 00:12:02 Eric:Yeah. I mean, I definitely can't name names, you know, obviously I keep everything confidential with my clients, but even non-clients, you've seen CACs go up 20, 30%. you see, like, if you think about like conversion rates from installs to subs, That's a big metric of actual intent. Did you find the right user, right?Did someone just click on it and download it? Great. But if they're not actually subscribing that wasn't a successful transaction for you. And so the way I think about this, David is it's the app stores made tracking a lot harder, so it's harder to find your right consumer. So imagine if you're a CPG company, you walk into a grocery.And instead of stuff, being laid out perfectly across the shelves at the right height for you, they just tossed everything in the middle of the store and said, find what you want. Just go pick it out. Right. You're going to have much lower conversion. You're going to have much lower purchase rates because people aren't being targeted with the stuff they want to see.And so I think now you have to find, you know, it becomes more of a specialty situation where you're walking into a store that has stuff for just outdoor gear or very healthy granola. Right. And you're going specifically to that store for that. That's probably better in the long term, for a lot of these companies, 00:13:01 Jacob:Yeah, but there's, there's a lot of, there's a lot of folks that have benefited from this ease relative ease, right. And any sort of market disruption is going to be painful. I was like, anecdotally, I mean, David, we've heard on this podcast and elsewhere people who have just like straight up pause acquisition, who are like all re scrambling because yeah.You get it tuned to this very fine knife edge. And I imagine for like consumer physical goods, like DDC stuff, it's even worse because their margins are thinner than software. Right. 00:13:28 Eric:And you've got inventory and everything. Yeah. It's a totally different. 00:13:31 Jacob:But, you know, as you do like you, the market reshuffles and the people, I can figure it out, the fastest are gonna are going to come out the best.So. 00:13:39 Eric:There's going to be a shift though. So people under this is like that seismic shift that just shows how much of your reliance is on maybe one or two channels. Right? Two, two major tech companies sitting here in San Francisco. If you're super, truly relying on those and you're doing great, fine.But if a bump happens, right, how exposed are you? And so like, this will be a benefit. Right. I think it's going to be a huge benefit for Tik TOK. Right? I think people are finding really good ways to acquire customers through tic-tac. And so that's a very interesting channel. I think it'd be really good for influencers, right?If you have people that are very passionate about a certain space and then they go out and, you know, have a very core customer base that loves what they do specifically. It's going to be pretty powerful for them to.00:14:18 David:Yeah, and I was just gonna say, anecdotally, you know, we haven't done a super deep dive in our data, but at a, at a high level, I was. Bracing for our numbers to take a big dip. Like I, I mean, Jacob and I had talked about it in the spring about, you know, how, what is going to look like for RevenueCat, you know, are some of these subscription apps just going to completely unwind and people are apparently figuring it out because you know, it keeps going up until the right. 00:14:49 Jacob:I mean the consumer, the consumer need hasn't disappeared. Right. So maybe if they just weren't driven, you know, it's not going to, it can't just disappear overnight. Right? Like if you never, if you, if you are a Coke fan who never saw Coke out again, and it's like, you're still gonna buy it. Right. Like there's, there's, there's a certain amount of demand.That's just going to find the supply. But, but yeah, no, I mean, it's hard for us to, to definitively say looking at our data and aggregators. Cause there's so much, but they're definitely. Like this summer was definitely slower than we've had in the past. Like on my, as I'm writing my investor updates of the year and each month and stuff looking at it.But yeah, it wasn't like this catastrophic, you know, macro thing. And they were talking about a lot of like, you know, probably outliers that we hear about people who were affected, you know, more than others, but overall. I, I don't think our, I don't think our prediction last year of, of a potential recession was necessarily false.Like it doesn't, it definitely doesn't feel like it's sped up the ecosystem. Right. But it doesn't necessarily feel like a depression, right. Maybe, maybe a slight recession or just the normalization. 00:15:49 David:Looking at our data in aggregate that, some folks use this to their advantage and actually, and, and accelerated because they knew it was coming and they did focus more on product and organic and other things. And so for whatever, you know, losses, there were. Other folks more than made up for that.And that's it kind of the interesting thing about working with so many, I mean, we're closing in on 10,000 apps on revenue cat. And so, you know, you kind of have a pretty broad basket where you, you know, there are going to be winners and losers, but in aggregate subscription apps are just continuing to tick along and do really well. 00:16:26 Eric:David it's like you read directly from bullets on my report. I, I, I completely agree with you.00:16:34 David:Another thing I wanted to dive into was the, the COVID bump. Cause that's, that's another thing that's kind of been on everybody's mind is simultaneous to this. I was 14 and, and this is something we've talked about again internally, with revenue cat, is it. This summer was the, everybody who was vaccinated and, and Delta hadn't kind of bumped yet.And so, you know, may, June and July, there was a big shift socially. kind of it felt like it, especially in the U S that we were coming out of the pandemic. and, and so simultaneous to the app, tracking transparency, going into effect, we had these like societal shift. And then now we're kind of back into it a little bit with the Delta surge, but just curious what your thoughts are on how much of the boosts we saw in 2020 really was dependent DEMEC and then how much of that will actually linger as kind of shifting consumer preferences and shifting consumer spend.00:17:36 Eric:Yeah. I mean, there's, there's absolutely a companies that benefited from us is called the removal of inf in in-person conversations. Right? So like Bumble and DuoLingo, two companies that both went public, right. They both benefited because their, their business model is designed around, not meeting in person for the first couple of conversations.Right. And so. There's no way to say that they didn't benefit. the way I think about it, though, in this, in the CSS space, it's very similar to like the overall e-commerce space, right? Is consumers looked around to find a solution for a problem they're having right. Instacart you couldn't, you couldn't go to the grocery store or maybe you felt less comfortable going to the grocery store.So you tried an Instacart for the first time. Maybe you were, you know, thinking about meeting someone, you know, long-term but you never, you never wanted to try online dating or you couldn't go to the bar. So you tried online dating for the first time and sorry. What the pandemic did was it really opened up people's eyes to other options from what they'd been doing for the last 20 years, 50 years, whatever it was.And so they had to find other solutions to, you know, their demands, their needs. And so I don't, I think it's absolutely a COVID bump, but I still look at it as really as an accelerant of people adopting new products and services that they would have tried in three to four years. but the pandemic kind of pushed them to try something, to move out of their comfort zone and try something new.So, you know, I absolutely think you'll see a little bit of a downshift in, in some of these companies that had a really big boom, right? Like language learning. People had nothing to do for four to five months, especially over some of the winter times. So people tried new hobby, tried language learning, you know, that'll probably go down a little bit, but overall, if you look at it from like a five-year trend, It's going to be up substantially from where it was in 20 17, 20 18, 20 19, and 2020, you know, made it look like a little bit of bump, but eventually I think those companies will continue to grow and surpass what anything they did in 2020. 