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Best podcasts about Node

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Latest podcast episodes about Node

CRYPTO 101: with Matthew Aaron
Ep. 449 - Developing the Google of Web3, With Kyle Rojas of Edge & Node and The Graph

CRYPTO 101: with Matthew Aaron

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:57


In this episode of CRYPTO 101, brought to you by Nord VPN, we talk to Kyle Rojas of Edge & Node and The Graph about the challenges of Web3 decentralized building… and how his company's hard work towards paving the way is finally coming to fruition. Sponsored link: nordvpn.com/crypto101 – NordVPN Plan discount + Free Threat Protection + 1 additional month for free. Guest Links: https://twitter.com/kylearojas https://edgeandnode.com/ https://thegraph.com/en/ https://twitter.com/edgeandnode https://twitter.com/graphprotocol Show Links: https://CRYPTO101podcast.com Patreon: www.patreon.com/user?u=8429526 Twitter: https://twitter.com/Crypto101Pod https://twitter.com/BrycePaul101 https://instagram.com/crypto_101 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/101Crypto https://www.facebook.com/CRYPTO101Podcast **THIS IS NOT FINANCIAL OR LEGAL ADVICE** © Copyright 2022 Boardwalk Flock, LLC All Rights Reserved ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Fog by DIZARO https://soundcloud.com/dizarofr Creative Commons — Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported — CC BY-ND 3.0 Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/Fog-DIZARO Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/lAfbjt_rmE8 ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬

IoT For All Podcast
UX Analytics in Consumer IoT | Kraftful's Yana Welinder

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 24:02


Yana starts with a background of herself and her company before getting into specifics about specific use cases and the founding story of Kraftful. They then talk about usability issues in IoT and the importance of analyzing data. Yana also shares insights on the most significant changes she's seen in this niche of IoT and what her journey of raising capital was like.Yana is the CEO and Co-Founder of Kraftful, where she's working to make smart home technology accessible to many more people. Before starting Kraftful, she headed up the product management team at IFTTT, helping people unlock magical experiences by connecting their different products. Previously, Yana worked on disrupting manufacturing with digital production at Carbon and tackled free knowledge creation on Wikipedia. She also co-created CollabMark, an open source and free culture brand guide, which has been adopted by Wikipedia, OpenStreetMap, and Node.js. As a tech policy thought leader, she's published pieces in the New York Times, the Harvard Journal of Law & Tech, and a chapter in the Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy. Yana holds an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, a J.D. from the University of Southern California, and an LL.B. from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

DevSpresso Podcast
JS News 85

DevSpresso Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 24:04


### Topics Github Copilot - for all Chrome 105 - :has Node 16 end date update Deno + $21M JS Dom 20 zx 7 Prettier 2.7 + TS Reactime 14 Safari bug… ### Prowadzący Piotr i Sebastian https://www.linkedin.com/in/piotrzaborow https://www.linkedin.com/in/smysakowski ### Timestamps 00:00 - Intro 00:57 - Github Copilot - for everyone 05:42 - [Twitter] Chrome 105 :has 06:21 - Node 16 End date switch 08:19 - Deno raises $21M 11:24 - JS Dom 20 13:02 - zx 7 14:40 - Prettier 2.7 added TypeScript support 15:04 - Reactime 14 19:50 - Safari bug… ### Słuchaj jak Ci wygodnie Youtube https://youtu.be/SpYzVNKeiCM Spotify http://bit.ly/devspresso_spotify Google Podcast http://bit.ly/devspresso_google_podcast iTunes http://bit.ly/devspresso_itunes SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/devspresso/js-news-85 ### Źródła Github Copilot - for everyone https://github.com/features/copilot/ Amazon launches CodeWhisperer, a GitHub Copilot-like AI pair programming tool https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/23/amazon-launches-codewhisperer-its-ai-pair-programming-tool [Twitter] Chrome 105 :has https://twitter.com/bramus/status/1539154484479377408 Node 16 End date switch https://nodejs.org/en/blog/announcements/nodejs16-eol/ Deno raises $21M https://deno.com/blog/series-a JS Dom 20 https://github.com/jsdom/jsdom zx 7 https://github.com/google/zx/releases/tag/7.0.0 Prettier 2.7 added TypeScript support https://prettier.io/blog/2022/06/14/2.7.0.html Reactime 14 https://github.com/open-source-labs/reactime [Twitter] Remix https://twitter.com/erikras/status/1525142738382950400 Ouch, Safari on iOS can overlap multiple full-screen videos https://mmazzarolo.com/blog/2022-06-16-safari-on-ios-can-overlap-multiple-full-screen-videos/

BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast
Mining Bitcoin and swimming in sats with @techengineer21

BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 61:06


  Mining Bitcoin and swimming in sats I had the pleasure of speaking to Tech Engineer a bitcoin mining pleb who has built a fully functional swimming pool heating system using bitcoin miners, immersion tanks and automation to thermostatically control everything. Tech engineers focus is on privacy, security and the ability to double spend energy to heat while mining Bitcoin. In this episode we discus Tech's rabbit hole journey and why mining was so interesting for him, we also discussed the need for decentralising the network and helping smaller miners compete by using the heat produced by mining for something productive. I really enjoyed speaking to Tech and I hope you enjoy listening. I have decided to also add transcripts at the bottom of the show notes as some people have told me this would be useful. Transcripts might not be perfect but they should be pretty good.    If you aren't already following @techengineer21 I suggest you do it now.    twitter - @techengineer21 twitter - link to pinned video https://twitter.com/techengineer21/status/1523023198287130624?s=20&t=Ct2G5BawqRw4Nc6LcRUaBQ As always please feel free to reach out and ask me any questions. twitter - @MaxBitbuybit twitter - @bitbuybitpod Website - https://ungovernablemisfits.com   Today you can exchange $1 for 4760 Sats (Sale ends soon.)  Thank you Foundation Devices for sponsoring the show. Use code BITBUYBIT at check out for $10 off your purchase   00:01.28 maxbuybit1 So hey there mate can you hear me I can hear you loud and clear welcome to the show.   00:03.55 TechEngineer I am max I can hear you can you hear me.   00:17.49 TechEngineer Thank you for having me I'd be here.   00:25.00 maxbuybit1 Yeah, well, it's an absolute pleasure to have you On. Um I try and find always people who are doing interesting things and not just the usual podcast circuit and I came across your profile and saw your video you'd done um on this immersion tank and. Pool heating and is something I discussed ages ago with a mate of mine a mate like me with no technical ability and it was just like a thing we talked about but we're too dumb to actually do it. We're like fuck. Someone's got to do this. This is something that's got to happen just makes so much sense and when I saw yours I was like fuck I just need to speak to you and.   01:25.59 TechEngineer And.   01:44.12 maxbuybit1 You know, find a little bit more out because this is the future. It's fucking cool.   01:51.23 TechEngineer So right on man. Yeah, let's let's talk about it.   01:59.56 maxbuybit1 So Yeah I mean um, less so we can do rabbit hole stuff later On. Let's just dive straight in with with what you've been doing Obviously I've seen the video but. For anyone who hasn't can you sort of describe the project and and and what made you decide to do it.   02:33.79 TechEngineer Yeah, absolutely so let me start with a little background. Um back in 2017 was when I kind of went down the bitcoin rabbit hole. It was November of None I heard on the radio bitcoin cross $10000 and I was like. What is going on with this. Um and I was I was instantly intrigued and wanted to look into it more and immediately was drawn to the technology aspect of it and the mining aspect of it. Um. So I started looking into mining and at that time. Ah the miners went up in cost dramatically kind of similar to what happened in 20202021 and I tried to put to order a miner and it. It got delayed and that eventually just never shipped. Um, but there it so it was ah an it was an expensive endeavor for me to get into but I was still very interested. But at the time I knew like I was living in Colorado and I wanted to somehow use the heat that was. Being put off of these devices because I knew they put just put out a ton of heat. So that time I was thinking well maybe I'll just put in my basement and ducked something up to my upstairs long story short. It never ended up up working out just because the miner never showed up and then um. Price kind of dumped and then we went into a bear market and the profitability equation changed and I just decided that I just couldn't I didn't get into it at that time but that kind of built in the back of my mind like.   05:54.36 maxbuybit1 Here.   06:16.35 TechEngineer Want to mine. It's important for the bitcoin ecosystem for mining to be very decentralized but we need some sort of other factor that helps it be more productive to like a home miner so hard using the heat was in my mind. So fast forward to 2021? Um I finally decided you know what I need to just take the plunge here and start building a heater out of a minor so I don't know if you saw my original video but it was a a minor that I put inside of a box. And then aducted into my hvac system my heater my the heater in my house and then I put in some dampers and thermostatically controlled the airflow from the heater from the from the miner into my heater. So I basically he did my entire house all winter using using this system. So I'm I'm guessing you haven't seen that one I think you saw my ah.   08:08.54 maxbuybit1 Amazing. I haven't no um I haven't seen that one I have seen it done before but I haven't seen that specific one and I'm right in thinking it's fucking cold in Colorado. Been been there skiing before and fraze my boocks off. So I assume you need a lot of heat when you're living in there.   08:55.51 TechEngineer So yeah, and actually I don't live in Colorado anymore I mean I'm in Nevada now. So it's a much warmer climate but um, still need some heat in the winter. So I mean that was that was my None big.   09:04.50 maxbuybit1 Okay.   09:30.39 TechEngineer Step into this whole arena here was when I built that that system and that was kind of before I had joined bitcoin Twitter even and realized everything that was going on. So um, so once I had ah finished that system.   09:40.60 maxbuybit1 Here here.   10:07.57 TechEngineer And I had proved out that I can actually heat my house all winter with this system. Um the the next level for me was immersion. So the original system was just taking the air and redirecting it.   10:30.76 maxbuybit1 Here.   10:43.77 TechEngineer Um, but you can only do so much with redirecting air. You can't move it very far. You can't do anything other than really heating air with air. But I knew in the back of my head that ah like liquid cooling like I have I build um my own computers. And the cpu are liquid cooled so that was already in my mind like that's a thing I just didn't know that an immersion existed yet. So once I so once I kind of got on to bitcoin Twitter saw some other people do an immersion once I realized that was a thing I was like.   11:24.72 maxbuybit1 Here. Okay.   11:51.81 TechEngineer Oh my God I gotta try this out because I.   11:58.56 maxbuybit1 What what was what was that like finding bitcoin Twitter for the None time because I know for me, it was an absolute lifesaver like it just changed the game.   12:20.30 TechEngineer And it was ah it was ah a game changer for me as well. I mean I have always kind of been doing these projects and I mean my name is my name is tech engineer because I love technology I Love engineering I'm mean the home automation I'm always doing Diy engineering projects but I'm just kind of doing it.   13:02.78 maxbuybit1 A.   13:00.51 TechEngineer Solo on my own That's how I've always done it and I've always wanted to kind of like branch out and like start documenting these things like because I know that what I'm doing has interest to other people and so finally I was like you know I just got to do this and I made a video about it posted on Youtube and then then it just kind of. Ble up on Twitter and went around in in through bitcoin Twitter and I realized all these people have a big interest in this and I was like oh my god these are these are my fucking people right here like so it was ah it was a game changer for me then I I mean I I love it like it's.   13:51.94 maxbuybit1 Are.   14:16.22 maxbuybit1 Yeah, that's so fucking cool and and like you said is it is so useful for so many people because you know there are people like me who like us a really great idea like it's It's a logical thing that you use this heat. But then we're too dumb to actually do it and then so you have this this stuff documented and.   14:14.17 TechEngineer Awesome.   14:50.77 TechEngineer So.   14:55.34 maxbuybit1 It's so important to help decentralize this thing because otherwise what's going to happen if you don't have people like you and acono alchemists and people out there who are pushing and documenting you just have everyone putting their minors in huge warehouses with shit shows like compass or things like that. And then it's really so much easier to attack and um, yeah, that's why I'm just I'm so excited when I see this kind of innovation and and people tinkering and and building and um, this is this is the stuff that like really moves this space. Forward. This is what it's all about.   15:58.53 TechEngineer So yeah, absolutely and that is one of my biggest drivers behind what I'm doing is to further decentralize mining because I see the trend happening of centralization of mining whether it be into. Big mining companies or like you were saying like hosted solutions and that just that just introduces a whole host of of problems. Um, when you have centralization and I actually have an article coming out in the next few days that I talk a bit more about it. Um.   16:41.14 maxbuybit1 Here.   17:12.20 TechEngineer And why I think that's kind of bad I don't I don't I don't one hundred percent think that like big bitcoin minds are bad but we need both. We need we need. We need to decentralize as much as we can um, but whereas but what worries me is what happened to me in 27   17:28.14 maxbuybit1 A.   17:48.93 TechEngineer Eighteen where I was interested in mining. But then I realized that the profitability equation just wasn't there once we went into a bear market. So but I realized that if we can use reuse the heat and if somebody's like heating their pool or their house.   18:04.92 maxbuybit1 Here.   18:25.21 TechEngineer And they're also making bitcoin Now we have a different equation altogether.   18:32.44 maxbuybit1 And the other the other interesting thing for me when it comes to this stuff like this like even if even if it's breakeven or only very very slightly profitable for people the fat that they're actually mining and getting no K I see sats. Rather than just going on to an exchange and buying on there and giving all their information I think that's incredibly important to push this space forward in the right Direction. So the more this gets normalized. Um the better for the whole space. The better for the individual like But. Ah, whole thing about this for me anyway is like this is freedom money and fuck you money? not you know KYC cut money and and go and give all your details away and everyone's tracked and and traced that's that's not the future I Want to see here. So What you're doing here allows people to actually have access to this and. Allows people to this to be a reality for people where it makes financial sense as well.   20:31.45 TechEngineer Yeah, absolutely and I mean I see you know more of the hardcore bitcoiners. They're willing to mine at an even or even a little bit of a loss just because of the no KYC option but to get into.   20:47.54 maxbuybit1 I.   20:58.34 maxbuybit1 Um.   21:10.15 TechEngineer The next layer of people that you know aren't that into it. It needs to be either more profitable or simpler or say they're just buying a water heater that happens to make bitcoin on the side. That's right, That's where I want to see it going and.   21:40.26 maxbuybit1 Here.   21:48.53 TechEngineer And 10 years is like these are just appliances that are that the average person is buying whether or whether or not they even know that bitcoin is being mined I mean that's all I think we need to get to eventually is that it's just.   22:09.86 maxbuybit1 A.   22:24.57 TechEngineer Integrated into every part of our system because I mean if if this is going to be the base layer of of the future monetary system. It's got to be secure.   22:48.56 maxbuybit1 Yeah, absolutely and so obviously you, you're a very like technically minded guy. Um, what was it like for you coming into this from the tech side and being like this is interesting. This is cool. Um, and then. Looking into the money like what was that experience like or were you already interested in Austrian economics and and that side of things or was it ah quite a mind blowing thing to be like oh shit like this is this is the money we've been using and this this is the problems.   23:38.37 TechEngineer And.   23:56.95 TechEngineer So I was I was at None very interested in money go up I saw 10000 I was kind of an investor in the stock market and I was like what is going on here now I I had actually heard about bitcoin mining in I think around None   24:30.52 maxbuybit1 A.   24:32.15 TechEngineer And I looked into it for None nutes and was like um yeah I don't know what this is like never got into it obviously kicking myself for it. But anyway, um, in 172018 it was like the technology was mind blowing to me. Um I have always. So I'm ah I'm a network engineer by trade I've been building computers and networks for over 20 years so the technology side was really really intriguing to me cryptography has always interested me. Um I'm a. Been a certified ethical hacker in the past. So I kind of um, have a deeper understanding of cryptography and security and all these things are just beautifully enveloped in in bitcoin. So it was technology kind of money. Go up. 172018 for me. Um, none 2021 it was really looking at bitcoin from the aspect of the world needs a new financial system because our current one is completely broken. And I mean it even it got just got worse in 202021 in my opinion and and now so it was in the last two years that I was like the world really needs. Bitcoin now it's not just a cool technology. It's it's a socioeconomic revolution that the world needs.   27:27.22 maxbuybit1 A.   27:37.92 maxbuybit1 Yeah I couldn't agree more I think we're fucked without it.   27:45.35 TechEngineer Um, yeah.   27:53.58 maxbuybit1 So yeah, it's interesting to see somebody come in from the textile I mean almost everyone that I know or spoken to is always number go up almost always number go up I mean a few people say like oh yeah I mean I'm in it for the tech, especially in the bear markets.   28:14.43 TechEngineer So ah.   28:26.92 maxbuybit1 Ah, you know if truth be told it's It's always for the money and um, yeah, it's um, it is nice to know that we've got this thing on our side and um, it's It's nice to know that there's like a possibility for a future where.   28:26.21 TechEngineer Yeah, so.   29:00.16 maxbuybit1 We aren't tied to these psychopaths who are doing the crazy shit they're doing at the moment and um, it's you know for for the less technical people. Um, it takes a long time to like have some trust in this thing. Um, but I imagine for you.   29:29.33 TechEngineer Yeah, absolutely I.   29:35.46 maxbuybit1 Especially with the background. You've just told me it's like um, you're almost made for this. You know you're made to understand this with the background that you have so when you were None learning were there any like red flags or anything where you thought ah you know this is a problem or that's a problem like were there were there concerns.   30:11.35 TechEngineer Amen you're cutting out a little bit and.   30:14.64 maxbuybit1 Or or are there any concerns that you have with the system now.   30:21.35 TechEngineer Hey sorry max you you cut out a little bit like I missed a bit of that question. Can you hear me.   30:29.68 maxbuybit1 Fucking Hell have I lost you? ah.   30:44.83 TechEngineer M.   31:02.93 TechEngineer Can you hear me.   31:17.81 TechEngineer Can you hear me relax.   31:49.70 TechEngineer Okay, can you hear me max.   31:54.98 maxbuybit1 Okay, mate what I'm gonna do then if you can't hear me I am going to close this out and then I'll send you another link and we'll start to with start again. You haven't got well you haven't got yours muted just try speaking. Let me see if I can see your sound waves.   32:42.17 TechEngineer Can you hear me can you hear me at all. Yeah oh they're moving for me.   32:46.76 maxbuybit1 If you're speaking now I can't hear you can you? You maybe can see the sound waves like minor moving and then there's nothing under yours. So if it's not muted then I don't know I'll ah I'll send you a new link now mate.   00:00.30 maxbuybit1 So hey mate. Yeah I heard that can you hear me? Yeah, excellent and we're recording fucking every time I have some stupid issue with this so apologies. Um, yeah, that's all say.   00:02.70 TechEngineer You Yes I can hear you can hear me. Okay.   00:26.46 TechEngineer But the worst.   00:34.85 maxbuybit1 So so I'm not sure where we exactly cut off there I was probably waffling about something. Ah but I can't remember where we'd got to it doesn't matter doesn't matter. Um, so yeah I.   00:47.16 TechEngineer I Can't remember either to be honest, um.   01:13.77 maxbuybit1 Tell me a little bit more about because obviously you'd said you'd started with without immersion and and moving air and now obviously you're working with immersion. Um I know from previous conversations with. John who you know and a few others who were saying that it also makes it a little bit more performant and potentially because it's more stable can be good for um for the miners as well is that right? and and if so do you sort of see most of the space eventually going. This route with immersion.   02:22.20 TechEngineer Yeah, so once I had completed my original heater and then I realized that immersion existed I was like this this is definitely the way because once you have the heat in liquid form. You can do a lot more with it. You can heat water heaters you can heat pools you can still heat air. You can use a water to air heat exchanger and just switch it back into air so you can have None power plant of a minor heater creating heat into an oil and then. Use that heat for many different applications. So I knew it was more modular to reuse the heat in that way. So I want it I wanted to try it out and and build it and in terms of.   03:45.77 maxbuybit1 A.   03:55.56 TechEngineer The longevity of the miners being in oil I have heard that as well and it makes sense to me that um, an oil would be healthier for the chips to be in um, the oil itself is like a none times more. Ah. Are less conducive to less electricity than air. So that helps and then it just keeps it. You know, encapsulated away from oxygen so I I think in general it. It makes sense that it would be better for it. I haven't done any long-term testing myself yet. Obviously I built that tank only I guess about five months ago now four or five months ago now so but yeah, that's kind of the the reasoning for transitioning into.   05:13.59 maxbuybit1 He.   05:27.71 maxbuybit1 A.   05:43.38 TechEngineer Immersion is the capability of where you can move that heat to you can go longer distance. There's many more things you can do at once once it's in a liquid form.   06:09.69 maxbuybit1 And so you know the other thing that you were talking about was like this being in ah this sort of being if I lost you again. Are you there.   06:39.22 TechEngineer Hey you just cut out again. Can you hear me? Okay, okay.   06:45.87 maxbuybit1 Yeah I just saw that it cut out. Um, yeah I can hear I can hear you sorry I'm almost certain this is going to be my ah my issue on my end. So I do apologize. But hopefully we can work with it. Um.   07:04.96 TechEngineer Okay, yeah.   07:19.30 maxbuybit1 Yeah, So ah, you were saying about you know this potentially being used um in boilers and and other products where people don't even necessarily have to know that they're mining bitcoin. Do You think that? um. There's any drawbacks or any reason like in terms of efficiency or anything like that. Why someone would use like a traditional kombie Boiler or something over one of these because obviously a lot of those are gas rather than you know running with electric.   08:19.56 TechEngineer So yeah, so in terms of efficiency. Um, all electricity turns into a to heat 100% of the time. No matter what what you're using the electricity for it always transitions a hundred percent into heat.   08:54.55 maxbuybit1 E.   08:56.18 TechEngineer So if you're comparing directly to say an electric pool heater that is just using resistive like a resistive coil. You're just pushing electricity through a coil and it heats up comparing that to running an Asic and then. Pulling the heat off of that you're we're gonna you're going to be near near a hundred percent efficiency um other than some losses of like the tank or the the piping but all that can be minimized with insulation and whatnot so comparing an Asic.   09:57.35 maxbuybit1 A a.   10:11.64 TechEngineer Heater to an electric heater. It's near near None efficiency theoretically and and for the most part in practice once it's once it's well designed and once you have a system that's is completed and set up the efficiency is going to be very high. Comparing to that to gas is um is another story because then you're you're running into like the cost of gas heating versus electric heating and often in a lot of jurisdictions. Gas is cheaper than electricity.   11:10.31 maxbuybit1 A.   11:26.60 TechEngineer So from a pure ah pure cost perspective gas could theoretically still be cheaper. But if you're just dropped replacing say an electric water heater for an asic electric water or pool Heater. It's going to be. Going to cost the same amount to run it. You're just going to be making bitcoin on top of that. So it might end up paying for itself. But so I mean in my case I have a ah gas heater in my house I switch to electric. Technically I'm spending more fiat dollars on.   12:10.30 maxbuybit1 A.   12:40.38 TechEngineer The electric cost relative to gas but I also made up enough bitcoin to cover to cover that. So.   12:57.99 maxbuybit1 Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, that makes sense and I guess the other thing is like getting people's minds to shift I mean it's hard for now like you're saying oh you know you come in in 2017 and you're looking at like mining profitability and you're thinking oh well. You know how many dollars am I going to get and and you're looking at it ah through that lens whereas you know once someone's been in bitcoin for long enough and understands this at the end of the day all they care about is how many sats can I get I don't care what the dollar value is today tomorrow a year two years you know it it matters to me long term how many sats I'm getting and so um, maybe that affects the way that people think about this in the future.   14:24.28 TechEngineer So yeah, absolutely and I mean that goes back to um you know more of a hardcore bitcoin versus a random person doesn't care I mean somebody that is just wanting to stack sats and that's important to them and that's I mean that's important to me for sure.   14:58.79 maxbuybit1 Hey.   15:02.36 TechEngineer Um, but to get this into a broader Market. It's got to be more more um profitable just in general and I mean even even for the the bitcoin miners that are very into to just stacking sats. Right Now. It's it's it's hard I mean the the profitability equation is has changed. You know you get you got the difficulty of the hash rates at all time Highs Meanwhile bitcoin's price is is down. So.   15:41.83 maxbuybit1 A.   16:11.20 TechEngineer So when you're looking at that equation. It's hard to be like yes I'm going to I want to get into mining because it looks unprofitable If you're if you're looking at the equation but mining for heat can change that equation.   16:26.91 maxbuybit1 Here.   16:45.15 maxbuybit1 Yeah, dramatically um and so what are people who you're working with and friends and family and and people around you are who aren't on bitcoin Twitter like what are they saying if they're coming round yours and they're seeing this thing and they're like what the fuck are you doing here like what are you.   17:02.26 TechEngineer So.   17:24.35 maxbuybit1 What is this crazy invention that you've got or are you starting to orange pill people around you.   17:35.92 TechEngineer Yeah, when when my friends and family see it I mean it depends on who it is you know I mean some of my friends that are more technical kind of already understand bitcoin a little bit. They're they're like Wow that's incredible that you can take a computer and harvest the heat and. Like most people had no idea that that's even possible I mean I didn't even know that was possible really a year ago either. So It's like it is like jaw-dropping even even for myself to look at it and look at this tank and be like wait. There's a computer putting off heat I'm heating my pool with a computer.. It's just like. I'm like swimming in bitcoin At this point literally. So yeah, exactly and it's so it's mind blowing to me I mean it's mind blowing to my friends and family that I tell about it and I mean yeah to some extent. It's helping to orange pill people because at at least.   19:00.75 maxbuybit1 Swimming in sets. Ah.   19:29.82 TechEngineer Opens up the conversation and they're like Wow This is so Interesting. What is this thing and I mean people are telling me like oh I should patent and it because it just looks like this crazy contraption and so it's ah it's a mix of like. Awe and interest and and and maybe a little crazy I don't know.   20:18.25 maxbuybit1 Ah, yeah, well, it's ah it certainly looks cool like um it it's just I don't know when you see something working when you see something like this.. It's so much more interesting than just like sitting down with someone and saying. Yes, There's a single bitcoin and it's really good money because of X Y and Zd and like you know the the normal sort of orange pilling that people do um I've always found like showing someone either just like sending them some bitcoin on a wallet or like showing a node running and telling them how it works and and that kind of stuff like. Tends to pique more interest but then this is that on steroids because it's like what what the fuck you're you're hitting your pool that's mental like no one. No one reads anything like that in you know in the newspapers or hears anything about. This kind of stuff in normally worlds. So. It's a real slap in the face and I think it opens the door really nicely to explain. Well yeah, it's not just some stock or something you buy and the price goes up or down like this is a system. And it's incredible for for a None reasons we could list and um, it just opens the door and and I think like whatever type of person it is if they take the time they'll find a little area that they're interested In. You know, be it privacy the economic side or.   22:30.72 TechEngineer This is.   23:00.55 maxbuybit1 You know the engineering side or whatever it is. There's always something for someone and um, yeah, it's ah it's that you know that's the great thing about bitcoin Twitter everyone can help each other and and um, they always have someone to speak to about and and go further and further. Down the rubber hole with these things and.   23:34.98 TechEngineer Yeah, absolutely and I mean and I mean speaking of the normie and their reaction to it I mean it's It's a pretty easy cell potentially eventually if these heaters are more integrated be like hey do you like? do you like free heat. Do you like free energy.   24:02.67 maxbuybit1 I.   24:12.30 TechEngineer I Mean do you like free water heaters. Do you like free pool heaters. Do you like? do you like a pool heater that pays for itself I mean nobody can say no to that right? So it's it's potentially it's a potential easy in for.   24:19.97 maxbuybit1 A.   24:32.29 maxbuybit1 Um.   24:48.58 TechEngineer Not only understanding bitcoin but also integrating mining and further decentralizing mining even to people that don't care about bitcoin.   25:10.70 maxbuybit1 And so is that something that you're trying to push now I mean I know that you ah yeah, think you're on this mining panel with John very soon. He'd mentioned is this something where you're kind of like trying to spread the word and and. You know make this a reality.   25:50.22 TechEngineer I Guess you could say it's kind of the angle that I'm working within the bitcoin ecosystem. It's an angle that I don't see pursued a lot and I and it's an angle that I think is important. Um for how I see.   26:14.70 maxbuybit1 And.   26:30.38 TechEngineer Long-term trend of of bitcoin mining and the importance of decentralizing it. So I don't don't I don't know if I'd say I'm like pushing it. But I mean like it's it's important to me and it's interesting to me and. Love what I'm building and I love the the projects I work on I Love engineering. So It's just it's fun to me and then and I'm I'm helping to I'm helping out the greater bitcoin ecosystem and it's fun to be a part of this.   27:38.47 maxbuybit1 Yeah, definitely and and getting to find other people who are iterating on this as well. Um, you know people who are taking ideas and then running with them and um, there's so many different things that you can do with heat So many useful things and so. Um, it's amazing. Like once you start looking at what people are doing and the the crazy ideas they've got like I've seen people um, using them in greenhouses I've heard people talking about um all sorts of heating not just for homes but also for like yeah hot tubs and. Yeah, obviously you're doing the pool and all sorts of things and like um I don't know where it ends like I'm sure this could be used for types of farming and other stuff. So um, you know everyone needs heat or almost everyone needs. Heat.   29:18.42 TechEngineer So yeah, there's there's a ton of applications. Um, yeah I've seen greenhouses and yeah bouncing ideas off of other people is amazing I mean bitcoin Twitter is almost kind of like a giant collective brain. Where.   29:51.57 maxbuybit1 A.   29:54.32 TechEngineer Like I can I can I can work on a ah micro part of the problem build something somebody takes what I've done and iterate upon that and solve another piece of the problem. Um, and I mean for example I built my my tank which other people had already done I Kind of. I Kind of saw what other people did and I kind of designed something around what I needed and and and customized it for myself. But I kind of iterated on what other people had done um the next step that I haven't released or talked about too much yet or I'm still in progress is The. More of the automation side of like so with a pool heater you want to increase the heat based on the temperature of the pool right? So I mean eventually you want to be able to set a set temperature.   31:32.95 maxbuybit1 Here.   31:45.86 TechEngineer Like and just make it simple and then the system just handles the background of heating or not heating So I I've talked to other people about this and somebody else. Ran with that idea and he he's ah he's a very talented developer and he was able to build an integration between the firmware and um, a microcontroller essentially and now I've been able to implement that into my system. So I have a thermostatically controlled. Environment Now. So I can set a temperature and then the the miners can actually scale up and scale down based on heat demand.   33:14.55 maxbuybit1 That's really fucking cool. So so what are they doing you you dropping the power of these machines to then drop the heat. Basically you're like under clocking or overclocking depending on the demand is that is that right.   33:37.40 TechEngineer Exactly That's exactly right.   33:45.31 maxbuybit1 And is that brains that's doing that or is that a separate bit of software or or firmware or whatever that you're using.   33:59.38 TechEngineer Yeah, so I'm using Brains Os Plus as the firmware and they have an api. Um, and that's what the integration was is reaching out to so the the integration between it's actually home assistant. Which is a home automation platform an open source home automation platform that talks to the api of Brains Os and now we can get. We can get the temperature of the chips and we can get the the hash rate and we can get a bunch of information from the minor to. Home assistant and we can also tell brains Os to tell the miner to scale up or scale down and we can do that based on any event Now. So I then set up a microcontroller with sensors that. Sense The input from the Pool. So and I now know the temperature of the pool and based on that I can have an automation that then says scale up the the miner if we need more heat which increases the wattage.   36:18.90 maxbuybit1 Here.   36:19.28 TechEngineer And therefore increases the the output of the heat and and heats faster Ideally where I see it ideally where I see it going is you would size the number of miners appropriately to the the heat.   36:35.81 maxbuybit1 That's.   36:54.82 TechEngineer Ah, destination. So say you have a fifty Thousand Gallon pool it's going to be different than a one Thousand Gallon pool you're going to need more miners. You're going to need more heat in a bigger pool obviously or in a a bigger house so you size it to the right size. Ideally, you want the miner running at an efficient wattage.   37:08.81 maxbuybit1 Um.   37:35.63 maxbuybit1 Um.   37:33.38 TechEngineer Pretty much all the time. But if say it was cold One day you could over clock quite a bit and and get more heat or you could under clock on say a hotter day so it it gives the ability to scale more so you can scale up or scale down more.   37:56.89 maxbuybit1 Here.   38:12.90 TechEngineer Using these automated integrations.   38:21.55 maxbuybit1 Are there any concerns with overclocking and under clocking and and adjusting these miners on a consistent basis in terms of the longevity. Um with these machines like gion I mean like is it. Is it possible that that could be detrimental to the lifespan of them and rather than just having them running at a consistent ah speed or you know whatever you would call that.   39:19.74 TechEngineer Yeah,, that's a good question and I mean I think in general overclocking of any chip is going to tend to decrease its lifespan. But. I Mean immersion helps a lot with that because you're you're keeping the temperatures down and I mean that's the biggest problem with overclocking is the temperature. The temperatures go higher and that's that's the killer of chips is temp is temperature. So but that being the case that's that's kind of why I said like.   40:04.71 maxbuybit1 A.   40:30.40 TechEngineer Ideally, you'd you'd keep it running at actually an efficient level or a standard level as kind of your base load and then just occasionally kind of overclock um as needed and I'd so I don't.   40:59.10 maxbuybit1 Here.   41:03.64 TechEngineer In that kind of use case I don't think it's It's bad and from what I've seen working with brainsos and the dynamic power scaling. It doesn't seem like it has any negative effect to be scaling up and scaling down on a somewhat regular basis.   41:40.69 maxbuybit1 Um.   41:42.20 TechEngineer Um, but that is a good question to actually look at the long-term impacts of that which which I haven't quite done at this point I mean that I've been running it for you know five months so it's a few months but not not years right.   42:10.63 maxbuybit1 Yeah, definitely um, but that I mean that's that's so key like having this thermostatically controlled and all you know automated is it just knows a whole new level isn't it because.   42:38.20 TechEngineer Yes.   42:44.17 maxbuybit1 You're not going to have people say like oh yeah, I'll put one of these in and then they're tweaking and fucking around with it all the time like you know people want want to put this in their pool to be at the right temperature the things to run nothing to break. They just wanted to to work. You know when the. Sort of non tinkerers start wanting these in their homes because it makes financial sense. Um, this is the kind of stuff which just completely changes the game.   43:27.62 TechEngineer Right? And and the other issue is it's got to be maintainable I mean you don't want to you don't want to have situations where it overheats and you know now we have other problems to deal with with overheating it can be a. Security arm mean. Ah it can be kind of dangerous if it overheats too much. You can have fires and lots of different things. So there there needs to be control mechanisms in place that I mean even just an emergency shutdown when overheating that requires some sort of brain.   44:13.50 maxbuybit1 A.   44:41.42 TechEngineer To to kind of control things and I mean the miners firmware usually have that kind of built in to some extent but I just don't it doesn't make me comfortable to just release like just a system without some sort of finish to it to any person that isn't.   44:44.79 maxbuybit1 A.   45:13.63 maxbuybit1 E.   45:17.26 TechEngineer Building it themselves you know So I've I've had people already like hey I want to do this on my pool I Want to do this on my hot tub and I'm just not quite there yet. But that's kind of the goal to be able to refine this system to make it more accessible to more people that are. Interested in doing this and.   45:57.87 maxbuybit1 Yeah I think there'll be a lot of people who do want to and the other thing I've wondered about for ages I don't know whether it's possible or not. But um, could you do it with a sauna. Do you think like I know that's a dry heat but would it be possible to. Do a hot tub and a sauna if someone like wanted both.   46:39.90 TechEngineer I Don't see why not I don't know a ton about Saunas but I think that would just essentially be um, changing the heat from the oil-based heat into air via a water to air heat exchanger and. Blowing it into a room to heat it up a lot and then I think Saunas are usually I mean they usually have some humidity put in or something but I think it's certainly doable. Yeah.   47:21.39 maxbuybit1 Here here.   47:33.87 maxbuybit1 Yeah.   47:45.17 maxbuybit1 So interesting. It's like once once your brain starts ticking with like these sort of ideas you cut I can't help like thinking into the future and just thinking Oh I lost you again either. Ah, you come.   48:11.64 TechEngineer So hey you just cut out for a None are you can hear me again. Okay.   48:23.59 maxbuybit1 Yeah, yeah, yeah, it seems to just cut out for a none or 2 but I was just saying I can't help my mind from running wild and like thinking where the fuck are we going to be in like 5 years with this stuff like there's so many applications for heat. It just? um. Yeah I can't help thinking that it's just going to be. You know, five years ten years from now everywhere.   49:08.98 TechEngineer I know there's there's so many applications it's it's unreal I mean I had a guy in Canada contact me. He's like yeah this this place way up here. How it's like ° all year long and they have almost free power like what can we do with this.   49:41.50 maxbuybit1 Ah, really.   49:45.40 TechEngineer I Mean it's like the the amount of the amount of areas that are cold and neat heat I mean that's that's a huge market. Yeah yeah.   50:07.77 maxbuybit1 Yeah, absolutely massive. Why is their power So so low is that like a ah dam or like Hydro or something like that.   50:22.40 TechEngineer Um, yeah, it was some ah like small mining town like old school mining town that had some old ah contract with like a hydro power plant or something like that. Um, so it was like.   50:55.51 maxbuybit1 Here here.   51:00.90 TechEngineer None cost power and they were all they're already using like electric heat. So I mean they probably just use thousands of Kilowatt hours of just electric heat already. So that's just an easy easy drop replace.   51:23.30 maxbuybit1 Here. Yeah.   51:34.78 TechEngineer I Mean it's not. It's not E It's not easy. It's but it's a it makes sense financially. It's like that's an easy equation.   51:49.81 maxbuybit1 Yeah, definitely and and for people who have cheap power. The other thing I was thinking before this call is especially now when you have like a drop drop in price and like the s nine s and some of the older hardware and those prices drop to like practically 0 Um.   52:19.90 TechEngineer Is this.   52:30.19 maxbuybit1 Presumably for you know someone who has 0 None near 0 power. It's actually going to be better than going and buying electric heaters because you can get these things for practically free and if you're heating a big space. Um, you know you can you can get a bunch of these things you know. Plug them in have them running and um, you know I'm sure if you get get enough of these people just want to get rid once they become unprofitable.   53:20.34 TechEngineer Yeah, exactly and that's kind of always been in the back of my mind too is that we could. We can definitely use older generation miners. We can keep them in service longer essentially by using them as heat sources now. Maybe you'd get you'd want to get. You know one or 2 generations old if you're installing a new ah new heater system. Just so that you wouldn't have to upgrade them for several years um obviously the the bitcoin bitcoin miners the the generations they they go quickly. Although.   54:08.95 maxbuybit1 Here.   54:37.14 TechEngineer I See that trending towards slowing down. Um the the quickness of how fast the older generation becomes obsolete I think we're reaching kind of the top of a exponential curve or a logrod and a curve of of improvements.   54:44.45 maxbuybit1 A.   55:15.56 TechEngineer In terms of hash rate and efficiency if that makes sense.   55:25.49 maxbuybit1 Yeah, yeah, yeah, um, and and do you think? Also you're going to have more players stepping in I know there's been talk of it. Um, you know I sort of believe it when I see it. But do you think that? um. People making this hardware There'll be some decentralization there and um and more optionality for sort of um yeah for for people coming in that there's not just like None big players.   56:19.64 TechEngineer Yeah, so I know there's so I know Intel is getting into the space as well as Jack Dorsey and I don't know a ton about them. But from what I understand they're attempting to make a more like modular approach.   56:35.83 maxbuybit1 Here.   56:57.58 TechEngineer To the the Asics. So instead of buying like an ant miner. You could just buy a thousand chips that you put directly into say a heater. So now we can just we don't need to like build the tank around the form factor.   57:03.51 maxbuybit1 Yeah.   57:39.39 maxbuybit1 A.   57:37.12 TechEngineer Ah, an s nineteen it can just it can just be more integrated directly into like an actual heater. They're just built right in and so.   57:58.70 maxbuybit1 Yeah, that makes a lot of sense and and like space wise that would make that would be much better presumably.   58:08.84 TechEngineer So yeah, so I mean that's kind of where I see it going longer term is it. It'll be very integrated.   58:27.13 maxbuybit1 Yeah, because the the other thing is like if you're getting these ah the hardware as it's built now when you're then putting it into Immersion. You're presumably like taking these fans off or bypassing them somehow because they're not needed and so there's there's a load of stuff that's. Built around it. That's actually not necessary so it seems quite wasteful. Um, yeah, like or not as efficient as it could be so that that would make sense if they did it that way.   59:25.64 TechEngineer Yeah, absolutely we're we're kind of repurposing a product for something. It wasn't really intended for. But if we can redesign it from the ground up as a heater then then it's a different equation altogether. But I mean.   59:47.57 maxbuybit1 A.   59:58.44 TechEngineer That's a whole other scale. That's you know, probably 5 10 years out I would think so in in in the shorter term. Um, it's interesting to see where we can go with repurposing these things for heat applications.   01:00:27.75 maxbuybit1 So you obviously spend loads of time thinking about bitcoin and mining and everything in the space like do you have any thoughts on where we're going like if you're looking out into the future. You've said obviously you know the money's fucked. You think that this system is. Very beautifully designed and it obviously has grabbed your attention hard because most people wouldn't be building what you're building unless they really cared. But do you sort of you know if you if you let your mind wander Where do you think we're going to be in None ears What? What? do you think is going to be happening in this space.   01:01:40.10 TechEngineer Yeah, it's a good question. Um I I hope for a bitcoin standard eventually I think it that it needs to happen I believe that I mean obviously I don't know how or when it's going to happen or. If. There's going to be some other intervention that slows it down or I don't know but it needs to happen. So I mean and that's why I want to get kind of the mining infrastructure prepared. Because when it happens it's just going to happen and nobody's going to be ready for it. So I mean coming from as a network engineer a network security engineer like you want to build a system that's secure ready to go. So when the load comes. It's just ready to go and it's safe and secure So for bitcoin the way I see it overall is like it needs to be highly decent. The mining needs to be highly decentralized so that there there are not attack vectors of like. Like say a political organization getting a bunch of big mining operations to like work together or shut down or do a 51% attack. There's a lot of things that can happen. But if it's more integrated into like so heaters all around the world.   01:04:34.85 maxbuybit1 Here.   01:04:43.46 TechEngineer And nobody has control or now it's now it's more secure from my mind.   01:05:03.35 maxbuybit1 Definitely so. That's a concern for you as like this centralization of the mining. Um I think that's reasonable I mean you you only have to look through history to see that like these people will do pretty much anything to protect their interests. And it's not that hard when you you know these these big these big miners are sitting ducks basically and if they're threatened or co-opted or blackmailed or whatever happens to them. They will fold. Um, you know a lot of these. Guys are going to be very fee outminded. Not everyone is here to say right? fuck we need to do this to to literally like just to save the world pretty much is like a lot of people will be in it just to say well I want my profits and you know I'm I'm going to be too scared if I'm threatened and and I will comply and. And that's my fear with it with a lot of these bigger miners. So I'm totally with you. There is that um the more we can decentralize things the better and um, also like you know I don't like this move where there's this so much power going to a specific country. It would be nice. Um. Yeah, be nice to see it spread out a little bit because it was like you know everyone was worried about China having all the hash power and or majority of it then it's gone a lot of it's gone over to America and it's like well if if they're ah losing reserve currency status and. They're concerned about bitcoin you don't really know what they could potentially do.   01:08:17.18 TechEngineer Yeah, and I mean I can see in the future I mean if if bitcoin becomes a standard like there could be ah, a war on bitcoin mining control like you control the blockchain you control kind of the world If that's the monetary standard like think of how.   01:08:52.97 maxbuybit1 Yeah.   01:08:57.22 TechEngineer Impactful that is I mean and yeah I pose the question of um decentralization actually in a mining panel at um at a bitcoin conference recently. To 1 of the the big miners and I just kind of threw it out there that like this is my concern of um that I see that I want to see mining more decentralized and I did I did like his answer. He kind of said you know we need we need both we need small operations we need large operations I mean the large operations can scale can scale with the growth of the of the asset. Um, and he also said that it it is important to him to to decentralize and.   01:10:08.53 maxbuybit1 A.   01:10:39.38 TechEngineer And they are decentralized from the perspective of having mines in multiple different countries in different continents in different power. Ah utility jurisdictions and that's that's a good thing I mean having having 1 big miner that has mines in 4 different continents. That's.   01:11:04.75 maxbuybit1 A.   01:11:20.75 maxbuybit1 Yeah, definitely.   01:11:18.44 TechEngineer Somewhat decentralized um us but still if if you know in 10 years when you know if if a whole if the most powerful government in the world at the time says you know what minor I want you to you're gonna shut down or we're gonna nuke you like that. That's.   01:11:50.49 maxbuybit1 Here.   01:11:56.64 TechEngineer That's the potential threat in the future. But if we have ah None heaters all over the world. It's it's a different threat.   01:12:17.77 maxbuybit1 Yeah, definitely. Um, yeah, it's definitely um, a potential issue. The other thing that I've been saying to people um is you know with with all the crazy stuff that's going on in the world and and so many people who are struggling to pay bills and so many small businesses that have. Being forced to close with all the Covid nonsense and everything else that's gone on in the world and there's a lot of people who are pretty desperate and can but barely afford to keep the lights on and I've been saying wouldn't it make sense for some of these smaller businesses like you know like a small garage or someone who's who's barely surviving.   01:13:11.54 TechEngineer And.   01:13:36.50 maxbuybit1 You can write off the cost of your energy and so effectively you can do like sort of pirate mining where you might need heat in your garage or your your business small business. And so if people are getting these old s Nine s or stuff the hardware. That's basically cost nothing um and they can write off the cost of their power Anyway, then suddenly these people actually become competitive because these huge mining operations get access to. Very very cheap money. They they have access to capital they they have lots of um options on like power contracts and generally they can drive their costs much lower because of economies of scale. But when you have these ah these smaller guys who are saying well I'm getting fucked from every angle. Can write off the cost of the power Anyway. So It's zero and I can get this old hardware for practically zero like it suddenly starts to become an absolute no-brainer and there are None of businesses like that around the world who could benefit from it. Um, so Like. You have any thoughts on that kind of stuff and um, how we could maybe make it a bit more accessible for more normal people. You know so they don't have the headache of worrying about setting it up and and understanding that this is actually potentially yeah. Could save them some money.   01:16:30.40 TechEngineer So yeah, absolutely I do and I don't I don't know if you saw a recent post I did about my Tesla solar grid plus powerwall and how I'm using that to my advantage. Um, but basically the concept is. Um, dynamic dynamic power scaling ah to work around time of service agreements with power companies. So here in Nevada um, the highest. Power consumption usages between 1 pm and 7 pm when everybody is running their air conditioning. So the the power grid is at its at its peak need at that point. So what they do is incentivize. There's an optional payment plan that you can opt into as a homeowner to basically.   01:17:45.15 maxbuybit1 A.   01:18:11.86 TechEngineer During that one to 7 pm period the price like quadruples. But then the rest of the entire year of the price is half price. So I opted into this this power plan and I get half price energy all the time except for this one time.   01:18:21.49 maxbuybit1 Here here.   01:18:46.31 maxbuybit1 A.   01:18:46.46 TechEngineer And now all we got to do is use some automation and I actually use my Tesla power walls which are the batteries and I can actually I can actually sell power back to the grid at a much higher rate and reduce my consumption during the the peak time.   01:19:00.59 maxbuybit1 A.   01:19:24.20 TechEngineer And what you're doing is essentially filling in the valleys of power demand for the energy jurisdiction and so for example, I'm I'm actually selling power back.   01:19:35.71 maxbuybit1 That makes a lot of sense.   01:19:56.34 TechEngineer Between None and 7 pm for like ¢22 a kilowatt or Twenty Eight cents kilowatt hour and then the rest of the time I'm using power at like None a kilowatt hour so in my that's my jurisdiction but in general. Power jurisdictions have a problem of the peak demand is only a short period of time but they have to build their energy grid to meet the peak demand. So the rest of the time they just have empty space of of unused demand. So I want to try to integrate.   01:21:04.19 maxbuybit1 A.   01:21:11.86 TechEngineer Further into that and basically miners can turn off and and on quickly and I mean riots riot released a video recently about how they're doing it in in their big minds. They're essentially powering down when when the Texas power grid needs.   01:21:53.71 maxbuybit1 Here.   01:21:51.64 TechEngineer More power so integrating with with the the power companies will be good in general for the overall robustness of the power grid but also have the benefit of decreasing costs for the bitcoin mining.   01:22:15.95 maxbuybit1 Yeah.   01:22:29.26 TechEngineer Because they can incentivize it in different ways.   01:22:41.37 maxbuybit1 Yeah, um, because yeah, yeah, exactly because you can overproduce and there's always going to be demand. Um, which which presumably then might incentivize them to create more power as well because they know that there's always someone who's going to be that buyer of last resort. Which is going to make everything run a bit smoother.   01:23:22.76 TechEngineer Right? ah.   01:23:36.27 maxbuybit1 It's mind-blowing stuff some.. It's absolutely mindlowing. So Um I mean obviously mining is your thing but outside of the mining stuff is there anything else that your. Particularly looking at within bitcoin at the moment are you playing around with lightning. Do you mess around with them thing like that you into your privacy stuff or you just solely focused on mining at the moment.   01:24:23.84 TechEngineer I am into everything I Just don't have time for everything so I would say so I've been focusing on these mining for heat projects. But I do run my own full bitcoin Node. I'm playing around with lightning privacy is very important to me Security is very important to me I have a lot to add into the space in terms of like network security. So like as a network engineer I'm able to build my home network in a way that is more like an enterprise. Network with security in mind different V lands. Um, there's a lot you can do to really secure secure things and then you can do things like use vpns and make your bitcoin node anonymous um and run an over tour. So I'm I'm.   01:26:07.99 maxbuybit1 Here.   01:26:15.92 TechEngineer Doing all those things. Um I don't have enough time in the day to explore as much as I would like but those are that's that's the other aspect that I I want to explore more is kind of the the security side of of ah of bitcoin and bitcoin mining.   01:26:54.21 maxbuybit1 Yeah, well I Really look forward to seeing what you come up with there. That's gonna be more and more important for people who are mining at home and are putting more of their net worth into this and um privacy is something that we really really focus on with this show because. You know if shit hits the fan and people know what you're doing and ah, there's a load of have nots and people who can't feed themselves. You do not want everyone to know where you are and what you've got.   01:27:49.22 TechEngineer And yeah, absolutely ah privacy is is a big concern to me and especially with how how the world has gone in the last year to 2 years and privacy is is so important now even more even more than before.   01:28:24.79 maxbuybit1 Absolutely well. Um, that's probably a good place to wrap things up I don't want to take too much of your Time. Youve got some awesome Stuff. You're building but I've really enjoyed chatting you and um so pleased to see that you're pushing this space forward and. Making some incredible stuff I'm sure loads of people will find it useful and um, as and when you you know start working on this privacy stuff and the home security stuff I'd love to him or I think that loads of people will benefit from that. So. Yeah, just want to say thanks for coming on and everything you're doing really? yeah, really do appreciate it.   01:29:40.00 TechEngineer Thanks sounds good. It's been. It's been a pleasure and good to talk to you. Thanks Max All right have a good one.   01:29:50.93 maxbuybit1 Awesome or I may I'll speak soon.    

