Podcasts about Sticking

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  • 2,511PODCASTS
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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Sticking

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Latest podcast episodes about Sticking

In The Aisles
Episode 72 - Venom: Let There Be Carnage

In The Aisles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:03


For our watchlist this week, James embraces variety by sampling Neil Blomkamp's Sci-Fi shorts experiment Oats Studios. Sticking with Netflix as a consistent source of content, he then takes a trip into a German courtroom to give his final ruling on The Billion Dollar Code. Elsewhere, Dan discusses the problematic handling of sensitive subject matter with ITV's latest drama Angela Black and delivers his overly long, complex feelings about a terrible film, The Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud.   In Reel News, William Shatner boldly goes where no celebrity man (or woman) has gone before, we use this as an opportunity to fill 3 minutes of silence. Meanwhile back on earth, reviews are in for Ghostbusters: Afterlife. Is the positive reaction going to encourage us to don our proton packs into the cinema?   One film that did make us return to our local cinema is Venom: Let There Be Carnage. Due to us making the effort to see it, we decided to use our collective experience to feature it as this week's main review.   Follow us: instagram.com/intheaislespodcast Email us: intheaislespodcast@gmail.com Like us: facebook.com/intheaislespodcast

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre
Dak Prescott is a Superstar, the Browns Need a Leader & Mahomes Feels Like Favre 2.0

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:57


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with an ode to Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott. After throwing a game-winning touchdown pass in overtime to beat the New England Patriots on the road, it's clear that Dak has elevated himself from 'game manager' to 'superstar'. The Cowboys are clearly the Beasts of the NFC East, but now that Dak has taken the leap, you could actually argue that they're a legitimate threat to make the Super Bowl coming out of the NFC. On the flip side, if Dak Prescott is playing the best football of his career, you can argue that Patrick Mahomes is playing the worst football of his. Producer Rob G argues that there was a case to be made as recently as last year that Mahomes was on track to become the greatest quarterback in NFL history. In the last 15 games, however, Mahomes has looked more like Brett Favre 2.0 with the way he keeps turning the football over. Sticking in the AFC, is it time to hit the panic button in Cleveland? Not only did the Browns get demolished by the still-undefeated Arizona Cardinals, but they may have also lost quarterback Baker Mayfield to a shoulder injury. With Mayfield, Nick Chubb, Kareem Hunt, Odell Beckham Jr. and both of their starting tackles all dealing with various health issues, the Browns are desperate for someone to step up and steady the boat. Finally, Jason closes the show with a very special Buffalo Bills vs Tennessee Titans Monday Night Football edition of the Best Bet. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
Straight Fire w/ Jason McIntyre - Dak Prescott is a Superstar, the Browns Need a Leader & Mahomes Feels Like Favre 2.0

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:57


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with an ode to Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott. After throwing a game-winning touchdown pass in overtime to beat the New England Patriots on the road, it's clear that Dak has elevated himself from 'game manager' to 'superstar'. The Cowboys are clearly the Beasts of the NFC East, but now that Dak has taken the leap, you could actually argue that they're a legitimate threat to make the Super Bowl coming out of the NFC. On the flip side, if Dak Prescott is playing the best football of his career, you can argue that Patrick Mahomes is playing the worst football of his. Producer Rob G argues that there was a case to be made as recently as last year that Mahomes was on track to become the greatest quarterback in NFL history. In the last 15 games, however, Mahomes has looked more like Brett Favre 2.0 with the way he keeps turning the football over. Sticking in the AFC, is it time to hit the panic button in Cleveland? Not only did the Browns get demolished by the still-undefeated Arizona Cardinals, but they may have also lost quarterback Baker Mayfield to a shoulder injury. With Mayfield, Nick Chubb, Kareem Hunt, Odell Beckham Jr. and both of their starting tackles all dealing with various health issues, the Browns are desperate for someone to step up and steady the boat. Finally, Jason closes the show with a very special Buffalo Bills vs Tennessee Titans Monday Night Football edition of the Best Bet. Click here to subscribe, rate and review all of the latest Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Oilersnation Radio
Season Opener Recap, Tyler's Birthday, and a Battle of Alberta Preview

