Podcast appearances and mentions of Jim Tressel

American college football coach

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Jim Tressel

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Best podcasts about Jim Tressel

Latest podcast episodes about Jim Tressel

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com
Jim Tressel, rivalry coach; transfer cornerbacks; and more suggestions Ohio State can use to beat Michigan

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 96:46


On this Wednesday Buckeye Talk, the call went out to Ohio State text subscribers to send in concrete suggestions that Ohio State could try to help the Buckeyes prepare for Michigan next season. From adding players to changing assistants to a different offensive focus to play calling responsibilities, Doug Lesmerises, Nathan Baird and Stephen Means ran through about 15 of the best and most interesting suggestions that were sent in. Thanks for listening to Buckeye Talk. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MI/NJ/PA/TN/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/KS/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/KS/LA(select parishes)/MI/NH/NJ/ NY/OR/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. $200 in Free bets: New customers only. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 bet. $200 issued as eight (8) $25 free bets. Bet must win. Ends 11/20/23 @ 11:59pm ET. Stepped Up SGP: 1 Token issued per eligible game. Opt in req. Min $1 bet. Max bet limits apply. Min. 3-leg. Each leg min. -300 odds, total bet +100 odds or longer. 10+ leg req. for 100% boost. Ends 1/8/23 @ 8pm ET. See eligibility & terms at sportsbook.draftkings.com/footballterms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Carlin
Hour 2: Thanksgiving Preview

Carlin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 38:13


Jim Tressel, Former Ohio State coach joins the show to talk about the upcoming game between Ohio State and Michigan. They then play Can he or Canty, and then preview the Thanksgiving day slate of games Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chiney & Golic Jr.
Hour 2: Thanksgiving Preview

Chiney & Golic Jr.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 38:13


Jim Tressel, Former Ohio State coach joins the show to talk about the upcoming game between Ohio State and Michigan. They then play Can he or Canty, and then preview the Thanksgiving day slate of games Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bucknuts Morning 5
The good, bad for Buckeyes heading into November

Bucknuts Morning 5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 25:24


"November's for contenders" is the phrase many college football coaches like to use -- Jim Tressel said it quite often -- and the aforementioned month begins tomorrow. What do we like about this Ohio State team heading into the final month of the regular season? What are some concerns? Patrick Murphy and Dave Biddle discuss that and much more on the Monday 5ish. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Buckeye Xtra RAW Podcast
What is Jim Tressel's favorite memory of Ohio Stadium?

Buckeye Xtra RAW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 1:14


As Ohio State football celebrates the 100th anniversary of Ohio Stadium, we've asked several past Buckeye greats for their favorite memories of playing there. Here is what former coach Jim Tressel recalls of his days at the Horseshoe. 

Willets Pod
Not A Football Podcast 5: Sentient Sweater Vest

Willets Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 49:54


By Keelin BillueThis week's episode of Not A Football Podcast is brought to you by Lane's Secret. Add some Juice to your wardrobe with looks that will never leave you feeling like you've been fired and stranded at the airport. Turn your closet into a transfer portal to style. Lane's Secret* Why Do We Talk About Lane So Much?: It's getting a little weird honestly. When are we going to stop talking about Lane? People are wondering.* Alabama Takes The Wheel: Georgia narrowly avoided an upset by unranked Missouri which puts Alabama a bit more firmly in the top spot. Does this really matter? Maybe?* The Curse of Kansas Being 5-0: Grace points out that Kansas is 5-0 for the first time since 2009. Coincidentally, the (OR NOT?) the last time the Yankees won the World Series. Some magic may be afoot, but for the sake of non-Yankees fans everywhere, I sure hope not.* Utilizing the Transfer Portal: Former Nebraska QB Adrian Martinez (22 years old) played at Nebraska for four years before transferring to Kansas State, who are now 4-1 overall and in second place in the Big 12. This is just one case that makes use of the transfer portal interesting as players have more agency in their college football journey. What responsibility do players and schools have in holding up their end of the deal?* Oklahoma is in Sad Town: Oklahoma is currently 3-2 overall and 0-2 in conference games. They may have a chance next weekend as they take on Texas, who are also 3-2 but 1-1 in conference games. No matter who wins, someone is going to be in Really Sad Town after that game.* Is UConn Good?: Okay, maybe UConn is not good, but they are maybe competent with a 2-4 overall record (2-1 at home). They are in fourth place out of the independents, right under Notre Dame. How the tables have turned!* Is Iowa a PsyOp? Is it Performance Art?: Britt asks what we are all wondering. What exactly is Iowa? Iowa lost to Michigan, 27-14, last weekend and will face Illinois next weekend, where we expect more of the same.* Nick Saban Hates Dogs, Otters, and Puppies: Please don't sue us for libel and/or slander. This is theoretical, but it really makes you think, right?* Ohio State's Boring Cult of Personality Thing: Urban Meyer, Jim Tressel, and Woody Hayes are just a few vile henchmen that are part of Ohio State's continuous cult of personality. Britt hangs the title on this episode with a beautiful three-word phrase. If you listen to nothing else, tune in for that.* *dings dinner bell* IT'S BETTIN' TIME: Pony up! This week we are betting on Kansas (vs. TCU), Tennessee (vs. LSU), Texas (vs. Oklahoma), and Purdue (vs. Maryland). Jesse shares that he has made money. I think he should give me a cut of that since I was super confident and bold about the Falcons winning against the Browns last week. The bankroll stands at $63.92.Join us next week to see if Alabama stays in control, we prepare for Michigan (4) taking on Penn State (10), and LANE LANE LANE. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit willetspen.substack.com/subscribe

Chasing Edges
Eric Lichter | Speed & Performance Coach: Don't Plow a Field with a Ferrari, Movement before Weights, Speed Training Wisdom, Less Can Be More, Optimal Output & Lose the Ego.

Chasing Edges

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 68:45


Eric is a Speed and Performance Enhancement Coach at Plus 2 University in Columbus, Ohio, where he is a co-founder/owner.  He built his reputation in the private sector as a top speed and performance enhancement coach preparing both NFL and NBA draft hopefuls. Eric has trained 2 Heisman Trophy winners and 30 First-Round Draft Picks in the NFL & NBA including LeBron James, Nene, Tedd Ginn Jr., Donte Whitner, Chris “Beanie” Wells, and many other notable clients. Multiple athletes who trained under Eric's speed programs have clocked in 4.3s in the 40-yard dash at the NFL combine. In 2006, Eric left the private sector in went into collegiate athletics where he served as the Director of Football Performance at The Ohio State University under Jim Tressel and was a part of 5 Big Ten Championships, 5 wins over Michigan, 2 National Title game appearances.On the podcast, Eric talks all things speed and testing preparation.  He goes into detail on how to approach volume and intensity, as well as how to properly assess athletes.  He elaborates on how movement and speed come first, then using the weight room to enhance those abilities. Eric differentiates what separates top track and NFL athletes from the rest. Then goes on to approach the eternal question in performance, what's enough? And talks on how he uses tech and science to navigate that world of performance.  He finishes out the podcast with a story about one of his most recent clients, Kobe Bryant (Seahawks) and his advice to young coaches and coaches in the industry. Hope you enjoy!!IG= @ericlichter & @plus2universityWebsite: Plus2-u.com15:50 Max effort, go do crossfit, track rewards max output32:58 Conditioning, minimum effective dose*34:00 DK Metcalf running down Buddah Baker, 1mph difference! Chasing edges = chasing 1 mph38:20 If you train movement, you won't miss muscles1:00:24. Everything starts with movement and speed, smooth, 3 planes of movement. Weight training to enhance those, around speed and movement. Everything made sense.1:04:00 Calm down ego, become best coach, become obsessed with results, can't hear that shit, what's next place, lift everybody, influence a coach

Torg & Elliott
Jim Tressel

Torg & Elliott

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 12:39


Former coach of The Ohio State Buckeyes and President of Youngstown State University, Jim Tressel, speaks with Torg and Elliott about the upcoming college football season. He shares his thoughts about renaming The Shoe, the new NCAA NIL rule, and the recent decision about student loan forgiveness. Plus, he tells the guys what he plans to do in retirement.

Scoop World Order: Ohio State Football Insiders
SWO: Jim Tressel Talks How To Beat Notre Dame, 2002 National Title Reunion

Scoop World Order: Ohio State Football Insiders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:49


Kirk Barton is joined by Legendary Ohio State national champion Jim Tressel to talk about beating Notre Dame, how to handle a massive recruiting weekend, and the 2002 National Title 20 year reunion!

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
SWO: Jim Tressel Talks How To Beat Notre Dame, 2002 National Title Reunion

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:49


Kirk Barton is joined by Legendary Ohio State national champion Jim Tressel to talk about beating Notre Dame, how to handle a massive recruiting weekend, and the 2002 National Title 20 year reunion!

Inside ND Sports: Notre Dame football
Jim Tressel on Marcus Freeman's coaching rise and challenges ahead

Inside ND Sports: Notre Dame football

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 65:57


Former Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel joins the podcast to discuss watching Marcus Freeman, a former Buckeye linebacker, develop as coach, how to learn about the opposite side of the ball as head coach, how he helped Freeman in his transition at Notre Dame, the challenge of playing big games on the road, what he thinks of James Laurinaitis entering coaching, the success of Ryan Day and more. Then Tyler James and Eric Hansen answer questions from Twitter and The Insider Lounge (25:40).

Tim May Podcast
Jim Tressel reflects on national title run, previewing Buckeyes clash with Notre Dame

Tim May Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 74:03


Game week is finally here for Ohio State. The Buckeyes and Notre Dame will kick off just days from now. And the Tim May Podcast is back with a special guest and a massive preview of the top-five showdown inside the Horseshoe this upcoming Saturday. Tim welcomes former Ohio State national-title winning coach Jim Tressel to the show to remember the 2002 national championship team for the Buckeyes, a team that will be honored at halftime of the game Saturday night. Tim and Jim break down what had to go right to win a title that season, the lasting imprint it left at Ohio State and if this current Buckeyes team can win it all this year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Morning  Juice
Morning Juice August 23, 2022

Morning Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 128:54


We listened to yesterday's comments from Ryan Day and Jim Knowles...Anthony Schlegel shared stories of Jim Tressel, driving from Columbus to Jacksonville and not paying his OSU parking tickets...Tim May of Lettermen Row talked about storylines surrounding Ohio State vs. Notre Dame...and Beau Bishop discussed the Browns' fans feelings toward Deshaun Watson.

Morning  Juice
Morning Juice August 22, 2022

Morning Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 111:18


Jim Tressel was at the Horseshoe on Saturday for the 100th anniversary celebration of the stadium. We played his speech on the show. Bill Bender of The Sporting News discussed college football...Spencer Holbrook of Lettermen Row talked about the Buckeyes...and Joshua Perry of Big Ten Network/Bally Sports told us about his preseason journeys around the Big Ten.