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Wofür Darknet und Tor wichtig sind | c't uplink 43.7

c't uplink (HD-Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


Im Audio- und Videopodcast c't Uplink besprechen wir ein Titelthema aus der c't 14/2022: Das Darknet, oft als Spielplatz ausschließlich für kriminelle Zwecke verschrien, erfüllt auch viele nützliche Funktionen. Wer seinem Provider oder WLAN-Anbieter nicht traut oder anonym gegenüber der besuchten Internet-Seite bleiben möchte, nutzt die Techniken von Tor und Darknet. In Ländern mit totalitärer Regierung, zahlreichen Internetsperren oder eingeschränkter Pressefreiheit mag das Darknet gar die einzige Möglichkeit sein, sich umfassend zu informieren und freiheitlich zu agieren. Wir beschreiben die Techniken: Was macht einen Tor-Browser so speziell, warum reicht nicht einfach ein VPN? Wir erklären, warum das Darknet sich selbst vor mitlauschenden Nodes schützen muss und wie das mit dem komplizierten und mehrfach verschlüsseltem Routing über Entry-, Middle- und Exit-Node gelingt. Zudem geht es um die Risiken des Internetverkehrs vom Client zum Entry. Auch die Strecke vom Exit zum Anbieter ist wichtig, und unter welchen Umständen die im Darknet selbst beheimateten Dienste die bessere Alternative sind. Einen Tor-Browser für Windows, Linux und macOS installiert man schnell; wir diskutieren die weiteren wichtigen Vorsichtsmaßnahmen. Auch Android kommt zur Sprache, und warum iOS keine gute Plattform fürs Darknet ist. Andere Dienste als den Browser über Tor laufen zu lassen, ist nicht ganz einfach; wir beschreiben die Möglichkeiten. Fürs Messaging existiert direkt eine Darknet-Implementierung: Briar beherrscht Chat, Diskussionsforen und Blog -- und kommuniziert auch direkt per WLAN oder Bluetooth, notfalls sogar per Speichermedien. Auch wer das Darknet unterstützen möchte, findet einige Hinweise, wie man Node wird oder als Snowflake-Proxy geschützte Einstiege für andere öffnet. ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS*** Dieser Podcast ist gesponsert von LastPass. Dem sicheren und beliebten Passwortmanager für Unternehmen und Privatnutzer. Schauen Sie vorbei unter: lastpass.com/heisectuplink ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS ENDE***

c’t uplink
Wofür Darknet und Tor wichtig sind | c't uplink 43.7

c’t uplink

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 57:32


Im Audio- und Videopodcast c't Uplink besprechen wir ein Titelthema aus der c't 14/2022: Das Darknet, oft als Spielplatz ausschließlich für kriminelle Zwecke verschrien, erfüllt auch viele nützliche Funktionen. Wer seinem Provider oder WLAN-Anbieter nicht traut oder anonym gegenüber der besuchten Internet-Seite bleiben möchte, nutzt die Techniken von Tor und Darknet. In Ländern mit totalitärer Regierung, zahlreichen Internetsperren oder eingeschränkter Pressefreiheit mag das Darknet gar die einzige Möglichkeit sein, sich umfassend zu informieren und freiheitlich zu agieren. Wir beschreiben die Techniken: Was macht einen Tor-Browser so speziell, warum reicht nicht einfach ein VPN? Wir erklären, warum das Darknet sich selbst vor mitlauschenden Nodes schützen muss und wie das mit dem komplizierten und mehrfach verschlüsseltem Routing über Entry-, Middle- und Exit-Node gelingt. Zudem geht es um die Risiken des Internetverkehrs vom Client zum Entry. Auch die Strecke vom Exit zum Anbieter ist wichtig, und unter welchen Umständen die im Darknet selbst beheimateten Dienste die bessere Alternative sind. Einen Tor-Browser für Windows, Linux und macOS installiert man schnell; wir diskutieren die weiteren wichtigen Vorsichtsmaßnahmen. Auch Android kommt zur Sprache, und warum iOS keine gute Plattform fürs Darknet ist. Andere Dienste als den Browser über Tor laufen zu lassen, ist nicht ganz einfach; wir beschreiben die Möglichkeiten. Fürs Messaging existiert direkt eine Darknet-Implementierung: Briar beherrscht Chat, Diskussionsforen und Blog -- und kommuniziert auch direkt per WLAN oder Bluetooth, notfalls sogar per Speichermedien. Auch wer das Darknet unterstützen möchte, findet einige Hinweise, wie man Node wird oder als Snowflake-Proxy geschützte Einstiege für andere öffnet. ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS*** Dieser Podcast ist gesponsert von LastPass. Dem sicheren und beliebten Passwortmanager für Unternehmen und Privatnutzer. Schauen Sie vorbei unter: lastpass.com/heisectuplink ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS ENDE***

c't uplink (SD-Video)
Wofür Darknet und Tor wichtig sind | c't uplink 43.7

c't uplink (SD-Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


Im Audio- und Videopodcast c't Uplink besprechen wir ein Titelthema aus der c't 14/2022: Das Darknet, oft als Spielplatz ausschließlich für kriminelle Zwecke verschrien, erfüllt auch viele nützliche Funktionen. Wer seinem Provider oder WLAN-Anbieter nicht traut oder anonym gegenüber der besuchten Internet-Seite bleiben möchte, nutzt die Techniken von Tor und Darknet. In Ländern mit totalitärer Regierung, zahlreichen Internetsperren oder eingeschränkter Pressefreiheit mag das Darknet gar die einzige Möglichkeit sein, sich umfassend zu informieren und freiheitlich zu agieren. Wir beschreiben die Techniken: Was macht einen Tor-Browser so speziell, warum reicht nicht einfach ein VPN? Wir erklären, warum das Darknet sich selbst vor mitlauschenden Nodes schützen muss und wie das mit dem komplizierten und mehrfach verschlüsseltem Routing über Entry-, Middle- und Exit-Node gelingt. Zudem geht es um die Risiken des Internetverkehrs vom Client zum Entry. Auch die Strecke vom Exit zum Anbieter ist wichtig, und unter welchen Umständen die im Darknet selbst beheimateten Dienste die bessere Alternative sind. Einen Tor-Browser für Windows, Linux und macOS installiert man schnell; wir diskutieren die weiteren wichtigen Vorsichtsmaßnahmen. Auch Android kommt zur Sprache, und warum iOS keine gute Plattform fürs Darknet ist. Andere Dienste als den Browser über Tor laufen zu lassen, ist nicht ganz einfach; wir beschreiben die Möglichkeiten. Fürs Messaging existiert direkt eine Darknet-Implementierung: Briar beherrscht Chat, Diskussionsforen und Blog -- und kommuniziert auch direkt per WLAN oder Bluetooth, notfalls sogar per Speichermedien. Auch wer das Darknet unterstützen möchte, findet einige Hinweise, wie man Node wird oder als Snowflake-Proxy geschützte Einstiege für andere öffnet. ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS*** Dieser Podcast ist gesponsert von LastPass. Dem sicheren und beliebten Passwortmanager für Unternehmen und Privatnutzer. Schauen Sie vorbei unter: lastpass.com/heisectuplink ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS ENDE***

Changelog Master Feed
Ahoy hoy, JSNation & React Summit! (JS Party #231)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 71:24


Nick went to Amsterdam for JSNation & React Summit 2022 and he joins Jerod to report on all the goodness! He also sits down with two special guests involved with the confs to talk Jest Preview and GraphQL Cache

JS Party
Ahoy hoy, JSNation & React Summit!