00:19:21 David:Yeah, that's really interesting.00:19:22 Jacob:I'll back that up as well with the, the unreleased, Jacob looks at graphs and then gives a, gives a hand wavy descriptions of them. But we, yeah, we, we were, I was kind of bracing for it as well. And then I would say this summer was slow and like, David was. We're not sure why. I think it was, I think it was a number of factors things have since picked up again.But I think generally summers are slow for software a and then B. Yeah, I think we were seeing kind of like a little bit of the payback for, for COVID perhaps it's a, it's a vial. I think it's a plausible theory. We don't, it's really hard to prove. but we have not seen, you know, we, we saw our COVID experience was really drastic.And we have not seen. Similar, like back off from that, like, it has been like, it has been like we just compressed six months and I'm saying partially, this is just revenue casts, individual story because of where we were last year. But then I think also it's, it's indicative of the system in general.It's like, I think, yeah, we just compressed a whole bunch of, like consumer behavior change into like a very short period of time. And yeah, we're not gonna be able to keep that up. Right. We're not gonna be able to continue. To, to crunch that in, or we'll run out of consumers eventually. But, but it doesn't look like everybody's, you know, because, you know, I think the story for CSS in general, it's like we've delivered value for people, right?Like it's, it's a good, it's a good product, right? The whole line, not every product is good, but in general it's like a it's, it's a decent deal. And so I, I think more people discovering that. Yeah, it can only get bigger, right.00:20:55 Eric:Yeah, I think we talked about it in our first year, our first time together, right on the last podcast, which is if these businesses are truly making consumers' lives better, this is going to be a very long-term.00:21:04 Jacob:Yeah. 00:21:05 David:And speaking of that, and the two companies you just mentioned, in the, Time since we last spoke, but Bumble and DuoLingo went public and some other consumer subscription, apps went public. so tell me a little bit about your, your perspective on the, the public investor. Excitement for CSS.I mean, we're seeing pretty high multiples in the both of those IPS did, did very well. so what are you seeing in the, in the public investor space?00:21:33 Eric:Yeah, I think, I think the public market has really woken up to this business model, the power of it and understanding, you know, it's public markets. They do a lot of pattern matching, right? If they've seen something be super successful, they look for something that looks similar to that. And so I think a lot of people are waking up to, how powerful Salesforce is not waking up.They're well awake, very aware of SAS businesses. But I think they're seeing that same pattern starts to take, hold on, CSS. It just has different metrics. Right? And so, you know, Bumble's now public, the match group's been public for quite some time. Once I spun out of IAC, you've got Netflix and Spotify, which are fantastic examples of the international global reach of Content, and how consumers are very sticky for something they love.And so. These businesses who can get to scale really quickly, like you nuMe, right, is a competitor to weight Watchers. Weight Watchers has been around for decades, but Newman built a better mouse trap and they acquired customers at a really quick rate. And, you know, they're well over 400 million in revenue and ready for the public market.So I expect them to go public. Pretty soon. And so I think there's going to be a lot of businesses that follow them that are using this, this metric. So, and then that'll cascade all the way through, from public market investors as, as exit opportunities all the way down to, you know, series a series B investors, seeing this business model work and scale.00:22:47 Jacob:Yeah. I mean, I guess my, like, what's your, like, I, I, when, when we started seeing these go public in the last, like couple of years, so, well, I mean, honestly, it's like, Since we started RevenueCat, like was actually the, kind of the first unicorns, even like, I guess Bumble might've been passing unicorn when we got started, but like there weren't a ton and now it's like every, every month there's a funding announcement for a CSS company.That's a, that's a university. I mean, partially that's just like valuations going up and stuff like this, but like, how do you see. The evolution of this market. Long-term, you know, so DuoLingo pops becomes the first, you know, are they going to be like Salesforce and just be dominant in that space forever?Or do you see it being maybe more dynamic than sasses?00:23:31 Eric:I think it's a little more dynamic than SAS for, for a couple of reasons. One, new consumers like to try stuff, right. And so if it's with like a Salesforce or something, right. That integrates into your day to day operations from a business model perspective, right. So if something breaks there, right.Your business. 00:23:47 Jacob:Is very high. 00:23:48 Eric:Yeah, it's a little higher, right. And it's not just you using it. It's your entire business. Right? So you've got 10 people using this product or 20 people or 5,000, depending on the size of your company. Right. In CSS. It's it's you, maybe you and your family. Right? So it's a little bit of a different switching cost.So that's, that's one. However, these companies can scale a lot of. and they can, they don't have like the heavy, heavy cost and, you know, on the sales and marketing side. So I think they have an ability to actually get to profitability a lot faster, especially if they have an organic customer acquisition engine.And so I think that's going to be a big difference between that, between CSS and SAS. 00:24:23 Jacob:So, yeah, you mentioned the metrics are different. What are, what are the metrics that folks are, public investors are looking at for these companies that it might be different from a SAS company?00:24:33 Eric:Yeah. I mean, a lot of them are the same metrics, but the numbers that are like good are different, right? So like on a SAS business model, right. Revenue growth is just as attractive as a CSS business model revenue growth. Right. Everyone wants to see high double digits, triple digit numbers on revenue growth.But like an interesting thing is net revenue retention. Now that's very different, right? In CSS, you typically don't upcharge people or have additional seats be filled because it's just one person. Right. So, you know, maybe you get an. 00:24:59 Jacob:It's not much expansion opportunity. 00:25:00 Eric:Yeah, you can, you can do maybe some, some packages, upgrades, and people are starting to experiment that you can pack it and you can experiment with bump, bundling 00:25:07 Jacob:But it's certainly never going to be greater. It's never going to be net positive, right? 00:25:11 Eric:No, you're never going to see a net positive number where a lot of the SAS businesses, right.People are looking for net revenue, retention, numbers of north of one, 20, 120% net revenue retention 00:25:18 Jacob:I mean the opposite of churn, right. Which if you have a CSS business with opposite, Congratulations. like 00:25:25 Eric:Yeah. You're doing something well, and I haven't found it yet, but yeah, 00:25:28 Jacob:You might be the only one 00:25:29 Eric:Yes, I think that's right. 00:25:31 David:Quick, point though, to counterpoint to what y'all were both just saying, of all the apps, dating app, it's totally slipping my mind. 00:25:40 Jacob:Tinder. partnership. David, look at us. We're like on a wavelength. 00:25:46 David:They, they have in-app purchase. They have consumable in-app purchases to boost your, profile. They're one of the few that I've seen that could potentially actually have a. A a positive, net revenue retention. whereas most subscription apps are just a subscription. it's going to be interesting to see if other subscription apps can pull off that sort of model that you could actually generate a, a net net revenue retention. 