Off Point With CJ & Ace
Buckeye evolution

Off Point With CJ & Ace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 65:38


Deshaun Watson decision made. The evolution of the Buckeyes from Jim Tressel to Ryan Day. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Playbook: Sports & Entertainment
How to Be a Strong Leader | Interview With Michigan State Head Football Coach, Mel Tucker

The Playbook: Sports & Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 23:30


On this episode of #ThePlaybook, Mel Tucker, Head Football Coach at Michigan State University, sits down to discuss: [2:42] - How he works to create a “relentless” mindset for his football team [4:37] - The lessons he learned from spending time with legendary coaches like Nick Saban, Jim Tressel, and Barry Alvarez [5:58] - How a 360° approach to leadership will leader to a greater impact on others, even when you are not “in charge” [14:49] - The first message he shares with every recruit that he meets Tweet me your takeaway from today's episode @davidmeltzer  Email Me! david@dmeltzer.com Sign up for my Free Weekly Training https://free.dmeltzer.com/friday-training-1 Text Me! (949) 298-2905 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Coach and Coordinator Podcast
Coaching Mindset - Brian Hartline, WR:Passing Game Coordinator, Ohio State

Coach and Coordinator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 47:54


Former NFL and College Strength Coach Anthony Schlegel joins the podcast as the co-host of "The Difference Maker Series" presented by The Difference USA. Brian Hartline is the Receivers Coach and Passing Game Coordinator for the Ohio State University. In making his transition from player to coach, Coach Hartline has been on a fast track as he's developed one of the most explosive position groups in the country with three All-Americans in 2021. Coach Hartline was named the FootballScoop wide receivers coach of the year and in 2019 he was honored by the American Football Coaches Association as one of its AFCA 35 Under 35 honorees, a prestigious program that develops “premier, future leaders” in the coaching profession. In his short tenure as a coach he's proven to be a difference maker on the Buckeyes' staff. Shownotes: Brian Hartline - Mindset -Coach Hartline's transition in to coaching -Being set up to be the coach on the field -Applying passion to play to other endeavors -Never been around a great player who is dumb -You have to sell your ideas -Lessons from Jim Tressel, Urban Meyer and Ryan Day -The moment you start putting people's importance in front of your own you'll remember them -Being purposeful -Family =environment is palpable -Problem with selling a narrative -Be genuine -Do the right thing and everyone wins -Character Connection Competence -Recruiting -In-Season training philosophy - keeping them fresh -Training load -Setting up practice with training load in mind -Be intentional and mindful of what you are trying to accomplish -A players must get A's -Having a pulse on your drills -You can find individual period all day long in practice -Being a mindset driven individual -Operating at a peak mindset all of the time -Attack the mindset not the action -Routes are a “race with the defensive line” -Maximizing the time you have -Blocking - leverage is advantage -Evaluation and corrections -Consistency -Learning the pre snap process -Separation is won breakpoint to catch point Develop superior contact/hand striking with The Difference USA: thedifferenceusa.com Enter TDUSA5 to save 5% off your order at checkout

The Wolverine Podcast
Chris Balas, Clayton Sayfie, Anthony Broome Preview Big Ten Media Days, What To Expect

The Wolverine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 29:25


TheWolverine.com's Chris Balas, Clayton Sayfie and Anthony Broome preview what to expect from Michigan Wolverines football at Big Ten Media Days (Tuesday, July 26). Balas tells tales from media days past, including on MSU coach Bobby Williams, OSU coach Jim Tressel and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat – We need to chill on social media, lest I use my heat-ray vision!

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 69:37


Jim Irizarry is in for Darin. Darin is back Monday (and there was much rejoicing!). Tyreek Hill was looking for some heat for his podcast, something that's not deserving of death threats. Jim Tressel is leaving Youngstown

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat – We need to chill on social media, lest I use my heat-ray vision!

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 69:37


Jim Irizarry is in for Darin. Darin is back Monday (and there was much rejoicing!). Tyreek Hill was looking for some heat for his podcast, something that’s not deserving of death threats. Jim Tressel is leaving Youngstown

Extraordinary
Jim Tressel

Extraordinary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 19:35


Day 1: Jim Tressel

Locked On Buckeyes
Comparing the Ohio State Coaching Careers of Ryan Day and Jim Tressel

Locked On Buckeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 41:17


Ohio State has a track record of hiring really good coaches. The coaches they hire have helped Ohio State be in the middle of a two plus decade long streak of being one of the most dominant teams in college football. Jim Tressel coached teams started said streak. Whike Ryan Day is trying to continue what Jim Tressel started over 20 years ago. During today's show, Jay welcomes Jeff Hunt back to the show. Jay and Jeff go back and forth comparing two coaches Buckeye fans love. At the end of the episode the two men let listeners know which coach they'd prefer to play for. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Playbook
How to Be a Strong Leader | Interview With Michigan State Head Football Coach, Mel Tucker

The Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 23:30


On this episode of #ThePlaybook, Mel Tucker, Head Football Coach at Michigan State University, sits down to discuss: [2:42] - How he works to create a “relentless” mindset for his football team [4:37] - The lessons he learned from spending time with legendary coaches like Nick Saban, Jim Tressel, and Barry Alvarez [5:58] - How a 360° approach to leadership will leader to a greater impact on others, even when you are not “in charge” [14:49] - The first message he shares with every recruit that he meets Tweet me your takeaway from today's episode @davidmeltzer  Email Me! david@dmeltzer.com Sign up for my Free Weekly Training https://free.dmeltzer.com/friday-training-1 Text Me! (949) 298-2905 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Youngstown Studio
The 330 Sports Show (and more) w/ Justin Coffin - 5/26/22

Youngstown Studio

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 79:47


Ohio State Buckeyes Throwback Thursday for 5/26/22 Justin and Greg will revisit their Top 20 games and many of their favorite moments since the Jim Tressel era began to present day. 20 games over the past 2 decades of Buckeye Football! If you're an Ohio State football fan, this is the show for you!

Real Pod Wednesdays
Why Ryan Day and Chris Holtmann Received Contract Extensions Now

Real Pod Wednesdays

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 59:12


Day is now one of the five highest-paid coaches in college football after receiving a two-year contract extension through the 2028 season that upped his compensation to $9.5 million per year. Holtmann received a pay bump to $3.5 million while his contract was extended through the 2027-28 season.Why was now the time to give both of them extensions, considering Ohio State football did not achieve its goals last year and men's basketball once again fell short of the Sweet 16? We analyze the timing and the impact of their contract extensions on this week's Real Pod Wednesdays.Holtmann's contract extension undoubtedly came with more scrutiny from Ohio State fans, yet it makes clear his job is safe for now – though we‘re not sure it guarantees anything beyond the next couple of seasons. We discuss why he deserves more time to continue building the Ohio State basketball program and what he will need to accomplish over the next couple of years to continue to be the right man for the job.As for Day's contract extension, we discuss how his new deal – and the money Ohio State spent on its assistant coaches this offseason – demonstrates that OSU is fully committed to doing what it needs to do to compete for national championships (12:20). Plus, we consider how Day's first three years as Ohio State's head coach stack up with his predecessors Urban Meyer and Jim Tressel.While we generally keep our focus on Ohio State sports on Real Pod Wednesdays, we couldn't not talk about the Nick Saban vs. Jimbo Fisher drama (23:02) this week. We personally want to see more public beefs between college football coaches, and we discuss why the SEC and college football as a whole should lean into the fun rather than trying to back away from it.We also talk about some of the other changes coming to college football, including: 33:05: The pros and cons for Ohio State of the likely death of divisions in the Big Ten 41:41: Whether eliminating the 25-man limit per signing class will make a real impact on recruiting 44:25: Why an FBS football split from the NCAA could solve some problems, but probably not all problems Finally, we share what we learned about Malaki Branham and E.J. Liddell from the NBA Draft Combine (53:45) and make our picks for who will be Ohio State football's top competition in the Big Ten this year (57:00).

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com
Ohio State football's greatest games of the century, with NFL insider and OSU grad Albert Breer

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 78:30 Very Popular


On this Monday Buckeye Talk from cleveland.com, Doug Lesmerises welcomes a special guest while unveiling the new 64-game bracket of Ohio State football's best wins of the century. Albert Breer from Monday Morning Quarterback on SI.com and Sports Illustrated, one of the best NFL reporters in the country, jumps on to discuss his life as an Ohio State football fan and OSU grad who entered school in the John Cooper era and left in the Jim Tressel era. The best games of the 2002 and 2014 title seasons are discussed, including the game that helped get Albert fired from his first job. It's a 20-year journey through his best moments of OSU fandom, and it sets up the bracket that will now start to be voted upon by text subscribers. Thanks for listening to another Buckeye Talk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com
What raises for Ryan Day and Chris Holtmann tell us about Ohio State football and basketball

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 82:52 Very Popular


On this Thursday Buckeye Talk, Doug Lesmerises looks at the raises and extensions for Ohio State football coach Ryan Day and Ohio State basketball coach Chris Holtmann announced this week, compares them to salaries for Urban Meyer, Jim Tressel and Thad Matta in the past, and tries to use the money to analyze the current state of the football and basketball programs. First, it's the new deals for Day and Holtmann in context of each other. Then it's a dive into Day's contract, why it happened and what it means for his future. And then it's a look at Holtmann's extension, how it fits in the Big Ten and the nation, and what it means for how much patience AD Gene Smith may have with the basketball Buckeyes. Thanks for listening to Buckeye Talk from cleveland.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Movin' the Chains
Andre Cook, Airport High School Eagles' Head Coach - Interview with Movin' the Chains

Movin' the Chains

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:03


"We got to love each other. When you love each other, there's nothing you won't do for your teammate." Andre Cook, Airport High School Eagles' Head Coach - Interview with Movin' the Chains Coach Cook talks with the guys about taking over as the new Head Coach of the Eagles, his coaching career & style, playmakers, his college days under Jim Tressel and winning a National Championship at Youngstown State, his goals for the program, & more! #schsfb #hsfb Hosts: Kevin Thomas, @K_Mart10 & Jerel Hendricks, @ Ol_Rel Guest: Andre Cook, Airport High School Eagles' HC, @_CoachCook Follow Movin' the Chains here: Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Email: MovingTheChainSC@gmail.com Check Out Our Sponsors! The George Agency Secured Advantage Federal Credit Union Always on Top Audio Version Now Available Wherever You Get Your Podcasts! Anchor Spotify Breaker Amazon Music Google Podcasts Apple Podcasts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/movinchains/message

Tell Us A Good Story
Episode 122: President Jim Tressel

Tell Us A Good Story

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 34:20


Jim Tressel is “legendary” in the state of Ohio. He won 5 national championships as a head football coach before becoming the 9th President at Youngstown State University. As big Ohio State football fans, this was a bucket list-like conversation for both Kevin + Steph. As expected, President Tressel has some GREAT stories to share.... The post Episode 122: President Jim Tressel appeared first on Kevin + Steph.