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 71:24


Nick went to Amsterdam for JSNation & React Summit 2022 and he joins Jerod to report on all the goodness! He also sits down with two special guests involved with the confs to talk Jest Preview and GraphQL Cache

How To Code Well
162 - Why I'm learning TypeScript

How To Code Well

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 15:10


Changlog The deployment phase of https://howtocodewell.net staging site is going very well. I now have Kubernetes cluster is running via Terraform Why am I leaning TypeScript? I know many languages, some more than others. PHP is my goto and Python is the next biggest language I know. Of course I know JavaScript and other languages such as Java and Perl but I rarely use those. In my opinion Typescript is what JavaScript should-of been to begin with. - I've noticed more demand for Typescript jobs than JavaScript jobs. - I've noticed no demand of Flow - Typescript works well with Node so its kinda backend friendly. I wouldn't consider using JavaScript on the backend without Type safety - Typescript works well with React Native so mobile apps can be built for both Android and IOS - Theres a bigger demand to convert Javascript apps to Typescript apps Will there every be any Typescript tutorials Yes, but not for a while.

Screaming in the Cloud
Google Cloud Run, Satisfaction, and Scalability with Steren Giannini

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:01


Full Description / Show Notes Steren and Corey talk about how Google Cloud Run got its name (00:49) Corey talks about his experiences using Google Cloud (2:42) Corey and Steven discuss Google Cloud's cloud run custom domains (10:01) Steren talks about Cloud Run's high developer satisfaction and scalability (15:54) Corey and Steven talk about Cloud Run releases at Google I/O (23:21) Steren discusses the majority of developer and customer interest in Google's cloud product (25:33) Steren talks about his 20% projects around sustainability (29:00) About SterenSteren is a Senior Product Manager at Google Cloud. He is part of the serverless team, leading Cloud Run. He is also working on sustainability, leading the Google Cloud Carbon Footprint product.Steren is an engineer from École Centrale (France). Prior to joining Google, he was CTO of a startup building connected objects and multi device solutions.Links Referenced: Google Cloud Run: https://cloud.run sheets-url-shortener: https://github.com/ahmetb/sheets-url-shortener snark.cloud/run: https://snark.cloud/run Twitter: https://twitter.com/steren TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Steren Giannini, who is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, specifically on something called Google Cloud Run. Steren, thank you for joining me today.Steren: Thanks for inviting me, Corey.Corey: So, I want to start at the very beginning of, “Oh, a cloud service. What are we going to call it?” “Well, let's put the word cloud in it.” “Okay, great. Now, it is cloud, so we have to give it a vague and unassuming name. What does it do?” “It runs things.” “Genius. Let's break and go for work.” Now, it's easy to imagine that you spent all of 30 seconds on a name, but it never works that way. How easy was it to get to Cloud Run as a name for the service?Steren: [laugh]. Such a good question because originally it was not named Cloud Run at all. The original name was Google Serverless Engine. But a few people know that because they've been helping us since the beginning, but originally it was Google Serverless Engine. Nobody liked the name internally, and I think at one point, we wondered, “Hey, can we drop the engine structure and let's just think about the name. And what does this thing do?” “It runs things.”We already have Cloud Build. Well, wouldn't it be great to have Cloud Run to pair with Cloud Build so that after you've built your containers, you can run them? And that's how we ended up with this very simple Cloud Run, which today seems so obvious, but it took us a long time to get to that name, and we actually had a lot of renaming to do because we were about to ship with Google Serverless Engine.Corey: That seems like a very interesting last-minute change because it's not just a find and replace at that point, it's—Steren: No.Corey: —“Well, okay, if we call it Cloud Run, which can also be a verb or a noun, depending, is that going to change the meaning of some sentences?” And just doing a find and replace without a proofread pass as well, well, that's how you wind up with funny things on Twitter.Steren: API endpoints needed to be changed, adding weeks of delays to the launch. That is why we—you know, [laugh] announced in 2018 and publicly launched in 2019.Corey: I've been doing a fair bit of work in cloud for a while, and I wound up going down a very interesting path. So, the first native Google Cloud service—not things like WP Engine that ride on top of GCP—but my first native Google Cloud Service was done in service of this podcast, and it is built on Google Cloud Run. I don't think I've told you part of this story yet, but it's one of the reasons I reached out to invite you onto the show. Let me set the stage here with a little bit of backstory that might explain what the hell I'm talking about.As listeners of this show are probably aware, we have sponsors whom we love and adore. In the early days of this show, they would say, “Great, we want to tell people about our product”—which is the point of a sponsorship—“And then send them to a URL.” “Great. What's the URL?” And they would give me something that was three layers deep, then with a bunch of UTM tracking parameters at the end.And it's, “You do realize that no one is going to be sitting there typing all of that into a web browser?” At best, you're going to get three words or so. So, I built myself a URL redirector, snark.cloud. I can wind up redirecting things in there anywhere it needs to go.And for a long time, I did this on top of S3 and then put CloudFront in front of it. And this was all well and good until, you know, things happened in the fullness of time. And now holy crap, I have an operations team involved in things, and maybe I shouldn't be the only person that knows how to work on all of these bits and bobs. So, it was time to come up with something that had a business user-friendly interface that had some level of security, so I don't wind up automatically building out a spam redirect service for anything that wants to, and it needs to be something that's easy to work with. So, I went on an exploration.So, at first it showed that there were—like, I have an article out that I've spoken about before that there are, “17 Ways to Run Containers on AWS,” and then I wrote the sequel, “17 More Ways to Run Containers on AWS.” And I'm keeping a list, I'm almost to the third installation of that series, which is awful. So, great. There's got to be some ways to build some URL redirect stuff with an interface that has an admin panel. And I spent three days on this trying a bunch of different things, and some were running on deprecated versions of Node that wouldn't build properly and others were just such complex nonsense things that had got really bad. I was starting to consider something like just paying for Bitly or whatnot and making it someone else's problem.And then I stumbled upon something on GitHub that really was probably one of the formative things that changed my opinion of Google Cloud for the better. And within half an hour of discovering this thing, it was up and running. I did the entire thing, start to finish, from my iPad in a web browser, and it just worked. It was written by—let me make sure I get his name correct; you know, messing up someone's name is a great way to say that we don't care about them—Ahmet Balkan used to work at Google Cloud; now he's over at Twitter. And he has something up on GitHub that is just absolutely phenomenal about this, called sheets-url-shortener.And this is going to sound wild, but stick with me. The interface is simply a Google Sheet, where you have one column that has the shorthand slug—for example, run; if you go to snark.cloud/run, it will redirect to Google Cloud Run's website. And the second column is where you want it to go. The end.And whenever that gets updated, there's of course some caching issues, which means it can take up to five seconds from finishing that before it will actually work across the entire internet. And as best I can tell, that is fundamentally magic. But what made it particularly useful and magic, from my perspective, was how easy it was to get up and running. There was none of this oh, but then you have to integrate it with Google Sheets and that's a whole ‘nother team so there's no way you're going to be able to figure that out from our Docs. Go talk to them and then come back in the day.They were the get started, click here to proceed. It just worked. And it really brought back some of the magic of cloud for me in a way that I hadn't seen in quite a while. So, all which is to say, amazing service, I continue to use it for all of these sponsored links, and I am still waiting for you folks to bill me, but it fits comfortably in the free tier because it turns out that I don't have hundreds of thousands of people typing it in every week.Steren: I'm glad it went well. And you know, we measure tasks success for Cloud Run. And we do know that most new users are able to deploy their apps very quickly. And that was the case for you. Just so you know, we've put a lot of effort to make sure it was true, and I'll be glad to tell you more about all that.But for that particular service, yes, I suppose Ahmet—who I really enjoyed working with on Cloud Run, he was really helpful designing Cloud Run with us—has open-sourced this side project. And basically, you might even have clicked on a deploy to Cloud Run button on GitHub, right, to deploy it?Corey: That is exactly what I did and it somehow just worked and—Steren: Exactly.Corey: And it knew, even logging into the Google Cloud Console because it understands who I am because I use Google Docs and things, I'm already logged in. None of this, “Oh, which one of these 85 credential sets is it going to be?” Like certain other clouds. It was, “Oh, wow. Wait, cloud can be easy and fun? When did that happen?”Steren: So, what has happened when you click that deploy to Google Cloud button, basically, the GitHub repository was built into a container with Cloud Build and then was deployed to Cloud Run. And once on Cloud Run, well, hopefully, you have forgotten about it because that's what we do, right? We—give us your code, in a container if you know containers if you don't just—we support, you know, many popular languages, and we know how to build them, so don't worry about that. And then we run it. And as you said, when there is low traffic or no traffic, it scales to zero.When there is low traffic, you're likely going to stay under the generous free tier. And if you have more traffic for, you know, Screaming in the Cloud suddenly becoming a high destination URL redirects, well, Cloud Run will scale the number of instances of this container to be able to handle the load. Cloud Run scales automatically and very well, but only—as always—charging you when you are processing some requests.Corey: I had to fork and make a couple of changes myself after I wound up doing some testing. The first was to make the entire thing case insensitive, which is—you know, makes obvious sense. And the other was to change the permanent redirect to a temporary redirect because believe it or not, in the fullness of time, sometimes sponsors want to change the landing page in different ways for different campaigns and that's fine by me. I just wanted to make sure people's browser cache didn't remember it into perpetuity. But it was easy enough to run—that was back in the early days of my exploring Go, which I've been doing this quarter—and in the couple of months this thing has been running it has been effectively flawless.It's set it; it's forget it. The only challenges I had with it are it was a little opaque getting a custom domain set up that—which is still in beta, to be clear—and I've heard some horror stories of people saying it got wedged. In my case, no, I deployed it and I started refreshing it and suddenly, it start throwing an SSL error. And it's like, “Oh, that's not good, but I'm going to break my own lifestyle here and be patient for ten minutes.” And sure enough, it cleared itself and everything started working. And that was the last time I had to think about any of this. And it just worked.Steren: So first, Cloud Run is HTTPS only. Why? Because it's 2020, right? It's 2022, but—Corey: [laugh].Steren: —it's launched in 2020. And so basically, we have made a decision that let's just not accept HTTP traffic; it's only HTTPS. As a consequence, we need to provision a cert for your custom domain. That is something that can take some time. And as you said, we keep it in beta or in preview because we are not yet satisfied with the experience or even the performance of Cloud Run custom domains, so we are actively working on fixing that with a different approach. So, expect some changes, hopefully, this year.Corey: I will say it does take a few seconds when people go to a snark.cloud URL for it to finish resolving, and it feels on some level like it's almost like a cold start problem. But subsequent visits, the same thing also feel a little on the slow and pokey side. And I don't know if that's just me being wildly impatient, if there's an optimization opportunity, or if that's just inherent to the platform that is not under current significant load.Steren: So, it depends. If the Cloud Run service has scaled down to zero, well of course, your service will need to be started. But what we do know, if it's a small Go binary, like something that you mentioned, it should really take less than, let's say, 500 milliseconds to go from zero to one of your container instance. Latency can also be due to the way the code is running. If it occurred is fetching things from Google Sheets at every startup, that is something that could add to the startup latency.So, I would need to take a look, but in general, we are not spinning up a virtual machine anytime we need to scale horizontally. Like, our infrastructure is a multi-tenant, rapidly scalable infrastructure that can materialize a container in literally 300 milliseconds. The rest of the latency comes from what does the container do at startup time?Corey: Yeah, I just ran a quick test of putting time in front of a curl command. It looks like it took 4.83 seconds. So, enough to be perceptive. But again, for just a quick redirect, it's generally not the end of the world and there's probably something I'm doing that is interesting and odd. Again, I did not invite you on the show to file a—Steren: [laugh].Corey: Bug report. Let's be very clear here.Steren: Seems on the very high end of startup latencies. I mean, I would definitely expect under the second. We should deep-dive into the code to take a look. And by the way, building stuff on top of spreadsheets. I've done that a ton in my previous lives as a CTO of a startup because well, that's the best administration interface, right? You just have a CRUD UI—Corey: [unintelligible 00:12:29] world and all business users understand it. If people in Microsoft decided they were going to change Microsoft Excel interface, even a bit, they would revert the change before noon of the same day after an army of business users grabbed pitchforks and torches and marched on their headquarters. It's one of those things that is how the world runs; it is the world's most common IDE. And it's great, but I still think of databases through the lens of thinking about it as a spreadsheet as my default approach to things. I also think of databases as DNS, but that's neither here nor there.Steren: You know, if you have maybe 100 redirects, that's totally fine. And by the way, the beauty of Cloud Run in a spreadsheet, as you mentioned is that Cloud Run services run with a certain identity. And this identity, you can grant it permissions. And in that case, what I would recommend if you haven't done so yet, is to give an identity to your Cloud Run service that has the permission to read that particular spreadsheet. And how you do that you invite the email of the service account as a reader of your spreadsheet, and that's probably what you did.Corey: The click button to the workflow on Google Cloud automatically did that—Steren: Oh, wow.Corey: —and taught me how to do it. “Here's the thing that look at. The end.” It was a flawless user-onboarding experience.Steren: Very nicely done. But indeed, you know, there is this built-in security which is the principle of minimal permission, like each of your Cloud Run service should basically only be able to read and write to the backing resources that they should. And by default, we give you a service account which has a lot of permissions, but our recommendation is to narrow those permissions to basically only look at the cloud storage buckets that the service is supposed to look at. And the same for a spreadsheet.Corey: Yes, on some level, I feel like I'm going to write an analysis of my own security approach. It would be titled, “My God, It's Full Of Stars” as I look at the IAM policies of everything that I've configured. The idea of least privilege is great. What I like about this approach is that it made it easy to do it so I don't have to worry about it. At one point, I want to go back and wind up instrumenting it a bit further, just so I can wind up getting aggregate numbers of all right, how many times if someone visited this particular link? It'll be good to know.And I don't know… if I have to change permissions to do that yet, but that's okay. It's the best kind of problem: future Corey. So, we'll deal with that when the time comes. But across the board, this has just been a phenomenal experience and it's clear that when you were building Google Cloud Run, you understood the assignment. Because I was looking for people saying negative things about it and by and large, all of its seem to come from a perspective of, “Well, this isn't going to be the most cost-effective or best way to run something that is hyperscale, globe-spanning.”It's yes, that's the thing that Kubernetes was originally built to run and for some godforsaken reason people run their blog on it instead now. Okay. For something that is small, scales to zero, and has long periods where no one is visiting it, great, this is a terrific answer and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's clear that you understood who you were aiming at, and the migration strategy to something that is a bit more, I want to say robust, but let's be clear what I mean when I'm saying that if you want something that's a little bit more impressive on your SRE resume as you're trying a multi-year project to get hired by Google or pretend you got hired by Google, yeah, you can migrate to something else in a relatively straightforward way. But that this is up, running, and works without having to think about it, and that is no small thing.Steren: So, there are two things to say here. The first is yes, indeed, we know we have high developer satisfaction. You know, we measure this—in Google Cloud, you might have seen those small satisfaction surveys popping up sometimes on the user interface, and you know, we are above 90% satisfaction score. We hire third parties to help us understand how usable and what satisfaction score would users get out of Cloud Run, and we are constantly getting very, very good results, in absolute but also compared to the competition.Now, the other thing that you said is that, you know, Cloud Run is for small things, and here while it is definitely something that allows you to be productive, something that strives for simplicity, but it also scales a lot. And contrary to other systems, you do not have any pre-provisioning to make. So, we have done demos where we go from zero to 10,000 container instances in ten seconds because of the infrastructure on which Cloud Run runs, which is fully managed and multi-tenant, we can offer you this scale on demand. And many of our biggest customers have actually not switched to something like Kubernetes after starting with Cloud Run because they value the low maintenance, the no infrastructure management that Cloud Run brings them.So, we have like Ikea, ecobee… for example ecobee, you know, the smart thermostats are using Cloud Run to ingest events from the thermostat. I think Ikea is using Cloud Run more and more for more of their websites. You know, those companies scale, right? This is not, like, scale to zero hobby project. This is actually production e-commerce and connected smart objects production systems that have made the choice of being on a fully-managed platform in order to reduce their operational overhead.[midroll 00:17:54]Corey: Let me be clear. When I say scale—I think we might be talking past each other on a small point here. When I say scale, I'm talking less about oh tens or hundreds of thousands of containers running concurrently. I'm talking in a more complicated way of, okay, now we have a whole bunch of different microservices talking to one another and affinity as far as location to each other for data transfer reasons. And as you start beginning to service discovery style areas of things, where we build a really complicated applications because we hired engineers and failed to properly supervise them, and that type of convoluted complex architecture.That's where it feels like Cloud Run increasingly, as you move in that direction, starts to look a little bit less like the tool of choice. Which is fine, I want to be clear on that point. The sense that I've gotten of it is a great way to get started, it's a great way to continue running a thing you don't have to think about because you have a day job that isn't infrastructure management. And it is clear to—as your needs change—to either remain with the service or pivot to a very close service without a whole lot of retooling, which is key. There's not much of a lock-in story to this, which I love.Steren: That was one of the key principles when we started to design Cloud Run was, you know, we realized the industry had agreed that the container image was the standard for the deployment artifact of software. And so, we just made the early choice of focusing on deploying containers. Of course, we are helping users build those containers, you know, we have things called build packs, we can continuously deploy from GitHub, but at the end of the day, the thing that gets auto-scaled on Cloud Run is a container. And that enables portability.As you said. You can literally run the same container, nothing proprietary in it, I want to be clear. Like, you're just listening on a port for some incoming requests. Those requests can be HTTP requests, events, you know, we have products that can push events to Cloud Run like Eventarc or Pub/Sub. And this same container, you can run it on your local machine, you can run it on Kubernetes, you can run it on another cloud. You're not locked in, in terms of API of the compute.We even went even above and beyond by having the Cloud Run API looks like a Kubernetes API. I think that was an extra effort that we made. I'm not sure people care that much, but if you look at the Cloud Run API, it is actually exactly looking like Kubernetes, Even if there is no Kubernetes at all under the hood; we just made it for portability. Because we wanted to address this concern of serverless which was lock-in. Like, when you use a Function as a Service product, you are worried that the architecture that you are going to develop around this product is going to be only working in this particular cloud provider, and you're not in control of the language, the version that this provider has decided to offer you, you're not in control of more of the complexity that can come as you want to scan this code, as you want to move this code between staging and production or test this code.So, containers are really helping with that. So, I think we made the right choice of this new artifact that to build Cloud Run around the container artifact. And you know, at the time when we launched, it was a little bit controversial because back in the day, you know, 2018, 2019, serverless really meant Functions as a Service. So, when we launched, we little bit redefined serverless. And we basically said serverless containers. Which at the time were two worlds that in the same sentence were incompatible. Like, many people, including internally, had concerns around—Corey: Oh, the serverless versus container war was a big thing for a while. Everyone was on a different side of that divide. It's… containers are effectively increasingly—and I know, I'll get email for this, and I don't even slightly care, they're a packaging format—Steren: Exactly.Corey: —where it solves the problem of how do I build this thing to deploy on Debian instances? And Ubuntu instances, and other instances, God forbid, Windows somewhere, you throw a container over the wall. The end. Its DevOps is about breaking down the walls between Dev and Ops. That's why containers are here to make them silos that don't have to talk to each other.Steren: A container image is a glorified zip file. Literally. You have a set of layers with files in them, and basically, we decided to adopt that artifact standard, but not the perceived complexity that existed at the time around containers. And so, we basically merged containers with serverless to make something as easy to use as a Function as a Service product but with the power of bringing your own container. And today, we are seeing—you mentioned, what kind of architecture would you use Cloud Run for?So, I would say now there are three big buckets. The obvious one is anything that is a website or an API, serving public internet traffic, like your URL redirect service, right? This is, you have an API, takes a request and returns a response. It can be a REST API, GraphQL API. We recently added support for WebSockets, which is pretty unique for a service offering to support natively WebSockets.So, what I mean natively is, my client can open a socket connection—a bi-directional socket connection—with a given instance, for up to one hour. This is pretty unique for something that is as fully managed as Cloud Run.Corey: Right. As we're recording this, we are just coming off of Google I/O, and there were a number of announcements around Cloud Run that were touching it because of, you know, strange marketing issues. I only found out that Google I/O was a thing and featured cloud stuff via Twitter at the time it was happening. What did you folks release around Cloud Run?Steren: Good question, actually. Part of the Google I/O Developer keynote, I pitched a story around how Cloud Run helps developers, and the I/O team liked the story, so we decided to include that story as part of the live developer keynote. So, on stage, we announced Cloud Run jobs. So now, I talked to you about Cloud Run services, which can be used to expose an API, but also to do, like, private microservice-to-microservice communication—because cloud services don't have to be public—and in that case, we support GRPC and, you know, a very strong security mechanism where only Service A can invoke Service B, for example, but Cloud Run jobs are about non-request-driven containers. So, today—I mean, before Google I/O a few days ago, the only requirement that we imposed on your container image was that it started to listen for requests, or events, or GRPC—Corey: Web requests—Steren: Exactly—Corey: It speaks [unintelligible 00:24:35] you want as long as it's HTTP. Yes.Steren: That was the only requirement we asked you to have on your container image. And now we've changed that. Now, if you have a container that basically starts and executes to completion, you can deploy it on a Cloud Run job. So, you will use Cloud Run jobs for, like, daily batch jobs. And you have the same infrastructure, so on-demand, you can go from zero to, I think for now, the maximum is a hundred tasks in parallel, for—of course, you can run many tasks in sequence, but in parallel, you can go from zero to a hundred, right away to run your daily batch job, daily admin job, data processing.But this is more in the batch mode than in streaming mode. If you would like to use a more, like, streaming data processing, than a Cloud Run service would still be the best fit because you can literally push events to it, and it will auto-scale to handle any number of events that it receives.Corey: Do you find that the majority of customers are using Cloud Run for one-off jobs that barely will get more than a single container, like my thing, or do you find that they're doing massively parallel jobs? Where's the lion's share of developer and customer interest?Steren: It's both actually. We have both individual developers, small startups—which really value the scale to zero and pay per use model of Cloud Run. Your URL redirect service probably is staying below the free tier, and there are many, many, many users in your case. But at the same time, we have big, big, big customers who value the on-demand scalability of Cloud Run. And for these customers, of course, they will probably very likely not scale to zero, but they value the fact that—you know, we have a media company who uses Cloud Run for TV streaming, and when there is a soccer game somewhere in the world, they have a big spike of usage of requests coming in to their Cloud Run service, and here they can trust the rapid scaling of Cloud Run so they don't have to pre-provision things in advance to be able to serve that sudden traffic spike.But for those customers, Cloud Run is priced in a way so that if you know that you're going to consume a lot of Cloud Run CPU and memory, you can purchase Committed Use Discounts, which will lower your bill overall because you know you are going to spend one dollar per hour on Cloud Run, well purchase a Committed Use Discount because you will only spend 83 cents instead of one dollar. And also, Cloud Run and comes with two pricing model, one which is the default, which is the request-based pricing model, which is basically you only have CPU allocated to your container instances if you are processing at least one request. But as a consequence of that, you are not paying outside of the processing of those requests. Those containers might stay up for you, one, ready to receive new requests, but you're not paying for them. And so, that is—you know, your URL redirect service is probably in that mode where yes when you haven't used it for a while, it will scale down to zero, but if you send one request to it, it will serve that request and then it will stay up for a while until it decides to scale down. But you the user only pays when you are processing these specific requests, a little bit like a Function as a Service product.Corey: Scales to zero is one of the fundamental tenets of serverless that I think that companies calling something serverless, but it always charges you per hour anyway. Yeah, that doesn't work. Storage, let's be clear, is a separate matter entirely. I'm talking about compute. Even if your workflow doesn't scale down to zero ever as a workload, that's fine, but if the workload does, you don't get to keep charging me for it.Steren: Exactly. And so, in that other mode where you decide to always have CPU allocated to your Cloud Run container instances, then you pay for the entire lifecycle of this container instances. You still benefit from the auto-scaling of Cloud Run, but you will pay for the lifecycle and in that case, the price points are lower because you pay for a longer period of time. But that's more the price model that those bigger customers will take because at their scale, they basically always receive requests, so they already to pay always, basically.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to chat with me. Before you go, one last question that we'll be using as a teaser for the next episode that we record together. It seems like this is a full-time job being the product manager on Cloud Run, but no Google, contrary to popular opinion, does in fact, still support 20% projects. What's yours?Steren: So, I've been looking to work on Cloud Run since it was a prototype, and you know, for a long time, we've been iterating privately on Cloud Run, launching it, seeing it grow, seeing it adopted, it's great. It's my full-time job. But on Fridays, I still find the time to have a 20% project, which also had quite a bit of impact. And I work on some sustainability efforts for Google Cloud. And notably, we've released two things last year.The first one is that we are sharing some carbon characteristics of Google Cloud regions. So, if you have seen those small leaves in the Cloud Console next to the regions that are emitting the less carbon, that's something that I helped bring to life. And the second one, which is something quite big, is we are helping customers report and reduce their gross carbon emissions of their Google Cloud usage by providing an out of the box reporting tool called Google Cloud Carbon Footprint. So, that's something that I was able to bootstrap with a team a little bit on the side of my Cloud Run project, but I was very glad to see it launched by our CEO at the last Cloud Next Conference. And now it is a fully-funded project, so we are very glad that we are able to help our customers better meet their sustainability goals themselves.Corey: And we will be talking about it significantly on the next episode. We're giving a teaser, not telling the whole story.Steren: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you are. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Steren: Well, if they want to learn more about Cloud Run, we talked about how simple was that name. It was obviously not simple to find this simple name, but the domain is https://cloud.run.Corey: We will also accept snark.cloud/run, I will take credit for that service, too.Steren: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: There we are.Steren: And then, people can find me on Twitter at @steren, S-T-E-R-E-N. I'll be happy—I'm always happy to help developers get started or answer questions about Cloud Run. And, yeah, thank you for having me. As I said, you successfully deployed something in just a few minutes to Cloud Run. I would encourage the audience to—Corey: In spite of myself. I know, I'm as surprised as anyone.Steren: [laugh].Corey: The only snag I really hit was the fact that I was riding shotgun when we picked up my daughter from school and went through a dead zone. It's like, why is this thing not loading in the Google Cloud Console? Yeah, fix the cell network in my area, please.Steren: I'm impressed that you did all of that from an iPad. But yeah, to the audience give Cloud Run the try. You can really get started connecting your GitHub repository or deploy your favorite container image. And we've worked very hard to ensure that usability was here, and we know we have pretty strong usability scores. Because that was a lot of work to simplicity, and product excellence and developer experience is a lot of work to get right, and we are very proud of what we've achieved with Cloud Run and proud to see that the developer community has been very supportive and likes this product.Corey: I'm a big fan of what you've built. And well, of course, it links to all of that in the show notes. I just want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. And thanks again for building something that I think in many ways showcases the best of what Google Cloud has to offer.Steren: Thanks for the invite.Corey: We'll talk again soon. Steren Giannini is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, on Cloud Run. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. If it's on YouTube, put the thumbs up and the subscribe buttons as well, but in the event that you hated it also include an angry comment explaining why your 20% project is being a shithead on the internet.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