00:26:19 Eric:I think you nailed it, David. So that's coming from. Right. I think people first experimented with, Hey, how do I get someone to buy my product every year or every month? Right. And now is how do you make it even better? So they're starting to listen to their core users. And we talk about this a little bit on the LTVs.And what do these people want and what makes this experience even better for them. And I think you nailed it with Tinder, right? It's the most, it's the easiest thing to convince people to, to encourage more is more, you know, more relationships, right? People love more relationships and people are willing to pay for that.And so, you know, then what else, what else could this go down the path of, right. What other options could people pay for additional services? Or what we've seen is like marketplaces or transactions spinning on. Right. So if you have a really passionate user base and they're going out there doing, camping, for example, like on, on the dirt, it's a camping site, right?What about doing a marketplace to buy and sell use tents right now is not a subscription, but now if someone's paying, like, okay, now they bought something through your marketplace and you get 10% of that purchase price. So there's going to be a lot of stuff. I think that happens there, to encourage that, to encourage that LTV numbers start rising, I just haven't seen a ton yet, make it happen above 00:27:26 Jacob:It's a scale problem. I need to do that either be at such scale for that to make sense. So I was going to say for anybody, listening to this, that hasn't reached 20 million in ARR, probably north of that do not add a marketplace to your 00:27:37 Eric:I totally agree with that. Very, very much focused focus, focus. And so I would even say like closer to 50 00:27:43 Jacob:Yeah. I mean, until you're like, how do we get this thing public? Or how do we show, like, how do we show like N plus one revenue streams, right? Like it's kinda more what it's about than it is necessarily the revenue generated. 00:27:53 Eric:I'm just a dreamer though. You're just a realist. I'm here, I'm here. And you're just telling me all that stuff that could go wrong. 00:27:58 David:One of the things you just kinda touched on that I wanted to dive deeper into was, was a truth about LTVs. And I love this slide on the, on your presentation, kind of defining these two cohorts, which I've never heard, defined this way. And I really loved the analogy and I'm going to start sort of stealing it from you and use.And crediting you of course. but in the presentation you define, tourists and locals, and then talk about kind of the importance of identifying these different cohorts. So tell me about Who the locals are and why that matters and who the tourists are and how companies can start, analyzing their data to understand this and better target marketing, better, craft the experience in the app and, and those sorts of things. 00:28:46 Eric:Yeah. So we're going to geek out here guys, and, really go deep into STSS. Right? So this is where, this is where my brain goes sometimes on a Saturday night, which is just exciting. but so the way I've been thinking about CSS a lot, and so the LTV component of CSS, which is lifetime value, Which I'm sure all your listeners are very, very well aware of is kind of like how much money can you make from this consumer over time.Right. And it's a function of your pricing and it's an, a function of your turn rate. And so, a lot of people are very focused on this metric as investors or buyers, right? Because it's effectively, how valuable is your customer? So it's an extremely important metric. The problem with this metric and lots of other metrics is it's, it's derived from an app.Right. It's looking at all your users that come into your, in your ecosystem is paying customers. And then how do they perform over time? and it's, it's driven, it's driven off an average of all your users. And so when I've gone through some of my client's data and you look at their user base, right, we, we quickly discovered there's a, there's kind of two different profiles.And I won't use any names here, but let's just, let's just say it's, a walking company, right? So you're, you've got people that go out and they, they sign up, you have a hundred people that. And 20 of them start walking every day and they're, and they, this is what they love and they're tracking, they're walking and you've got another 40 that do it for like a month or two.And then they kind of drop off and then just like, I'm going to go do biking or skateboarding or something. And I switch and you've got another people that sign up. They subscribed to it because their friend pressured him into it and they hate walking and they're never going to walk again and they turn off immediately.Right. So you kind of have those three different groups, some that are just going to do whatever. Some that do it for two to three months and then leave. And then some that do it the first month. And then say, forget this. I'm never going to use this again. And so the problem is your LTV of each one of those three groups are very, very different.And so what, we've, what we've been guiding investors and entrepreneurs, as they think about their growing their businesses, really find out who those locals are, who those people that are going to come and use your app every day, every week, every summer, whatever, whatever the metric is that you're looking.And find ways to measure that, right? Because ultimately that's who you need to bring to your community. And one, those people make the community run more robust, right? Cause they're constantly contributing feedback into the. To, they're much more likely to stay around with you guys. And so you need to find those tools that they're looking for.Right? Like seeing around the corner and saying like, okay, this person loves walking. What else can I provide them? What about a weather forecast? So now that they are about to go out and walking, you know, what does the weather look like? And, oh my God, this is now, this is my one-stop stop for, for walking.And so I think w we've been guidinGP Bullhound's like if you use the averages as a broad metric and that's great, and you should, because investors are going to want to know that, but, but really dig deep into your, your cohort and understand like who's using this every day, all day and what do they need. And so if you can really identify that and show that LTV to, to invest in.I think you can get people a lot more excited than just like that average LTV, right? Cause this shows them potential of what it can be over three to five years, which is really important if you're two or three year old company. Right. And try to convince someone to invest in you showing them that lifetime value of the tour or the locals is going to be a lot more valuable than that average.00:31:46 Jacob:I mean, if you think about just as the, you know, I think it's one of the, you highlighted one of the hard parts of assessing these businesses early on, is that yeah. Your cohort, your total subscriber base is very heavily biased on like your most recent cohort, because often you're also growing, right?Like that's often, like your most recent cohort might be the size of your first five, you know? just because, and for that reason you can really have scurry looking data. but you know, if you think five years from now, mostly. Those other two groups you mentioned there they'll have turned out from most cohorts.Right? And then the only ones remaining for four years of cohorts will be these locals and these long-term retention. And then your total subscriber base is gonna look very different than it does today. Right. And yeah, I'll admit revenue. I've tried to solve this problem in the product. And we still are trying to solve this problem in the product.It's how do we like show people? Cause you're, you're dealing with a mixed population, right? And like you, you can also also run into a problem with begging the COO or like doing very, like, look, you got to invest in and say like, look, look how great my retention is. If I just ignore them. Bad users. Right?Like, let me just look at