Inside the Garage
Inside the Garage - Marcus Freeman on his rapid rise to head coach of Notre Dame

Inside the Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 68:39 Very Popular


It's a special week on Inside the Garage, with Marcus Freeman joining the guys at the table to detail his path from a standout linebacker at Ohio State to Notre Dame's newest head coach, the conversations he had with Mike Vrabel, Jim Tressel, and other coaches that helped him prepare for the coveted job, and what it is about Notre Dame – as a football team and as a university – that makes it such a rarefied opportunity for a young coach. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Documentary Diehards
54. Maurice Clarett, Jim Tressel, Olympic moments, and signs you're getting old

Documentary Diehards

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 47:53


30 for 30 Documentary reviewed: "Youngstown Boys." Sam, Ren, and Nic review a doc about Maurice Clarett, an uber-talented running back who won a national championship at Ohio State as a true freshman alongside head coach Jim Tressel. Clarett's career then was effectively ended after NCAA violations and alcohol abuse. The guys dive into many of the questions this film presents and how it would have been drastically different, had it played out today. Ren talks to much about the winter olympics, and the gang plays Mt. Rushmore with 'signs you're getting old.'

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com
Was building Ohio Stadium the most important act in Ohio State football history?

Buckeye Talk: Ohio State podcast by cleveland.com

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 53:47


On this Thursday episode of Buckeye Talk, Doug Lesmerises is joined by author John Baskin, who wrote "Lords of Smashmouth: The Unlikely Rise of an American Phenomenon." The book covers the history of Ohio State football from its inception to the current day, from John Wilce and Francis Schmidt, to Paul Brown and Woody Hayes, to Jim Tressel, Urban Meyer and Ryan Day.The book zeroes in on all the most important moments and people in the history of the Buckeyes, and not just that they were important, but how and why they came to their place in OSU history.Doug and John focus in particular in this conversation on Ohio Stadium, Paul Brown, Woody Hayes, and the history unfolding right now in the Day era. This episode is a great look at John's book and interesting nuggets from OSU history. Thanks for listening to Buckeye Talk from cleveland.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The OHIO Podcast
Episode 202 - The Sweater Vest Strikes Back

The OHIO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 79:59


Aaron, Chris and Eric are back to talk about the commitment of legacy recruit Will Smith Jr. Plus, Jim Tressel strikes back, and we give our top 5 Buckeye encounters. Also, listener Erik Osbeck joins us for an exclusive interview.

1 Star Recruits
Jim Tressel (Former Ohio State Buckeyes football coach) interview

1 Star Recruits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 52:13 Transcription Available


Former Ohio State Buckeyes head football coach and current President of Youngstown State University, Jim Tressel, (9:48) joins the podcast.Find out more details about this episode here:https://www.buzzsprout.com/1153229/episodes/9911784-jim-tressel-former-ohio-state-buckeyes-football-coach-interviewEPISODE SPONSORS:UCAN - Get 20% off + free shipping on all orders with the promo code 1STAR here - UCAN.co/1STARIN THIS EPISODE:Jim TresselFiesta BowlThe Ohio State UniversityOhio State Buckeyes footballYoungstown State UniversityEddie GeorgeMaurice ClarettMahoning Valley RestaurantJim HarbaughMichigan Wolverines footballArizona CardinalsWordleFollow 1 Star Recruits on:InstagramTwitterFacebookYoutube

The
Jim Tressel: How Inner Satisfaction of Developing People Leads to Winning Championships

The "I" in Win

Play Episode Play 47 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:14 Transcription Available


#16. In 2004, I was tasked with building a football program at a brand new high school.  It was my first experience working in a public school, and although I thought I had all the answers as a first-time head coach, I quickly learned that I was not as ready as I had originally thought.  For the first couple of years, I did what “good” programs do - all learned from being a product of Catholic schools.  We had some success with this blueprint, but I knew something was missing. So, in 2009 I evaluated my program, and concluded that a vital component was missing:  we were only training our players to win football games.As I mentioned, my previous experience as a student, a teacher, and a coach was only at Catholic schools, which had very strong athletic programs. Although these Catholic schools wanted to win on the field, their ultimate mission was to prepare their students for life. Most of which was done through the lens of Catholicism, which obviously wasn't going to fly at my new public school. So, I had to turn to other resources. Being an English teacher at heart, I read everything I can get my hands, but one book in particular, provided that “aha” moment, The Winners Manual by Jim Tressel.Coach Tressel was the head football coach at Youngstown State and Ohio State. At the young age of 32, Coach Tressel was hired to turn around the football program at YSU, and he decided that he first needed to teach his players what winning meant - not only on the field, but more importantly in life. So in 1986 he created The Winners Manual that center around guiding his players to be able to answer this important question: “If the game of life ended tonight, would you be a winner?”  Using The Winners Manual as his foundation, Coach Tressel won over 240 games, 5 national championships, and 7 conference titles in his 25-year head coaching career. More importantly, he helped his players be winners in life.Currently the President of Youngstown State University, Coach Tressel was kind enough to take time from his busy schedule to discuss:Where the idea of The Winners Manual came fromHow training his athletes to be winners in life translated to winning on the field as wellWhy it's important for coaches to separate what they do from who they areAnd as a special bonus, of course had to get Coach's thoughts on the CFP and the upcoming OSU/Michigan gameIn the Prologue, Coach Tressel states, “It is my sincere hope that this manual will be helpful in your pursuit of excellence; that it will provide important tools you need to succeed; that during difficult times when you feel like giving up, you will leaf through this book and find something refreshing or something that ignites a fire to keep you going” (Tressel XV). Well The Winners Manual has been just that for me and think it can be for you too.Review The "I" in Win on Apple Podcast or my website to let me know what you think of the show. If you want to connect with me to discuss leadership coaching, or even make guest recommendations, best ways through my website or on Twitter (@LukeMertens) 

Let's Huddle with Ed Cunningham
Thinning the Field with Dan Wetzel

Let's Huddle with Ed Cunningham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:37


The NY Times bestselling author, Yahoo! Sports columnist, screenwriter, producer and podcaster Dan Wetzel has just about seen it all and gladly shared his take, but nothing has him leaning into the laptop more than the financial schemes and inequities baked into the NCAA's handling of the athletes who make up their work force. We discuss how the amateur sports we watch on all the big networks are not contractually legal, how the greed of administrators finally reversed the flow of value and revenue back towards the amateurs and why covering the Olympics during a pandemic sucked. Yahoo!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fresh Air At Five
Far Out with @AstroStephenson - FAAF32

Fresh Air At Five

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 24:35


Welcome to FreshAirAtFive (FAAF) Podcast - Episode 32 I'm your host, Bryon Carpenter In this episode, I share my daily reflection posted on Twitter @bryoncar, from August 2-6, 2021 I reflect on these podcast episode from my listens on the: 2nd: Special segment as I had a guest walker, Tim Stephenson @AstroStephenson, join me for FAAF. Walked, listened and reflected on the following: Ignite EdTech Podcast E57 "Hamish Brewer"; Exponential Wisdom E95 "Transforming the Education System" 3rd: Got TechEd E91 "7 Easy Steps to Start a Student Podcast in Your Class"; EdTech Bites E92 "2021-2022 Beginning Of The Year Keynote"; Sons of Technology E68 "The Updates Episode!" 4th: House of EdTech E182 "Teaching and Learning with Wakelet" 5th: Teachers on Fire E200 "FIVE LATINA SUPERINTENDENTS: Building Equity During Times of Crisis"; The 10 Minute Teacher Podcast E750 "Getting the Brain Ready to Learn Math"; Overthrowing Education Bonus "Edupodlooza: The Last Day of School: A Comedy Radio Show"; The Wired Educator Podcast E205 "Personal Leadership an Interview with Jim Tressel" 6th: Science 360 E38 "Summer Sky Star Hopping" Next Episode: Aug 13th at midnight - stay tuned. You can connect with me by leaving a Voice Message here or following me on Twitter (@FreshAirAtFive or @bryoncar) ------------------------------ As my OneWord for 2021 is APPRECIATE, I appreciate you giving this my first-attempt-in-learning to create a podcast experience a listen. Subscribe so you don't miss any upcoming episodes and please give me a review on Apple Podcast to get my voice out there further. ------------------------------ Track: It's Almost Over - SelChol ( NoCopyrightMusic ) | My Audio Library | Background Music Bumper: Shake Up Learning Show with Kasey Bell --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/freshairatfive5/message

Silver Bullets Podcast
Buck Off: Urban what if's, Terrelle Pryor Statement, NIL, and Top-5 TEs

Silver Bullets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 39:18


On today's episode of “Buck Off with Christopher Renne,” I am joined by cohost Jordan Williams and we get into a few different conversations surrounding the “Tattoo 5” and What If?'s”. We begin the show with a conversation about some of the what ifs during the Urban Meyer era and how his decision making altered the future of Ohio State football. In that conversation we talk about personnel, on the field, and at Quarterback. Then, we get into a conversation surrounding the new NIL legislation and how we can make reparations to Jim Tressel and the “Tattoo 5.” Which includes talks about their stats going back into place or other alternatives. Lastly, we get into Ohio State's top TE's since 2005 with a list that shows this might be the best position (which was hard). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Buckeye Show
Buckeye Show July 14, 2021

The Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 84:39


Joshua Perry is the guest tonight. They start off by discussing why its important not to take it easy on kids as an adult. Then we ask Joshua if he would've liked to play for Jim Tressel. Dave Holmes from 10 TV came on the show to talk about the streak of good coaches Ohio State is on. Then we continue to list our All-Urban Meyer Ohio State football team. This time we list the defense. Austin Ward from Lettermen Row came on the show.

Bishop and Laurinaitis - 97.1 The Fan
Bishop and Laurinaitis July 13, 2021

Bishop and Laurinaitis - 97.1 The Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 121:50


James and Chops covering the show today. Pete Alonso wins his second Home Run Derby last night. Team USA loses another game, this time to Australia. Peyton Manning doesn't want to see Aaron Rodgers retire but he also doesn't think he'll end up anywhere else other than Green Bay. 20 Biggest Questions: Can Dwayne Haskins rejuvenate his career in Pittsburgh? Brooke Pryor covering the Steelers for ESPN Nation came on the show to discuss. We talk about Jim Tressel wanting his wins back from the 2010 football season. Dom Tiberi comes on at 11:33.

The Edge of Greatness Podcast
Episode 51: Interview with Jim Tressel

The Edge of Greatness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 49:55


Today's interview is with former head coach of Youngstown State and Ohio State and current president of Youngstown State Jim Tressel. The five time National Championship coach with Youngstown State and Ohio State takes time to talk about culture, leadership, and shaping well rounded young people. His time in various leadership positions puts him in a unique place to help grow our next generation of leader. I hope you enjoy his stories and wisdom.You can follow Coach Tressel on Twitter for some #quiettime @JimTressel5 or see what he's got going on at www.ysu.edu. Hope you enjoy today's episode. Please take a moment now to subscribe. I would also appreciate feedback on how we're doing so if you would leave a rating and review you can help guide the direction of future episodes. Thanks for listening.Make sure you take a minute to subscribe to our new YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyJSZK07ki5-eywRGIZmw7g/featured we will be adding videos as weekly.Also, Please consider becoming a patron at https://www.patreon.com/edgeofgreatness. Also don't forget to check out www.theedgeofgreatnessproject.com for updates and apparel to support your quest for greatness.