NFT Alpha Podcast
NFT Morning Show - Monday 6/20: Live Show

NFT Alpha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 83:56


This was the first live edition of the NFT morning show in front of an audience of holders. We hosted it at Degen Arcade on Gansevoort Street in New York City, which is going to be open all week for NFTNYC. We had a bunch of portal whales come up to discuss their thoughts on the NFT market and had returning speakers like Node come on in person. Tune in live every weekday Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM Eastern to 10:30 AM Buy our NFT Sign up for FTX Join our discord Check out our Twitter Give us your thoughts on the show by leaving a rating. -- DISCLAIMER: You should never treat any opinion expressed by the hosts of this content as a recommendation to make a particular investment, or to follow a particular strategy. The thoughts and commentary on this show are an expression of the hosts' opinions and are for entertainment and informational purposes only. This show is never financial advice.

Broken Silicon
158. Lovelace & Raptor Lake Launch October, AMD Little Phoenix APU, ARC A380 Pricing

Broken Silicon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 131:19


AMD, Nvidia, and Intel all seem to be targeting Quarter 4 for their big releases… SPON: Get 10% off Tasty Vite Ramen with Code “brokensilicon” at: https://bit.ly/3oyv4tR SPON: brokensilicon = -25% off Windows, dieshrink = -3% off Everything: https://biitt.ly/shbSk 0:00 Zebra vs Hoarse Voice, Bonus 6G Episode is LIVE 4:44 Reesie Health Update 10:33 Ionizing Radiation, First OLED TVs (Corrections) 16:34 Intel 4 Node Doubles Density or brings +20% Performance 21:50 Intel Sapphire Rapids Delayed to Q2 2023 - Next to Bergamo 31:31 Raptor Lake likely Launches October...after Zen 4 42:14 Wait for Raptor Lake or Zen 4 with Vcache? Will 170w be enough for Zen 6? 49:02 AMD Phoenix, Dragon Range, Mendocino, and Sonoma Valley Discussion 1:00:19 Little Phoenix for Steam Deck 2 Leak 1:10:09 Will Phoenix & Raptor Lake Mobile actually have good supply? 1:14:16 Nvidia Lovelace Launches Q4 due to Oversupply Issues 1:22:33 Alchemist Performance & Pricing Update 1:26:44 Late 2022 Building Advice – Used Cards, OLED Monitors, RDNA 3 1:31:16 Apple M2 Announced with 8-core CPU and 10-core GPU 1:35:54 AMD Game Bundle, Intel 3 Node, Loongson CPUs (Wrap-Up) 1:47:27 Metaverse, Bitcoin, XBOX June Showcase (Final Reader Mail) https://www.techpowerup.com/295809/intel-4-process-node-detailed-doubling-density-with-20-higher-performance https://medium.com/@mingchikuo/intels-sapphire-rapids-shipment-delay-to-2q23-is-detrimental-to-intel-and-its-server-supply-chain-a1de691bd093 https://twitter.com/mooreslawisdead/status/1538622486258008070 https://youtu.be/MYJ_9zfqWUg https://youtu.be/rIN3IbA3vCY https://twitter.com/wxnod/status/1537824618613833728 https://youtu.be/JN0ygfN0-go https://www.techpowerup.com/295926/amd-phoenix-point-zen-4-mobile-processor-powered-up https://www.techpowerup.com/295850/amd-ryzen-3-7320u-surfaces-possibly-the-mendocino-soc https://wccftech.com/nvidia-geforce-rtx-4090-october-rtx-4080-november-rtx-4070-december-rtx-4060-ces-2023-launch-rumor/ https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1630-delayed-rtx-40-series-launch-slips-by-a-month https://youtu.be/ARjeBywF7uo https://twitter.com/SkyJuice60/status/1537031000970371073 https://twitter.com/3dcenter_org/status/1537435073774907394?s=21&t=oMgVBvr5ST4LeAiiAP2ztQ https://videocardz.com/newz/first-review-of-intel-alchemist-acm-g10-gpu-is-out-arc-a730m-is-outperformed-by-rtx-3060m-in-gaming https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-quietly-changes-official-arc-a380-memory-specs-its-15-5-gbps-not-16 https://www.notebookcheck.net/Apple-M2-GPU-outdoes-its-own-hype-with-up-to-45-faster-performances-than-the-M1-in-GFXBench-and-up-to-13-5-in-Cinebench-R23.629517.0.html https://videocardz.com/press-release/apple-announces-next-gen-m2-silicon-with-8-core-cpu-and-10-core-gpu?s=03 https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-raise-the-game-bundle-goes-live-after-a-month-saints-row-sniper-elite-and-forspoken-are-out-for-grabs https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/nvidia-arm-intel-alder-lake-expert https://www.techspot.com/review/2478-amd-ryzen-5600-upgrade/ https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/amd-radeon-rx-6700 https://www.techspot.com/news/94919-preview-core-i9-13900-engineering-sample-performance-looks.html https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-14th-gen-core-meteor-lake-p-die-shot-with-6-performance-and-8-efficient-cores-has-been-revealed https://twitter.com/iancutress/status/1536471424654778372?s=21&t=nKekRs5AxVEX3154QCA6SQ https://youtu.be/he6xyl_MHXY https://www.techspot.com/news/94921-chinese-chipmaker-claims-upcoming-cpus-feature-similar-ipc.html

Ham Radio 2.0
E904: ALLSTAR QSO Party - Ham Radio Allstar Livestream, Come Chat with Us!

Ham Radio 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 91:55


Let's all connect to Node 43136 and have an Allstar QSO Party! Bring your questions about Allstar or just Ham Radio in general. I look forward to seeing you in the chat, and hearing you on the air!

DevTalles
069- Node.js

DevTalles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 42:24


Node es una de las tecnologías que cambió el mundo, y honestamente no me imagino mi vida sin usar Node! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fernando-her85/support

The Bitcoin Cash Podcast
#50: Celsius Collapse & Node Dev feat. Josh Ellithorpe

The Bitcoin Cash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 182:48


The much promised node developer episode, Josh joins the 50th episode to discuss Celsisus exploding, developing BCHD and the node protocol, BCH history, his upcoming game Clementine's Nightmare, Eric Wall's change of heart and a huge array of other topics.Donations: bitcoincash:qrgag0mqczptkghkeh3eclav0x2wk0q5wcq0gatlzc

JS Party
ESLint and TypeScript

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:00


Josh Goldberg joins Nick, Chris & a very nasally-sounding KBall for a fun conversation around TypeScript ESLint. They discuss why we need ESLint when we have TypeScript, some useful rules in typescript-eslint, how it works, and a few hot takes along the way!

Changelog Master Feed
ESLint and TypeScript (JS Party #230)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:00


Josh Goldberg joins Nick, Chris & a very nasally-sounding KBall for a fun conversation around TypeScript ESLint. They discuss why we need ESLint when we have TypeScript, some useful rules in typescript-eslint, how it works, and a few hot takes along the way!

AWS Bites
41. How can Middy make writing Lambda functions easier?