Oilersnation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:59


It's Friday afternoon and that can only mean one thing — a brand new episode of Oilersnation Radio to help you finish off your week with an hour of all things Edmonton Oilers. On this week's show, we looked back at the season opener, ahead at tomorrow's Battle of Alberta, did another round of Ask the Idiots, and a whole lot more. To kick off the podcast, we got started with a look at the season opener and what was our biggest takeaway from the first game against the Vancouver Canucks. Obviously, it wasn't a perfect game by any means but the Oilers were able to cash out a win that didn't look like a sure thing after Vancouver tied the game late in the third period. Whether it was Hyman's brilliant debut or the second pairing trying to stay afloat, the boys offered their early-season takes on what happened on night one and whether those first impressions are indicative of what's to come. Sticking with the opener, three of the four of us were at the game on Wednesday night so I asked them what it was like to be back at Rogers Place for the first time in 581 days. As you'll hear, the boys had plenty to say about what went well and what could have gone better after so much time away from the rink. Next up, we previewed tomorrow's game against the Calgary Flames and offered up our boldest takes as for what to expect for the first Battle of Alberta of the season. 

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
Jolene Park - What is Gray Area Drinking & How To End the Back & Forth

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:36


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!   iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen   Connect with Jolene Park Visit Jolene's Website: https://grayareadrinkers.com/ Follow Jolene on Instagram @jolene_park Watch Jolene's TEDx talk: https://www.healthydiscoveries.com/tedx-talk/      The Lightning Round    Book recommendations:  Drinking, A Love Story, by Caroline Knapp Many Roads, One Journey: Moving Beyond the Twelve Steps, by Charlotte Kasl Favorite Quote: “This too shall pass” Regular Self-Care Practice: Grounding - walking barefoot on the beach, breathwork, somatic work, and healthy eating. Transcript:  Arlina Allen  2:56   Jolene, thank you so much for joining me today.   Jolene Park  3:03   Thanks for having me I'm I'm really looking forward to chatting with you and getting to know you a little bit more in the studio.   Arlina Allen  3:09    Listen, I appreciate somebody who has done their own work and who has a lot of credibility. Can I just say that to you?   Unknown Speaker  3:20   Thank you. I received that and appreciate that and feel the exact same way so I'm with you. Yeah,   Arlina Allen  3:27   we were just okay, I'm not gonna go into a rant, but maybe just a tiny little soapbox. You know, little cautionary tale. There's, there's a while I love how open people are being with their recovery. I just really appreciate people who have done their own work, right? So and you'll hear it I listen, I can sniff it out in two seconds. If I'm talking to someone who has not done their own work. And I've listened, I've listened to your TED Talk, your other interviews, there's lots of really good quality stuff that you've been putting out that I really appreciate. Because you are rooted in logic, which is nice. You got a lot of science going on. I love me some science. So we'll talk about all the stuff all the things, but just for fun. Do you hear my dog barking? Yeah, one second. I'm so sorry.   Unknown Speaker  4:54   Oh, I think you're still muted. Ah, here we go.   Arlina Allen  5:02   Okay, I had to go. Let my I have an English bulldog named named Teddy had to let him out. Did you know that Dr. Andrew Huberman has an English bulldog?   Unknown Speaker  5:11   I mean, his dog is no castellet. Well, long videos watch. Yeah, yeah. Costello was Costello   Arlina Allen  5:18   okay. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, so we were totally   Unknown Speaker  5:23   embarrassed that I know that but I might make you vermin fans.   Arlina Allen  5:27   Me, too. Oh my God. He's talking about him all the time. I digress. Sorry about that, I will have to edit that little part out. What I where I thought we would start is just kind of a fun little lightning round. It's a fun little icebreaker. When you first started your journey to do you call it do how do you refer to it your alcohol free journey, your sobriety journey?   Unknown Speaker  5:53   alcohol free is what I use most. But you know, I'll interchange sobriety here and there, but in general, I, you know, I'll the term alcohol free is what I'm most comfortable with.   