the good ones. Right. But there is something there in that. What you're talking about, Eric, that long, that very long-term view is that if these users really do retain for a long time, eventually they will be the lion's share of. Subscriber base. And that churn that we talk about, like, you know, if you're adding 1% of your total user base, the most you can experience off of that as like 1% of churn, right.Versus when you're adding half, you know, if you have 110,000 subscribers and you add 10,000 in a month, that's going to be a huge effect to your overall subscription subscription base. Right. so yeah, I think, I think, you know, we certainly have a lot to build on the tooling side. Right. And I think it goes to what you're talking about.Air. We're very early. Like, I think we've just kind of solved infrastructure, like infrastructure. I mean, I would even say kind of, cause there's a lot for us that we need to do yet. but as far as like data science and actually yeah. Being able to outside of a spreadsheet, understand this stuff. It's it's, it's not trivial.It's not trivial. All 00:33:51 Eric:It's extremely hard. And I think like, cause there's so much more you could do once you've broken those two cohorts into tourists and locals, right? Like how do you acquire the locals versus how do you acquire the tourists? Are tourists coming through like Facebook, apple store and the locals are coming from referrals.Okay. So maybe your Facebook spend, is that even worth doing the spending on right. If they're, if they're turning off after a month or two, you know, subscribers is a vanity metric, right. If they don't. All right. You can grow. We talked about this in our 2020 report. We have like this cheetah versus thoroughbred.Right. And it's really easy to show a ton of growth. And you've got all these subscribers and everything is fantastic. Right. But if those subscribers get tired and they turn off right away, you kind of probably wasted money on them. Right. Maybe you got paid back in a month, right. So you didn't lose like on the CAC spend right in here, but you're not building your business.Right. You're just gonna you're pinching pennies. 00:34:36 Jacob:But not a lot of work. Right? Like it's not actually getting translated into business 00:34:39 Eric:Exactly. So is it better to kind of focus on the product, right? Figure out what those, those, tourists are using and spend less time on the marketing side and really nailed the products like, Hey, you'll probably grow slower, right? And That's an issue. That's a risk you have to take, but maybe you can grow more efficiently, more capital efficiency.00:34:55 Jacob:Capital's free now, so that's not a 00:34:58 Eric:That's a fair point of half my fault, I'll take full responsibility for some of that. Right. 00:35:03 Jacob:I think it's interesting how this like feeds into, you know, kind of going back to targeting and ad targeting how often. Optimized Facebook campaigns on like trial conversion. And that doesn't even that doesn't, that's all your tourists and your locals. I mean, maybe some of those that never even start a trial would be cause, but there's a lot of tourists in that group that started trial right.Or convert a trial. And a lot of people are targeting off of that. Right. And so as these methods become less. Good. it will force it'll force developers to yeah. Maybe do one of these scary things actually talk to users, right? Like actually like find those locals, like go in your analytics. And I think just the thing as you were talking about, I just want to point out that, like, I don't think you necessarily need to define this off of monetization retention either could just be retention, like pure usage retention, but it could also be engagement.Yeah. I think about the way Facebook, Oriented their growth teams very early on, which was like findinGP Bullhound that connected, like that was a really key step for them in their product, was to get people to make like three or four. I forget there's some number of friends and they oriented all of their growth efforts around that.Find the thing that people do in your. Shows that they're engaged and give them opportunities to show that. And then, you know, you can use that as an indicator. Okay. Talk to those folks and actually talk to them, right? Like find out, always put something in your app that lets you reach out to them in some way.And like, have you can get on a zoom call. I've done. It's easier now in SaaS land because like, I, I, I, people I'm an app. People like I know how to talk to them, but when we were, when I was working in consumer. Phone calls were more awkward, right? It was different. You're not going to books like outside of computer land, but still like just incredibly valuable.And, and, and, and I think like, you know, if we want to talk about the way to build the way to fully realize how CSS is going to, I'm just going to go all in on your turmeric, by the way, I said, I'm going to, 00:36:57 Eric:That.00:36:57 Jacob:I'm going to push it. We're going to standardize. But 00:36:59 Eric:It's not trademark, but knock it out. 00:37:01 Jacob:All right. So to fully like, to fully realize the potential to like help problems for people.Like, I think we need to lean into this more of this model. Right. Rather than I've always kind of like had an uncomfortable relationship with how our RevenueCat fits into the like hyper fast monetization stuff. Right. I'm like, get users, check your CAC, put more money into Facebook. Right. And so, the more the industry gets away from that. The happier I am. I don't know. Like you said, maybe it doesn't go quite as fast, but I think the overall Tam will be larger. Right? If we take that approach,00:37:33 Eric:Think that's right. And, you know, I mean, I've talked to a bunch of founders that haven't raised capital. Right. And they build something that like their users love. Right. Like, so I don't know if you guys saw the deal with day one that got bought by automatic braised almost as your outside capital.Right. He built. 00:37:46 Jacob:Big fans that they won. 00:37:47 Eric:Yeah. Yeah. I was a big,I got it's an awesome business and he did that exact same thing. Right. He just listened to his users. He didn't care about vanity metrics grew really nicely. Right. And it wasn't like, you know, he's not getting tech crunch publishing, but that's fine. Right. You know, on an amazing business.And then, you know, I've got a fantastic exit out of it. So I think, I think people are really waking up to that's a very much a possibility here in the.00:38:08 David:Yeah, one thing I wanted to highlight too, in that graph that you made, and for people that are listening to this, you can go to the show notes. We'll have links to the, Eric's presentation and you can find this chart, but to visualize it00:38:25 Jacob:Page 18. it open right here. 00:38:27 David:Following along at home, the, line for the locals drops.So, you know, even, even for locals, you're going to have some turn early on, but then it essentially flat lines. and I'm sure you did that very purposely to kind of illustrate how. How long term some of these, these, this retention can end up being, and it's something we've actually been talking on the podcast about recently is that we're so early in the space.We don't even really know what, how to measure LTV. Cause you're going to have people who ended up subscribing for decades. and years and years and years, if not decades. And so, and, and then, you know, to your point about the cheetah versus thoroughbred, another great chart in the patient number, Jacob Page number00:39:16 Jacob:I 00:39:17 David:Cheetah versus thoroughbred but in that tuna versus thoroughbred, The other aspect to locals, and we're kind of touched on it earlier is that those cohorts start to stack. So when you identify this cohort, that is going to be a very long-term cohort. That's going to stay subscribed and have very low churn. You, you acquire a hundred thousand this year, and then they're still there next year.And you put a hundred thousand on top of that. And those are still there next year. And by year three, you know, you just continue to grow this pie of people who are very, very sticky in the product. And I think that's part of what. you know, what you're talking about with delinquent and Bumble and other companies is like, we're still just starting to understand even as different as this is from SaaS.We're starting to see similar dynamics as far as. Early on the churn is so high, but then you do have this really strong stickiness over the long-term that, that, that can build a really healthy business of people who really love your, your product and really are invested in it and are going to stay for a really long time.So yeah, I just wanted to point that out that, that I, I love that aspect of the chart of how flat that line is for the locals. 00:40:35 Eric:I mean, you, you can see it in your own spending patterns, right? Like how many of you guys have subscribed to Netflix or Spotify for more than five years? I bet it's a good chunk of your listeners. Right? So, I mean, if I look at my phone, right, I'm going to subscribe to all trails for the next decade, 00:40:47 Jacob:Yeah, I've got CSS. I I've started subscribing to in 20 13, 14, like as 00:40:52 Eric:Yeah. 00:40:52 Jacob:It was a thing, 00:40:53 Eric:I've, been a script user for four years and I still download audio books or download other books from like the San Francisco library. Cause I'm probably the cheapest banker of all time. but you know, I still use script 00:41:04 Jacob:It's finding margin, Eric you're finding margin. That's what that is. 00:41:07 Eric:Exactly. I've pinched counties all day.But yeah, so I mean, I, I think those tails David to your point are still being written. And so that's the whole point, right? If you use average LTV and you say, all right, well, we have 30% churn that math means you lose every user in three years, and that's just not how it works. And if with really good businesses that are delivering value, right?And so then once you convince people of that, right, the investment case becomes a very different company.00:41:30 David:And speaking of that, you, you had a great, slide on investor benchmarks. And so I wanted to get to that real quick, tell me about how you, how you thought. These different metrics. And what, and how investors think about these metrics? Because you know, we're talking about LTV and in there you have LTV to CAC of you, you know, for a really strong app, that investor would be super excited about.You're closest to. Six X versus less than three X, you start to cool off. So, yeah. Walk us through each of these metrics and kind of how you think about it, how you think investors think about it, And even how that's kind of maturing as we understand the space better. 00:42:10 Eric:Yeah. And just to note like these metrics are all different for different types of businesses, right? If you've been around for a year, these metrics are very different versus if you've been around for 10 years, right. If you're in high growth, you know, venture back, spending a lot of money, these metrics look very different than if you're a bootstrap business, you know, just trying to inch out.You know, 10% growth a year. Right. So they can be very different. And the important thing is how does the story of your business and what you're trying to accomplish tie to these metrics? Right. So that's what we spent a lot of time talking to founders about is, is what's good based on what you're trying to do.Right. So it's just how you, how do you tell your story through the metrics? but yeah, so a couple of your points on the S on the slide, we talk about like user growth rates, gross margins, LTV to CAC, churn rates, free to paid conversion rate, and then sales efficiency. and then, you know, just to talk about something different, we, we talked about LTV a little bit earlier, but maybe talking about, churn, right.And so like how quickly do people churn off? Right. And so that's, there's a couple different ways to interpret churn, right? It's one, they didn't find your product. Too. They thought it was really expensive. or if they're not turning, they really love something you've put together. Right. And they decided to pay you multiple times for that either monthly or annual.And so what we just try to do is try to tell the story of where the business is at and where it's going by looking at these metrics. And so, you know, that's why it's so important to truly understand these metrics, because if you don't understand the metrics, it's hard to tie that to the story. so we spent a lot of time with any client or even non-clients just talking about this stuff to truly understand, you know, what investors care about.And it's, you know, if someone's buying the business, they may care a very good. They may care about very different metrics for someone who's investing your business for growth, right? So someone's going to put 40%, $40 million on your balance sheet to go grow. They may be focused less on LTV to CAC now because your LTV is not formally formed, right.They don't know how good it is, but they will focus very heavily on churn, which is a reflection of how good your product is and how good you're finding consumers that love your product. Right. So those, those are metrics that they may focus. They made me more comfortable spending a lot of money in the next two years.Right. So your CACs going to look a lot worse because they watched, you acquire a lot of users to make the platform a lot better. Right. And a lot of CSS businesses, right. UGC is a, is a, is a spinoff of user activity on the post. Beautiful uploading photos reviews. They're adding new new items on, on the platform for other users to use.And so it's worth spending more money to get those people in the first two to three years because your platform becomes that much better and that much more valuable, right? So you may be willing to burn down to a, an LTV to CAC of three X or something like that in the near term, or sometimes even two extra one X, because it's a land grab for those.Once you're on their platform right now. You want to see that LTV to CAC, start to move up a little bit, right? So you start to put it to four or five, six X, LTV to CAC. So it's all about where your business is. It's each different stage, but it's important to have a story and a message around why your numbers are, what they are.00:45:03 Jacob:Of the, I have the slides up in third slide, 37 for anybody who's following along at home. all of these as a veteran SAS CSS person, every annual user growth rate, gross margin to be cash I'll clear me, sales efficiency ratio. Can you talk about that one? Cause that one's, that one's, not as a little foreign to me. 00:45:22 Eric:Yeah. It's, it's a, it's more of a metric that's come out of SAS just to be honest. So it's thinking about like, it involves like how, how many users are you gaining? It's how much revenue you're gaining versus how much money are you putting out there? So it's a little bit of a different metric. and most CSS businesses don't get to that yet because they typically don't have heavy sales team.And so we've included it because you're starting to see some of these CSS businesses really start to grow. And so how much revenue gaining versus how much revenue you're losing and how much is it costing you to do that? And so that's when you're starting to get into like the tens to $20 million of, of, marketing spend a year, it's, it's, important to understand like how efficient is that spend being, and this is the best metric 00:46:00 Jacob:We, it says called sales, but you actually throw in marketing, spend in there as well. So it's like all go to market spend 00:46:07 Eric:Yeah. Are using head count, not just like the ad dollars. right. 00:46:10 Jacob:Right. 00:46:11 Eric:It's like a fully loaded CAC number, like 00:46:13 Jacob:Your, all of your people telling Facebook what to do, 00:46:17 Eric:Yep, exactly. Exactly. 00:46:18 Jacob:Content graders, like all that stuff, right? Yeah. 00:46:20 Eric:If you've got a hundred people running around campus, right. Promoting your app. Right. Okay. How much those people cost. Right. So it's an important way to think about how much you grow. And it's a way to think about like how well can you grow a capitally efficient capital with limited amounts of capital.So it's an important one. We look at it, it's typically a later stage, right? So you've gotta be like north of 20 million of 00:46:40 Jacob:So he's going to be super high when you're small, right? Because you're, you're your. 00:46:43 Eric:Sir. Request important. 