The Underdog Podcast
Jim Tressel - Nothing Great Happens Without A Little Suffering

The Underdog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 41:21


He's one of the winningest Coaches in college football history.  Yet despite all of his national championships and on-field success, Coach Tressel still considered himself an Underdog when he took on his new role as President at Youngstown State.  

The Schick and Nick Show
What are you wearing right now?

The Schick and Nick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 64:26


In light of the Super Bowl streaker, Schick and Nick revisit the awkward moment when Bo Ruud asked Jim Tressel about his clothes.  Kevin Harlan had a great streaker call.  The guys recap the commercials.  Why do sportswriters love Bruce Springsteen?  Nick defends Tom Brady.  How legacies are born out of random events.  The Nebraska football schedule is released.  Dublin or Champaign?  The inexact science of recruiting.  Schick impersonated Nick during a basketball broadcast. Connect with us! SchickandNick.com Facebook, Twitter, or email  We would hate it if you missed an episode! So PLEASE subscribe, rate the pod, and throw us a review. It helps us out so much! We'd likey that.  A Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Million Dollar Monday
Winning Through Adversity with Jim Tressel

Million Dollar Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 46:12 Transcription Available


Jim Tressel led the Ohio State Buckeyes to win the 2002 National Championship and seven Big Ten Championships. Learn what it takes to win through adversity with one of the most respected coaches in college football history. Tressel discusses how ‘anyone can handle the good times; it's how you handle the tough times,' with host Greg Muzzillo on Million Dollar Monday. Chapter Summaries02:25 - Jim Tressel Into 07:06 - Learning from Example13:21 - Setting Records 19.18 - Journey to Ohio State 25:23 - Believing is Achieving28:02 - Handling Adversity34:50 - Heart of Giving Back41:37 - Advice to PivotResource LinksThe Winners Manual: For the Game of Life book by Jim Tressel - https://www.amazon.com/Winners-Manual-Game-Life/dp/1414325703Former Buckeye's Head Coach at Ohio State - https://ohiostatebuckeyes.com/coach-tressels-bowl-history-at-ohio-state/President at Youngstown State University https://ysu.edu/presidentGood to Great book by Jim Collins - https://www.amazon.com/Good-Great-Some-Companies-Others/dp/0066620996Click here to subscribe and receive updates when new episodes are available

Roughnecks Podcast
#20 - Passion and Love

Roughnecks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 35:58


We are already into the second month of 2021. This month's topic of the Roughnecks Podcast is Passion and Love. They are the same but different. In this episode, I introduce the topic and guests for the next 3 weeks. At one point of the episode, I will read a short portion from chapter 9 of The Winners Manual by Jim Tressel. This chapter is titled love and talks a lot about discipline and commitment and how they go hand in hand with love. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roughneckspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/roughneckspodcast/support

MSU Today with Russ White
Coach Tucker seeks “character, unselfishness, teamwork, discipline, and maturity” from Spartan Football student-athletes

MSU Today with Russ White

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 32:01


Tucker recalls the challenges of being hired on February 12, 2020 and then shutting down the program a few weeks later due to the pandemic.“I was just in the final stages of assembling the staff and had just put the strength coach in place and got everyone under contract,” Tucker tells Beekman. “We were actually going to start spring ball the following Tuesday. I was going to make a trip down to Indianapolis for the Big Ten basketball tournament, and I got word that they weren't going to have fans. And then a couple hours later, I got word the team was headed back to East Lansing. And at that point, that's when my world had changed forever.“Our staff did a great job adapting quickly to the situation. I sent everyone home and said that we're going to be working from home for a while so get with the IT guys to get packed up and get your laptops and whatever you need to work from home. Then we started talking to our academic folks about what our players were going to do and they started mentioning something called Zoom. They said that the professors on campus were using Zoom and they recommended that we do the same. And so, we're all saying, ‘What the heck is Zoom? I've never heard of that.'“So our first challenge was to figure out how to use Zoom to communicate with our players and have team meetings, have unit meetings, individual meetings, figuring out how to put a background on the Zoom, Zoom etiquette, lighting, auto mute, all of those deals, and it was fun. We recognized right away that that was going to be our most daunting challenge. How do we connect with our players when we're a new staff? All the players have been sent back to their permanent homes and they don't know us and we don't know them. Take out the X's and O's, just to introduce ourselves and just get to know each other as people was done completely over Zoom and FaceTime and phone calls and text.“And then we needed to install our playbook on defense and special teams and so we did that through Zoom and our coaches became very creative on how to incorporate chalkboards and telestrating and unit meetings with guys in various places in the country. And it was just fascinating how quickly the players and the coaching staff adapted. And now you look, Zoom is like walking the dog now. It's like riding a bike; it's just normal. But at that time, it was not, and there was a learning curve. Some of the learning curve for some of our coaches was steeper than some of the others,” Tucker quips.“You started your early coaching career as a graduate assistant at MSU back in 1997. So now going on 24 years ago, when you think about what it was like back then in the football program and across campus, what's changed? What's the same? What were some of the things that you've noticed as you've been back on campus,” asks Beekman?“Those were great memories,” Tucker continues. “I remember I felt so fortunate to have the opportunity that Coach Saban gave me to come here and start my coaching career at a great university with the football tradition. I mean, it was just huge. When I got here, my focus was, ‘what do I need to do to make Nick Saban happy?' That was my goal every day. ‘What do I have to do to get the job done? What does he need done? What do the coaches need done?' And so my focus and my world was very, very small. It was pretty much the Duffy Building and Kellogg Center for me. I didn't get to know a lot of the campus at that point.“When I came back this past February, I got a chance to see a broader scope of the university, and I became even more excited. I saw some of the changes, like the 1855 Building. That wasn't part of the campus landscape. With the Skandalaris Center and the North End Zone I just really felt like I was walking into a great situation at Michigan State.”Tucker talks about the coaches who have influenced him most: Nick Saban, Barry Alvarez, Jim Tressel, and Romeo Crenel. And he describes some of the differences between college and professional football.“In the NFL, it's all business. For those players, it's their livelihood. That's how they feed their families. So when you're coaching an NFL player, they don't have any use for you if they don't believe that you know what you're doing. All they want to know is can this coach help me stay in the league. Can he help me in any way provide for my family? And those NFL players, they make those assessments very quickly. And so you have to, in short order, gain the trust of your players and prove to them that you are an asset and that you can help them in their career.“But one of the things that's very similar is that at the end of the day, it's still football. There are fundamentals of the game, whether it's Pop Warner, high school, college, or pro that don't change.”Tucker tells Beekman about his recruiting philosophy.“Recruiting is the lifeblood of your organization. Good players make you a good coach; great players make you a great coach. And when it comes down to it, when you look at the best teams year in and year out, they usually have the best players. The purpose of recruiting is to improve your team. It's very similar to the National Football League. The purpose of the draft and free agency is to improve your team. You always have to ask yourself, ‘Is this player better than this player that's already on your roster?' Can this student athlete make us better?'“You have to recruit every day and your players have to be a good fit. Character and academic standing are extremely important. We want guys who want to graduate from Michigan State and have the ability to do that. We also want players who want to buy into something bigger than themselves. They're all highly recruited players who have individual aspirations. They all want to go to the NFL, but we want guys who believe in the concept of team who are unselfish and who pour themselves into the team and who understand that the better the team does, the better they do individually.“And so it's not just an athletic evaluation; we're also doing our best to evaluate some of the intangibles and the things you can't see on tape. Character, unselfishness, teamwork, discipline, maturity. But it's an inexact science. We lay out the standards and we communicate the standards to the coaching staff. We all know what we're looking for. And at the end of the day, I have the final say; the buck stops with me.”Tucker says this time of the year “is one of the more exciting times of the calendar year. Our players are back. We've been able to evaluate our guys who are returning, and we know what they can do, what their strengths and weaknesses are. The guys who are back are guys who want to be here. And we want them to be here. They bought into our culture, they understand the expectations and the standards, and they're ready to work. I like to coin this time of year as the out season. I believe there's an in season and an out of season; there's never an off season because football is a year-round sport now. Recruiting and training never stop.“In this out of season time, it's time for our coaching staff to do scheme evaluation, scout, and look for new ideas and look for things that we know can help our players. It's also a time for us to indoctrinate our mid-year enrollees and our high school players and our transfers. The onboarding of those student athletes to our culture is critical. We've begun our Spartan Training Program, STP. We'll have eight weeks of training in our weight room with our strength and conditioning staff. Coach Novak he has a great staff. And I told him that I wanted this to be the most rigorous, demanding, out of season training program in the history of sport. He guaranteed that it would be.“I truly believe that your team is built in the weight room. You want your team to first and foremost be the best conditioned. Fatigue makes cowards of us all. The toughness of your team, the competitive nature, the sense of urgency, attention to detail, grit, determination, straining, overcoming adversity, having adversity, all of those things really start in your weight room. That's what's exciting about this time of year.Tucker closes the conversation by describing the toughest NFL stadiums in which he's coached and telling Beekman what his favorite meal is.“Going to Seattle is probably the loudest. They've got a DJ there. And I swear they pipe music in there.  I can remember coaching a preseason game there and my ears were ringing for days. You literally could not hear anything on the headset. And that was just a preseason game. I can't imagine what that would be like during the regular season or playoffs. It's extremely loud there.”He says Pittsburgh and Green Bay are also tough.“My favorite thing for dinner would be lamb chops with mint jelly and a healthy portion of mashed potatoes with a little butter and some pepper sprinkled on. That would be ideal for me. If I need to get my weight down a little bit, then I would swap out the lamb chops for sea bass, snapper, or a grouper entree.”MSU Today airs every Sunday morning on 105.1 FM, AM 870, and however you stream your shows. Find “MSU Today with Russ White” on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your podcasts.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Lead With The Brain In Mind with Bill Flynn