AWS Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 25:18


Lambda functions are small units of code that achieve a specific purpose. It's always a good idea to keep your code short, clean and simple. And yet, sometimes you find yourself writing lots of boilerplate code in every function to do common things, like parsing events, validation, loading parameters and lots more. The Middy.js framework was designed to help you keep Node.js Lambda function code simple, letting you focus on the business logic and clearing away duplication and boilerplate. By the end of this episode, you will know: How Middy.js works with JavaScript and TypeScript, how to perform validation, event parsing and parameter loading, and how you can even write and use your own Middy middleware. Finally you'll get to know who is using Middy and how you could contribute to the Middy ecosystem. In this episode, we mentioned the following resources: - Middy Website and documentation: https://middy.js.org/ - How to get started with middy (official docs): https://middy.js.org/docs - Middy official middlewares (official docs): https://middy.js.org/docs/middlewares/intro - How to write your own middlewares (official docs): https://middy.js.org/docs/category/writing-middlewares - Middy integrations (official docs): https://middy.js.org/docs/category/integrations - Interview with Taco Bell in an episode of Real World Serverless where they mention how they use middy: https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/real-world/56-serverless-at-tacobell--k5gAQBMHSb/ - Open source projects using Middy: https://github.com/middyjs/middy/network/dependents?package_id=UGFja2FnZS00Njc1NDUzOTU%3D - Lambda Power Tools for TypeScript Middy Integration: https://awslabs.github.io/aws-lambda-powertools-typescript/0.10.0/core/logger/#capturing-lambda-context-info This episode is also available on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/AWSBites You can listen to AWS Bites wherever you get your podcasts: - Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/aws-bites/id1585489017 - Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3Lh7PzqBFV6yt5WsTAmO5q - Google: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy82YTMzMTJhMC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== - Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/aws-bites - RSS: ​​https://anchor.fm/s/6a3312a0/podcast/rss Do you have any AWS questions you would like us to address? Leave a comment here or connect with us on Twitter: - https://twitter.com/eoins - https://twitter.com/loige #aws #serverless #lambda

NFT Morning, Decouvrez tous les projets NFT et Crypto-art
#290 | Room Spéciale NFT Factory Vol. II x Le projet All Triangles

NFT Morning, Decouvrez tous les projets NFT et Crypto-art

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 69:28


En tout début de room Neal Robert, cofondateur de l’agence BEM Builders, que nous connaissons déjà accompagné par Basile Lapray, sont venus nous présenter une collection phygitale très spéciale issue de la collaboration entre New ERA et la marque française Paraboot, lancée sur All Triangles… Retrouvez toutes les infos sur cette collection sur (https://www.alltriangles-atexp.com/)Nous avons continué la room avec une partie des nouveaux fondateurs de la NFT Factory. En effet depuis notre room #240 du 22 mars dernier où nous avons annoncé le lancement de la NFT Factory avec une cinquantaine de cofondateurs, le projet a pris encore une nouvelle dimension.La NFT Factory regroupe aujourd’hui 126 membres que vous pouvez retrouver ici.En plus l’élargissement du nombre de cofondateurs, nous voulions évoquer le lancement de The Node, un token de membership créé par le collectif Obvious en 1000 exemplaires et qui permettra notamment à ses détenteurs, de bénéficier d’accès privilégiés aux évènements de la Factory et à bien d’autres avantages…Plusieurs étapes : → Demain, vendredi 17 juin - minuit CET : Clôture de l’Allowlist Application Form pour les personnes souhaitant participer à la private sale.→ jeudi 23 juin - midi CET : début de la private sale→ lundi 27 juin - midi CET -  début de la public sale (et fin de la private sale)Pour aller plus loin:Site web officiel de la NFT Factory (Onglet The Member Node)Formulaire pour participer à l’allowlistCompte Twitter de la NFT Factory This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.nftmorning.com

Egy ablak a lelki világra
Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:29:00 +0200 http://sivaramaswami.media/node/92985

Egy ablak a lelki világra

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 5:30


Fun Astrology with Thomas Miller
Astrology Fun - June 16, 2022 - Sun Trines Saturn; Venus Conjunct N Node; Sun Squares Neptune

Fun Astrology with Thomas Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 6:35


Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/fun-astrology. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Money Gang
Node NFT Marketplace & Staking Platform To CRUSH #OpenSea (BigFoot Finance)

New Money Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:26


Today, we are talking about Bigfoot Finance. They are an NFT & node protocol that is developing a revenue share business model involving a NFT Marketplace similar to OpeaSea or LooksRare with goals to scale quickly. They are a young company with a doxxed founder and massive growth potential.

Break Things On Purpose
Developer Advocacy and Innersource with Aaron Clark

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 40:55


In this episode, we cover: Aaron talks about starting out as a developer and the early stages of cloud development at RBC (1:05) Aaron discusses transitioning to developer advocacy (12:25) Aaron identifies successes he had in his early days of developer advocacy (20:35) Jason asks what it looks like to assist developers in achieving completion with long term maintenance projects, or “sustainable development” (25:40)  Jason and Aaron discuss what “innersource” is and why it's valuable in an organization (29:29) Aaron answers the question “how do you keep skills and knowledge up to date?” (33:55) Aaron talks about job opportunities at RBC (38:55) Links Referenced: Royal Bank of Canada: https://www.rbcroyalbank.com Opportunities at RBC: https://jobs.rbc.com/ca/en TranscriptAaron: And I guess some PM asked my boss, “So, Aaron doesn't come to our platform status meetings, he doesn't really take tickets, and he doesn't take support rotation. What does Aaron do for the Cloud Platform Team?”Jason: [laugh].Jason: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about reliability, learning, and building better systems. In this episode, we talk with Aaron Clark, Director of Developer Advocacy at the Royal Bank of Canada. We chat with him about his journey from developer to advocate, the power of applying open-source principles within organizations—known as innersource—and his advice to keep learning.Jason: Welcome to the show, Aaron.Aaron: Thanks for having me, Jason. My name is Aaron Clark. I'm a developer advocate for cloud at RBC. That is the Royal Bank of Canada. And I've been at the bank for… well, since February 2010.Jason: So, when you first joined the bank, you were not a developer advocate, though?Aaron: Right. So, I have been in my current role since 2019. I've been part of the cloud program since 2017. Way back in 2010, I joined as a Java developer. So, my background in terms of being a developer is pretty much heavy on Java. Java and Spring Boot, now.I joined working on a bunch of Java applications within one of the many functions areas within the Royal Bank. The bank is gigantic. That's kind of one of the things people sometimes struggle to grasp. It's such a large organization. We're something like 100,000… yeah, 100,000 employees, around 10,000 of that is in technology, so developers, developer adjacent roles like business analysts, and QE, and operations and support, and all of those roles.It's a big organization. And that's one of the interesting things to kind of grapple with when you join the organization. So, I joined in a group called Risk IT. We built solely internal-facing applications. I worked on a bunch of stuff in there.I'm kind of a generalist, where I have interest in all the DevOps things. I set up one of the very first Hudson servers in Risk—well, in the bank, but specifically in Risk—and I admin'ed it on the side because nobody else was doing it and it needed doing. After a few years of doing that and working on a bunch of different projects, I was occasionally just, “We need this project to succeed, to have a good foundation at the start, so Aaron, you're on this project for six months and then you're doing something different.” Which was really interesting. At the same time, I always worry about the problem where if you don't stay on something for very long, you never learn the consequences of the poor decisions you may have made because you don't have to deal with it.Jason: [laugh].Aaron: And that was like the flip side of, I hope I'm making good decisions here. It seemed to be pretty good, people seemed happy with it, but I always worry about that. Like, being in a role for a few years where you build something, and then it's in production, and you're running it and you're dealing with, “Oh, I made this decision that seems like a good idea at the time. Turns out that's a bad idea. Don't do that next time.” You never learned that if you don't stay in a role.When I was overall in Risk IT for four, almost five years, so I would work with a bunch of the teams who maybe stayed on this project, they'd come ask me questions. It's like, I'm not gone gone. I'm just not working on that project for the next few months or whatever. And then I moved into another part of the organization, like, a sister group called Finance IT that runs kind of the—builds and runs the general ledger for the bank. Or at least for a part of capital markets.It gets fuzzy as the organization moves around. And groups combine and disperse and things like that. That group, I actually had some interesting stuff that was when I started working on more things like cloud, looking at cloud, the bank was starting to bring in cloud. So, I was still on the application development side, but I was interested in it. I had been to some conferences like OSCON, and started to hear about and learn about things like Docker, things like Kubernetes, things like Spring Boot, and I was like this is some really neat stuff.I was working on a Spark-based ETL system, on one of the early Hadoop clusters at the bank. So, I've been I'm like, super, super lucky that I got to do a lot of this stuff, work on all of these new things when they were really nascent within the organization. I've also had really supportive leadership. So, like, I was doing—that continuous integration server, that was totally on the side; I got involved in a bunch of reuse ideas of, we have this larger group; we're doing a lot of similar things; let's share some of the libraries and things like that. That was before being any, like, developer advocate or anything like that I was working on these.And I was actually funded for a year to promote and work on reuse activities, basically. And that was—I learned a lot, I made a lot of mistakes that I now, like, inform some of the decisions I make in my current role, but I was doing all of this, and I almost described it as I kind of taxed my existing project because I'm working on this team, but I have this side thing that I have to do. And I might need to take a morning and not work on your project because I have to, like, maintain this build machine for somebody. And I had really supportive leadership. They were great.They recognize the value of these activities, and didn't really argue about the fact that I was taking time away from whatever the budget said I was supposed to be doing, which was really good. So, I started doing that, and I was working in finance as the Cloud Team was starting to go through a revamp—the initial nascent Cloud Team at the bank—and I was doing cloud things from the app dev side, but at the same time within my group, anytime something surprising became broken, somebody had some emergency that they needed somebody to drop in and be clever and solve things, that person became me. And I was running into a lot of distractions in that sense. And it's nice to be the person who gets to work on, “Oh, this thing needs rescuing. Help us, Aaron.”That's fantastic; it feels really good, right, up until you're spending a lot of your time doing it and you can't do the things that you're really interested in. So, I actually decided to move over to the Cloud Team and work on kind of defining how we build applications for the cloud, which was really—it was a really good time. It was a really early time in the bank, so nobody really knew how we were going to build applications, how we were going to put them on the cloud, what does that structure look like? I got to do a lot of reading and research and learning from other people. One of the key things about, like, a really large organization that's a little slow-moving like the bank and is a little bit risk-averse in terms of technology choices, people always act like that's always a bad thing.And sometimes it is because we're sometimes not adopting things that we would really get a lot of benefit out of, but the other side of it is, by the time we get to a lot of these technologies and platforms, a bunch of the sharp edges have kind of been sanded off. Like, the Facebooks and the Twitters of the world, they've adopted it and they've discovered all of these problems and been, like, duct-taping them together. And they've kind of found, “Oh, we need to have actual, like, security built into this system,” or things like that, and they've dealt with it. So, by the time we get to it, some of those issues are just not there anymore. We don't have to deal with them.Which is an underrated positive of being in a more conservative organization around that. So, we were figuring there's a lot of things we could learn from. When we were looking at microservices and, kind of, Spring Boot Spring Cloud, the initial cloud parts that had been brought into the organization were mainly around Cloud Foundry. And we were helping some initial app teams build their applications, which we probably over-engineered some of those applications, in the sense that we were proving out patterns that you didn't desperately need for building those applications. Like, you could have probably just done it with a web app and relational database and it would have been fine.But we were proving out some of the patterns of how do you build something for broader scale with microservices and things like that. We learned a bunch about the complexities of doing that too early, but we also learned a bunch about how to do this so we could teach other application teams. And that's kind of the group that I became part of, where I wasn't a platform operator on the cloud, but I was working with dev teams, building things with dev teams to help them learn how to build stuff for cloud. And this was my first real exposure to that scope and scale of the bank. I'd been in the smaller groups and one of the things that you start to encounter when you start to interact with the larger parts of the bank is just, kind of, how many silos there are, how diverse the tech stacks are in an organization of that size.Like, we have areas that do things with Java, we have areas doing things with .NET Framework, we have areas doing lots of Python, we have areas doing lots of Node, especially as the organization started building more web applications. While you're building things with Angular and using npm for the front-end, so you're building stuff on the back-end with Node as well. Whether that is a good technology choice, a lot of the time you're building with what you have. Even within Java, we'd have teams building with Spring Boot, and lots of groups doing that, but someone else is interested in Google Guice, so they're building—instead of Spring, they're using Google Guice as their dependency injection framework.Or they have a… like, there's the mainframe, right? You have this huge technology stack where lots of people are building Java EE applications still and trying to evolve that from the old grungy days of Java EE to the much nicer modern ways of it. And some of the technology conversations are things like, “Well, you can use this other technology; that's fine, but if you're using that, and we're using something else over here, we can't help each other. When I solve a problem, I can't really help solve it for you as well. You have to solve it for yourself with your framework.”I talked to a team once using Vertex in Java, and I asked them, “Why are you using Vertex?” And they said, “Well, that's what our team knew.” I was like, “That's a good technology choice in the sense that we have to deliver. This is what we know, so this is the thing we know we can succeed with rather than actually learning something new on the job while trying to deliver something.” That's often a recipe for challenges if not outright failure.Jason: Yeah. So, it sounds like that's kind of where you come in; if all these teams are doing very disparate things, right—Aaron: Mm-hm.Jason: That's both good and bad, right? That's the whole point of microservices is independent teams, everyone's decoupled, more velocity. But also, there's huge advantages—especially in an org the size of RBC—to leverage some of the learnings from one team to another, and really, like, start to share these best practices. I'm guessing that's where you come into play now in your current role.Aaron: Yeah. And that's the part where how do we have the flexibility for people to make their own choices while standardizing so we don't have this enormous sprawl, so we can build on things? And this is starting to kind of where I started really getting involved in community stuff and doing developer advocacy. And part of how this actually happened—and this is another one of those cases where I've been very fortunate and I've had great leaders—I was working as part of the Cloud Platform Team, the Special Projects group that I was, a couple of people left; I was the last one left. It's like, “Well, you can't be your own department, so you're part of Cloud Platform.” But I'm not an operator. I don't take a support rotation.And I'm ostensibly building tooling, but I'm mostly doing innersource. This is where the innersource community started to spin up at RBC. I was one of the, kind of, founding members of the innersource community and getting that going. We had built a bunch of libraries for cloud, so those were some of the first projects into innersource where I was maintaining the library for Java and Spring using OIDC. And this is kind of predating Spring Security's native support for OIDC—so Open ID Connect—And I was doing a lot of that, I was supporting app teams who were trying to adopt that library, I was involved in some of the other early developer experience things around, you complain this thing is bad as the developer; why do we have to do this? You get invited to one of the VP's regular weekly meetings to discuss, and now you're busy trying to fix, kind of, parts of the developer experience. I was doing this, and I guess some PM asked my boss, “So, Aaron doesn't come to our platform status meetings, he doesn't really take tickets, and he doesn't take support rotation. What does Aaron do for the Cloud Platform Team?”Jason: [laugh].Aaron: And my boss was like, “Well, Aaron's got a lot of these other things that he's involved with that are really valuable.” One of the other things I was doing at this point was I was hosting the Tech Talk speaking series, which is kind of an internal conference-style talks where we get an expert from within the organization and we try to cross those silos where we find someone who's a machine-learning expert; come and explain how TensorFlow works. Come and explain how Spark works, why it's awesome. And we get those experts to come and do presentations internally for RBC-ers. And I was doing that and doing all of the support work for running that event series with the co-organizers that we had.And at the end of the year, when they were starting up a new initiative to really focus on how do we start promoting cloud adoption rather than just people arrive at the platform and start using it and figure it out for themselves—you can only get so far with that—my boss sits me down. He says. “So, we really like all the things that you've been doing, all of these community things and things like that, so we're going to make that your job now.” And this is how I arrived at there. It's not like I applied to be a developer advocate. I was doing all of these things on the side and all of a sudden, 75% of my time was all of these side projects, and that became my job.So, it's not really the most replicable, like, career path, but it is one of those things where, like, getting involved in stuff is a great way to find a niche that is the things that you're passionate about. So, I changed my title. You can do that in some of our systems as long as your manager approves it, so I changed my title from the very generic ‘Senior Technical Systems Analyst—which, who knows what I actually do when that's my title—and I changed that to ‘Developer Advocate.' And that was when I started doing more research learning about what do actual developer advocates do because I want to be a developer advocate. I want to say I'm a developer advocate.For the longest time in the organization, I'm the only person in the company with that title, which is interesting because then nobody knows what to do with me because I'm not like—am I, like—I'm not a director, I'm not a VP. Like… but I'm not just a regular developer, either. Where—I don't fit in the hierarchy. Which is good because then people stop getting worried about what what are titles and things like that, and they just listen to what I say. So, I do, like, design consultations with dev teams, making sure that they knew what they were doing, or were aware of a bunch of the pitfalls when they started to get onto the cloud.I would build a lot of samples, a lot of docs, do a lot of the community engagement, so going to events internally that we'd have, doing a lot of those kinds of things. A lot of the innersource stuff I was already doing—the speaking series—but now it was my job formally, and it helped me cross a lot of those silos and work very horizontally. That's one of the different parts about my job versus a regular developer, is it's my job to cover anything to do with cloud—that at least, that I find interesting, or that my boss tells me I need to work at—and anything anywhere in the organization that touches. So, a dev team doing something with Kubernetes, I can go and talk to them. If they're building something in capital markets that might be useful, I can say, “Hey, can you share this into innersource so that other people can build on this work as well?”And that was really great because I develop all of these relationships with all of these other groups. And that was, to a degree, what the cloud program needed from me as well at that beginning. I explained that this was now my job to one of my friends. And they're like, “That sounds like the perfect job for you because you are technical, but you're really good with people.” I was like, “Am I? I guess I am now that I've been doing it for this amount of time.”And the other part of it as we've gone on more and more is because I talk to all of these development teams, I am not siloed in, I'm not as tunneled on the specific thing I'm working with, and now I can talk to the platform teams and really represent the application developer perspective. Because I'm not building the platform. And they have their priorities, and they have things that they have to worry about; I don't have to deal with that. My job is to bring the perspective of an application developer. That's my background.I'm not an operator; I don't care about the support rotation, I don't care about a bunch of the niggly things and toil of the platform. It's my job, sometimes, to say, hey, this documentation is well-intentioned. I understand how you arrived at this documentation from the perspective of being the platform team and the things that you prioritize and want to explain to people, but as an application developer, none of the information that I need to build something to run on your platform is presented in a manner that I am able to consume. So, I do, like, that side as well of providing customer feedback to the platform saying, “This thing is hard,” or, “This thing that you are asking the application teams to work on, they don't want to care about that. They shouldn't have to care about this thing.” And that sort of stuff.So, I ended up being this human router are sometimes where platform teams will say, “Do you know anybody who's doing this, who's using this thing?” Or finding one app team and say, “You should talk to that group over there because they are also doing the same thing, or they're struggling with the same thing, and you should collaborate.” Or, “They have solved this problem.” Because I don't know every single programming language we use, I don't know all of the frameworks, but I know who I asked for Python questions, and I will send teams to that person. And part of that, then, as I started doing this community work was actually building community.One of the great successes was, we have a Slack channel called ‘Cloud Adoption.' And that was the place where everybody goes to ask their questions about how do I do this thing to put something on Cloud Foundry, put it on Kubernetes? How do I do this? I don't understand. And that was sometimes my whole day was just going onto that Slack channel, answering questions, and being very helpful and trying to document things, trying to get a feel for what people were doing.It was my whole day, sometimes. It took a while to get used to that was actually, like, a successful day coming from a developer background. I'm used to building things, so I feel like success because I built something I can show you, that I did this today. And then I'd have days where I talked to a bunch of people and I don't have anything I can show you. That was, like, the hard part of taking on this role.But one of the big successes was we built this community where it wasn't just me. Other people who wanted to help people, who were just developers on different dev teams, they'd see me ask questions or answer questions, and they would then know the answers and they'd chime in. And as I started being tasked with more and more other activities, I would then get to go—I'd come back to Slack and see oh, there's a bunch of questions. Oh, it turns out, people are able to help themselves. And that was—like that's success from that standpoint of building community.And now that I've done that a couple times with Tech Talks, with some of the developer experience work, some of the cloud adoption work, I get asked internally how do you build community when we're starting up new communities around things like Site Reliability Engineering. How are we going to do that? So, I get—and that feels weird, but that's one of the things that I have been doing now. And as—like, this is a gigantic role because of all of the scope. I can touch anything with anyone in cloud.One of the scope things with the role, but also with the bank is not only do we have all these tech stacks, but we also have this really, really diverse set of technical acumen, where you have people who are experts already on Kubernetes. They will succeed no matter what I do. They'll figure it out because they're that type of personality, they're going to find all the information. If anything, some of the restrictions that we put in place to manage our environments and secure them because of the risk requirements and compliance requirements of being a regulated bank, those will get in the way. Sometimes I'm explaining why those things are there. Sometimes I'm agreeing with people. “Yeah, it sucks. I don't want to have to do this.”But at the same time, you'll have people who they just want to come in, write their code, go home. They don't want to think about technology other than that. They're not going to go and learn things on their own necessarily. And that's not the end of the world. As strange as that sounds to people who are the personality to be constantly learning and constantly getting into everything and tinkering, like, that's me too, but you still need people to keep the lights on, to do all of the other work as well. And people who are happy just doing that, that's also valuable.Because if I was in that role, I would not be happy. And someone who is happy, like, this is good for the overall organization. But the things that they need to learn, the things they need explained to them, the help they need for success is different. So, that's one of the challenges is figuring out how do you address all of those customers? And sometimes even the answer for those customers is—and this is one of the things about my role—it's like the definition is customer success.If the application you're trying to put on cloud should not go on cloud, it is my job to tell you not to put it on cloud. It is not my job to put you on cloud. I want you to succeed, not just to get there. I can get your thing on the cloud in an afternoon, probably, but if I then walk away and it breaks, like, you don't know what to do. So, a lot of the things around how do we teach people to self-serve, how do we make our internal systems more self-serve, those are kind of the things that I look at now.How do I manage my own time because the scope is so big? It's like, I need to figure out where I'm not moving a thousand things forward an inch, but I'm moving things to their completion. And I am learning to, while not managing people, still delegate and work with the community, work with the broader cloud platform group around how do I let go and help other people do things?Jason: So, you mentioned something in there that I think is really interesting, right, the goal of helping people get to completion, right? And I think that's such an interesting thing because I think as—in that advocacy role, there's often a notion of just, like, I'm going to help you get unstuck and then you can keep going, without a clear idea of where they're ultimately heading. And that kind of ties back into something that you said earlier about starting out as a developer where you build things and you kind of just, like, set it free, [laugh] and you don't think about, you know, that day two, sort of, operations, the maintenance, the ongoing kind of stuff. So, I'm curious, as you've progressed in your career, as you've gotten more wisdom from helping people out, what does that look like when you're helping people get to completion, also with the mindset of this is an application that's going to be running for quite some time. Even in the short term, you know, if it's a short-term thing, but I feel like with the bank, most things probably are somewhat long-lived. How do you balance that out? How do you approach that, helping people get to done but also keeping in mind that they have to—this app has to keep living and it has to be maintained?Aaron: Yeah, a lot of it is—like, the term we use is sustainable development. And part of that is kind of removing friction, trying to get the developers to a point where they can focus on, I guess, the term that's often used in the industry is their inner loop. And it should come as no surprise, the bank often has a lot of processes that are high in friction. There's a lot of open a ticket, wait for things. This is the part that I take my conversations with dev teams, and I ask them, “What are the things that are hard? What are the things you don't like? What are the things you wish you didn't have to do or care about?”And some of this is reading between the lines when you talk to them; it's not so much interviewing them. Like, any kind of requirements gathering, usually, it's not what they say, it's what they talk about that then you look at, oh, this is the problem; how do we unstuck that problem so that people can get to where they need to be going? And this kind of informs some of my feedback to the systems we put in place, the processes we put in place around the platform, some of the tooling we look at. I really, really love the philosophy from Docker and Solomon Hykes around, “Batteries included but removable.” I want developers to have a high baseline as a starting point.And this comes partly from my experience with Cloud Foundry. Cloud Foundry has a really great out-of-the-box dev experience for lots of things where, “I just have a web app. Just run it. It's Nginx; it's some HTML pages; I don't need to know all the details. Just make it go and give me the URL.”And I want more of that for app teams where they have a high baseline of things to work with as a starting point. And kind of every organization ends up building this, where they have—like, Netflix: Netflix OSS or Twitter with Finagle—where they have, “Here's the surrounding pieces that I want to plug in that everybody gets as a starting point. And how do we provide security? How do we provide all of these pieces that are major concerns for an app team, that they have to do, we know they have to do?” Some of these are things that only start coming up when they're on the cloud and trying to provide a lot more of that for app teams so they can focus on the business stuff and only get into the weeds when they need to.Jason: As you're talking about these frameworks that, you know, having this high quality or this high baseline of tools that people can just have, right, equipping them with a nice toolbox, I'm guessing that the innersource stuff that you're working on also helps contribute to that.Aaron: Oh, immensely. And as we've gone on and as we've matured, our innersource organization, a huge part of that is other groups as well, where they're finding things that—we need this. And they'll put—it originally it was, “We built this. We'll put it into innersource.” But what you get with that is something that is very targeted and specific to their group and maybe someone else can use it, but they can't use it without bending it a little bit.And I hate bending software to fit it. That's one of the things—it's a very common thing in the corporate environment where we have our existing processes and rather than adopting the standard approach that some tool uses, we need to take it and then bend it until it fits our existing process because we don't want to change our processes. And that gets hard because you run into weird edge cases where this is doing something strange because we bent it. And it's like, well, that's not its fault at that point. As we've started doing more innersource, a lot more things have really become innersource first, where groups realize we need to solve this together.Let's start working on it together and let's design the API as a group. And API design is really, really hard. And how do we do things with shared libraries or services. And working through that as a group, we're seeing more of that, and more commonly things where, “Well, this is a thing we're going to need. We're going to start it in innersource, we'll get some people to use it and they'll be our beta customers. And we'll inform it without really specifically targeting an application and an app team's needs.”Because they're all going to have specific needs. And that's where the, like, ‘included but removable' part comes in. How do we build things extensibly where we have the general solution and you can plug in your specifics? And we're still—like, this is not an easy problem. We're still solving it, we're still working through it, we're getting better at it.A lot of it's just how can we improve day-over-day, year-over-year, to make some of these things better? Even our, like, continuous integration and delivery pipelines to our to clouds, all of these things are in constant flux and constant evolution. We're supporting multiple languages; we're supporting multiple versions of different languages; we're talking about, hey, we need to get started adopting Java 17. None of our libraries or pipelines do that yet, but we should probably get on that since it's been out for—what—almost a year? And really working on kind of decomposing some of these things where we built it for what we needed at the time, but now it feels a bit rigid. How do we pull out the pieces?One of the big pushes in the organization after the log4j CVE and things like that broad impact on the industry is we need to do a much more thorough job around software supply chain, around knowing what we have, making sure we have scans happening and everything. And that's where, like, the pipeline work comes in. I'm consulting on the pipeline stuff where I provide a lot of customer feedback; we have a team that is working on that all full time. But doing a lot of those things and trying to build for what we need, but not cut ourselves off from the broader industry, as well. Like, my nightmare situation, from a tooling standpoint, is that we restrict things, we make decisions around security, or policy or something like that, and we cut ourselves off from the broader CNCF tooling ecosystem, we can't use any of those tools. It's like, well, now we have to build something ourselves, or—which we're never going to do it as well as the external community. Or we're going to just kind of have bad processes and no one's going to be happy so figuring out all of that.Jason: Yeah. One of the things that you mentioned about staying up to speed and having those standards reminds me of, you know, similar to that previous experience that I had was, basically, I was at an org where we said that we'd like to open-source and we used open-source and that basically meant that we forked things and then made our own weird modifications to it. And that meant, like, now, it wasn't really open-source; it was like this weird, hacked thing that you had to keep maintaining and trying to keep it up to date with the latest stuff. Sounds like you're in a better spot, but I am curious, in terms of keeping up with the latest stuff, how do you do that, right? Because you mentioned that the bank, obviously a bit slower, adopting more established software, but then there's you, right, where you're out there at the forefront and you're trying to gather best practices and new technologies that you can use at the bank, how do you do that as someone that's not building with the latest, greatest stuff? How do you keep that skills and that knowledge up to date?Aaron: I try to do reading, I try to set time aside to read things like The New Stack, listen to podcasts about technologies. It's a really broad industry; there's only so much I can keep up with. This was always one of the conversations going way back where I would have the conversation with my boss around the business proposition for me going to conferences, and explaining, like, what's the cost to acquire knowledge in an organization? And while we can bring in consultants, or we can hire people in, like, when you hire new people in, they bring in their pre-existing experiences. So, if someone comes in and they know Hadoop, they can provide information and ideas around is this a good problem to solve with Hadoop? Maybe, maybe not.I don't want to bet a project on that if I don't know anything about Hadoop or Kubernetes or… like, using something like Tilt or Skaffold with my tooling. That's one of the things I got from going to conferences, and I actually need to set more time aside to watch the videos now that everything's virtual. Like, not having that dedicated week is a problem where I'm just disconnected and I'm not dealing with anything. When you're at work, even if KubeCon's going on or Microsoft Build, I'm still doing my day-to-day, I'm getting Slack messages, and I'm not feeling like I can just ignore people. I should probably block out more time, but part of how I stay up to date with it.It's really doing a lot of that reading and research, doing conversations like this, like, the DX Buzz that we invited you to where… I explained that event—it's adjacent to internal speakers—I explained that as I was had a backlog of videos from conferences I was not watching, and secretly if I make everybody else come to lunch with me to watch these videos, I have to watch the video because I'm hosting the session to discuss it, and now I will at least watch one a month. And that's turned out to be a really successful thing internally within the organization to spread knowledge, to have conversations with people. And the other part I do, especially on the tooling side, is I still build stuff. As much as, like, I don't code nearly as much as I used to, I bring an application developer perspective, but I'm not writing code every day anymore.Which I always said was going to be the thing that would make me miserable. It's not. I still think about it, and when I do get to write code, I'm always looking for how can I improve this setup? How can I use this tool? Can I try it out? Is this better? Is this smoother for me so I'm not worrying about this thing?And then spreading that information more broadly within the developer experience group, our DevOps teams, our platform teams, talking to those teams about the things that they use. Like, we use Argo CD within one group and I haven't touched it much, but I know they've got lots of expertise, so talking to them. “How do you use this? How is this good for me? How do I make this work? How can I use it, too?”Jason: I think it's been an incredible, [laugh] as you've been chatting, there are so many different tools and technologies that you've mentioned having used or being used at the bank. Which is both—it's interesting as a, like, there's so much going on in the bank; how do you manage it all? But it's also super interesting, I think, because it shows that there's a lot of interest in just finding the right solutions and finding the right tools, and not really being super-strongly married to one particular tool or one set way to do things, which I think is pretty cool. We're coming up towards the end of our time here, so I did want to ask you, before we sign off, Aaron, do you have anything that you'd like to plug, anything you want to promote?Aaron: Yeah, the Cloud Program is hiring a ton. There's lots of job openings on all of our platform teams. There's probably job openings on my Cloud Adoption Team. So, if you think the bank sounds interesting—the bank is very stable; that's always one of the nice things—but the bank… the thing about the bank, I originally joined the bank saying, “Oh, I'll be here two years, and I'll get bored and I'll leave,” and now it's been 12 years and I'm still at the bank. Because I mentioned, like, that scope and scale of the organization, there's always something interesting happening somewhere.So, if you're interested in cloud platform stuff, we've got a huge cloud platform. If you're in—like, you want to do machine-learning, we've got an entire organization. It should come as no surprise, we have lots of data at a bank, and there's a whole organization for all sorts of different things with machine-learning, deep learning, data analytics, big data, stuff like that. Like, if you think that's interesting, and even if you're not specifically in Toronto, Canada, you can probably find an interesting role within the organization if that's something that turns your crank.Jason: Awesome. We'll post links to everything that we've mentioned, which is a ton. But go check us out, gremlin.com/podcast is where you can find the show note for this episode, and we'll have links to everything. Aaron, thank you so much for joining us. It's been a pleasure to have you.Aaron: Thanks so much for having me, Jason. I'm so happy that we got to do this.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