00:46:44 Jacob:People are discreet. Right. And that you can't, you're not continuous. So, and also your, your, your revenue just grows less because of like, you know, you're smaller, you're less, well-known like, you're less is momentum is things like this. 00:46:56 David:Well, we're starting to run low on time, but there's so much more I want to talk to you about, but just to hit one last thing. I also love this chart you did, of Pandora versus Spotify. It's such a. And encapsulation, really everything that we've been talking about on this podcast is to see how well Spotify revenue has compounded over the past few years versus a Pandora, which, which look was the juggernaut.You know, when, when, when Spotify started. so, so walk us through this chart. And in how and why you think, you know, Spotify was able to, to grow the way they did while Pandora really struggled. And obviously there's a ton of, you know, other business factors and execution and other things. But, but I think overall, this does speak to the power of CSS.00:47:54 Eric:Yeah. And this is, this is something we did back in 2020 when we were just trying to decide like, Hey, what's is this CSS thing real? And, and a big question you get from, from investors. And listen, I think a lot of them have stopped asking this question because the case studies are out there is why would someone pay monthly or annually for something they can get for free?And by get for free, it means listening to, or watch. Right. And so I wanted to see like, alright, graphically or like actually numbers to will people, more companies make more money by making that really hard decision and say, pay me for what I'm giving you first. I'll give you something for free and exchange every half hour, you watch two minutes of ads, right?That's a really hard question to say, because it involves you putting a lot of value in your product. And so entrepreneurs, you know, product developers have to. Is this worth money or am I giving something out to people that, Hey, they'll kind of use it if they get it for free. Right? So it's a, it's a gut check for people to say, like, did I build something that someone will buy?That's hard. That's really challenging. Ask yourself, especially if you've started with advertising. and Spotify, you know, listen, they were a small company based in the Nordics, right. Versus Pandora US-based juggernaut and, and raised a lot of money. Right. That's a tough challenge. And so they took a really tough thing and said like, Hey, we're going to get.And make people pay for our product and we're going to make it better. But the crazy thing that happens though, right, is you make so much more on a user from subscriptions than you do from average. Right on advertising. You're trying to pick up pennies per subscription on some or pennies per user on the subscriber.You're making 10, 20 bucks a month, depending maybe maybe $60 a year for a subscriber. So the amount of users you have compounds so quickly, and then if you have that heavy retention, all of a sudden, you've got these really thick layers of cashflow that come in every year, use that cashflow. You invest it back in.He invested back in product and you do it again and again and again, and all of a sudden you've got a better product. And if you have a better product, people will come to it. And if it's something that they're using daily, right. Why would you not be comfortable like paying five bucks? Right. If I think about like how much my Netflix subscription is, right.It's $11 a month or something like that. Right. Well, I probably watch 10 hours of Netflix a month, right? So I'm paying a dollar an hour to be entertained. Pretty good deal. And so, like, I think if people, people start doing that math and you start to see like how powerful that that subscription is for user versus an ad driven, it becomes pretty interesting.And so I think you've seen this case study play out over and over and over across CSS, where if you build a good enough product, you know, a 10 X product versus the free option, people will pay for it. 00:50:24 David:And Spotify does double dip as well, which is interesting is that they have a good enough free tier and people can listen for free. But they choose to spend, even though they can. And so, so Spotify is a great example of, of double-dipping with a great freemium tier, but then a good enough product in a compelling enough reason that people will pay.00:50:47 Jacob:Yeah, another dimension. I don't know the specifics of Pandora and Spotify. It's like fundraising history, but if you have like the subscriber. Subscription revenue momentum makes capital more easy to access. And you look at some of this. I think of some of the strategic stuff that Spotify has done. Like they got the Beatles on Spotify pretty early on and lets up, they spent big on partnerships and Content and stuff.And if you have momentum, if you have hard dollars, it's a lot easier to go to an investor and be like, Hey, like I want to raise X million dollar. Revenue growth. I have, like, this is very clearly a business. I can remember raising money in the pre revenue is everything era or like trying to raise money.And it was like a lot harder. Right. Cause it was just like hand waves and we're going to grow and like, and now it's like, yeah, for better or worse, you go over the curtain and you show something. Right. But the big benefit too, I think for founders, it's not just for investor, for founders. It's like, yeah, you build a great business.You're building a safety net, right? Like if you can't fundraise, it's not the end of the world. Like you have options. And I think that's part of the reason why also, I mean, now we're getting into fundraising like macro, but that's part of the reason the funding environment is crazy because businesses are sturdier than they've ever been.Like they need capital less than they've ever needed it. Right. And so like, that's why it's gotten cheaper. or, you know, evaluation's gotten higher same thing. Right. So, Anyway. Yeah. And this is a fascinating to put this. I already was not on here, which was my horse. And I was like really pulling for them.And then it gets to a whole different story of why that's not on there. But, but yeah, it's fascinating.00:52:11 David:Well, I think that's a really fun place to end the story of Spotify, one of the biggest juggernauts in the space. We're going to include in the show notes a link to the report, a link to your LinkedIn and Twitter to follow along.Anything else you want to share as we wrap up? 00:52:27 Eric:No guys. Always a pleasure to join you. One thing for your audience users, we are trying to make the GP Bullhound CSS report a resource for founders. This year, for the first time ever, we did include a link to a survey.So, if you want to contribute your data, what we'll do is aggregate everything, anonymize it, and then we'll provide back a summary to users to say, “Hey, here's your LTV to CAC. How does this compare to other founders at this stage?” We are trying to be a resource. I'll probably give you guys that link, if you don't mind. We'd love to have as many people as possible. No pressure.Of course, all of it would be anonymized. This isn't a marketing tactic for us. It's us giving back to the community. We'd love people to take a second to do the survey, but if not, don't hesitate to email me, tweet at me, hit me on LinkedIn with questions, comments, and specifically stuff We got wrong. Absolutely love to hear where we can learn.00:53:22 Jacob:Yeah. 00:53:23 Eric:Because we're not building, we're just talking about what you guys are doing.00:53:26 Jacob:By the time you print this thing, it's like, stuff's changed, right? Like it's changing so fast.00:53:32 Eric:The whole Apple thing when we were publishing was happening everyday. And I was like, this is unbelievable.00:53:36 Jacob:And wait to...00:53:36 Eric:Since July, and I have to change every minute. Yeah. I had to change a PowerPoint. You guys had to change code. So I think one was a lot harder.00:53:44 David:Well, it was great having you on, Eric, and we'll have to make this an annual thing.00:53:49 Eric:Sounds good.You're welcome.00:53:51 Jacob:Yeah, we'll see you next year. 00:53:52 David:See you in 2022.00:53:54 Eric:All right. Thanks David. Thanks Jacob.

WeMartians Podcast
108 - Space, UAE, and the World (feat. Sarwat Nasir)

WeMartians Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 34:10


The UAE started their space agency in 2014 and have accelerated at a remarkable pace since then, including putting their first orbiter around Mars this year. The work continues with new mission announcements, astronaut selections and more. Dubai-based space journalist Sarwat Nasir joins Jake to report on Expo 2021 and IAC 2021, two back to back space conferences happening in the UAE.We talk UAE, Space and the WorldThe Hope Mission Data PortalUAE and Israel Co-operate on BeresheetSpace is the UAE's most promising sectorUAE to launch asteroid missionFollow SarwatSarwat's Publications at the National NewsSarwat Nasir on Twitter (@SarwatNasir)Sarwat's WebsiteFollow Jake & WeMartiansWeMartians.comPatreon (https://www.wemartians.com/support)WeMartians Shop (shop.wemartians.com)Mailing List (https://wemartians.com/signup)Twitter (@we_martians)Jake's Twitter (@JakeOnOrbit)Off-Nominal PodcastWheels DownPick up your Perseverance Wheels Down design at the WeMartians shop today!

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Automating Infrastructure as Code with Apache Kafka and Confluent ft. Rosemary Wang

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 30:08


Managing infrastructure as code (IaC) instead of using manual processes makes it easy to scale systems and minimize errors. Rosemary Wang (Developer Advocate, HashiCorp, and author of “Essential Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices”) is an infrastructure engineer at heart and an aspiring software developer who is passionate about teaching patterns for infrastructure as code to simplify processes for system admins and software engineers familiar with Python, provisioning tools like Terraform, and cloud service providers. The definition of infrastructure has expanded to include anything that delivers or deploys applications. Infrastructure as software or infrastructure as configuration, according to Rosemary, are ideas grouped behind infrastructure as code—the process of automating infrastructure changes in a codified manner, which also applies to DevOps practices, including version controls, continuous integration, continuous delivery, and continuous deployment. Whether you're using a domain-specific language or a programming language, the practices used to collaborate between you, your team, and your organization are the same—create one application and scale systems.The ultimate result and benefit of infrastructure as code is automation. Many developers take advantage of managed offerings like Confluent Cloud—fully managed Kafka as a service—to remove the operational burden and configuration layer. Still, as long as complex topologies like connecting to another server on a cloud provider to external databases exist, there is great value to standardizing infrastructure practices. Rosemary shares four characteristics that every infrastructure system should have: ResilienceSelf-serviceSecurityCost reductionIn addition, Rosemary and Tim discuss updating infrastructure with blue-green deployment techniques, immutable infrastructure, and developer advocacy. EPISODE LINKS: Use PODCAST100 to get $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)Use podcon19 to get 40% off “Essential Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices”Watch the video version of this podcastJoin the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with Confluent

Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for Professional Software Developers
Episode 482: Luke Hoban on Infrastructure as Code

Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for Professional Software Developers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:11


Luke Hoban, CTO of Pulumi, joined host Jeff Doolittle for a conversation about infrastructure as code (IAC), which allows software development teams to configure and control their cloud infrastructure assets using code in contrast to other approaches...

AWS FM
Ben Bridts: Infrastructure-as-Code, Getting the Most Out of the CLI, and Other AWS Tips

AWS FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Ben joins Adam to discuss what he's learned through years of leveraging infrastructure-as-code (IaC), how to get the most out of the AWS CLI, and other AWS tips that he enjoys sharing with the community.

Iceberg de Valor
#178 - Ganadores y perdedores

Iceberg de Valor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 11:44


0:00 - OLPX 1:20 - TWTR, APP 2:33 - IFIT 4:06 - MDP, IAC 4:47 - TMV 5:19 - Macro - 7:21 - #178 - Ganadores y perdedores

PQS Quality Corner Show
Preparing for the 2021- 2022 Flu Season (Available for CE)

PQS Quality Corner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:48


Litjen (L.J) Tan, MS, PhD, Chief Policy and Partnerships Officer at immunize.org (IAC) and Co-Chair, National Adult Immunization Summit and National Influenza Vaccine Summit  joins the PQS Quality Corner Show to talk Flu Season 2021 with PQS Senior Manager of Pharmacy Accounts, Nick Dorich, PharmD.Tan reviews a bit about flu season 2020 and explains how 2021 could be different. He also encourages more pharmacist communications and patient engagement for increased flu vaccinations.Pharmacist's Letter is offering CE credit for this podcast. Please log into your Pharmacist's Letter account and look for the title of this podcast in the list of available CE courses.

Regionally Speaking with Chris Nolte
Regionally Speaking, Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Regionally Speaking with Chris Nolte

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 25:03


Today: Paige Sharp with the Indiana Arts Commission is on "Regionally Speaking" to talk about the IAC's partnership with the state's Small Business Development Center for its annual "On Ramp Entrepreneur Accelerator which helps Hoosier artists, and the businesses they run, to be more resilient and be able to deal with the pandemic and the financial impact it brings. South Shore Arts is a local partner in the program. Karen Anaszewicz with the Mascot Hall of Fame in Whiting talks about how the downtown attraction is doing during COVID-19 and has the details on two big projects which include a November 5th fundraiser -- with the accent on "fun." And we have another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University.

Fly Cool Shit - An Aviation Podcast About Flying Cool Shit

Welcome back! We are back to regularly scheduled episodes (hopefully lol). Nationals is in the books and live moves on! This week we have Chapter 36 president (or Vice President according to the website ha!) Bryan Jones on the podcast. Bryan is an aerobatic competitor, Contest Director, chapter President, and so much more! We ask about Bryans thoughts on Nationals and how he thought the contest went from a scoring standpoint, from a CD standpoint, and then of course his thoughts on the protests and DQs. Bryan also shared with us the movement now to change the way Class IV Directors are appointed, and that was very educational. Bryan currently flies a Great Lakes but is training in Michael Church's mid wing Extra 300 to tansition into a Panzl, and Bryan shared his experiences moving into a high performance monoplane. Finally, we discuss the Southern California Classic contest coming up in Borrego CA 10/21 - 10/23. This is a joint venture between IAC 36 and IAC 49 and honestly has all the right ingredients to be one of the best contests in the country! You can check out more info here: https://www.iac.org/contest/2021-10-15-akrofest-2021 .Learn more about IAC Chapter 36 here: http://www.iac36.org/Home.aspxJoin the IAC here: https://www.iac.org/roll-with-us-join-or-renew Buy Fly Cool Shit merch here: https://www.flycoolshit.com/merchGo support Lift Aviation! www.liftaviationusa.com and use FLYCOOLSHIT at checkout for 25% off!

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 9/27/2021

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 5:35


US stocks were mixed Friday. Plus, IAC eyes Meredith Corp., NYC passes bills for delivery workers, and Nike battles supply-chain issues.

This Week in Tech (Video LO)
TWiT 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones - Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel

This Week in Tech (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

This Week in Tech (Video HI)
TWiT 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones - Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel

This Week in Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones - Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 150:36


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

This Week in Tech (Video HD)
TWiT 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones - Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel

This Week in Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Tech 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 150:36


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)
This Week in Tech 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)
This Week in Tech 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Tech 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 151:19


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Tech 842: The Ivermectin of Smartphones

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 150:36


Crackdown in China, Surface Duo 2, end of magazines, Peter Thiel What technology has brought since the '80s. Are today's students aware of how much technology has changed since the '80s? We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People New edition by Dan Gillmor. The importance of blogs and the state of blogs now. Facebook: The Inside Story by Steven Levy. How much has Mark Zuckerberg evolved since the beginning of Facebook? Facebook to testify on kids' safety as lawmakers probe a whistleblower's revelations. Was the Facebook Files series a fair representation of what's going on inside the company? China's central bank says all cryptocurrency-related activities are illegal, vows harsh crackdown. FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operations targeting hackers. Apple iPhone 13 Review: The Most Incremental Upgrade Ever. Microsoft's new Surface Duo 2 has all the features that were missing the first time around. Where does Apple go next? What is the next "perfect thing"? The Framework Laptop. The Art of the Thiel. Watch a raven take out a Google drone mid-air as the tech giant is forced to ground its home delivery service due to bird attacks. What Our Research Really Says About Teen Well-Being and Instagram. "Completely Running Blind." Apple's Power Move To Kneecap Facebook Advertising Is Working. Google to Buy New York City Office Building for $2.1 Billion. The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous. I went to Amazon's high-tech hair salon and virtually dyed my hair pink — then got the best haircut I've ever had. William Shatner's Going to Space on Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Rocket Ship. Facebook introduces portable Portal Go for $199. Facebook Chief Technology Officer Schroepfer to Step Down. The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What's Coming. Barry Diller's IAC in Talks to Buy Magazine Publisher Meredith. Phones of journalist who tracked Viktor Orban's childhood friend infected with spyware. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Steven Levy, Jeff Jarvis, and Dan Gillmor Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wwt.com/twit podium.com/twit Modern Finance www.stamps.com - promo code: TWIT

WSJ Minute Briefing
Dow, S&P Edge Higher After Evergrande Payment Deadline Passes

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 2:04


China Evergrande's global bondholders didn't receive interest payment before deadline. Shares of magazine publisher Meredith jump on takeover talks with Barry Diller's IAC. PG&E to face manslaughter charges over 2020 wildfire. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fly Cool Shit - An Aviation Podcast About Flying Cool Shit

Welcome back!!! Happy 1 year anniversary for FCS!!!! Even though we missed last weeks episode, we intend to make up for it by covering Nationals daily, so buckle up buttercups! Between Jeff's family vacation, and Mark's family vacation, today was the first day we could actually connect and record, and boy did the first day of 2021 IAC Nationals not disappoint! Unlimited opened the contest with the known, and Rob Holland crushing it to a first place finish. We talk about the finishes, how we thought everyone did, and what to expect for the free and unknown out of unlimited. We address a few who we thought were going to be there but didn't show up, and some that we were almost certain not to show, that showed! We didn't address intermediate yet but we will cover that on episode 53. Support your IAC by joining here: https://www.iac.orgBuy our merch! https://www.flycoolshit.com/merchSupport LIFT Aviation by buying cool stuff and using the promo code FLYCOOLSHIT at checkout! www.liftaviationusa.com

Fly Cool Shit - An Aviation Podcast About Flying Cool Shit

Welcome back! This week we talk about the updated list for IAC Nationals 2021, some fun hypotheticals, the fact a Yak 55 is going to fly unlimited and so much more! Helmets and wobblies, breaking canopies, broken canopies passing tech at contests etc. Great job to Susan Bell, and IAC 26 for a successful contest this past weekend, and congratulations to all the competitors. 2021 Southern California Classic is coming up next month hosted by IAC 36 and IAC 49. Cash money for the top 3 finishers, Friday night freestyle, live music and so much more! This sounds like the West Coast contest of the year! Check out: http://www.iac36.org/ContestEntry.aspx?EventID=23 to register! Contest runs OCT 21-23. Also, thanks to LIFT Aviation! Check out www.liftaviationusa.com and use FLYCOOLSHIT at checkout for 25% off most items. Buy our merch! www.flycoolshit.com/merch.

Great Things with Great Tech!
Episode 36 - LAB3

Great Things with Great Tech!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 40:21


In this episode I talk with Lachlan White, General Manager of Technology at LAB3. LAB3 is a company that empowers ambitious organisations to modernise, transform and grow fearlessly through controlled, automated, and scalable cloud technology. Lachlan and I talk about how LAB3 have found success powered by Code and driven by Innovation. We also talk about the reality of what it is to be a born in the cloud native IT practitioner and how DevOps, Infrastructure as Code and any automation challenges the previous generation of IT born in virtualization with a hint of the physical. Lachlan explains his approach to making both worlds work together to produce the right outcome for their customers... a must listen to anyone trying to work out modern platform operations. LAB3 was founded in 2017 and is head quartered out of the Melbourne, Australia. TALKING POINTS NOTES Agile technology services founding Azure Microsoft partnership Cloud & DevOps, Modern Workplace, Network, Security and Data, IoT & AI practices IaC generally Starting in automation and Cloud Native Lead into Terraform Next Generation Platforms How does Lab3 take more traditional companies on this cloud native journey DevSecInfoOpsO OpenShift Kubernetes Web: https://www.lab3.com.au/ Interested in being on #GTwGT? https://launch.gtwgt.com Music: https://www.bensound.com Could always do with a coffee! https://ko-fi.com/gtwgt

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
Barry Diller Says New York Is Done

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 4:00


RUSH: Here's Barry Diller. Audio sound bite number 15. The Fox Business Channel today where Maria Bartiromo, she got IAC and Expedia chairman Barry Diller. “What are you seeing in New York, Barry? What's your take on recovery post-pandemic, the protesting, the looting that we saw earlier this year in New York City?” DILLER: We opened our offices actually Labor Day, we said, “Pease come, if you can,” and truthfully no one comes. There's so much of the city idle, it is not sustainable. Drive anywhere, walk anywhere, and you see local destruction. We gotta get used to the risks. And we've gotta take some risks — particularly people who are not vulnerable — and get back to full life. Work from home is not productive. The concept of work from home does not work, full stop. https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2020/10/01/barry-diller-says-new-york-is-done/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Fly Cool Shit - An Aviation Podcast About Flying Cool Shit

Welcome back! This week we have Michel Lents on the show. Mike runs the aerobatic program at the University of North Dakota. He has won numerous IAC contests flying the mighty Super Decathlon, and achieved a second place finished in Intermediate Power at the 2019 IAC Nationals. We talk about his role as a coach for the UND team, ins and outs of flying the Super Decathlon, and his recent flight where he flew a Super D in advanced.Head on over to www.liftaviationusa.com and use the promo code FLYCOOLSHIT at checkout to get 25% off most items!

Danny In The Valley
Hinge's Justin McLeod: "Engineering intimacy"

Danny In The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 45:55


The Sunday Times' tech correspondent Danny Fortson brings on Justin McLeod, founder of Hinge, to talk about dating in the pandemic (2:41), launching an app (4:33), his early years as a “hot mess” (5:51), cleaning up his act (6:50), loneliness (9:45), overhauling the app (12:15), the irony of maximizing for “time in app” (15:03), injecting friction into the process (18:10), introducing a “vaccine status” badge (23:28), Facebook dating (27:00), the future of dating (30:03), the 36 questions to find love (32:14), his worst day of work (38:14), reconnecting with his wife (39:49), video first dates (41:49), and selling to IAC (43:20). Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/dannyinthevalley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

M&A Science
118. How to Build an M&A Team That Can Support Multi-Vertical Strategies

M&A Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 52:41


How do you manage a multi-vertical M&A strategy? IAC (NASDAQ: IAC) is one of the world's leaders when it comes to building consumer internet companies such as Tinder, Expedia, and Vimeo. Ailene Holderness, IAC's Head of M&A shares their strategy and how they build a team to execute on that. In this episode you'll learn: -How to build a diverse M&A team  -Why you shouldn't just look for current skills in capabilities when hiring a team member -M&A Approach on Portfolio Companies and New Verticals 

The Business
Barry Diller on the rise of streaming and why Hollywood ‘does not exist anymore'

The Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 28:32


Barry Diller, who made his name as a powerful studio boss, recently told NPR that “the movie business is over.” Expanding on those views, the legendary mogul and former chairman of Paramount and Fox tells KCRW why, with the pandemic and rise of streaming, Hollywood will never go back to what it once was. In the first of a two-part conversation, Diller — now the chairman of online empire IAC — weighs in on a transforming industry and its future.