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 48:21


Bill Flynn is the Chief Catalyst at Catalyst Growth Advisors; he's a coach, mentor and author of the number one Amazon bestselling book, Further Faster. In this, our special 50th Episode, you can learn about: Why creating a compelling vision allows others to follow Why some businesses succeed while others fail How the biggest reason for failure is success Neuroleadership is a critical skill for 21st century leaders Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services Find out more about Bill Flynn below: Catalyst Growth Advisors Website - www.catalystgrowthadvisors.com Further Faster (Book) Bill on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/billflynnpublic/ Bill on Twitter – https://twitter.com/whfjr   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you.   Welcome to our 50th episode. I can't believe that we're already halfway to a century of Leadership Hacker Podcast, so thank you everybody who's been part of that. So, Bill Flynn is our special guest on episode 50, he's the chief catalyst at Catalyst Growth Advisors. He's over 30 years' experience working with hundreds of different companies, including lots of start-ups. But before we get a chance to speak with Bill, it's not The Leadership Hacker News. Instead, today we're going to do something a little bit different. I'm going to introduce you to Jermaine Pinto from our production team. And Jermaine has been absolutely inspirational to help us on our journey with the 50 episodes. So, hey Jermaine, say hello to our listeners.   Jermaine Pinto: Good day listeners. Nice to meet you all. I'm really excited, and Steve congratulations on that 50 episodes.   Steve Rush: Thank you, my man, I really appreciate it. And for those of you that are not familiar with Jermaine's accent, he's in Jamaica and that's the wonders of the remote world that we work in. We can have remote team working all over the place. So, Jermaine, I just wanted to say from my perspective and behalf of the listers, thank you for being part of our team on this journey. And over the course of our 50 episodes, there must be a few of those episodes that really ring a bell. And there must be some learning as I've had out of this. But from your perspective, what would you say has been the best part of being involved in the journey that we've been on?   Jermaine Pinto: Always hearing the guest stories, their background stories. Those are always interesting; those are always motivating. Especially some who have start from basically nothing and build their way up. Some who have accomplished a lot and still manage to start all over, no matter the age, that is always great to hear.   Steve Rush: Yeah, the backstory is really fascinated me because there's been no two guests, right? That have the same backstory.   Jermaine Pinto: Exactly.   Steve Rush: They come from different backgrounds, different experiences, and they all bring great learning and inspiration to others to get on that journey too, right?   Jermaine Pinto: Yes, correct.   Steve Rush: So, who of the 50 shows has been the most inspirational for you?   Jermaine Pinto: I have two right here, Steve. And before I introduce the second one, my first one who be, you Steve.   Steve Rush: Aww, Jermaine, you're such a softy. Thank you so much.   Jermaine Pinto: Steve I have to say thank you so much for allowing me to be a part of your team. It was actually March 3rd 2020.   Steve Rush: Yeah.   Jermaine Pinto: You reach out to me to do episode two with David Marquet.   Steve Rush: Yeah.   Jermaine Pinto: Yeah, and that was an amazing episode. And since then, I have been on this journey with you, and now it's 50-episode, wow! that's amazing.   Steve Rush: It is, yeah. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that man. Jermaine Pinto: You are welcome. And the second one will have to be Michelle Boxx, The Blonde Fixer. She is just so vibrant. She's is just so cool, energetic. And I just love her. Steve Rush: Yeah, good.   Jermaine Pinto: Yeah, so what about you Steve?   Steve Rush: Wow. You know, like you Jermaine, I try to find two or three people out of the over 50 guests that we've had on the show. Really tough, right? But there are three that really stick out for me. So, I guess in order of episodes, episode 29, a good friend, Eric Chasen, you know, this is a guy who lost his fiancé, tragically. Subsequently his mum passed away all the while his businesses were collapsing around him, but managed to find that, you know, real grit, resilience, and determination and get back not only to be successful, but to be a millionaire and retire incredibly early. That was a great, great inspirational story. Amber Hurdle, episode 40. Teen mum to superstar business woman and podcaster herself. Another great inspiration for anybody who listened to that. And I guess the one that really kind of moved me emotion actually was Nathanael Zurbruegg.   Jermaine Pinto: Agree.   Steve Rush: He was on episode 30, right? So, this is a guy who has suffered much more than most of us would suffer. You know, he was told by his practitioners, he should have been dead six times over and still to this day, whilst he still suffers with chronic illnesses, still inspires and works and inspires others to change their lives. And I think, wow, what a great guy. And that's all, you know, coming from a place of helping others. And I think that's just amazing.   Jermaine Pinto: Yeah, you're right Steve and I can tell the listeners that I'm actually one of the biggest fan, of the show. I look forward to hearing these stories every week. Most episodes I will listen to treat the three to four times to be honest.   Steve Rush: Yeah. And, you know, fortunately we get to hear all of these stories before our listeners do. So, we're in a really privileged position to get all that.   Jermaine Pinto: That's always a plus.   Steve Rush: Yeah, so if you think about how many hacks we've had on the show, we've had hundreds and hundreds of fabulous ideas and tips and tools and inspiration. If you had to kind of maybe think of one or two that resonate with you the most Jermaine, what would they be? Jermaine Pinto: I actually have three and I'm going back to my favourite person again, Michelle Boxx, The Blonde Fixer. When she said facilitate feedback from your teammate. She is one hundred, spot on with that one. We can all relate to that. The second one would be from episode 9, John Spence.   Steve Rush: Yeah.   Jermaine Pinto: When he said lead with your gut, you can never go wrong with that.   Steve Rush: Absolutely, and John was another inspirational guest too. Wasn't he? This is a guy who reads over a hundred books a year and has done for 20 years.   Jermaine Pinto: Honestly Steve, I was blown away by that. A hundred books, I'm like, wow!   Steve Rush: Yeah.   Jermaine Pinto: This guy's on top of his game.   Steve Rush: Sure thing.   Jermaine Pinto: And the last one it'd be from Ira Wolfe from episode 49, growth mindset. Throughout the almost 50 episodes, mindset was one thing that was always said by most guests.   Steve Rush: Yeah   Jermaine Pinto: Mr. Wolfe expound on that and try new things. Don't be afraid to fail or make mistake, and he is absolutely right by that.   Steve Rush: Yeah, I agree.   Jermaine Pinto: And so, Steve, I know you pretty much have a lot of hacks, so what would be your, maybe best three?   Steve Rush: So, I've gone back over my notes and I've gone back over the show notes. And there were three things, actually the present themselves where they keep repeating from many guest's time and again. Then they're also things that I share. So, I guess the first thing is journaling presents itself a lot, doesn't it? So, you know, taking that time in the morning and night to really set out what your plans are for the day, how you can be thoughtful, how you can demonstrate gratitude and self-love, and self-worth that presents self a lot. Meditation, you know, is interesting, that keeps coming up. And it's something that I do every morning. So, I meditate every single morning before I look at emails, before I look at work before, look at anything. And that's now a core habit of mine. That is a key tenant in how I do things. A lot of our guests share meditation as a way to get into that zone. And the other thing that presents itself is mentoring. All the while we've been speaking to our guests, having a good mentor, having somebody they can rely on. Having somebody that they can kick the leaves around with is a real core attribute of all of our guests and anybody who's been successful. And I guess those are three things that really present themselves to me.   Jermaine Pinto: And I would agree, especially the last one there Steve, Mentoring. I have never had a mentor, till you could see now, which is again, use Steve. Those one-on-one meetings that we have, where I would bounce ideas off of you. It's really great to have someone that you can share with and you can also get their experience.   Steve Rush: You're right, your absolutely right. So, Jermaine, thanks for being on the show. Thanks for being part of our journey and behind the scenes and not often getting the recognition, I think you deserve. And hopefully our listeners will listen to this and connect with you through LinkedIn and your other mediums as well. So, cheers to the next 50, right?   Jermaine Pinto: And let's say here to a next thousand.   Steve Rush: Wow, yeah, why not? Absolutely. Let's think big.   Jermaine Pinto: That's how big we are going with this one.   Steve Rush: You're right. Okay, so let's get back to the show. This hasn't been The Leadership Hacker News, but of course, as always, if you do have an insights, news or stories you think our guests could hear, let's get in touch with either me or Jermaine my man.   Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Our special guest on today's show is Bill Flynn. He's the chief catalyst at Catalyst Growth Advisors. He's a coach, mentor and author of the number one, Amazon bestselling book, Further, Faster. Bill, welcome to the show.   Bill Flynn: Hey Steve, great to be here. You know, they say good things come to those who wait. So, it's good to finally make this happen.   Steve Rush: Our listeners won't know that you and I have been waiting for probably four or five months, to get a hook-up and get together having spoken originally. So, looking forward to having a great conversation with you today, but for those that don't know your backstory, maybe just give us a little summary as to how you've arrived at leading Catalyst Advisors.   Bill Flynn: Sure, I'll do the quick version. So, I sort of had two arcs to my career if you will. I'm a start-up guy, early on. I'm not a founder, but I'm generally the person who comes in and helps on the scaling side. So sales marketing, that kind of stuff. I did 10 of those from 1991 through about 2015. And depending on how you count my contribution, I'm either 5 for 10 or 5 for 7 because there were 3, I left. Either they went out of business or actually I think all of them went out of business or got acquired by someone else. And then around 2015, I sort of said, what do I want to do? I had an opportunity to really reflect a little bit, I think I was just in my early fifties and I had an experienced at one of the start-ups that allowed me to basically become a coach, not knowing it at the time, of course, because I wasn't smart enough to know what I was doing.   Steve Rush: Right.   Bill Flynn: But I really remembered that experience. And I kind of said, how do I get more of that? I wanted that feeling of really being able to teach people how to fish, so to speak. So, I looked around, I looked at, I don't know, six or seven different kinds of methodologies if you will. And I had sort of made my own in that experience that I mentioned earlier, I didn't really have the confidence in, so I've never really been a CEO or a Founder. I wanted to have something that I could feel sort of backstopped me and my credibility. So, I picked one out of all the things that I looked at and began doing that around middle 2016. It's really when I go through certification and all that kind of stuff and learning and such.   And I've been a coach for four or five years, what do I do as a coach? I'm a leadership team coach. I don't do executive coaching necessarily, although it sort of is an off shoot of what I do. And what that means is I teach this framework, which I've modified a little bit from my experience and my research, but basically, it's a framework on three things, which we'll get into a little bit on my book of how to really build a healthy and thriving organization. There is a way to do it and it's been done over and over and over again, yet, most people don't know how to do it. We, do it differently and the stats show that the way we do it isn't necessarily the best way to do it. So, I'm about teaching people how to do that. So that's sort of my backstory.   Steve Rush: Awesome, and given the environment that we've been in over the last 12 months or so, how have you seen the role as leaders and teams change from your perspective?   Bill Flynn: I don't think they've changed that much, at least on how you should be a good leader. And we should probably describe leader because people have different definitions of leader. To me, a leader is someone who has followers more than anything. It's doesn't' necessarily mean you're in a position of authority because that's different. You can have authority and not be a leader. Leadership is, I'm a big fan of Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall a bunch of other folks. I'm a bit of a contrarian. I don't actually don't think leadership is a thing. I know it's a $15 billion dollar industry around the world, but there's no real definition of leadership, that's the same. Everyone has their own version.   Steve Rush: I agree.   Bill Flynn: But the thing that I've found, two or three things that I found that permeate and really flow through all of those things. One is what I mentioned is if you're a leader, you have followers and followership is really, I think the thing and followership is something that is voluntary, it's given. You, can't say, I'm your leader. People have to say, you're my leader. I choose you to be my leader. I choose to follow you. So, you have to give them a vision, a compelling vision, right? Because if you want to have someone follow you, you have to say, here's where we're going. Follow me here. And then lastly, I think you have to have courage. And that's the only attribute that, you know, they say humility and integrity and charisma and all this stuff. And, you know, I looked at that stuff and it's really different across leaders. You know, Gates is different than Malali is different than Jobs is different than Ballmer is different than the Della. They're all different.   You know, Buffet is a different kind of leader, but they're leaders, people follow them for some reason. But I think you have to have courage. You have to courage to be able to give up, right? make it about them and not you and risk some of that. You also have to have courage to follow that vision. A lot of people are going to tell you your vision isn't right. You have to have courage to do that. There's a lot of things you have to do. So, I think those three things really make the leader. So, if you do that as a leader, then I don't think it matters much except the platform that you have on how you use it. If you communicate well and you make it about them, and you care about these folks and you and I talked previously about really great leaders in the pandemic and what have they done, they made it about the other people. They said, look, I don't know everything. I'm going to gather information. But we're going to keep you informed. I'm going to make it so simple for you to understand. I'm going to tell you where we're headed and I'm going to ask you to sort of follow along. And those that did a really good job at that did a much better job so far in controlling the virus with COVID-19 and those people who didn't do that, or aren't doing that, we're noticing it. And we're now saying, wow, you're not really as good a leader as we thought you were because we're in trouble and we've got stark differences across the world on who's doing good job and who's not. So, I think that's what's changed, meaning we've seen it. But I think those that are really good leaders haven't changed their style at all. They've been doing the same thing. It's now noticed that it's more effective.   Steve Rush: And like you, I think leadership is a behaviour, It's not a thing, It's not a job. It's just,  the way that you behave to encourage people around you to feel that safety and that courage to come on a journey with you. If we think about those organizations that will survive for the future versus those that weren't, what do you think the main reasons will be between the two?   Bill Flynn: Cash, I mean, that's really been apparent is that those people who have really understood how to generate cash or have cash in reserve, have been able to do things. Because if you have that, you know, cash is fuel. Most people I ask them sort of, you know, what's the purpose of business and they all make it about money. And I said, really, it's not really about money, is it? I mean, cash is fuel for your business, but your business should be about something else and you need the money to fuel the thing, right? You know, we don't buy cars in order to buy fuel. You know, we don't get a house in order to heat it, you know, and have electricity or whatever. It has a larger purpose, and I think too many leaders and runners of companies focus much more on that.   So, I think, you know, the ones that can come out of this really, of course, are solving a problem worth solving. It's certainly, it's more of a crucible now, right? That we're focused on just a few things. Those that were doing it already, you know, the US stock market is driven by five companies right now, that's it. You know, we go up and down based on Apple, Google, Facebook, I missed one. And I think that's what we're seeing. If you weren't doing that, if you're not empathetic and compassionate for your customers and really understanding what their struggles are, then they're just not going to pay attention to you because they're pay attention to so many different things right now. So those two things, you got to have either access to cash or ways to generate cash. So, you can ride out this stuff. If you can't, then you have to be, I think compassionate, like Bob Chapman who runs, Barry Well Meyer who have several times, through to the 2008 crisis, you know, he lost 30% of his business, the entire group, and he could have laid people off and he never did, but he asked people to sacrifice for each other and they did. And they actually took things upon themselves. So, if you create that environment, that culture, that atmosphere, and you have the cash to be able to weather stuff like this, then you'll always be able, I shouldn't say you will always, you'll have a much, much better chance of being able to survive things like this. Cause this is, you know, this is horrible and it's different than the last two, but we've already had three crises like this in the last 20 years, right. We've had 9/11, especially in the US.   Steve Rush: Yeah   Bill Flynn: We've had 2008 and now we've had this, there's going to be another one. And statistics say every six to eight years, there'll be another downturn of some kind of some magnitude. You need to be prepared for. If you can do that, then you'll survive most things.   Steve Rush: What do you think the reason is Bill in your experience, that leaders don't put cash in that same category as other things that they would maybe plan for and think about?   Bill Flynn: Because we are enamoured growth, we were enamoured of top line growth. Revenue is vanity, and I'm sorry, but we are egotistic animals. And we like vanity, we like the social aspect and the emotional aspect of being seen as doing something important. And we measure and value revenue and revenue is vanity. You know, there's a great saying revenue is vanity, profit is sanity and cash is king, and that's true. I think revenue is great for bragging to your brother-in-law or telling a reporter how great you've done. But if you see revenue as the financial metric to measure your success, you're picking the wrong one, and that's what you do. And then you say, oh, we need to grow. So, we need to, we need to sort of take this risk with this money. A lot of the time it works out, but sometimes like this, it doesn't. And that's what you're seeing. Unfortunately, going out of business for completely unique to this pandemic, but many of them are going out of business because the light has been shown on them.   Steve Rush: Yep.   Bill Flynn: And we're seeing that they're just not very well-run companies underneath.   Steve Rush: So all of your learning and your career along with all of the start-ups and experiences you pulled together, you wrote the book Further, Faster. What was the inspiration for the book?   Bill Flynn: There were two things. There was an external inspiration, which were my coaching, colleagues and friends and my clients. When I say stuff, they'd look at me like it was different, right. They sort of said my perspective on things was unique to them. And I looked at it as, you know, my perspective isn't any different anyone else's, all the stuff that you and I do are based upon people that aren't alive anymore. You got Drucker and Deming and Shine and all these guys, and now we've got, of course Lencioni and Collins and Sinek. But we're just regurgitating the same stuff over and over again. There's not a lot new here. So, I was surprised, and I said, okay, well, that's interesting.   And the second was internal, which is. Having been through 10 start-ups and, you know, that's just almost masochistic, right? I just really found that it's a shame that really good people, really good leaders, really good businesses and really good ideas just fail or struggle for completely preventable reasons. There is a way to run a very healthy and thriving organization. There're some other factors involved, but it's been proven over and over again for decades, if not longer. And we just seem to ignore it. We go back to conventional wisdom and intuition and, you know, I'm all for intuition, but there's something called a gut check, right? It's fine, go with your gut, but check it, make sure it's right. And make sure that there's data supporting what you're doing, at least in terms of the fundamentals of running your business. We don't do that enough, data shows that there's two sets of data, at least in US, that I've seen. There are basically the same, one is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and one from The Small Business Administration. If you start a business in 1994, you had a 50% chance of making it to 1999, five years, 50%. It was like a flip of a coin. But if you made it to 15, there are only 25% of the people that did that. And if you want to get to 20 or 25, it's 16. So, the longer you're in business, the less likely it is that you're going to stay in business, which is just a shame. And I know people choose and they retire or opt out or whatever, but even if you took those out, I don't think that that curve would change that much. And I want to do my best to help at least a small corner of the world that I'm in to not have that happen to them.   Steve Rush: Do you think that's complacency that causes that curve to narrow towards the longer period of time?   Bill Flynn: There's a saying that one of the biggest reasons for failure is success. Is that, you know, you think because you were successful before that everything in the future that you do will be successful, and that's true. I've seen that, you know, this is called Fonda Riotous in the start-up world, and I've worked with lots of folks and yeah, they just sort of feel like they can do no wrong and trying to guess what a massive people value and will pay you for. And then also be able to run an organization of completely crazy people. You know, we're crazy, right? People are nuts, people are impulsive, we're irrational, we just are. So be able to do that over and over again. If you can do that over and over again, you're pretty rare. And thinking that just the way you did it before is going to happen again, is wrong because the mix is different. Every time the mix is different and you got to be able to work from first principles. I'm a first principles guy. If you can figure out your first principles and go from there, then you can sort of bob and weave and figure out as you go, how to apply those principles. And, and we don't do that. We put our head down and we work and we never look out, you know, we don't predict the future as much as we should. And I think that's one of the reasons why we just say, oh, well, I'm really good at this. And we get comfortable and we just keep making the decision. And we think because we're making all these decisions where the answer, man, that it's good and it's not, you know, I keep telling my leaders, you need to fire yourself from the day-to-day, that's your job. Once you get through that knothole of figuring out and have some predictability and scalability of your business, you need to get rid of all of your day-to-day work as much as you possibly can, because your job is to figure out the next two, three, four years, not the next couple of quarters.   Steve Rush: Yeah, in your book, you focus on this quite a bit around specifically the CEO or the boss; they must fire themselves from their day-to-day work. And it's a really interesting philosophy because I bumped into somebody just recently, who has been a start-up engine, if you like for about three or four different organizations, but never been the CEO, because they're just not great CEOs, but in the leadership space, what would be the reason you would encourage CEOs to think metaphorically around firing themselves?   Bill Flynn: Well, so here's the deal, right? If you're going to grow your business, you have to predict the future and predicting the future is about innovation and creation and insight. And so, I asked this question, I'll ask of you to view is when do you get your best ideas, Steve, what are you doing?   Steve Rush: Daydreaming, thinking, walking, at the gym, but not at work.   Bill Flynn: Not at work and actually, I would say, you're not actually thinking maybe you're different than most, but most people it's, they're not thinking. They're actually letting their brain rest.   Steve Rush: Right.   Bill Flynn: A little bit, and that's the walk or the shower I hear a lot, or I'm on a run, just doing something else. And then somehow this insight is called the edge effect in neuroscience, where all of a sudden, a couple of different things have been floating around in your brain connect. And they actually physically connect in your brain, which is just really cool, the whole biology of it, really cool for me. And you know, there's axon and neurons and dendrites, and they actually connect to each other. And then this idea comes into your head. It's just the coolest thing. And so, if you're doing all the time, you can't do that. Your brain can't focus on more than one thing at a time, multitasking is a myth. Most of us have learned that, right? It's called context switching, and you go from one to the other, and there's a whole issue around the degradation of that, which we won't get into. So, I think you need to fire yourself the day-to-day because you need to be able to have these thoughts that come to you and, so you need to gather information. You need to go out and talk to your customers a lot more. You need to sort of roam around the business and talk to people and learn from outsiders, have an advisory board and capture all this information. So, when that thing happens, that insight happens. You've collected all this data already, and then you start making these connections and that figures out, where's our business going? What is this thing going to look like in the next two, three, four years? And you can't do that doing.   I was a speaker at Investige for a number of years. And I asked hundreds of CEOs the same question, which was, what percentage of time do you spend working in the business versus working on the business? And I would say the majority of the answers was 80% to 90% in the business. And then to 20% on the business. And I said, look, if you're going to make sure that you're not guessing on a regular basis, you need to stop doing that. You need to flip that ratio. So, you're spending a lot more time working on things for the future, which your two most important constituencies, which are your best customers, not all your customers, but your best customers and your top team, right? You're A, B plus and B players. Those are the people you need to focus on the most. If you can do that, you'll put yourself in a much better position to be able to predict the future. You don't get it right every time, but we don't do that. We got our head down. As I say, we looked down, we don't look out as much. We need to look out a lot more.   Steve Rush: Got it. You've taken the thinking of neuroscience and applied that to your work. And it's something that we both share a passion in. What's commonly referred to as NeuroLeadership, for our listeners listening in today, maybe you could just describe what NeuroLeadership is?   Bill Flynn: Yeah, I'll say one thing, but there is this great quote by Chris Voss, who I love, he's written a couple of books and he says, “All humans should accept that we are all crazy, irrational, impulsive, emotionally driven animals, or all the raw intelligence and mathematical logic is fraught.” And when you have two people sort of interconnecting with all this irrationality and impulsivity and emotionally doing stuff, you know, you just have to understand that you have to know a little bit about how the brain works, because it doesn't work the way we think it does. It fools us on a regular basis. We have supposedly 150 unconscious biases that are broken down into five major categories, according to the NeuroLeadership Institute and its simplicity. So, we bias towards the simple, we'd rather have a simple explanation we think is better than a not simple.   Expediency, right? So, whatever it seems the fastest seems right. To us experience, we're much more likely to dismiss science because our experience is different. Even though our experience maybe an anomaly or certainly biased by our own needs and wants et cetera. The next is distance, we are biased to things that are more close to us than things that are far away and then there's safety, right? Which of course is a biological imperative. If we think we're going to die, we're much more likely to or be hurt in some way. We're much more likely to believe that. That's why there's a negativity bias. So, you need to, what's called lead with the brain in mind. If you understand that, then you'll understand that your job is to create the environment for people to use their brains, not to tell them what to do and take their brains out of the equation, because you can have, you know, if you have 200 people in your company and you can have 150 of them actually thinking for you and helping you to move the company forward, it's way better than what normally happens, which is a handful of you. And that's it. And then you tell everyone else what to do. Jim Collins calls this the genius with a thousand helpers. I think there's a great phrase. You can't do that. You have to be able to say, I'm the genius at figuring out the future. Because I love doing that, but you know, you're much better at marketing than I am. You're much better at this manufacturing thing than I am. I'm going to trust you, but I'm going to tell you, you know, sort of where we're going, what we're doing and work with you to figure out how you can contribute to doing that. I think that's what NeuroLeadership means. You have to understand that we're all irrational, impulsive, and emotional beings.   Steve Rush: Yeah.   Bill Flynn: If you understand that, then you'll be more compassionate, you'll be more thoughtful. And I think you'll be able to see it, this environment that you create is much more important than trying to figure out the answer to questions every day. You know, I keep saying you should, you should make one or two decisions a week as a leader. You know, we make dozens, if not hundreds of decisions a week, we shouldn't be making like, what kind of birthday cake should we do for the person in our group? Amazing stuff that we decide is important.   Steve Rush: It's very true. Isn't it? You talk about safety as being one of those key biases. And a, lot's been said about the whole principle of psychological safety, but it's an absolute key tenant of having the right behaviours so that you're thoughtful and compassionate to do the right things. So, if you could give our listeners a crash course on psychological safety and how to create that culture, where would you start?   Bill Flynn: So psychological safety is a term I believe was coined by Amy Edmondson, as far as I can tell, she's a person who acquainted. She has been studying this for about 20 years, I think. So psychological safety is basically is this. Creating an environment so that the people that are around you, especially your team, feels like they can screw up, admit mistakes, come up with crazy ideas without the fear of retribution or ridicule or scorn from others, either directly or indirectly. And if you can create that environment where people would just be themselves and not feel like they have to guard every thought and make sure that they're, you know, they're not looking stupid to their team, then you've created that environment, psychological safety. And then once you do that, then the magic happens, right? That's when all the really cool stuff, all those ideas, you know, you don't have to be the only one that comes up with the ideas of where to go. You can get them from others. And as long as you've created this environment, and you've sort of put that roadmap of that vision of where we're going, then you'll recognize the good ideas. Because you're like, oh, that can actually get us. That's a better idea than mine, and that'll get us closer or that'll be a better way of doing something in your particular world. Because you know it better than I do, so you just need to create that environment, is really an atmosphere that you're creating. That people could really just be themselves, and then once we relax again, backs that thing, once we can relax and we're not worried about how people think about us, you know, Simon Sinek calls us the second job of work, which is lying, hiding, and faking, and if we can eliminate that and get them back to the main job of really contributing to the healthy growth of the business, then you've done a great job.   Steve Rush: What do you think the reason is Bill that leaders don't embrace this enough?   Bill Flynn: It's hard, right? It's trusting someone else. You know, we live in a world that we kind of value that, right? We kind of value the knowing stuff. And we think that in order for us to be valuable, we have to be seen a certain way. And so, it's all about winning for the person as opposed to winning for the team. There's this great story about a football team. American football team here, a college football team here in the States, it's called the Ohio State University. In the thirties, forties and fifties. They were a juggernaut. They were just really hard to beat. They were always in the hunt for the championship every year. And then they started giving away these stickers and they call them Buckeyes. Which is, I think it's a nut or something and they put them on their helmets, but they were for individual awards.   And over the sixties, seventies and eighties, they started to get worse and worse. And then this guy came in and I think his name is Jim Tressel. And he said, you know, we've got to create this team atmosphere. We're sacrificing our own individual rewards for that of the team or our unit. And so, he still used the buckeye thing, but he only did it when the team or that unit on the field, when the defensive unit, you know, how to sack. Everyone on the defensive unit, got a Buckeye when there was a great play that was executed on, whatever, special teams or whatever. Everyone got a Buckeye and then they started to become better and better. And they've now, they still do the same thing, Urban Meyer or someone is their coach. And again, they're back every year, they're in for the chance to be in the championship game. And actually, this year, I think they're in it. And it's because they've created this environment of being a team. You know, being a teammate is not being in a group. It's being part of something bigger than yourself. It's sharing the rewards or responsibilities, but also having each other's back. And when you can create that environment, it's amazing what people will do. We are tribal people. Let's leverage that right. Lead with the brain and mind, understand that we are tribal people. We want to work together. So, create the environment so we can in the most way, and I think you'll do a much better job as a team leader. And I do team leader in the large scope either if the organization, then you're a team of team's leader. And then if you're in a particular group, you have a team. If you could teach people how to be really great team leaders. And I go into that a little bit, my book, and so does Amy Edmondson and hers called Teaming. And there are a few other people who talk about teams as well. You're just in a much better position and you'll do much better. So, I think that's true of what we're dealing with.   Steve Rush: I love that. One of the other things that you focus on with teams is helping them really stretch their thinking about the art of what is possible and you call these Bhag or Big Hairy Audacious Goals.   Bill Flynn: Yeah, Bhag is a term that was coined by Jim Collins. Made most famous by good to great, but I think he actually had it in an earlier book, but since Good to Great was such a bestseller. The term became a term of art. It's over 20 years old.   Steve Rush: Yeah, probably was actually.   Bill Flynn: Basically, it stands for Big Hairy Audacious Goal and being a contrarian than I am. I don't actually think it's a goal. I think it's more of a consequence than a goal because goals generally have some sort of measurable timeframe, et cetera. And the Bhag is sort of this thing that in the future, there's not really sure how you're going to get there, but this is how we would recognize it when we did. And that is, I think, sort of the combination or really the metaphor of the success, right? Of this vision that you have for the organization. This is a way to describe it in very specific terms. So, people can recognize that, hey, when we get there, we'll do this. There was a great company in Australia called RedBalloon. And they've been following this, they're doing this kind of work for a long time. So, they were an experiential gifting company, right? So, you didn't give away physical things. You gave away ballooning or jumping out of a plane or whatever. And they were tiny and they were in Australia and they were only in Australia. And so, they said, what would be the best? Like if we actually super successful, how would we know? And they came up with a numerical thing, which was, they wanted to have 2 million gifting experiences cumulatively. And they were like a few thousand, by the way, at the time. At the time when they did, they were only 20 million people in Australia. So, they wanted to be 10% of the population would be doing that. And so, a Bhag is a 10 to 30 year, according to Jim Collins sort of goal, somewhere in that 10-to-30-year timeframe, we will do this. We don't know how we're going to do it, but this will be it. And they did it in eight years. And I think that eighth year they'd push it up to 5 million. So, if you give people that, right, this, again, leading with the brain in mind. We'd love to have those targets, right? We love to be able to also see an experience and sort of recognize today, what's possible tomorrow because you've described it in such a vivid way. And the Bhag is a great way to do that. And we've seen lots of Bhags over time. You know, I think one Bhag, most people in the US know is, we will send a man to the moon and bring him home within the decade. And that was when we landed on the moon. That was a Bhag, right? We had to create new metals and also things that we didn't have before in order to get there. So, we had no idea how we were going to do it, but we said we were going to do it. And we put people on a task and human beings are wonderful, wonderful. If you give them something like that. If they have a passion for it, and it's amazing, the things that we can do, and we just need to create that environment. That's what the Bhag does. It creates something that's tangible.   Steve Rush: And in reverse, of course, the biases you talked about are the things that stop us, having the ability to think big, to move outside our comfort zone and to take those risks and to feel that psychological safety. So, we need to pay attention to that in ourselves, don't we? As well as when we lead.   Bill Flynn: Exactly, right. And this gets back to sort of this growth mindset and all the growth mindset means is you understand the power of yet, the word yet. I don't know this yet. I can't do this yet. And there are some things that you can't do, but most things you probably could if you put the time and the effort and the energy into it, and you really had the passion for it and the love for it. And we've seen this over and over again with people, especially, you know, just imagine. Lionel Messi, right? Which is probably the best soccer player ever. I mean, he had a great under fundamental talent, but man, he put in a lot of time and effort and he practiced a lot, but he almost quit when he was 15 from Barcelona, because they were trying to turn him into what they described as the ideal soccer player. And they wanted him to focus more on his right foot versus left foot. Most of us know that his left foot is just superior to his right and superior to everyone else's left foot as well. And they also wanted him to sort of stay in his lane and do his job, but that's not how he was successful, right? The reason he was really successful was he had a left foot that no one could touch. And he was able to see the field in such a way that he would put himself in a position where the ball was going to be. So that means he needed the ability to roam. And they said, don't quit. They said look, if you want to have your left foot be the main focus, you just got to be the best left foot in the game, let's focus on it. And they said, you know what, when you're on the field, we don't care where you are, just be dangerous. And that's what he did, right? And, you know, the story he is now 34, 35 years old.   Steve Rush: And I'm still dangerous.   Bill Flynn: Still dangerous. He started when he was 15, can you imagine he was doing this for 16, 17 years. So, I think that's a great metaphor for understanding being a leader, right? It's understanding the unique talents of each of your team members and then try to have them use those as often as you can every day, every week, every year. If you do that, they'll be happier, they will be more engaged. They'll feel more connected, you know, et cetera, create that psychological safety. That's why I think the NeuroLeadership thing is so important to understanding the brain is such a huge factor in creating a great organization and being successful.   Steve Rush: I agree, so this part of the show Bill is when I get to hack into your leadership mind and pull on all of the years of experiences. Now, given all of the vast experiences you've had, I'm going to ask you to narrow down what your top three leadership hacks could be?   Bill Flynn: Sure. I've got three, there in my book. And basically, there's a meaningful gap between what science knows and business does. We've already mentioned this a little bit. You know, I say challenged, conventional wisdoms. For instance, we're told often to talk to your customers and that's just wrong because it's valid, but not sufficient, I like to say. You shouldn't talk to all your customers. You should only talk to your best customers. The customers who love you and who you love, because you want to get to know them. So, you can find the next one like them, because their most profitable, they're your best referrals and references in the business. Other things like our learning, we just more recently in the last 10 years, understanding how the brain learns, yet still go back to the old didactic model, right? Where teacher stand in front of the class and fills you full of information. That's actually not how the brain learn. The brain learns in a completely different way. And my last one is feedback. I'm just not a big fan of feedback. I think feedback is a tool, but we use it as the thing, right? And to me, the thing that we want to do. Feedback as a tool for growth is to help others to improve. There's lots of great ways to help them grow and feedback is one of them. And I think it's actually one of the things you should use the least often, because there's this thing in neuroscience called reactants, right? Which is, I'll put it in terms of mask wearing. A lot of people don't wear masks just because they were told you have to wear masks, that's it, that's reactants. We are like, screw you. Don't tell me what to do. I know better. And we come up with reasons with freedom and CO2 is going to kill me or whatever, you know, we'll make up irrational reasons to support whatever we think is important. And that's the difference between science and just sort of conventional wisdom. And so, I think if you focus on the science of business and understand that there are real first principles and how to build a great business, and we've seen it over and over and over again and learn those and then see how they apply to your business and then create methodologies to help you apply those principles that work for you. The second thing is few things truly matter, but those that do matter, tremendously. Leaders do not spend enough time here. There are only a few things, and in my book is just three things, right?   It's created a team environment. Performance is a team sport. If you want to create a business that scales in a predictable manner, you have to think in terms of systems and processes, your business is just one big system made up a bunch of small subsystems. And if you can understand how those systems work, you'll be able to tweak them as they go. And by the way, if you fix one system, sometimes you break another one, right? If you fix the sales process, sometimes you break the delivery process because all of a sudden you can't deliver on time. If you fix the marketing process, sometimes you break the sales process and so forth. So, figuring out those two things. The last thing of my three, so it's team, it's creating the business operating system. And then the last is cash. It should be your primary financial growth metric.   To me, those are the few things that truly matter in business. And you need to figure out how to apply those in your business. And then lastly is, leaders rely too much on effort, luck, timing, and force of will to achieve quote unquote, success. These do not scale profitably. At some point, you're going to run out of hours in a day and energy, relying on yourself and a few people to make a business grow to a hundred, two thousands of people, just doesn't work. So those three things, meaningful gap between science, what science knows and business does, few things truly matter. But those that do matter tremendously and leaders rely too much on effort, luck, timing, and force of will to achieve success. Don't do it.   Steve Rush: Awesome, love that. Now this part of the show we Hack to Attack. It's typically where something's gone wrong in your life or your work. Indeed, it could have been catastrophic, but as a result of the experience, we now use it as a positive in our life or our work. So, what would be your Hack to Attack? Bill Flynn: Yeah, so I've been a sales person since I was 22, 23 years old. And when I first became a sales person, I just became Salesforce by accident, to be honest with you. I was lucky enough to have a very well-connected family member in the Boston high-tech scene. And he got me a whole bunch of informational interviews. And one of them hired me, which is really cool. And they hired me as a sales guy. And I said, all right, I'll give that a shot. And they told me, here's what you need to be a good salesperson, right? You need to really know your product. You need to know it inside and out and so on and so forth. And you need to be able to relate to customers and all that kind of stuff, and I was terrible at it. Terrible, but I did all those things. I mean, I'm generally a pretty smart guy, I'm pretty relatable, most people like me. And I knew my product inside and out, but I was not good at it. And I looked at it and said, why? Why am I not good at this? All the things they told me to be good at, I am good at. But I'm still not selling. And I said, so there's got to be a next factor in here that I'm unaware of. So, I really studied it and said, what is the essence of selling? The essence of selling is helping someone else to make a decision. So, I studied decision-making. How do people make decisions? And then that's how I got into neuroscience, 15 years ago.   The brain makes decisions in a certain way. And you probably know this, but maybe your listeners don't. When a decision is made, most often the emotional centres of our brain light up first, and they actually light up often before we're consciously aware of the decision that we've made. And some people call this limbic system. There's a lot of controversy of the limbic system or not. I don't really know, but let's call it that for sake of argument. So, and your limbic system and decision-making system was designed before we really had language. So, we actually make a decision on an emotional level and then make up the reasons after the fact. And once I figured that out, I became the number one or number two salesperson everywhere I went.   Steve Rush: Awesome, yeah.   Bill Flynn: It's like a super superpower.   Steve Rush: I love that. And it's ironic, isn't it? That all buying decisions are emotional first and then logical second, but most salespeople start with that logical approach and features, benefits, advantages when actually the emotional triggers are the ones you need to be focusing on first.   Bill Flynn: Agree, there's this great theory called jobs to be done, which I love, which focuses on three things, which is the social, emotional and functional aspects of decision-making in the buying process. And all three are factors. Some out weight more than others and some before the others, but they're almost always the three of them in there or two or three of them in there. And if you notice, two of them are social and emotional, which are not something that we focus on a lot. And if you can really do a good job of that, you can actually create great products that you never even thought you should make. And people, you know, a lot of the things that I do are talking to leaders and saying, helping them understand their future, which is really interesting how to create a strategy. And I asked them, why do people buy from you? And they basically say, because we're awesome. Because we make great this, we do we do this, and their like, no, they don't. They don't really care about what you make. They care about what you do for them.   Steve Rush: That's right.   Bill Flynn: Not what you do. And if you could figure out, how you make their lives better? How you fix a struggle or help them with progress? Then you'll actually create products and parts of products and services that support that, but we don't.   Steve Rush: It's interesting stuff. Really interesting. Last thing we want to do with you today, Bill is give you the chance to do a bit of time travel and you get to bump into yourself at 21 and give yourself some advice.   Bill Flynn: So, mine is, and actually this is funny Steve. I do this question a lot. I do an alignment question with my clients on a regular basis and alignment, meaning that these are things that they learn about each other that maybe they didn't know. And this is one of them, which is, if you go back in time, give yourself some advice and that would have made your life easier or better or accelerated, you know, your successors in some way. So, I've been doing this forever. So, I love this question, which is, to me, it would be to embrace uncertainty and to eschew certitude. I was brought up in a household that having the answer was more highly valued than asking a question and being unsure, sort of not being as comfortable. There's a saying, which I don't know if it's true, but I love it, which is that, you know, stupid people are always confident and smart people are unsure.   Steve Rush: I like that.   Bill Flynn: And you know, so you got to be comfortable holding two opposing ideas in your mind at once or more. One of both, maybe right, depending on the circumstance. And sometimes combining the best bits of each may also be right or more right. And if you sort of keep that in mind and not get stymied by it, right? Cause you can actually go into analysis paralysis. At some point you got to make a decision. I think if you can do that, you could say embrace uncertainty. You know what? This decision might be wrong. And if it is, then we'll fix it, but let's go ahead. We've got enough information, as much as we can particularly gather, let's just go with what we think is the best option, but know that we might be wrong either by hiring this person or making this product decision or bringing on this partner, whatever it is. And then if it is, then we'll fix it because we've got all this wonderful environment created around the culture and values and purpose and all those kinds of things. And we might find out that we're wrong and that's okay.   Steve Rush: Awesome.   Bill Flynn: We'll, we'll fix it.   Steve Rush: Bill, I could talk to you for hours and hours. Unfortunately, we're coming to the end of our time together today. But for the folks that are listening, who also want to continue the conversation with you, where's the best place where you can send them?   Bill Flynn: My website, which is catalystgrowthadvisors.com. And there you can find my email, my phone number, or you can actually set up a book some time with me, my book is on there. My book I give away for free on my site is if you just want to download the PDF, you can certainly do that. And more about the message than the money. If you want to buy it off Amazon, great. You can do it from there as well. There's a link to my Amazon audible on my website, but that's it. So, again, www.catalystgrowthadvisors.com.   Steve Rush: We'll also make sure those links are in our show notes Bill so that folks can head straight over and connect with you from here.   Bill Flynn: Awesome, thanks Steve. Appreciate It.   Steve Rush: Been amazing having you on the show, Bill. I wish you every success. It's no surprise that you have been so successful, some fantastic foundations and some fantastic learning you shared with our listeners today. So, we wish you all the best for the future.   Bill Flynn: Thank you, your very kindly. Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler there @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.    