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Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 62:46


KBall, Ali & Nick explore a new type of segment: “WTFJS” talking about wild and wooly “it's not a bug it's a feature” examples in the JavaScript language. They also dive into code maintainability, and end by discussing the whiplash shift in the tech industry from “hottest market for engineers in history” to “oh noes everything is stopping!”

JS Party
WTF, JS?

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 62:46


KBall, Ali & Nick explore a new type of segment: “WTFJS” talking about wild and wooly “it's not a bug it's a feature” examples in the JavaScript language. They also dive into code maintainability, and end by discussing the whiplash shift in the tech industry from “hottest market for engineers in history” to “oh noes everything is stopping!”

JS Party
Live from Remix Conf!

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 76:57


Ali & Divya recorded seven (!) awesome conversations all about Remix and the web ecosystem live on-stage at the first-ever Remix Conf after-party!

Changelog Master Feed
Live from Remix Conf! (JS Party #228)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 76:57


Ali & Divya recorded seven (!) awesome conversations all about Remix and the web ecosystem live on-stage at the first-ever Remix Conf after-party!

Next to Madison
CEO/Founder of Presearch - The new search engine that pays you to do your online searches & protects your privacy

Next to Madison

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 56:13


On this episode I am joined by the founder and CEO of Presearch, a new search engine that pays you to do your online searches through their native token PRE. Instead of using Google and other search engines that are selling your data without your knowledge, Presearch keeps your data protected and pays you to use it. You can also run a node to earn more tokens. Create a nice passive income stream just by using this platform vs. Google.

That's my JAMstack
S3E5 - Facundo Giuliani on end-user experiences, NextJS, and Storyblok