Arlina Allen  6:05   Okay, cool. Yeah. I mean, it's so interesting, you know, over the years, you know, when people were first talking about getting sober, it was all about alcoholism. Right. And you and I know now that the DSM five doesn't even recognize that term anymore. It's alcohol use disorder. So which I appreciate because that sort of speaks to the spectrum. Right? There's an Oh, you're going to talk about this too. I'm not gonna steal your thunder here. But um, but yes, so when you started your alcohol free journey, were there particular books that you found really helpful?   Unknown Speaker  6:42   Oh, what a fun question.   Arlina Allen  6:45   I am obsessive when it comes to books.   Unknown Speaker  6:48   Yeah. Because you know, when I started my journey, and Anna Grace's book was not out. Oh, okay. Unexpected joy of getting sober. You know, all of these these books, the sober diaries by Claire Pouliot. None of those. They all came after I quit drinking. Yeah, me too. So yeah, this is a really fun question. Kind of, you know, pre this big Instagram boom, about talking about alcohol free. I definitely read Carolyn naps book, the drinking love story. Have you? Have you read her memoir?   Arlina Allen  7:20   I haven't. That also came out after I got sober. I heard that people read the books that came out when they got sober, or became alcohol free.   Unknown Speaker  7:31   She wrote her book. I think it was in the 90s and the 90s. Yeah, okay. Yeah, she was an early, early one. And her writing is just exquisite. I mean, it's so visceral and it pulls you out. I mean, it almost it's called drinking a love story. And she really romanticizes the drink and she had an absolute 100% you know, drinking problem, but her writing is just mesmerizing. So I read her memoir a couple times. But you know, who I knew about early on to was Charlotte, I think it's castle, k s L, I never know how to say her last name. And she wrote the book moving beyond the 12 steps, many roads one journey,   Arlina Allen  8:18   I think wow. And   Unknown Speaker  8:21   and so she took a she looks at the physiology, which is you know, is a real core piece of my work and you know, potential things like blood sugar and, and allergies to alcohol and, and she, you know, she knew about that side as a psychologist, but, but were her work really, where she really anchored it was looking at the language of the bill Wilson's 12 steps. And so she wrote the 16 steps and more of a feminine kind of empowered approach, you know, she just turned the language and so I enjoyed her work and kind of her take on things. And I think that you know, her book came out probably in the 90s as well   Arlina Allen  9:03   in the 90s that is so interesting. So I grew up in the church where I was accustomed to reading patriarchal language of the Bible and things like that. And and I was accustomed to reading things and then interpreting it like I didn't realize I was I had like this interpretation filter, so that you know, when I got sober in 94, all there was really was the 12 steps. And I was so desperate to be different and I just happened to know some people who were going and so I just kind of got they call it getting Eskimos in the cold, I guess. Um, and so that that worked for me. But it's so fascinating that there were so many women that are just like, I'm not okay with this, like this whole patriarchal thing and, and so it's so interesting to hear that Charlotte was able to sort of translate To the 16 steps I'm totally gonna have to check that out so that was a book that you read early on as well   Unknown Speaker  10:06   it was because I I appreciated her comprehensive approach which is very much resonated with me about looking at the biochemistry looking at the emotional components and today's you know language around that is the somatic work the polyvagal work which Charlotte wasn't you know that's newer research but she was aware of that of that bigger comprehensive approach around the codependency is another you know term that was more traditional but that emotional sobriety and then the spiritual piece of it too and there's all different you know, currents to ride with that and and she helped me you know, have an appreciation too I've always been very neutral with with 12 steps I've been in and out of meetings you know, throughout the years and I certainly see from a nervous system standpoint the huge benefit of the community so being in a room with other human beings where you can be heard and seen and witnessed and you know, that your story is held and that's very healing to the nervous system. I understand the criticisms and I have you know, I respect you know, it's everybody has their different preference but speaking strictly from a nervous system standpoint community and the predictability the regular meetings the the support that that you know, there's a lot of dynamics in there that are very supportive to the nervous system now