The City: Off Campus
The City: Off-Campus Episode 19: Former CFP Champion & Super Bowl 50 Champ Jeff Heuerman

The City: Off Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2020 36:53


On Episode 19, Sam and Jack sit down with Jeff Heuerman and talk about his football career from not playing football at all in Florida to being recruited to play at Ohio State University. Jeff talks about transitioning from Jim Tressel to Urban Meyer, how unsure he was about staying there or going elsewhere, and how he found his place. We touch on Jeff's role as a leader during his time at OSU, the role Coach Meyer had in sculpting his leadership skills and how he applied them on the field. We cover the 2015 National Championship season, the story of why Jeff wore #5 and the story behind the three different quarterbacks that led them to the inevitable championship. Part 2 of this interview will be out later this week.

The Howard Alumni Movemakers Podcast hosted by Joshua Mercer
Ep 4: 2 Time Emmy Winner AJ Ross of CBS Sports talks Howard, Delta, Sports, Big Break, and Future...

The Howard Alumni Movemakers Podcast hosted by Joshua Mercer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2020 66:49


The HU Movemakers Podcast highlight folks in Howard Culture that are blazing the trail and making moves! Subscribe to our email list now at www.humovemakers.com. Got questions or want to nominate someone? Email humovemakers@gmail.com. A two time Emmy award winning reporter with ten plus years experience in sports and news. AJ Ross cover the NFL, college football, and college basketball sidelines for CBS Sports providing in game reports, post game interviews, and additional content for CBS studio shows. Additionally AJ has also worked with the WNBA solo hosting news segments and All-Star live-streaming coverage across the league's digital platforms. In 2019 AJ also freelanced with MSG Network covering the sidelines of the NY Streets arena football team games. After graduating magna cum laude from Howard University, AJ landed her first job working as a production assistant at ESPN producing and editing montages, teases, and highlights for SportsCenter and various NBA studio shows. Later AJ transitioned from behind the scenes to in front of the camera at WMBF News in Myrtle Beach, SC. As a multi-media journalist and anchor AJ covered one of the biggest wildfires in South Carolina history. AJ also produced an in depth feature on the NAACP's boycott of the confederate flag. On weekends AJ also served as a fill in sports anchor assisting with Friday Night Lights high school football coverage. My next stop was WSYX in Columbus, OH where AJ served as a reporter and fill-in morning anchor. While there AJ covered a wide range of stories from the Senate Bill 5 protests at the Ohio Statehouse, to the Zanesville animal massacre, and Jim Tressel's resignation from OSU following Tattoo Gate. After two years in Columbus, AJ returned home to Pittsburgh to work as a freelance reporter for WTAE-TV and the New Pittsburgh Courier newspaper. In April 2013 AJ joined WKYC in Cleveland where AJ was awarded two Emmys for my breaking news contributions; including coverage of the ‘Miracle in Cleveland', the mass stabbing at Franklin Regional HS, and ongoing developments in the deadly Cleveland Police chase that ended with 137 shots fired. In September 2014 AJ joined WABC in NYC covering breaking news stories across the five boroughs and beyond. From the Halloween box truck terror attack to traveling abroad to Brussels following the ISIS attacks, AJ was able to further hone my skills in high pressure situations. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humovemakers/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humovemakers/support