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 28:42


Quick show notes Our Guest: Facundo Giuliani (Twitter) What he'd like for you to see: His musical Jam: The Meters Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:15 Welcome back to yet another episode of That's My Jamstack, the podcast where we ask the ever important question, what is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson. And this week we had the amazing Facundo Giuliani. Facundo do is a developer relations engineer at story block, and an avid presenter and author about all things Jamstack. Bryan Robinson 0:46 All right, Facundo. Well, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. Facundo Giuliani 0:49 Thank you. Thank you very much for the invitation and the opportunity. Awesome. So Bryan Robinson 0:53 tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun? Facundo Giuliani 0:57 Cool. So Well, I started working as a developer when I was 18. While I was studying at college, because I finished high school on on a school that had a career that was like programming oriented, let's say so I, I learned how to program during the high school, I started to work with all programming languages that people don't know what they are about, like Visual Basic six, or those things that are like, I mean, I talk to people that this 20 years old, and they look at me, like what are you talking about? Right. Bryan Robinson 1:38 But luckily, I at least dabbled in those super early on. So I'm with you. That's fine. Facundo Giuliani 1:43 Okay, okay. So, um, yeah, I mean, I started working with Visual Basic seats. After that, while I was studying, I was also working as a developer, it was like, almost 1414 years, probably that I worked as a developer. And during the last couple of years, after working on on different companies on different positions, but all of them mainly related to the development, like, full stack back and, and etc. I started to, to be more involved with the community started to generate content to share starting to talk to other people and and meet other people. And I really enjoyed doing doing that. I did that during my free time. During these last couple of years, like after work, I started to generate content, engage with the community, like being involved in a Ambassadors Program in in different organizations and companies. And this opening a new door for me, because I started to learn about developer relations, developer advocacy, developer experience, some terms that probably I've read in the past, but I didn't know what they were about. And, and I started to get interested on that, like I, I mean, I felt like I was enjoying more the fact of generating content, or sharing content with the community, or communicating with the community, I really like to talk to other people. And I enjoy talking. And I felt like I was enjoying more doing that, instead of doing my daily job of developer, let's say, I mean, it's not that I don't like to, to develop, but I was enjoying more generating content, sharing content with the community engaging with other people. And well, I took like this, I made a decision, I started to read about developer relations and etc. I saw this opportunity on serverless, that they were looking for a developer relations engineer, I applied for the, for the job, and I was selected. I mean, I had a portfolio because in the past, I presented some talks, or events or conferences, I had some articles that I wrote before applying for the for the job, working with different technologies, and etc. So that was my, my presentation letter, let's say, and well, I had the chance to apply and to be and to be accepted for the position, let's say. And since June, I'm working as a developer relations engineer at serverless, my first developer relations position and experience, and I'm really enjoying it. So that's a little bit about me. Bryan Robinson 4:38 Sure, yeah. So So you're a developer relations engineer at storyblocks. So you're doing all that kind of content creation, education, talking with community there. Are you still doing that in your spare time? Are you actually able to like branch out and do other things now that you don't have to do that yet to your day job? Facundo Giuliani 4:56 Well, that's a good point. Because I mean, I did it Probably, I'm doing it but just a little bit like not so much. Because the cool part about being a developer relations engineer is that I found that that it was possible to do what I wanted to do or what I was enjoying, while doing it on my on working time, right, I mean, during the day, instead of using my free time to generate the content to do that, probably use my free time to set my mind free, right? That I mean, I'm not complaining, because I really enjoy doing that. And I enjoyed that at that moment when I was doing it after work. But I felt like it was it was cool to to enter to a company and start doing this during I mean, like, my, the tasks that I'm doing in my position are related to that. So I can use my free time on that on other things. So I enjoy doing that. But yeah, I'm trying to take the free time for other projects, probably not related to to developer relations or engaging with the community. I'm probably not even related to programming developer or technology Bryan Robinson 6:15 at all. What's your favorite thing to spend time on outside of development? Facundo Giuliani 6:19 Well, I really like I mean, I was I mean spending more time outside, I moved to a house, I was living in an apartment and I have a house with a backyard. So I'm trying to spend time there or I don't know walking around the neighborhood, I live in more than a situs Argentina, in the suburbs of the city, not in the city center. And the place where I live is like a calm neighborhood with a lot of trees and etc. So like when I, when I finished my, my, my day after working, I like to go and walk around the neighborhood and etc. but also talking with friends. So there are other projects like personal project related to, to their staff playing, playing sports with friends. I'm trying to do several activities, like to get out of my house. I mean, I enjoy being on my house with Mr. Gary Burger, and etc. But I also enjoy seeing other people spending time with other people. And these last couple of years were like We spent a lot of time inside our houses. So spending time like, I don't know, keep grabbing some fresh air and talking to other people is something that I enjoy doing. And I try to do as possible. Bryan Robinson 7:33 Awesome. I think there's something that we all do a little bit more of, especially in the past couple of years. Yeah. So. So moving on to talk about the Jamstack a little bit. You have a history in kind of full stack development, back end development, what was your entry point into the Jamstack, and static sites and that sort of thing. Cool. Facundo Giuliani 7:52 So Well, in my previous job, I mean, my last job before being a developer relations engineer, I was working mostly as a back end developer, I was working with Microsoft technologies like ASP, dotnet, dotnet, core and etc. But I, I mean, I felt like I was missing the the opportunity of learning about probably newer products or different products, let's say related to the front end. And when I started to read about the static site generators, the headless CMS is that I mean, for the products that we did in my previous job, I was not able to apply these technologies on them. So I was like, not super aware of all this new approach of creating study sites. And I started to read about the Jamstack different articles, watching different talks, or Devens, at conferences, and etc. And I started to learn about that and to learn about the approach. I really enjoyed that because at a certain point, as I said, I am I mean, I'm working as a developer for since I was 18. But before that, I was creating websites at home when I was even younger, with with products that again, they don't exist anymore, like Microsoft front page, or Macromedia Dreamweaver. And what you did in the past with Microsoft from page was like creating your own website. And when I was said, I mean, when I was a teenager, or probably even younger, I really enjoyed doing that. Because at that time, internet was not what it is now, right? I mean, at the beginning of this of the 2000 years, or the or the or the end of the 90s Probably, internet was like the super new things and being able to create your own web page was like, Man, this is NASA technology, right? So I tried to create like websites related to anything related to my friends related to us. Searching a football club or related to I don't know, my different interested interest is that I had in that moment. And and what I was doing at that moment were static sites. I mean, they had movement. They have awful MIDI sounds in the background, because that was so yeah, I mean, that was like any any site at that moment, that sound. So that is terrible, I think now about that. And he's like, Man, why do you need to listen to music while we're browsing? A web page was terrible. But well, it's what we did. Yes, exactly, exactly. So I enjoyed doing that. But the thing is that they had dynamism, let's say, or movement, or etc. But they were static. So while when, when I started to read about the new approach of having studied websites, I felt like, I mean, the Navy sidebar, but we are again, doing the same that what that what I did was when I was a young teenager, or probably pretty teenager, I don't know, how is it called the the concert when you are 12 years old, or 13 years old pro. But, I mean, I started to feel to feel like excited with this concept. And I started to read about different study site generators, like neck JS Gods B, I started to read about React, probably get more involved with React, and etc. And on the other hand, all the concepts that you have avoidable to generate the content at build time, ahead of the people visiting your website, I mean, the process of generating static assets, but not manually, right, not using Microsoft front page like we did at that time. So I mean, I felt that that was super fun. Because using new technologies, you were able to do something that probably reminded me to what I used to do when I started creating web pages. So I think that that was the first step that I took to to enter to the Jamstack work, let's say, Bryan Robinson 12:07 I like that concept of like, this is kind of how we did things in the late 90s. And now we do it. We have a similar output. But it's so much easier to like it just Yes, I'm not I'm not writing and copying and pasting 15 different HTML pages. I just, it generates for me, it's an amazing feeling to kind of see that come out. Yeah, exactly. Facundo Giuliani 12:28 I'm not only that, I mean, when you are using a study site generator, when you like, start a new project with the boilerplate that they offer you, you have a site up and running, and you run just like three comments in the console, or probably less. And that's all I mean, that's awesome. For me, the web development is evolving in, like, in all directions to make the work easier for the developers and to have the products up and running as fast as possible. And that's something that for me, it's awesome. Bryan Robinson 13:01 Yeah, and let's, let's try a whole bunch of stuff and like work closely with clients and with stakeholders and all that to, like, realize what they're looking for. And then we can make it better. Like we can do something simple and then add to it and add to it and add to it. I think that's a really powerful pattern that we get to have. Facundo Giuliani 13:18 Yes, yes, I agree. I mean, a lot of technologies appear during the last year, some being able to use these technologies, but also offering a great experience to the final users or the content editors. It's something pretty, pretty cool. I mean, I see that all the pieces are, like joining to offer a good experience, not only to the developers, but also to the people that is using your product on beseeching the websites that you create, right, Bryan Robinson 13:46 exactly. Yeah. Theoretically, if we can do things easier and simpler, we can pass on a whole bunch of really positive things to those end users. Facundo Giuliani 13:55 Yes, yes, I agree. Totally agree. So. Bryan Robinson 13:58 So you're at story block now. So how are you using? I mean, sorry, block is a headless CMS. So it's a very Jamstack company, how are you using Jamstack philosophies and kind of your day to day at story block. Facundo Giuliani 14:10 So what we were we tried to offer to the, to the customers to the users is that having a headless CMS is a way of generating faster websites, using cool technologies and cool frameworks, probably, but also offering a good experience not only to the end user, but also to the content editors, the Jamstack, we see that we have a lot of products available to create static sites, or offer great experiences and having like, sites up I mean, up and running that are working great. But the thing is what happens when we need to generate the content that is going to be exposed in our static sites, right? So story block has this real time visual editor, which I think it's probably the best feature that serverless is offering. Because there is this bridge that connects the the admin panel that Starbuck offers to generate the content with the front end of your application. And well, you can use it with environments that are already deployed, like your testing environment, or staging or production. But you can also connect that to your local host. And using like the preview mode of the different static site generators, you can also offer an experience to the content editors to see how the content is going to look like before it's deployed or published. So in that case, connecting the story blog application or the server admin panel to the front end of your application using the storybook bridge, you're offering the possibility of creating an experience very similar to a page builder, but not being tied to the styles or the components or their structure that the Page Builder probably feeds or probably sets for the developers that are going to use it. So you are able to create the front end and the code and the logic that you prefer for your application connecting to a headless CMS that is allowing the users to see that page and to like, create a unexperienced very similar to editing that page on the fly, and see how the content is going to look like. So I think that we are focused on on different technologies, frameworks, and tools, probably I will I work more with Node js, and react. And what we try to do is to get advantage of the static site generation process of these frameworks to generate static assets, but also work with a preview mode of these frameworks to connect to the headless CMS and offer the content editor the possibility of exactly creating the continent scene, the content that is going to be Publish when the build process run and generate the static Bryan Robinson 17:14 assets. Exactly. And that build process sometimes can be a minute or two. And so like if you're trying to iterate on content, and you're having to save, wait for the build, preview it and then preview it live, like snap previewing more, it's just a view that can really slow you down. Oh, no, I wrote one word too long. It's gonna break onto a line at the screen sizes. Like no, just use the Preview mode, use that visual editor to make sure it's exactly what you want it to be. It's kind of it's the best of both worlds kind of solution. Right? Facundo Giuliani 17:42 Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And not only that, I mean, talking about Nigeria, in particular, the framework offers cool features like incremental static regeneration, where you don't really need to generate the the run a build process for the complete site to generate probably only one page or two, apply the changes to only one page in your website, we can discuss about if using incremental study regeneration is really Jamstack or not, because you are breaking the atomic bill and etc. But you have the possibilities there, you can use it or not take it or leave it. Bryan Robinson 18:19 I actually like that that like thought process of I might not be Jamstack anymore. But it I mean, at the core, even though you lose the atomic deploy, you're still hosting the majority of it from the CDN, it's still much the majority of it's still pre built HTML, and you're updating pieces. It's a rehydration thing, which I I would say arguably, is still plenty within the idea of the Jamstack. I think it's it's a big umbrella. We can fit everyone underneath it, I think. Facundo Giuliani 18:46 Yeah, totally. I in fact, I think that, well, probably the concept of the Jamstack was originated by JavaScript API's and markup. But the thing is, I feel like the idea is always trying to generate the more static content that we can as possible at build time. And not, I mean, not having dynamic content to be generated whenever a user visits our website, right? Why are we Why will we generate content, that will be the same for probably all the users that will visit our web application or a lot of them, if we can do that ahead of time, and offering a better and faster experience to the user right there. Exactly. Bryan Robinson 19:27 And then just augmenting, augmenting is always the best way to go adding little bits of extras for for when you have the ability to do it. And it matters like what what, what pieces of content actually have to be dynamic. And let's make sure those are dynamic and keep everything else quick and secure, you know, as static as possible. Exactly. So we've talked about story block we've talked about next. Jas, we've talked a little bit about incremental static regeneration and whether or not that's Jamstack or not, what would you say is kind of your jam in the Jamstack? What's your fate? Have a product maybe story block or or framework or philosophy, what makes you love the Jamstack. So? Facundo Giuliani 20:06 Well before joining storybook, I was a user of a storybook, I've used terbuka and other headless CMS. So I mean, probably I'm biased on my feature now is like, but I really think that cerebral is a great product to generate content, probably. I mean, we as developers are used to work with things that are not super how to say that friendly for the users, or were used to work with code and etc. But having the possibility of giving the people that there is not super full into the technology, the possibility of creating the content and and exposing the content that they want to share. I think it's very, very cool. And having a visual editor to do that. I think he's pretty cool, too. So I think that sort of look is very, very good. I'm kind of like, I use NET Jas a lot. And I feel like when the the new versions that they released, I mean, version after version, I see that they create really cool things. So I will say that I really enjoy using Node js with with Node js 12. And all the announcement that they did was like, the possibilities that are appearing with these new features. And with these new products is really, really cool. I mean, enjoying, like the edge functions or the support for React 18 with the React server components, different features, like I think that are opening new doors or new windows for other possibilities to, again, what I think I mean, what I think it's important from the Jamstack, that is offering not only a good developer experience, which they are with the product, but also offering a great experience to the final user. So if I can offer a website that is working faster and better for the final user, I'm getting the advantages. So I will take it. Bryan Robinson 22:08 And the great thing on like next and again, like the the big surge of next Jas, in the past year and a half, two years. They're bringing so many new things to table. I mean, next next 12 is great. But we've talked about ISR, like that was pioneered in next and like all these different patterns that are coming out, are coming from the next open source team, the Vercel. Team, the community all around that. I think it's it's moving the ecosystem at a much faster pace than it did previously. I love to see that. Facundo Giuliani 22:40 Yeah, I agree. I totally agree. I mean, the the opportunities that are appearing, and yes, as you said, like an starting point, or a pioneer point of saying, hey, why don't we take a look at this possibility and discussing it and offering that to the developers. Bryan Robinson 23:00 I think it's also interesting, you know, we talked about ISR, maybe not being Jamstack. And I think the cool thing with next is the next doesn't care. Like they they look at it, and they say, Well, you can be completely Jamstack and just use, you know, static props and all that good stuff and render HTML and and send that down for the CDN. But you can use these other things, too. And whether or not that's Jamstack. It's still a nice website. And it's still like meeting all the user needs. So let's not even talk about it. Let's just have these features built in. Facundo Giuliani 23:30 Yeah, that's true. That's, I mean, I love the Jamstack. I like the approach. I enjoyed using it. Sometimes we have to think what's better for the users and for the developers, and probably not stick to too much to the theory like, Oh, I'm moving from the Jamstack. Like, what I was going to say millimeter but if the United State people is listening to me, they probably won't get what measure unit I'm using. But what I mean is that barely moving from the borders of the Jamstack, or the bounds of the Jamstack is not that bad. I mean, the final idea or the final goal is to offer a great experience not only to the final user, but also to the developer. So you have to think about that Bryan Robinson 24:15 make a good app or a good website with the best developer experience possible. Facundo Giuliani 24:20 Exactly. Bryan Robinson 24:21 All right. Well, let's let's do a kind of a hard pivot here and ask maybe the toughest question on the show, which is what's your actual jam right now? What what are you listening to what musician or album is really getting you going right now? Facundo Giuliani 24:33 I mean, I really enjoy listening to music. I'm listening to music all the time. Like, what I found out lately was that if I listen to music that they have like a singer and they are singing a lyric. I can't focus on the work that I'm doing. I don't know if that happened to me in the last time or not. I really don't understand because I really enjoy listening to music and I Listen, a lot of music of different genres, so of different types and etc. So while I was working or probably probably because with this developer relations engineer position, I need to focus more on writing, or I don't know speaking or generating content, I'm probably not doing some automatic thing, things, let's say, I need to focus more on the work and not not too much on the on the lyrics that I'm listening to. So what I what I was listening this last time was probably more like Lo Fi setlist in the background, I live Lo Fi music, and I enjoy listening to that while I'm working. But I also was listening to the meters, which is a band from I don't know, if they are from New Orleans, I really don't remember. But they did in the in the 70s. Music like it was it is funk music, but without singing, or at least, not all of the of the songs have had lyrics. I mean, the most of them are music only. And I enjoy that because they have this groove and this kind of music that I really like. And with the headphones with the, with the boost of the bass there is like it's a good experience while working. So I'm really enjoying that. Bryan Robinson 26:22 Awesome. Yeah, I totally like Lo Fi is definitely something that I usually have on in the background while I'm doing some writing or working through a hard code problem. So I get that. And I hadn't heard the beaters, which is surprising. So I'm going to check them out. And I could I could use some fun in my ears as well. Yeah, sure, sure. All right. So anything that you're doing that you would like to promote out to the Jamstack community as a whole, Unknown Speaker 26:45 no, I encourage the people to if they didn't try the Jamstack to take this step and to see I mean, probably it's a good experience. And it's very fun. I enjoy doing that. So I recommend that. But if if any person wants to talk about the Jamstack, front end development or anything, they will find me on Twitter, I'm while I'm FacundoGiuliani, my my Twitter handle is @facundozurdo. With so you can talk to me and we can discuss about the topic that you prefer. I am constantly like presenting talks at events or conferences. Well, I mean, all of them virtual now but but I will I have the hope that I will be in person in in in person, probably local meetup or conference soon. So we can probably meet in person in any country, some with with the people. But yeah, I mean, if you go to Twitter, and you talk to me, you will see I have my personal website where I announced the the events where I will be part of and I will be speaking Bryan Robinson 27:53 amazing. All right, cool. Well, thank you so much for being on the show with us today. I hope you keep doing amazing things at storyblocks and beyond. Facundo Giuliani 27:59 Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you for the invitation again. Bryan Robinson 28:03 We'll see you around. Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoyed the podcast, be sure to leave a review, rating, Star heart favorite, whatever it is, and your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Transcribed by https://otter.ai Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast
#733: Node.js Development Services

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 5:22


Node.js was first introduced in 2009 at the annual European JSConf. It's based on Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine and can be utilized in a variety of environments.  Every major release is actively maintained for at least 18 months. The platform works just as well for smaller businesses and ventures as it does for Fortune 500 companies.  Dev.co provides Node.js planning, development, and deployment that is unrivaled in the industry. We use the top technologies in the industry and employ rigorous testing and continual optimization. More info about node.js development services:    https://dev.co/node-js/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

CodeNewbie
S20:E4 - How to transition from the arts into a career in tech (Jessica Wilkins)

CodeNewbie

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 37:25


In this episode, we talk about how to transition from the arts into a career in tech, with Jessica Wilkins, software developer at This Dot Labs, technical writer at Free Code Camp, and former professional classical musician. Show Links DevDiscuss (sponsor) DevNews (sponsor) Cockroach Labs (sponsor) New Relic (sponsor) Porkbun (sponsor) Stellar (sponsor) Bright Data (sponsor) This Dot Labs Black Excellence Music Project HTML CSS JavaScript React Tailwind CSS edX Udemy freeCodeCamp How freeCodeCamp has evolved over time CS50: Introduction to Computer Science What it's like to be in a computer science class Node.js Express

JS Party
JS logging & error handling

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 71:54


Nick and Chris welcome back Mik and Bret to discuss logging and error handling in Node and JavaScript and the subtleties and intricacies that extend far beyond console.log!

Changelog Master Feed
JS logging & error handling (JS Party #227)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 71:54


Nick and Chris welcome back Mik and Bret to discuss logging and error handling in Node and JavaScript and the subtleties and intricacies that extend far beyond console.log!

The Good Morning Crypto Show
E69 | INSANE BITCOIN BEAR TRAP, Ripple IPO Soon, Metaverse vs. Internet

The Good Morning Crypto Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 59:27


Today on Good Morning Crypto…  We will be discussing… JP Morgan sees significant upside for Bitcoin with a long term price target well above 6 figures, while Ted Cruz shares our warrior mindset stating he DCA into Bitcoin on a weekly basis.   According to the WEF, More than two thirds of participants surveyed are bullish on the metaverse, we break down why the shift from 2D to 3D is inevitable.  Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse says they are waiting for “certainty and clarity” from the SEC, with the anticipation Ripple will IPO after the lawsuit.  And for all our Node investors out there, we bring a strong block update from our industry specialist. //// T I M E C O D E S // Linqto https://www.linqto.com/?cjevent=b65ecbbec46011ec81b91b3a0a1c0e10 //// T H E 3 T W A R R I O R A C A D E M Y 3t Warrior Academy: https://www.3twarrioracademy.com https://www.3twarrior.com Free Discord: https://3twarrior.com/discord49541345 //// F O L L O W T H E T E A M // Official Twitter Account Twitter: https://twitter.com/3tGMCrypto // Abs  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Abs3t/  // Mario | Node Defender https://linktr.ee/nodedefender Twitter: https://twitter.com/NodeDefender Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCnld-Xvam562HFQDOIBwymw Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/NodeDefender/ // Johnny Krypto https://linktr.ee/johnnykrypto Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnnyKrypto00 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm-qyQNf1rnUaw6u20mKCVw // Gonzo Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobDog406 // Selman Twitter: https://twitter.com/geeinvesting YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/GeeInvesting // NFTtones: https://linktr.ee/NFTtones // Billy Twitter: https://twitter.com/WadkinsBilly TikTok: @Homeless2Humbled Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/homeless2humbled_ //// #Crypto #CryptoNews #Bitcoin #BTC #Ethereum #ETH #XRP #CryptoCurrency #Finance #Talkshow #NewsShow #money #finance #Metaverse Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices