Podcasts about Under Pressure

1981 song by Queen and David Bowie

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Best podcasts about Under Pressure

Latest podcast episodes about Under Pressure

The A24 Project
162 - Harry 'Aftersun' Perdios Interview

The A24 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 38:11


We continue our Aftersun interview series as Lee welcomes Harry Perdios to discuss his role as Toby in Charlotte Wells' acclaimed debut film as he shares his experiences shooting the film and career so far. ​In 'Aftersun' Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier to Turkey where they meet Harry's Toby as a young teen also on holiday who welcomes Sophie into their group.Check out our previous Aftersun interviews with Charlotte Wells, Paul Mescal, Frankie Corio, Sally Messham & Kayleigh Coleman in our back catalogue

The Anfield Index Podcast
AI PRO Plus: POST CONFERENCE PRESSER: CHELSEA 20/01/23

The Anfield Index Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 40:59


Dave Davis is joined by Under Pressure regular Phil Barter to review: Klopp's presser, Wolves clues, Brighton threats, formation / line-up and play Beat the Host..Prefer to listen to our shows without the ads? We've got your back, just head on over to http://anfieldindexpro.com and supercharge your listening experience.Chat and debate 24/7 with other Reds, join our FREE Discord community at https://bit.ly/3geu605Follow us on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3u9gYShFind us on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3KWFxbdSubscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3KXImsjFREE iOS app: https://apple.co/3KSqdMGFREE Android app: https://bit.ly/32KMxqmSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/theanfieldindex. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Anfield Index Podcast
AI PRO Plus: POST CONFERENCE PRESSER: BRIGHTON 13/01/23

The Anfield Index Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 35:43


Dave Davis is joined by Under Pressure regular Phil Barter to review: Klopp's presser, Wolves clues, Brighton threats, formation / line-up and play Beat the Host..Prefer to listen to our shows without the ads? We've got your back, just head on over to http://anfieldindexpro.com and supercharge your listening experience.Chat and debate 24/7 with other Reds, join our FREE Discord community at https://bit.ly/3geu605Follow us on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3u9gYShFind us on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3KWFxbdSubscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3KXImsjFREE iOS app: https://apple.co/3KSqdMGFREE Android app: https://bit.ly/32KMxqmSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/theanfieldindex. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice January 13, 2023

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 127:21


Happy Friday! Buckeyes suffer a terrible home loss, previewing wildcard weekend, PFF's Brad Spielberger at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, Bengals Radio Analyst Dave Lapham at 1:33pm, the chances Stroud returns to Ohio State, Super Bowl winner draft, and NFL Picks at 2:33pm!

Script Apart
Aftersun with Charlotte Wells

Script Apart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 54:04


Today, we have with us the extraordinary Charlotte Wells – writer-director of one of the most affecting feature debuts in recent memory. Aftersun is a meditative drama about a father and daughter on a resort holiday in Turkey, told through the eyes and camcorder footage of 11-year-old Sophie, played by Frankie Corio. She shares a sweet relationship with her father Callum, played by Paul Mescal. Across their holiday, however, she's able to steal glimpses of him wrestling with problems beyond her comprehension, – problems he attempts to hide from the world. It's a story about memory, parenthood and the heartbreak of growing up and realising that your parents are people, too, with their own burdens to carry. Inevitably, it's being described as an awards season frontrunner, and one of the best movies of 2022.In the conversation you're about to hear, Charlotte tells me how the film began as an exploration of her relationship with her own dad, who she sadly lost aged sixteen. There's a certain overlap between her life and the events of the movie that we unpack in this chat, as well as some big differences between her early drafts of Aftersun versus the final film. Initially, the film was set to feature an adult version of Sophie wandering through scenes following her childhood self, like a sun-soaked Scrooge in A Christmas Carol. There was also a romantic relationship at the holiday resort for Callum that got jettisoned, and much more melodrama, a more pronounced plot.We talk why she stripped away those elements to drill deeper into the father-daughter tensions at the heart of the film, what it is about the pressures and repetitions of a family holiday that make for such an interesting backdrop to the film, and what exactly is happening in the film's astonishing emotional climax: a dance sequence set to Queen's Under Pressure, whose lyrics take on a poignant new meaning in the context of Callum and Sophie's relationship. It's a spoiler conversation, so be sure to watch the film on Mubi before tuning in. Script Apart is hosted by Al Horner and produced by Kamil Dymek. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram, or email us on thescriptapartpodcast@gmail.com.Support for this episode comes from ScreenCraft, Arc Studio Pro and WeScreenplay.To get ad-free episodes and exclusive content, join us on Patreon.Support the show

#LeDriveRTL2
La cover du #DriveRTL2 (10/01/23)

#LeDriveRTL2

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 7:49


Karen O & Willie Nelson reprennent "Under Pressure" de David Bowie & Queen

#LeDriveRTL2
L'INTÉGRALE - #LeDriveRTL2 (10/01/23)

#LeDriveRTL2

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 127:26


La nouveauté du jour : Miossec "Mes voitures" La cover du #DriveRTL2 : Karen O & Willie Nelson reprennent "Under Pressure" de David Bowie & Queen Le journal de la musique - Les nominés au 38e Victoires de la musique - Iggy Pop n'est pas fan des Grammy Awards Le classique du jour : Noir Désir"Aux sombres héros de l'amer" Le live du jour : Arcade Fire "Wake Up" (Live at Lollapalooza)

The Danny Diess Show
David Bowie Vinyl Mix 1/8/2023

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 120:35


David Robert Jones (8 January 1947 – 10 January 2016), known professionally as David Bowie (/ˈboʊi/ BOH-ee),[1] was an English singer-songwriter and actor. A leading figure in the music industry, he is regarded as one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Bowie was acclaimed by critics and musicians, particularly for his innovative work during the 1970s. His career was marked by reinvention and visual presentation, and his music and stagecraft had a significant impact on popular music.Bowie developed an interest in music from an early age. He studied art, music and design before embarking on a professional career as a musician in 1963. "Space Oddity", released in 1969, was his first top-five entry on the UK Singles Chart. After a period of experimentation, he re-emerged in 1972 during the glam rock era with his flamboyant and androgynous alter ego Ziggy Stardust. The character was spearheaded by the success of Bowie's single "Starman" and album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, which won him widespread popularity. In 1975, Bowie's style shifted towards a sound he characterised as "plastic soul", initially alienating many of his UK fans but garnering him his first major US crossover success with the number-one single "Fame" and the album Young Americans. In 1976, Bowie starred in the cult film The Man Who Fell to Earth and released Station to Station. In 1977, he again changed direction with the electronic-inflected album Low, the first of three collaborations with Brian Eno that came to be known as the "Berlin Trilogy". "Heroes" (1977) and Lodger (1979) followed; each album reached the UK top five and received lasting critical praise.After uneven commercial success in the late 1970s, Bowie had three number-one hits: the 1980 single "Ashes to Ashes", its album Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps), and "Under Pressure" (a 1981 collaboration with Queen). He achieved massive commercial success in the 1980s starting with Let's Dance (1983). Between 1988 and 1992, he fronted the hard rock band Tin Machine before resuming his solo career in 1993. Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Bowie continued to experiment with musical styles, including industrial and jungle. He also continued acting; his roles included Major Jack Celliers in Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (1983), Jareth the Goblin King in Labyrinth (1986), Pontius Pilate in The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), and Nikola Tesla in The Prestige (2006), among other film and television appearances and cameos. He stopped touring after 2004 and his last live performance was at a charity event in 2006. In 2013, Bowie returned from a decade-long recording hiatus with The Next Day. He remained musically active until his death from liver cancer at his home in New York City. He died two days after both his 69th birthday and the release of his final album, Blackstar (2016).During his lifetime, his record sales, estimated at over 100 million records worldwide, made him one of the best-selling musicians of all time. In the UK, he was awarded ten platinum, eleven gold and eight silver album certifications, and released 11 number-one albums. In the US, he received five platinum and nine gold certifications. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. Rolling Stone ranked him among the greatest artists in history. As of 2022, Bowie was the best-selling vinyl artist of the 21st century.

The A24 Project
161 - Kayleigh 'Aftersun' Coleman Interview

The A24 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 67:01


Lee is joined by Aftersun's Kayleigh Coleman to discuss her role as Jane in Charlotte Wells's acclaimed debut film as she shares her experiences shooting the film and life since. In 'Aftersun' Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier to Turkey where they meet Kayleigh's Jane as a young teen also on holiday.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice January 6, 2023

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 126:59


Happy Friday! Buckeyes lose to Purdue, NFL preps for neutral site plans, PFF's Sam Monson at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, Sporting News' Bill Bender at 1:33pm, Chris Holtmann on Okpara filling in for Key, and Bucknuts' Steve Helwagen at 2:33pm!

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
161 - Kayleigh 'Aftersun' Coleman Interview

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 67:01


Lee is joined by Aftersun's Kayleigh Coleman to discuss her role as Jane in Charlotte Wells's acclaimed debut film as she shares her experiences shooting the film and life since. In 'Aftersun' Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier to Turkey where they meet Kayleigh's Jane as a young teen also on holiday.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice December 26, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 123:17


Happy Friday! Dave Biddle fills in for Matty Ice. 49ers clinch NFC West in the TNF win, Columbus Dispatch's Adam Jardy at 12;33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CBS NFL's Jared Dubin at 1:33pm, Buckeyes comments heading into Peach Bowl, Charlie Woods looks like a future great, and Fantasy with 4For4Football's John Daigle at 2:33pm!

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice December 16, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 125:50


Happy Friday! Dave Biddle fills in for Matty Ice. 49ers clinch NFC West in the TNF win, Columbus Dispatch's Adam Jardy at 12;33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CBS NFL's Jared Dubin at 1:33pm, Buckeyes comments heading into Peach Bowl, Charlie Woods looks like a future great, and Fantasy with 4For4Football's John Daigle at 2:33pm!

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition
Water Under Pressure: Searching for Solutions (S2 Ep5)

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 36:45 Very Popular


In this series, we've investigated the pressures around water in Colorado – from climate change to population growth to different values – and how they shape the management of this vital resource. But where do we go from here? And how do we change the relationship we've had with water historically, to better reflect the realities of our future? Because we should all care about where our water comes from, where it goes, what it's used for, and the true cost to use it. Water, Under Pressure is a podcast about the increasing demands on water in Colorado. And how the choices we make now could tear us apart or help us to navigate our uncertain future. Learn more about the podcast and people featured at waterunderpressure.org.  Sign-up for the Institute for Science & Policy's mailing list.  Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube.  If you like our work, consider making a tax-deductible donation.    The Institute for Science & Policy is a catalyst for thoughtful dialogue, working toward solutions on society's greatest challenges with scientific thinking, empathy, and inclusivity. The Institute is a project of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. The podcast was produced in partnership with House of Pod.  Episode Credits: Reporting, writing, hosting: Kristan UhlenbrockReporting, writing, production: Cat JaffeeProduction: Ann Marie Awad Additional reporting and fact-checking: Nicole Delaney and Kate LongSound design: Seth SamuelTheme music: Alex Paul, Birds of PlayEpisode composition: Jesse Boynton with tracks from Epidemic Sounds Marketing: Tricia WaddellA special thanks to Trent Knoss and George Sparks

We Will Rank You
Queen's Greatest Hits ranked

We Will Rank You

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 145:18


WE WILL WE WILL…. What's your most loved and least favorite song on 1981's Queen Greatest Hits?! Adam came up with a fun way to finally talk about our namesake song: kicking off a four-episode series of Greatest Hits episodes! You'll never guess where we ranked WWRY. It's only the best-selling album in UK history. You've probably never heard of it. Shockingly, none of us are huge fans, despite having so many fun stories and opinions that this became our longest show to date! One of us even needed to be reminded that they worked for Queen's record label. Three of us went to high school with guest ranker Ken Dow, who shared his amazing Queen For A Day tale with us. Finally, Adam got his old neighbor, Eber Lambert, to chat about producing another Jewish Adam from California: Queen's lead singer. Hear it at WeWillRankYouPod.com, Apple, Spotify, Youtube and your local Stomp Stomp Clap Stadium. Follow us and weigh in with your favorites on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @wewillrankyoupod . FILE UNDER/SPOILERS: Greatest Hits, Another One Bites the Dust, Freddie Mercury, Radio Gaga, Live Aid, Bohemian Rhapsody, Jellyfish, Tie Your Mother Down, harmonies, Crazy Little Thing Called Love, Wayne's World, Dragon Attack, harmonies, Killer Queen, Brian May, arena rock, News of The World, Fat Bottomed Girls, Chic, Bicycle Race, Roger Taylor, Under Pressure, John Deacon, We Will Rock You, Adam Lambert, We Are the Champions, Ken Dow, Flash, Jason Falkner, Somebody to Love, the Locust, You're My Best Friend, David Bowie, Keep Yourself Alive, Eber Lambert, Play the Game, 1981. US: http://www.WeWillRankYouPod.com wewillrankyoupod@gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/WeWillRankYouPod http://www.instagram.com/WeWillRankYouPod http://www.twitter.com/WeWillRankYouPo http://www.YourOlderBrother.com (Sam's music page) http://www.YerDoinGreat.com (Adam's music page) https://open.spotify.com/user/dancecarbuzz (Dan's playlists)

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice December 9, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 124:51


Happy Friday! AR is out this week, Tyvis Powell fills in today. Buckeye Hoops gets important win over Rutgers, Baker wins in primetime, PFF's Ben Brown at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Joe Woods on the Bengals offense, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, Bengals Reporter Marisa Contipelli at 1:33pm, Chris Holtmann on Holden's buzzer-beater, Alex Van Pelt not worried about Watson , and Cleveland.com's Stephen Means at 2:33pm!

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition
Water Under Pressure: Finding Balance (S2 Ep 3)

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 30:12 Very Popular


When people learn that 91% of Colorado's water is used for agricultural purposes, farmers are the first to blame for its overuse. But there's a lot more baked into this figure than many realize. There are compromises that farmers are making, trying to ensure they are in the black financially while adapting to drought and a changing climate, in order to ensure we all eat. So as Colorado approaches 6 million people with most of us living in the Front Range are people aware of the sacrifices needed to keep up with the growing demand for water? This is episode three of Water, Under Pressure, a podcast about the increasing demands on water in Colorado. And how the choices we make now could tear us apart or help us to navigate our uncertain future.   Learn more about the podcast and people featured at waterunderpressure.org.  Sign-up for the Institute for Science & Policy's mailing list.  Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube.  If you like our work, consider making a tax-deductible donation.    The Institute for Science & Policy is a catalyst for thoughtful dialogue, working toward solutions on society's greatest challenges with scientific thinking, empathy, and inclusivity. The Institute is a project of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. The podcast was produced in partnership with House of Pod.  Episode Credits: Reporting, writing, hosting: Kristan Uhlenbrock Reporting, writing, production: Cat Jaffee Production: Ann Marie Awad  Additional reporting and fact-checking: Nicole Delaney and Kate Long Theme music: Alex Paul, Birds of Play Episode composition: Jesse Boynton with tracks from Epidemic Sounds  Sound design: Seth Samuel Marketing: Tricia Waddell A special thanks to Trent Knoss and George Sparks  

Verge of the Dude
Inspired by Annie Lennox (and Friends)

Verge of the Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 11:39


Hey Dude, I was feeling deep blue until I saw a Facebook post from an old high school classmate, and later the video of Annie Lennox getting inducted into the Rock Hall. QUOTE: "Whenever I need to jump start my creativity, I watch it." PEOPLE: Annie Lennox, Dave Stewart, Eurythmics, Edge, U2, The Tourists, Freddie Mercury, Queen, David Bowie, Gina Gershon, Jennifer Tilly, Jack Kerouac PLACES: The Valley, North Hollywood High School, Wembley Stadium, Universe THINGS: ADU, Facebook, "California Girls", Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Story Salon, "Under Pressure", Showgirls, Bound, Thanksgiving SOUNDS: wind, birds, footsteps, gravel path, saw, dog bark, Laguna Sawdust Cowbell Chimes  GENRE: storytelling, personal narrative, personal journal PHOTO: "Google Lennox and Bowie" with my iPhone XS RECORDED: November 22, 2022 from the "Wawona Lawn" under the flight path of the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California GEAR: Sony ICD PX370 digital voice recorder and Sony ECM CS3 "tie-clip" microphone. HYPE: "It's a beatnik kinda literary thing in a podcast cloak of darkness." Timothy Kimo Brien (cohost on Podwrecked and host of Create Art Podcast) DISCLAIMER/WARNING: Proudly presented rough, raw and ragged. Seasoned with salty language and ideas. Not for most people's taste. Please be advised.

Verge of the Fringe
Inspired by Annie Lennox (and Friends)

Verge of the Fringe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022


Hey Dude, I was feeling deep blue until I saw a Facebook post from an old high school classmate, and later the video of Annie Lennox getting inducted into the Rock Hall. AUDIO LINKQUOTE: "Whenever I need to jump start my creativity, I watch it." PEOPLE: Annie Lennox, Dave Stewart, Eurythmics, Edge, U2, The Tourists, Freddie Mercury, Queen, David Bowie, Gina Gershon, Jennifer Tilly, Jack Kerouac PLACES: The Valley, North Hollywood High School, Wembley Stadium, Universe THINGS: ADU, Facebook, "California Girls", Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Story Salon, "Under Pressure", Showgirls, Bound, Thanksgiving SOUNDS: wind, birds, footsteps, gravel path, saw, dog bark, Laguna Sawdust Cowbell Chimes  GENRE: storytelling, personal narrative, personal journal PHOTO: "Google Lennox and Bowie" with my iPhone XS RECORDED: November 22, 2022 from the "Wawona Lawn" under the flight path of the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California GEAR: Sony ICD PX370 digital voice recorder and Sony ECM CS3 "tie-clip" microphone. HYPE: "It's a beatnik kinda literary thing in a podcast cloak of darkness." Timothy Kimo Brien (cohost on Podwrecked and host of Create Art Podcast) DISCLAIMER/WARNING: Proudly presented rough, raw and ragged. Seasoned with salty language and ideas. Not for most people's taste. Please be advised.

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition
Water, Under Pressure: A Right (S2 Ep2)

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 25:05 Very Popular


One of the most controversial pieces of real estate in the San Luis Valley isn't because of anything it's got above ground, but because of the water below it. Water is needed for all living things to survive. It can also be controlled and has been by civilizations for millennia. So how is it decided where the water goes and what it can be used for?  In order to understand this, we must understand how water rights work. This is episode two of Water, Under Pressure, a podcast about the increasing demands on water in Colorado. And how the choices we make now could tear us apart or help us to navigate our uncertain future. Learn more about the podcast and people featured at waterunderpressure.org.Sign-up for the Institute for Science & Policy's mailing list. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube.If you like our work, consider making a tax-deductible donation.  The Institute for Science & Policy is a catalyst for thoughtful dialogue, working toward solutions on society's greatest challenges with scientific thinking, empathy, and inclusivity. The Institute is a project of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. The podcast was produced in partnership with House of Pod.  Episode Credits:Reporting, writing, hosting: Kristan UhlenbrockReporting, writing, production: Cat JaffeeProduction: Ann Marie Awad Additional reporting and fact checking: Nicole Delaney and Kate LongTheme music: Alex Paul, Birds of PlayEpisode composition: Jesse Boynton with tracks from Epidemic Sounds Sound design: Ameeta Ganatra and Seth SamuelMarketing: Tricia Waddell A special thanks to Trent Knoss and George Sparks

Bad Dad Rad Dad
Daddy Deep Dive: Aftersun

Bad Dad Rad Dad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 123:10


Introducing Daddy Deep Dive: a spoiler-filled unpacking of the most special films. For this inaugural spoiler episode, Kylie and Elliott are joined by their friend - artist, art educator, and fellow crier - Ashley Meyer to dive into Charlotte Wells' 2022 film Aftersun. In this conversation, they explore their personal connections to the film, the craft of Charlotte Wells, what they will carry with them from this stunning debut, and how they'll never be able to listen to "Under Pressure" the same way again. Grab some tissues and get your tear ducts ready!Read "A Note From Charlotte Wells." Follow along onInstagram: @baddad.raddadLetterboxd: kylieburton Letterboxd: ElliottKuss Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Meridian Church of God: Weekly Message
Cheerful 03: Under Pressure

Meridian Church of God: Weekly Message

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 35:03


“Under Pressure” – Most of us would like to have more joy in our lives. This series looks a group of people who were really struggling and the guidance they received that has helped multitudes of people become more cheerful As you listen to the podcast, you can follow along at you https://bible.com/events/48988635 Full Service … Continue reading "Cheerful 03: Under Pressure"

ZEIT WISSEN - Woher weißt Du das?
Fleiß oder Talent? Das Geheimnis später Profimusiker

ZEIT WISSEN - Woher weißt Du das?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 28:51


Fast alle Profimusikerinnen und -musiker haben schon in der Kindheit ein Instrument gelernt. Es gibt aber auch Menschen, die erst im Erwachsenenalter ernsthaft zu musizieren beginnen – und es trotzdem schaffen. Welche Rolle spielt Talent? Wie viel müssen sie üben? Antworten aus der Hirnforschung, der Musikwissenschaft und der Pädagogik. Warum haben unsere Vorfahren einst überhaupt angefangen zu musizieren? Weil Musik soziale Beziehungen stärkt, sagt die Evolutionsbiologie. Ein Psychologe der Harvard University hat eine andere Hypothese, die wir im zweiten Beitrag diskutieren (14:00). Und in seiner unmöglichen Kolumne fragt Christoph Drösser, warum traurige Musik nicht traurig macht. (24:00) Shownotes: Die Jazz-Aufnahme ist ein Ausschnitt aus "Under Pressure" der Band Le Gimp beim SummerJazz Pinneberg. Am Saxofon: Richard Häckel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GeH_AkC-2A Sophie Romy Renner ist zu hören mit "no comfort", einem Stück von am0rphy, Andy T. und ihr selbst. https://screamingbathtubmusic.bandcamp.com/album/no-comfort-2 Die klassische Aufnahme ist ein Ausschnitt aus dem vierten Satz der Sinfonie Nr. 6 von Tschaikowsky, gespielt vom NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester am 6. November 2022 in der Elbphilharmonie. (www.elbphilharmonie.de) Eine kostenlose Probeausgabe des ZEIT-WISSEN-Magazins erhalten Sie unter: http://www.zeit.de/wissen-podcast. Dort sehen Sie auch die Topstorys der aktuellen Ausgabe. Wir freuen uns über Kritik, Lob und Themenwünsche an redaktion@zeit-wissen.de.

Friendly Fire
Schlüsselerlebnisse

Friendly Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 48:42


Whiskas kaufen und Whisky saufen – Das unterscheidet den Menschen vom Tiere. Herzlich Willkommen zur "ARD Themenwoche: Kübeln, Speien & Co." mit Amber Cobb Salad und Black Pulpo – Ein Moderatoren-Duo, so reflexartig wie Ihre Speiseröhre. Und klar, statt kotzen kann man auch "vomieren" sagen, aber das is' nich' "Das perfekte Dinner" und dementsprechend tischen wir nich' halbgar auf. Face the facts: Das Leben ist kein Ponyhof, sondern manchmal eben Saufen auf dem Abenteuerspielplatz. On the bright side ist es im Alter ein größerer Hochgenuss als es ein jedes Glas Whisky je sein könnte, auf seine promillig-prolligen 20er zurückzublicken und festzustellen: Dat war mal! Kleiner Bummer: Während wir hier alle beispielsweise uns zu fünft mit Mitte 20 in einen Fiat Panda quetschten, um sich in niedersächsischen Großraumdissen in Fubu-Shirt, Homeboy-Hose und Airwalk Puschen einen Namen zu machen, schrieben andere in ihren Zwanzigern so Hits wie "Under Pressure" und machen sich damit zum x-ten Mal einen Namen in Millionen von Spotify-Jahresrückblicken. Es is' ja bald wieder soweit… Und am Ende noch kurz eine Gassi-Warnung für Berliner Hunde-Besitzer: Die Füchse haben Kohldampf & they ain't afraid to show it! Oder um es beginnerig zu sagen: "Au! Der Magen knurrt wie Sau! Ich hau' ab aus meinem Bau". Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte: https://linktr.ee/Friendly_Fire

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
155 - Sally 'Aftersun' Messham Interview

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 42:41


Lee is joined by actor Sally Messham who plays Belinda, a travel rep in Aftersun, the debut feature from Charlotte Wells. Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier to Turkey where they meet Messham's Belinda.

The A24 Project
155 - Sally 'Aftersun' Messham Interview

The A24 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 42:41


Lee is joined by actor Sally Messham who plays Belinda, a travel rep in Aftersun, the debut feature from Charlotte Wells. Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier to Turkey where they meet Messham's Belinda.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice November 18, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 124:02


The CBJ are on a little bit of a streak, and apparently Twitter was gonna end last night. The Buckeyes are in Maryland tomorrow against the Terps. Neal Coolong jumped on to go around the NFL. Thre Browns-Bills game gets moved to Detroit due to weather. Under Pressure for the weekend. CFB picks against the number. Buckeye Bulletin with Tim May. The Bengals are in Pittsburgh on Sunday. Ryan McFadden joined the show to give us a look at Maryland.

Matt and Alex - All Day Breakfast
The Biggest Choke Award

Matt and Alex - All Day Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 25:16


 Under Pressure.    How much to spend on wedding gifts?     MIND BLOWN.   If you've got something to add to the show, slide into our dm's @Matt.and.AlexSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition
Water, Under Pressure: Trailer

Coal at Sunset: A Colorado Town in Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 3:18 Very Popular


This year, we're taking you deep into the world of water. Where values, science, law, and our identity collide, as communities in Colorado face tough choices about this dwindling vital resource. Stay tuned for Water, Under Pressure, a five-part podcast about the increasing demands on water in Colorado. And how the choices we make now could tear us apart or help us to navigate our uncertain future.  Learn more about the podcast at waterunderpressure.org. Sign-up for the Institute for Science & Policy's mailing list. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube. If you like our work, consider making a tax-deductible donation.    The Institute for Science & Policy is a catalyst for thoughtful dialogue, working toward solutions on society's greatest challenges with scientific thinking, empathy, and inclusivity. The Institute is a project of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. The podcast was produced in partnership with House of Pod. 

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice November 11, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 124:41


Happy Football Friday! Buckeyes get ready for IU, CBJ win but lose several to key injuries, SB Nation's Mark Schofield joins at 12;33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CFB Picks at 1:33pm, Tim May for the Buckeye Bulletin at 1:50pm, how the Buckeyes match up with IU, and Big Game Preview w/ Indy Star IU reporter Zach Osterman at 2:33pm!

Selfie
Lisa Damour on Raising Preteens/Teens | Selfie Episode 238

Selfie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 35:00


I'm talking with fellow therapist Lisa Damour about raising preteens and teens, how to promote empathy and self-esteem while also promoting resilience, and what the pandemic is doing to an already stressed-out generation. Lisa is the author of the books Under Pressure and Untangled.

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
152 - Aftersun + Paul Mescal & Charlotte Wells Interviews

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 68:27


Dallas and Lee welcome filmmaker and critic Billie Melissa to review Aftersun. Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier. Memories real and imagined fill the gaps between miniDV footage as she tries to reconcile the father she knew with the man she didn't. We bring you red carpet interviews with Aftersun stars Paul Mescal, Frankie Corio and writer/director Charlotte Wells and preview an upcoming bumper interview with Sally Messham.

The A24 Project
152 - Aftersun + Paul Mescal & Charlotte Wells Interviews

The A24 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 68:27


Dallas and Lee welcome filmmaker and critic Billie Melissa to review Aftersun.Sophie reflects on the shared joy and private melancholy of a holiday she took with her father twenty years earlier. Memories real and imagined fill the gaps between miniDV footage as she tries to reconcile the father she knew with the man she didn't.We bring you red carpet interviews with Aftersun stars Paul Mescal, Frankie Corio and writer/director Charlotte Wells and preview an upcoming bumper interview with Sally Messham.

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
When Love is On, the Pressure is Off

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 7:47 Very Popular


Every time I say, 'my life is in Your hands, God',or, 'not my will but Yours...'I'm back.The awareness of the 'I Am' is here. Joy is here, consciously.Fear is gone, again.Anxiety is gone, again.Pressure is off, again.Love is ON-- that 'spring of Living Water' flowing from my heart. And the listening, is the drinking. The feeling, is the tasting.   I Love you,Niknikki@curlynikki.comSong of the day- Under Pressure by QueenCome meditate with us TONIGHT at 7pm ET on  Spotify! Please share with a friend so we can practice Love together!LOVE CHARGING STATION, Live, Daily, Group Practice-  6:30am ET (Spotify LIVE):▶▶ https://apps.apple.com/id/app/spotify-live/id1517524960Support the show:▶▶https://www.patreon.com/goodmorningsGoOD Mornings merch:▶▶https://www.patreon.com/goodmorningsWeekly LIVE Meditation, Tuesdays at 7pm ET (FREE on Spotify)▶▶ https://spotify.link/meditation_________________________________Today's Quotes: "Land where you are because here is the buried treasure you seek."-Isha Das"As you receive and implement the innovations of this day you will uncover a wellspring of life, a perpetual treasure that will bless and prosper you for many years."-Neil Vermillion "If one surrenders unto Me, by saying 'I am yours' . I shall immediately free that person from all fear and danger."-Bhagavad Gita 18:66"I place the future in God's Hands."-A Course in Miracles "I am Yours. Don't give myself back to me."-Rumi  "Do not look upon the coming days as upon an uncharted path. They shall be charted by law and divine order. As long as you consciously walk in that law and work with it, your way is charted for you in perfection. Have no fear, for though you see not the road before you, your only fear need be that you step aside and try to walk the path alone. Speak often to Me, my Beloved. I do beseech you to hear more clearly My voice. I can only speak as you listen and you can only listen as you become very still. Do not dwell over much on past days but be eager to greet each now day as it comes to you. Bless those that are past for they shall bear fruitage from the seed sown. Scatter abroad new seeds of love and helpfulness, that when these days are likewise wise numbered, the harvest shall be a golden one of joy for you. Peace be with you. Love be warm within your heart, as you keep My words ever sweetly ringing in your ears."-Eva Bell Werber. Voice of the Master (Kindle Locations 556-562). Kindle Edition. "But whoever drinks of the water that I will give him shall never thirst; but the water that I will give him will become in him a well of water springing up to eternal life.”-John 4:14"Anyone who believes in Me may come and drink! For the Scriptures declare, ‘Rivers of living water will flow from his heart.'”-John 7:38"When you lean on God you take the pressure off of yourself."-Joyce Meyers Support the show

TWWWBLY
Ep.14 – Week Beginning October 24th

TWWWBLY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 52:34


Who was the shortest President of the US? When the The Great Pumpkin debut? Who was the 1st to survive Niagara Falls in a barrel? When and How did Queen and David Bowie record "Under Pressure"? and What's the name of that guy from Gulliver's Travels? all the answers to these questions, and more, on this week's episode of TWWWBLY!! This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice October 21, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 124:07


Happy Football Friday! Buckeyes and Hawkeyes set to face off, CBJ win late, Jim Lachey joins the show at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, CMC gets traded to the 49ers, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CFB Picks at 1:33pm, Tim May joins for the Buckeye Bulletin, Will the Iowa offense get any success Saturday, and Big Game Preview w/ The Gazette's John Steppe at 2:33pm!

Crossbridge Community Church
When Worry Waves Wallop

Crossbridge Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 37:31


This week Pastor Keith Schubert continues our message series: Under Pressure. Text the word Pressure to (866) 948-2828 or visit us at crossbridge.church/pressure for financial next steps.

PitchIt
Weekly News Roundup - October 13, 2022

PitchIt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 31:23


The Fintech Nexus weekly news show covers the top stories in fintech.Get ready for this week by catching up on last week's top stories:Under Pressure, Goldman CEO Ditches Dream of Consumer DominationApple partners with Goldman Sachs to introduce high-yield savings accounts for Apple Card holdersNeobank Step Raises $300 Million in Debt Financing, Targets Next Generation with Investing Services Including CryptoAmerica's Oldest Bank, BNY Mellon, Will Hold That Crypto NowCustodia Bank Files Court PetitionBuy Now, Pay Later' Is Still a Credit-Score Blind SpotOCC wants more data on banks' crypto-related activitiesOctober Becomes Worst Month for Crypto Hacks With Two Weeks to GoMorgan Stanley Says Crypto Ecosystem Is Becoming Less DecentralizedConnect with PitchIt: Tweet me @ToddFintech Connect with me on LinkedIn Find previous PitchIt episodes Email me at todd@fintechnexus.com Until next time.

Crossbridge Community Church
Living Pressure Wise

Crossbridge Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 28:52


This week Pastor Harold Flach continues our message series: Under Pressure.

VOUS Church
Under Pressure — SEVEN — Rich Wilkerson Jr.

VOUS Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 46:49


Today Pastor Rich Wilkerson Jr. continues our collection of talks, Seven: Revelations of Jesus for His Church. In this message, "Under Pressure," we learn of the church in Smyrna, and how their faithfulness produced pressure. We often think our pressure is a result of our failure, but could it be that pressure is present to prove and improve our faith?! For more resources check out http://vouschurch.com/seven. Now, let's lean into the message together.

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice October 7, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 125:01


The Colts win last night, what's wrong with Denver? It's hard to find a path to victory for MSU against the Buckeyes. Nate Davis jumped on to talk NFL week five. Overs/Unders. Are Reds fans rooting for or against the Guardians? Draymond Green decked Jordan Poole. Under Pressure. CFB week six picks. Buckeye Bulletin with Tim May. Deeper Dive: Buckeyes vs Sparty. Pre-snap reads. Chris Solari joined us in the Big Game Preview to get a look at Michigan State.

V Sessions with Yves V
V Sessions 375

V Sessions with Yves V

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 63:01


01. Alok - Slow Down (Plastik Funk Extended Remix) 02. LIVA - Trippin' On Acid (Extended Mix) 03. Lucas & Steve - Rage (Extended Mix) 04. Öwnboss & FAST BOY - Left, Right (Extended Mix) 05. Monroe - Feel It Now (Extended Mix) 06. Yves V x Conor Maynard - Don't Hurt Me (What Is Love) (Extended Mix) 07. Bingo Players - Supersized (Extended Mix) 08. Jay Ancor & Ibrahin Cuevas - Be In My Heart (Extended Mix) 09. Piero Pirupa - We Don't Need (Extended Mix) 10. Mark Knight & Crusy - Daddy Shhh (Extended Mix) 11. Meduza & Vintage Culture 'Under Pressure' ft. Ben Samama (Extended Mix) 12. Yves V & Bhaskar - Round & Round (Extended Mix) 13. Lucas Butler & Max Lean - Falling Into You (Extended Mix) 14. Cristoph ft Ross Quinn - Turning Away (Radio Mix) CLASSIC OF THE WEEK 15. Julian Jeweil - Air Conditionne

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice September 30, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 124:40


Happy Football Friday! Tua suffers another head injury, Bengals get a huge win, PFF's Sam Monson at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Myles Garrett meets with the media, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CFB Picks at 1:33pm, Tim May in the Buckeye Bulletin, and Big Game Preview w/ ESPN Radio Host & Rutgers Football PBP voice Chris Carlin at 2:33pm!

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice September 26, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 122:09


Happy Football Friday! Browns get a big win over Steelers, Buckeyes set to host Wisconsin, PFF's Brad Spielberger at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Bengals face a crucial road game, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CFB Picks for Week 4 at 1:33pm, Tim May joins in the Buckeye Bulletin, Kevin Stefanski was pleased with Jacoby Brissett's play, and Big Game Preview with Wisconsin 247Sports' Michael Hogan at 2:33pm!

Rothman & Ice
Rothman & Ice September 23, 2022

Rothman & Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 126:03


Happy Football Friday! Browns get a big win over Steelers, Buckeyes set to host Wisconsin, PFF's Brad Spielberger at 12:33pm, Overs & Unders at 12:48pm, Bengals face a crucial road game, Under Pressure at 1:20pm, CFB Picks for Week 4 at 1:33pm, Tim May joins in the Buckeye Bulletin, Kevin Stefanski was pleased with Jacoby Brissett's play, and Big Game Preview with Wisconsin 247Sports' Michael Hogan at 2:33pm!

Pops on Hops
Pressurized (Logic and Community Brewhouse)

Pops on Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 116:00


Barry, Abigail, and third-time guest Zachary Hummel, brother to Abigail and son to Barry, discuss Under Pressure by Logic and sample Burton's Best, Seaside Sour, Windtalker, Baltic Porter, and Brew Club 9th Anniversary Ale from Community Brewhouse in Sanford, Florida. Many thanks to Gary Holmes and Aaron Libera, Co-Owners of Community Brewhouse, for sitting down with us to discuss the fascinating story behind Community Brewhouse and the Sanford Homebrew Shop. Zach has seen Logic twice, once on the Bobby Tarantino vs. Everybody Tour in Tampa (setlist), and once on the Confessions of a Dangerous Mind tour in Orlando (setlist). Zach noted that Under Pressure contains a sample from Eazy-Duz-It by Eazy-E. These lyrics deserve your attention. We got a lot of the information shared on this episode from the Genius annotations for each song. Read about Barry's friend Bob Becker, who at the age of 74 broke the course record during the 2019 Race for the Ages ultra-running event in Tennessee using non-alcoholic O'Doul's as part of his hydration strategy! Follow Def Poppa Gaming, Zach's YouTube channel. Up next… Shake Your Money Maker by The Black Crowes Jingles are by our friend Pete Coe. Follow Barry or Abigail on Untappd to see what we're drinking when we're not on mic! Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Website | Email us | Virtual Jukebox --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pops-on-hops-podcast/message

Willamette Christian Church Sermons
Under Pressure: The Demands of Life

Willamette Christian Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 45:54


When we are under pressure, we often look to coping mechanisms to ease our pain, gain control over our circumstances, or find temporary relief in our anxiety. Sadly, many of the ways we try to relieve the pressure often just make things worse. They cannot bring us the relief, comfort and peace that we are hoping for. When we trust God and do what He asks us to do, the Spirit gives us what we need to not only cope, but overcome the pressures we are feeling. Under Pressure Labs • https://willamette.cc/labs • October 2, 9 & 16 at 9am Find A Counselor • https://cdn.willamette.cc/assets/downloads/Counselor-Referral-List.pdf • Download a list of our recommended counselors. Find Community • https://willamette.cc/community • Growth happens best in community. Find your circle today! What's Happening • https://willamette.cc/bulletin • Take a look at everything that's going on here at Willamette. Care & Counseling Resources We would love to come alongside you in prayer and support. We have a dedicated team of volunteers who care about you and will confidentially pray over your requests. They also offer support in a variety of ways, including hospital and hospice visits, funeral and memorial support, physical home needs support and more. Complete our Care Request Form and someone from our team will reach out to you. Download the Under Pressure study guide, which is being used by all of our Home, Women's, and Men's Communities during this series.

Aha! Moments with Elliott Connie
How to Manage Stress

Aha! Moments with Elliott Connie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 5:57


Stress can be manageable if we recognize it early enough. Look for opportunities to laugh, move your body, and become more disciplined with your thoughts.Text me at 972-426-2640 so we can stay connected!Support me on Patreon!Twitter:  @elliottspeaksInstagram: @elliottspeaks

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP294 - Amazon Q2 Earnings

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 52:55 Very Popular


EP294 - Amazon Q2 Earnings . Episode 294 is a breakdown of Amazon's Q2 2022 earnings. Episode 294 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Sunday July 31, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 294 being recorded on Sunday July 31st 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scott strip show listeners well we have had a plethora of vacations Jason did a business trip he's going to report on over it in our F and then I had a little covid situation so it's been The Universe has been trying to keep us from podcast so it's great to be back in the saddle tonight Jason. Jason: [0:59] I am thrilled to be chatting with you on a rare Sunday night this is unusual for us. Scot: [1:04] It is it is usually we watch our Disney movies have a little popcorn in called an evening but tonight we're going to throw down a podcast. Jason: [1:11] We I feel like we need to get ahead a little bit because you know there's a new Game of Thrones series coming soon. Scot: [1:16] I know and Lord of the Rings we got a lot a lot of geekdom kind of happening all at once here. Jason: [1:23] Exciting stuff and even more exciting than all of that Scott I'm super grateful that you're feeling well and recovered but mental picture for our listeners I have a mild version of what Jason considers a tan for the show which is super rare. Scot: [1:40] Wow and that is because you went to a that summer in RF show that's out in a ranch somewhere tell us about that. Jason: [1:48] Yeah I doubled down so I had a week of vacation in Upper Lake Michigan and then I went straight from there as one does when you work hard to a quote-unquote work trip which is in Ranchos Palos Verdes at The Tiara new resort on the beach in southern California. Scot: [2:07] Cool and then so I've been turning our F of n this time of year that was called the merchandise or the merch conference is that what you want to. Jason: [2:16] You are old school so originally when shoppbs.org and NRF were two separate entities shoppbs.org had a, fall summer event at this Resort that was exclusively focused on like digital merchandising and you're exactly right it was a great event called the merch Summit. And so this is kind of the spiritual successor to that than in a ref also had a event at the same time of year that was called the CIO Summit where all the cios got together and so they've kind of mashed those two events together change them a little bit try to make it even more inclusive and they now call it an RF Nexus and so it's focused on, really forward-looking Trends and technologies that are relevant to e-commerce professionals to digital leaders to cios and to see a Moe's so there was a you know kind of like senior execs across it marketing and. Digital all in attendance. Scot: [3:17] Nice nicer than what was the was there a topic to the event or what. Jason: [3:24] So there are a range of forward-looking topics. Like probably the trend that topic that got brought up most were various aspects of the metaverse and some of those conversations came very close to getting me kicked out of the. Scot: [3:43] Because you are. Jason: [3:45] Because I've become. Scot: [3:46] VR headsets. Jason: [3:47] I become a huge cremation. I know that's shocking to listeners who find me like wildly optimistic but you know we had a lot of outside speakers talking about the metaverse and. Spoiler alert I think the metaverse is super interesting it absolutely could be an important part of the future and when people say metaverse they're mostly talking about three things that don't necessarily go together but can which is. In ftes and blockchain stuff they're talking about the actual metaverse which is kind of like you know virtual reality and they're also talking about web 3.0. [4:24] And so they brought in a bunch of authors and subject matter experts, that are super bullish and are like it's a foregone conclusion that the future is with three and everyone's going to abandon web 2 and if you haven't already gone your, wheezes and secured your property in the metaverse then you're stupid and you're going to lose huge sums of money. And I disagree with most of that like I feel like it's. Wildly more up in the air than that and like at the moment first-movers that have tried to do Commerce things in the meadow verse have made more mistakes than not and so I spent a fair amount of time. Like debunking some of those claims and highlighting some of the catastrophic mistakes that people have been making when they when they try to make a splash in the metaverse Without Really knowing what they're doing and, I choose to believe that the attendees appreciated that counter perspective but I don't think some of the speakers appreciated being challenged. Scot: [5:20] What to do a deep dive where you essentially just dumped on the metaverse Jason dumps on the metaverse. Jason: [5:27] Well or. Scot: [5:28] Be part of our curmudgeon series. Jason: [5:29] Yeah a dose of reality about them again it could be a big thing I'm not saying it's not I'm just saying it's not a guaranteed big. And then a close cousin of that that I spoke was, the future of artificial intelligence for Commerce and I'm kind of and we've talked about this before but I'm kind of a curmudgeon on that as well only because. I think focusing on artificial intelligence is kind of silly like to me artificial intelligence is a tactic not an outcome and there are a bunch of super exciting outcomes that are, made much better by using artificial intelligence and so I talked about some use cases that I'm super excited about. But but I you know caveat that with they're not super exciting just because of the math that causes them to be artificial intelligence their super exciting because they help people find more stuff to buy and have more successful shopping trips. Scot: [6:26] Cool well that's that's definitely out there and we have history on the show of given our listeners more of the hot truth of what's going on right now so it was a it was a really interesting second quarter reporting period so we wanted to spend the bulk of our time today reporting on that I want you to lay the scene for us mr. US Department of Commerce what what's what are the things feeling like there and then you know I think we're all pretty red in on the macro that consumer confidence is like what 10 20 year lows inflation's at 40 year highs we had two quarters of negative growth that used to be called recession but no longer is called a recession. So yeah so. So that's kind of the macro backdrop and then then I saw you had done your normal really great analysis of the US Department of Commerce what's that looking like. Jason: [7:18] Yeah and there's not a lot like super game-changing in the in the monthly data from the US Department of Commerce I like is you just kind of called out I feel like we've just made this transition from. Overheated economy due to stimulus and extra covid demand and certainly a greater level of uncertainty and fluctuation but like in general, really robust retail sales to now we're having really robust retail sales because of inflation and so you know, looking at the numbers they're pretty consistent with the last couple months of numbers we've seen and so in general like July retail sales were up 8.3% from July of last year, and year-to-date all retail sales from from January through July of this year are up 8.8%, from July of last year so ordinarily we would expect retail to be up. [8:11] I'll call it you know three to four and a half points so being up 8.8 is a. Significantly higher growth obviously a chunk of that growth is. Fairly attributed to inflation and people having to spend more. But you know inflation is kind of I feel like is misunderstood and people talk about about it being one number consumers spend a bunch of money on a big basket of goods and the amount of inflation on each item in that basket of goods. Varies wildly right so the amount of inflation we're seeing in gasoline. And certain food items is really high consumer electronics are actually deflating it's a you'll get a cheaper TV this year than you did last year right so. So you know if you break down in a segments. Segments that have high inflation and you know we're negatively affected by the pandemic the last couple of years are killing it right now so it's a great time to own a gas station like that. Gas stations are up 50% year-over-year. Scot: [9:10] Yes cool and then it's too early to get the online number from the US Department of Commerce right that that's got it. Jason: [9:17] Yeah we don't have the quarterly number but the proxy that we do get is this like non-store sales and that's a nine point six percent from last year so we're where the brick-and-mortar number is up more than you would usually expect the. The non-star sales are e-commerce is up even higher but, probably a little lower than you would ordinarily expect we're kind of used to that kind of twelve to fifteen percent growth in the so you know 10% growth is a is a little bit lower. Scot: [9:50] That's because we're that they've got a comp problem because last year was such a surgery or with covid. Jason: [9:54] Exactly exactly. Scot: [9:56] Okay so that's one set up and then the other one was for some reason we've entered this interesting period where Snapchat is one of the first companies to report and. Jason: [10:06] They need to change that by the way. Scot: [10:07] Yeah I don't think that's her they like it. Because in our Recaps they've been kind of the first one to take it on the nose and it wasn't any different this quarter so July 21st they came out. And it was just a total mess and lower and a poop show because last quarter they basically said we got a handle on this we know what's going on with ID fa. You know I'm going to another Victory lap on this because I feel like you and I were like super early on I DFA and it's really coming home to roost and interesting ways and Snapchat continues to be a, non beneficiary of those changes but then addition to that, you're more in that business that I am but I've got to imagine that when you see recessionary head winds and and everyone's tucking in their expenses one of the first things that you look at is your ad spend right and you know maybe it's not a great place to be if you're Snapchat basically saying hey you know we're not really good anymore and measuring what's going on with your ads because it feels like I guess people would cut that they've also become you know one of the smaller platforms so I imagined. They're probably out on experimental ring of AD spend and maybe they get cut from that too so they had a double whammy of both kind of micro meaning I DFA and then macro softness so that was just a total total nightmare quarter for them. Jason: [11:33] No do it wasn't pretty 100% agree like I do think we call the that I DFA was going to be pretty substantial to some of these businesses but I do think. Some of there's like there they were mostly trying to blame it all on IDF a and I do think there's some softness in. Digital marketing spend right now right I guess you go into recession it's not the right thing to do but you know a lot of people that are nervous about their economic future are you know slow down their marketing spend right and it's kind of like when when you start to Skid on the ice. You know it's not very smart to hit the brakes but it's human nature to hit the brakes and and you know some people people are doing that right now and I think some of their their softness and then you know some of the softness in the other AD platforms we're going to talk about, is is related to that recessionary fear and the ongoing impact of the various privacy initiatives. Scot: [12:30] Yes so then we were all like okay that's that's Snapchat maybe it's isolated and then we had five days till Google was going to announce, or / alphabet there called a whole I will always call them Google and then there was a surprise announcement on July 24th Walmart basically came out and said hey we need to update our guidance that they had already lowered, for the quarter and they basically said sales are decent but profits are going to be way below kind of what we were talking about and they specifically called out some inventory problems so the CEO they now have everyone has a there's like 16 CEOs at Walmart or something but the CEO of us said, there's probably 20 percent of inventory if you could just wish it away and make it disappear you would, and then around that same time Target also came out and I think there's was even more severe, and then Walmart called out apparel as a problem area where basically I guess when you look at kind of your your wallet where you're spending money there's always, can't live without groceries but you can live without like that 10th pair of socks or, or a new outfit or something like that so it seems like consumers are definitely slowing down dramatically on the apparel side did you parse anything else out of the Walmart announced. Jason: [13:51] Yeah I mean I feel like those are the main two takeaways I Walmart in particular like they're got they reduce their guidance from like eleven percent profit 21 percent profit right so pretty meaningful and essentially what they said is a we're starting to see significant changes in consumer Behavior as a result of the recession and or as a result of the inflation I should say and the the specific behavior we're seeing is people are spending more on Essentials and less on non-essentials and the non-essentials are more profitable for us so our mix is getting less profitable which is why we're adjusting our guidance and it also means that we have too much of these non essentials we were already you know heavy on them because we over ordered, during all the supply chain crisis and now we're having trouble moving them so Walmart didn't say this but a lot of other pundits have said this like you can expect to see all these Goods at Walmart and Target start to really get discounted and in one weird way, that's potentially good news for the economy because that that could actually help counter some of the inflation that everyone's talking about. Scot: [14:56] Yeah yeah 10% profit change at Walmart's like a 40 billion dollar number. Jason: [15:02] Yeah I will say and you you're the stock market guy I'm not right so not shocking you come out and you revise your guidance in significantly down like that and not tracking your stock takes a pretty big haircut right so everyone wrote articles talking about the dipping the stock I happen to pick the stock right before we went on the show and its back it's completely rebuilt. Scot: [15:23] Yeah it's always better to take your medicine and then if you're going to do it kitchen sink it and throw in some stuff because it's an expectation machine not necessarily an absolute. Machine okay so then everyone was like well that's not good but maybe it's isolated to stores let's see what Shopify does well then well then Google came out and Google was mixed probably less bad than people thought so their Core Business which is people going to google.com and typing in stuff it exceeded expectations but their ad business and then their YouTube business were under pressure and they basically kind of counteract that each other where they did talk about you're more macro head runs around the ad world and that advertisers were pulling back so they kind of, added on to that Snapchat message of some softness with ad spend. Jason: [16:11] Yeah and just for Google followers I would add you know they're interested in comments Commerce particularly interesting just remember like the president of Google Commerce recently left, Bill ready to go to Pinterest right so they haven't announced a new head yet like I'm expecting them to call me any day so we'll see where that goes but previously one of the things they'd really been leaning into was YouTube for Commerce and they've added a ton of Commerce capability to YouTube and it it varies it doesn't seem like that paying off quite yet in the Google world. Scot: [16:47] Yeah and then everyone's like well let's see what Shopify does in so let's see after market close 26 was Google and then everyone was expecting Shopify to do something the next morning well then that evening Toby put out a Blog post saying hey we're laying off 10% of folks and then I was like oh boy that's not good the quarter must be really really bad. And it was really interesting to his credit I think Toby did a really good job in his blog post it's never easy to do these types of layoffs and I thought he did an exceptional job of laying out, why and essentially taking the blame for it basically saying he made a bet that this would be a pull forward it was you know. [17:32] And then when you're in the thick of it you do that was our logical, thing to think could happen and instead now we're reverting to the mean and they've gotten way out of their skis what did you think about and then the next morning because he had taken their medicine, it wasn't quite as bad and then Wall Street actually likes it when Shopify gets rid of expenses because they've added there, that's like a thousand people to them that they laid off our 10% so they've grown their head count up to this kind of astronomical 10,000 folks and then they, is one of those little quizzical because then they said you know it's not going to change our ability to innovate or do anything basically so then you're kind of like wow I wonder wonder hey how's it feel to be one of those thousand people here in that part of the message and then be you know what did they do that you didn't really need them and they were in the sales they have all these content management people so kind of not developers not product and so part of their message was they were going to double triple down on on product development and adding features. Jason: [18:33] Yeah I'll be interested to see how it plays out I got a ton of pings after that announcement because everybody did a Victory lap on my corpse right like everybody's calling and going ha ha mr. e-commerce guy e-commerce was an anomaly like it was it was big during the the pandemic but but now it's all gone see even Toby like over-invested in e-commerce and then he had to come out and say that he Comer sucks now. And so a I got a bunch of those kind of troll tweets that I had to respond to. And you know I have my own kind of issues / concerns with Shopify so a I would say. That shopify's actually been slower than I would like to see in product development leading up to this and in particular they have a product that's aimed at more Enterprises and less. Tiny businesses that's called the Shopify plus and most of the folks I talked to that have. Invest in Shopify plus I've been pretty disappointed with the rate of innovation and product development on that platform and a bunch of the people that got laid off. [19:38] Where the teams associated with Shopify plus so that seems. Interesting to me and I will tell you that like in Toby's announcement he published this this US Department of Commerce Economic Development. Which of course you and I are super familiar with and we talked about all the time but eat accurately represented it right like that there's, e-commerce has been at the certain rate and during the you know from 2022 2022 we had this crazy Spike and you know if you look at where it is now and you draw a dotted line to the growth you would have expected before the the pandemic like the. The line is barely above where you would have expected so they called that regressing to the mean and you know gosh we exuberantly over-invested in now that it's come back to the mean we have to right-size. And so the only thing that's wrong with that graph is it's kind of a it visually doesn't represent, the huge amount of growth that's in the mean like the mean is very high so, from 2022 2022 we added four hundred and twelve billion dollars a year of e-commerce sales so e-commerce in United States of America Grew 61% From 2022 2022, so when when Shopify another say oh man we covid dim boost e-commerce as much as we thought we only grew 61 percent over the last two years. [21:06] Um like how many people did you hire right like you did you you didn't add 61 percent to their their staff commensurate with that growth. So yeah I just I take exception with people that think. That this data in some way shows some some significant softness and the other thing I would say is all of these graphs that these people are talking about they all like to show the percentage of e-commerce to Total retail and. It's easy to overlook and forget the fact that the denominator in that that ratio has been fluctuating wildly because of covid-19. Scot: [21:42] Yeah yeah and then you know the other thing that mrs. is the it's like almost like a pie chart where you don't see the absolute dollars so so percentages are a tricky thing it's gonna be a better way to visualize it. One scary thing is maybe we don't revert to the mean like a week the you know the lines we haven't had enough time to know until that start sticking up you know we won't know if we're back on the mean or not who knows. Google. Jason: [22:11] I know for sure but I get you know like I will do it maybe a Shopify deep dive at some point but like to me Shopify does is. Great product for small businesses it caters to this long tail in my biggest gripe with Shopify as an investor is always that they never tell you what they're stainless or sales are like they never tell you how well last year's customers did this year they just tell you the gmv of all the customers they currently have and so as far as We Know, more than 50% of their customers go out of business every year and then you know 50% of new mom and pop start a smart start a business and sign up with Shopify so the unlike a lot of other retail platforms that report their their data and when they grow we can kind of assume e-commerce grew shopify's growth can be 100% attributed to turn we just don't know. Scot: [23:00] Yeah so then it was Thursday morning the 27th and meta formerly known as Facebook announced and that was a poop show so they had a myths of top and bottom and their second quarter of declining growth they threw the kitchen sink in there IDF a they're seeing macro issues Sheryl Sandberg is leaving and this has been announced for a while and then all the Talking Heads were like oh my God you know she when out of the top this is kind of the end of Facebook so that was that was pretty pretty negative sentiment there and then that brings us to the main topic we want to talk about which is after hours on Thursday Amazon announced. Jason: [23:41] And Scott one thing before you jump in the Amazon like you forgot the most important thing about meta. Scot: [23:46] What. Jason: [23:48] The Kardashians are mad at them. Scot: [23:50] Oh yes they changed Instagram in Kim's I don't I haven't tracked this you know it better than I do. Jason: [23:56] Yeah I'm just well it is an interesting thing will do another show about this at some point but like Instagram is has probably been the crown jewel of men of for a while and you know Instagram is getting a lot of competition from Tick Tock that the news feed and Tick-Tock is a lot more our rhythmic so the content you see is less related to who you particularly follow and more what the robots think they want to show you and the you know can monetize and so Facebook to try to follow suit is changing Instagram to be more algorithmic and less based on your followers and so if you're a mega influencer with 30 million followers you don't like that right like if you're Kim Kardashian you want everyone to see all of your content because they followed you you don't want them to see some unknown person that did something viral. And so the change that Instagram made is to be more like Tick-Tock and you know some of these big big influencers that benefited from the old model understandably don't like it in are criticizing it. Scot: [25:01] Got it yeah we should definitely do a Kardashian deep dive how fun will that be. Jason: [25:06] Yeah yeah finally be able to let Kylie on the show and so she'll stop bugging us. Scot: [25:12] Good. Okay so if you've been listening this recap there's two words I haven't said and those are beat and raised so then Thursday night Amazon came out and everyone was like oh boy this is gonna be bad and there was a CNBC person who actually like a lot of names Josh and. He was basically he they do this little lunch time. They have this investment committee they call it and he's had a short on Amazon because he kept thinking they were going to miss Q2 he basically said look with Walmart and Target basically reporting the way they have. To think Amazon would do differently means they have some totally different customer base I just don't think that's the case so Amazon surprised everyone with a beat and raised quarter. So how did they do that with all this you know we've got Walmart Surprise Miss Shopify surprise Miss Google. Less worse meta terrible Snapchat total disaster in an Amazon just kind of came out and surprised everyone. [26:16] So so one way to think about Amazon is this very unique business and there's not a lot of. That you know another company like this that they have this portfolio of businesses they have built and they're all intertwined but. They have I imagine they have this is my mental model is they have dials where they can turn up and down this portfolio of businesses because they're all intertwined and that's one of the benefits of keeping this stuff together like when PayPal and eBay were together there are some operational Dynamics there that you could use to you know if you hit a certain speed bump or something you could navigate that better, so Amazon has these things so they've got the core retail business which is lower margin it's a retail business still profitable on its own but. [27:02] Not a great business but a good business and but like a massive scale you know hundreds you know what three hundred million dollars plus annualized then you've got a third party Marketplace business that we talk a lot about. Very profitable, doing really well you've got a smaller ad business super profitable doing really well growing rapidly AWS the cloud component now merchant services which is essentially the monetization of the, Center asset you had to build for the first piece. And my mental model is what they basically said was well we're heading into this period where we've got all these recessionary things consumers Under Pressure let's dial back on first party and dial-up third party. And that really won the day so so what they did is the third party as a percent they don't really give us. The gmv of each of these things that the total sales in each bucket they give you a unit mix so the unit mix was at an all-time high I need a fact check on this I'm 99% sure this is right. Five 57% third party versus first party the highest previous that was last quarter at 55%. They may say let's 2% how could that really make that big a difference well. [28:18] That's actually big because when a hundred dollars moves from the first party bucket and you and I have talked about this a million times but just to recap for listeners in the first party bucket the accounting is a dollar is a dollar of Revenue. The third party Amazon doesn't get to recognize the hundred dollar widget that sold they only get to recognize their commission or take rate which is about 10%. So they lose 90 dollars if a doubt if a widget moves between those things and Revenue. But that ten dollars that's left is pure profit it's almost like 99% profit so so if you really want to you know juice profits you move things from the 1p bucket the 3p buck. So and then also tell us about Prime. Jason: [29:06] Yeah so Prime is a little confusing this year because it was in July and historically that's when Prime day has always been except this weird covid era that we've had so you know if you if you go back to 2020 they canceled Prime day in July and instead had it in October and then the following year in 2021 they went back to Summer but instead of having it in July I like they always have they had it earlier in June which is a big deal because it's a quarter earlier it's Q2 instead of Q3 so we're looking at Q2 this year we're competing against a cue to that had prime day in it and this year Prime day is in Q3 so this year Brenda is back to Mid July which July 12th and 13th so a lot of extra work and verbal gymnastics for the poor cf0 on the earnings calls. Scot: [30:03] Yes there was no benefit from Prime in the quarter so that didn't really it neither hurt or helped. So even though third-party carried the day and I kind of theoretically so let's say. Yeah let's say you're running one of these really large retail businesses and you're either a store based or a e-commerce base I feel like Amazon because they have their products in a central location they can be much more dynamic because you know think of the store networks that Target and Walmart have almost like an edge Network. [30:37] And that product gets pushed out to the edge and then if you need to Pivot for some reason well you've got a tough decision you can you can pull the product back it's not really desistance not really designed for that it's mostly returns comes back not like let me yank all the sweatshirts out of a you know store number 292 or something. Or you have to liquidate them and then you end up with this problem that you call so if your Edge is full of stuff that's not really moving right now, you can't really. Change that rapidly you know you've got like a 60 90 day cycle to flush that out clear room for the stuff that's going to work so I think that even even though they did turn up these higher-margin pieces to win the day I think being an e-commerce oriented retailer gives them a lot more flexibility in a world where inventory and consumer behaviors are changing rapidly do you agree or disagree with that. Jason: [31:34] Yeah no I I mean I feel like they're their breath of offerings and monetization make them much safer than most other retailers they have more levers to pull in more knobs to dial. Scot: [31:49] And then the other thing and you know here one of the reasons I started spiffy is because we had talked so much on this show about the bifurcation where K seal Obama has come on and. Talked about the value and the consumer and the convenience or any consumer and a lot of that data came from 08-09 the quote-unquote Great Recession and you know what we learned during that recession is there is a consumer that is largely immune from recessionary and in that point time we didn't have inflation but I think I think that's kind of the same. Same kind of Stew if you will of macroeconomic stuff that the consumer has to face whereas the value are going to Consumer was really impacted by it. So I will also another argument I have is that that guy Josh on CNBC was wrong there is a separate customer now surely there's overlap and what not. But Amazon has captured all if not you know. 98% of that convenience or any consumer and you know that is a great place to be when you have a lot of these recessionary wins because they're not as impacted as the value or any consumer. Jason: [32:57] Yeah no I do I think you're 100% right like this gets complicated because these are such large numbers but the way I think of it there's 240 million households in the United States of America there is more than 100 million. Prime households right so the you know a significant chunk of America shop Amazon and have Prime, 190 million households shop Walmart so basically all you know the vast majority of America except for rich people in New York and California shop Walmart so you can't talk about oh, there's a Walmart customer and there's an Amazon Customer because the vast majority of customers go to both places but. [33:38] There's a core customer that spends most of their money at these two places that is likely very different right so there's these these higher net worth individuals that spend the bulk of their discretionary money Amazon that are way more insulated from inflation than the average Walmart consumer that spends the bulk of their money there and then. A big difference in this inflationary period is if you're a cord customer that shops at Walmart or Target. You have more economic instability so you're spending more of your dollars on Essentials versus nice to haves right and guess where you get your Essentials Walmart and Target like that's still where you get your food. And so at Walmart the mix shifts right instead of buying a cool outfit you're buying more proteins for your family. But that that Amazon customer is both more affluent and therefore less impacted by by inflation and they probably don't get their protein from Amazon. Right so like we Amazon doesn't see their quote-unquote essential spending they only see their discretionary spending so they don't have the same. Dynamics like causing their mix to shift to less profitable mixes in a recession so I do think in that way. The economic headwinds facing Walmart and Target are very different than the ones facing Amazon. Scot: [35:05] You know if you are getting your protein from Amazon it's probably at a Whole Foods where I have a feeling that consumers pretty resilient based on. Jason: [35:13] Yeah which and again people do but like a see a statistically insignificant period of like whole food is less than 4% of the grocery market so yeah. Scot: [35:23] Well our are like Kroger and those folks feeling I don't track them as. Jason: [35:27] Yeah the so again they have less discretionary right so yeah they're they're doing pretty well like they're benefiting like a lot of the items in Kroger are impacted by inflation so there's their sales are up um the you know. They're like the discretionary retailers are losing more dollars to the grocer so it's I'm not saying that that the grocer particularly love the current circumstances they're in but but they are like if you navigate them right there economically favorable. Scot: [36:03] But then because it's not Walmart where interest or you're making the toys there's there's a loser somewhere and it's pie like a Macy's and JC Penney you're probably going to get hammered I would imagine because there's you know if Walmarts telling us people aren't buying much apparel than this kind of start Rippling through all these other places. Jason: [36:18] Yeah or I'll give you an even more painful example Bed Bath & Beyond. Scot: [36:22] Yeah yes Father they're not doing well. Okay let's peel the onion on this a little bit so Revenue grew 7.2 percent year-over-year to 120 1.2 billion and that exceeded the expectations of 119 billion by about 2 billion. So not a huge huge beat but again it was such a bad setup that that it seemed like. You know what a miracle in somewhere North America this is really interesting when you kind of look inside of Revenue North America came in at 74 billion and then expectation was sixty seven billion so that was a really that was almost like a 10% Len. But then International was a miss it was 27 verses 32 billion. Everything I forgot to say that the top and everything we do is outside of the impact of financial currency moves so it's called X FX and Wall Street parlance which which is important because the, currency moves are gyrating around like crazy right now so you swirl that together and that's where you get your North America was up seven, International is all five so that's how you get your two billion dollar win but it's really interesting because if you look at Amazon's North America they were up 14 percent year-over-year which Compares very favorably to your US Department of Commerce data. Jason: [37:44] Yeah yeah no that's a and again like, I look at this all in Aggregate and say this is a solid quarter in a challenging climate for Amazon and yeah they have performed the the industry average despite being one of the largest players. Scot: [38:04] Yeah and then you know a mere like less than a week after Walmart said they were going from kind of ten percent to one percent profit margin Amazon's gross margins improved 45 percent year over year versus the consensus 43 percent so that, that was the one that really yeah I think people are like well if they make revenues surely they're going to go out and readjust their profits and it's going to be really hard so they came in with an operating income of 3.3 billion and this was in our Sunday called out an incremental for billion of increased cost but that was offset from improved fulfillment center Ops so I think what's going on is they built out the Fulfillment center capacity so crazily and they'll since the pandemic they were basically just standing them up and just you know getting stuff out as quickly as possible. [38:51] And then this quarter they kind of came back and where they use this phraseology invest in Harvest so they go in these different modes so they're able to come out of invest mode and look around and say well. You know in 2020 we sure we're setting up fulfillment centers kind of crazily lets you know we need to tweak, this this and this and then I want to have billion dollars of operational efficiency came out of that they called out some areas that are increasing and expense are. Ews expenses so those sit there and use a lot of electricity which a lot of electricity is off fossil fuels and then I think I think computers are getting more expensive I guess that must be a chip related thing you said Electronics but that's probably like big screen TVs anyway. Then obviously they called out fuel as an area and then they have a particularly large amount of money going into digital. With the funding with digital content with the funding of The Lord of the Rings series coming out and then they also bought Thursday Night Football so they called those out is as expense items. And as I mentioned at the top third-party one today. And then looking inside of there we talked about that seller Services grew nine point one percent year over year to twenty seven point four billion and I think whenever any of these things, grow faster than the Baseline of 7% and they're higher-margin they're going to drop that much more dollars to the bottom line. [40:20] So there was that and then I don't know anything about ads so I'll kick that one over to you. Jason: [40:27] Yeah speaking of things that drop Towers to the bottom line so that the ad units is a reminder is a. This business Amazon has had for a while but only broke out as a separate segment recently and so now it's fun to see it every quarter so it Q2 of 2022 was up 21% versus, the second quarter last year, um if you add up the last four quarters of Ed Revenue its thirty four billion dollars in ads than Amazon selling and Amazon doesn't tell us the profitability of these individual segments but most people estimate that like. [41:06] Worst the advertising business is probably a 75% gross margin business so, 75% gross margins on thirty four billion dollars makes the ad business more profitable than AWS for Amazon so, um Healthy Growth again you think about all the other people selling ads Google Facebook snap, um you know really struggling but Amazon you know continues to grow and they're already the third largest advertising Network in the US so, that's pretty impressive, side note you know every other retailer in the world is trying to replicate this this new ad business than Amazon has invented and they're all doing it you know with great success at a much smaller scale. Um so that you know the ad dollars are shifting from these, kind of top of funnel content providers to these bottom of the funnel retail networks that have first-party data and don't have all these idea of a. Problems that the others are facing so that's. [42:10] The ad business you know separately Amazon Amazon has this subscription business which is mostly Prime but a few other things mixed in there and, you would expect that to be slowing down because they've you know hit they've saturated they probably have half of us households have Prime accounts but that's still growing at 14% which again. [42:31] Is pretty impressive and I think that's a picking up the rate of growth from last quarter so it's super interesting impressive to me that these, these plati sticky Echo systems are particularly strong and Amazon and then of course everyone always talks about AWS, you know I get and we'll talk about this later but we get all these annoying tweets that like oh the only profitable part of Amazon is a WS and it's great it is great right and revenue there was almost 20 billion dollars in nineteen point seven billion, which is well ahead of the confessed consensus estimates it's a decent margin business so I think there is a lot of hardware and electronic electricity, behind that business but it's still pretty high margins and you know a lot of the world hasn't moved to the crowd yet so it WS has a lot of, Headroom in its Tam but a lot of folks were worried that in these economic uncertainty times that I see shops would be slowing down their migration in the cloud and therefore AWS would, would take a hit and I want to say Microsoft announced a slower rate of growth before Amazon so there was an expectation there that might not be an awesome number and and again it was pretty solid solid beat for for AWS. Scot: [43:52] Yeah so that's kind of the different operating units and then, you know again wall Street's kind of a what have you done for me lately so then everyone's like well this is an anomaly surely surely you're not going to be able to repeat this and everyone said number one stop calling me Shirley and then number two Amazon put out Q3 guidance and basically both the revenue of that guidance and the prophet were well ahead of what Wall Street had been thinking. The the revenue guidance was 125 to 130 billion which at the midpoint is 15 percent growth so are one was was quite pleased by that it basically made it feel like they were feeling very strong because remember this is all 727 so Amazon's got 27 date they got about a third of the quarter already in the books and it basically was a signal Amazon saying yeah we feel pretty good about the quarter right now and Amazon had prime day in the books as well so that was good and then. [44:54] Do anything Wall Street loves more than a beat and then raised so the beat is current quarter and then the Rays was the going forward quarter is Abby trays in a buyback so then they also said oh and by the way we bought 3.3 billion dollars worth of stock in the quarter because we felt like the price the stock was was kind of left so so that was all very very well received and and really made Amazon stand out from from me up substantially from the other both retailers and add companies that had previously reported. Jason: [45:27] Yeah so. Scot: [45:28] And then you got Mean Tweets go. Jason: [45:30] Yeah so here's what's annoying so I would say that that's a terrific quarter for Amazon given the economic climate and you know frankly exceeded my expectations and in a number of areas. But you do know there's room for lots of different interpretation and a bunch of folks on Twitter like zoomed in on the profitability of the US retail sector was down and you know they jump on this whole like see this is what we've always been saying retails unprofitable it's a loss leader for Amazon, you know really Amazon is just about a WS and this like you know Silly retail thing is just a sideshow and there's no way to make money on it. How do they get away with a lot sweeter thing Jason don't I have that right like I got a bunch of tweets like that and I didn't respond because. I'm not articulate enough to answer in a short tweet so hopefully it will make everyone listen to this this whole podcast, but I would say you guys are all wow like it was a terrific quarter for Amazon retail like and there's two things you're missing Gap profit is not the same thing as how many dollars flow to your bank account right like, um you know how much money Amazon decides to invest in new warehouses that are going to pay off in the future dramatically affects their. [46:51] And so it's almost silly to look at Gap profit to say whether Amazon retailers a good business or not but more importantly. Um all these profitable businesses that everyone's talking about exist only because of retail right so that ad business I just talked about. [47:10] People aren't coming to Amazon to consume ads they're coming to Amazon to buy stuff in the ad show up right, um and the other business that's impossible for Amazon to lose money on that's growing wildly is merchant services that you hit on, um the merchant services are because Merchants want to sell stuff on Amazon on the retail platform and so it's a little when people are talking about oh gosh the retail business and Amazon's a loser but the ad business is profitable, that's a little bit like saying. The content creation business in b.c. is a total loser but the ad business at MBC is a winner right like know that they're only able to sell ads because they create that content and in the same way. Amazon is only able to make money on Merchant Services and ads and to some extent on subscriptions because of this, vibrant strong retail business um that you know has more favorable characteristics than a lot of other big retailers in this current inflationary potentially recessionary environment so I'm sorry guys I just I think you're wrong and wildly oversimplifying Amazon's business model and economic circumstances. Scot: [48:22] Yet another framing that's kind of fun is after retails been around for what like I guess even longer but I get I was here Sears like 150 years or something. And you have all that history and it took Jeff Bezos to figure out hey you can actually glom on these really profitable high margin businesses and make the whole thing better and there's a synergy synergy inside of there that enables you to like they did this quarter where they can dial things up and down don't you think Walmart had more of that right now or Target or you know Macy's or any of these other retailers so so in a way I think they're missing the point there to just pick out this one piece that can't be unintegrated and say that it's doing bad because you have to take the whole enchilada because they designed you know retail 2.0, by mixing all these things together in a unique way no one figured out till they did. Jason: [49:21] Yeah no hundred percent so so Props to Amazon and keep on keeping on. I did want to I think we're over on time but I just wanted to just like briefly hit on a couple non earnings related topics just to wet people's whistle so. Hey we talked about prime day there's a pretty significant week that there's going to be a second prime Day this year so a lot so a number of journalists have seen internal documents. That talked about a thing called Prime Early Access sale which is scheduled to happen this fall. And so most of us interpret that as likely going to be October which again is when they accidentally had Prime in 2020 because of covid-19. So look for more there but like potentially Amazon will have a second prime day to me that's really interesting because. I feel like the first Prime day at this point is mostly about comps and people turn to match last year's Prime day and it's I'm not sure it's necessarily totally additive but adding a new sail if it. [50:26] Works and capture sales in October that could be interesting so. I found that super interesting Amazon launched a new product that maybe is only cool to me but it's called retail store analytics and this is they're taking all the data from all the cameras and all the just walk out stores and they're selling it back to the brands. So you know just like a you know a cpg can go to Amazon and find out how many glances they got on their their product detail page and how many add to carts they got, they can now find out in a Whole Foods how many people looked at their package on the Shelf versus how many people bought it so there, they're monetizing all the customer insights they're getting from these brick-and-mortar stores using all those cameras which I thought was pretty cool. And then the last thing I'll leave people with is there were some significant articles talking about internal week memos about Amazon trimming its private label and its private label largely being. Unsuccessful and Amazon potentially moving away from private label and. Like I don't think those articles are wrong but I would just throw 11 piece of caution when you interpret those articles. [51:35] I've seen no evidence that Amazon's moving away from any of its successful private-label initiatives, so so what's happening Amazon has a huge amount of private labels they have a ton of Brands they invented a bunch of them never got traction never caught on never had significant sales and I do think they're doing a rationalization of all of those, but there still are Amazon private label brands, they're doing quite well and it appears the Amazon is doubling down on those so I guess what I would say is that they're really focused on the head tail private labeled it's doing well in there, they're kind of rationalizing the long tail that was not doing well so that is all of the Amazon news, and it's a good thing because we've blown through our lot of time once again as always if you found this episode valuable we sure would appreciate that five star review on iTunes. Scot: [52:33] Thanks everyone and until next time. Jason: [52:37] Happy commercing!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.