we can find them in you know, in churches or spiritual groups or movement groups like yoga communities or more knitting communities it doesn't have to be a recovery based community but in general community that's part of my acronym nourish uniting with others so   Arlina Allen  11:55   I thought we're gonna get to that I wrote   Unknown Speaker  11:58   and power code   Arlina Allen  12:01   is so good it okay so I don't want to jump ahead but I'm just I'm gonna ask you about all that cuz I was listening to and I was like writing this down I was like, Oh my god, how did I not hear about this before? It's so interesting that we can sort of sort of like package or position information in a way that is so consumable and easy to remember your whole nourish, and that a knack? Is it an acronym my does that sound weird? acronym, acronym? Sorry, dear, I laugh at my own jokes. Bear with me. Um, okay, so the books these are, these are really good books. Okay, so drinking a love story, and then moving beyond the 12 steps, which I totally appreciate. Like,   Unknown Speaker  12:45   let me let me throw one other in there that was very emotional. And we can as we get more into kind of the biochemistry of the book, seven weeks to sobriety was also very influential. And I can dig more into that but but the author, she has her PhD in nutrition. And she was inspired to write the book again in the 90s, I believe, is when it came out, because her teenage son, I think it was late teens, early 20s, went into to to traditional treatment, around the you know, mid 90s, and stayed sober, but was miserable. So emotionally, he came out of treatment and was still very depressed and he didn't drink but tragically then took his life because the alcohol had been removed. But the other pieces is like he didn't feel better, even though he was following you know, the program. And so his mother then said, there's something else we're not even talking about the physical side, there's this whole biochemical side and she got very interested in the nutrients and the amino acids and went on for her PhD to really learn that and then opened a treatment center in Minneapolis, called the health Recovery Center wrote a book called seven weeks to sobriety. And so that was an influential part as I was studying and learning functional medicine about that biochemical piece and and Charlotte wrote about that too. She understood some of the biochemical side but she really looked at kind of that psycho emotional spiritual. So those those were influential books to me while I was drinking like the you know, because I'm a I'm a nutritionist I'm a health coach, I have been for 20 years and so that stuff was always interesting to me. And I would read it and kind of chew on it and be like, this is kind of fascinating. It's a little bit off the traditional path. I still drink but it was planting seeds of where ultimately got me to my final stop what I used when I stopped and now what what I use in my work was was those early seeds.   Arlina Allen  14:41   Yeah, so good. I mean, listen, there's a period of time like I lived in this barn, the Self Help section at Barnes and Noble trying to like think my way into right living as they say. And just because I had as I want to ask you about this a little bit later, but once having the information wasn't like applying them formation is kind of my current obsession and so we'll talk about how to apply it and but I think that's really important that we'll we'll talk about that Do you have a sort of go to mantra or quote that you live by   Unknown Speaker  15:17   this too shall pass   Arlina Allen  15:18   whoo that's fine   Unknown Speaker  15:20   yeah or another one is you know all as well which comes from a Christian mystic in England Her name is Julian of Norwich. Yeah, I I like the Christian the feminine Christian mystics I draw a lot of wisdom from and that was that was one of her really well known quotes is well as well   Arlina Allen  15:43   yeah. I love that Oh, you know what I'm what I like is that just popped into my head was in the end everything will be okay. And if it's not okay, it's not the end.   Unknown Speaker  15:54   Yeah. Yeah. I often post that around New Year's, you know, turning up the calendar and kind of New Year's Eve and it feels like the end but it's you know, we're beginning   Arlina Allen  16:10   Yes, every and has a beginning. I love that. Let's see, do you have a regular your own personal self care routine? Like do you like a daily practice a weekly practice,   Unknown Speaker  16:24   I have a whole menu of nourishment that I have a bag of nourishment that goes Borg and self care. I'm admittedly i'm i'm not great about you know, hitting every single day. But I certainly have really favorite practices that and it changes you know, with different seasons, the time of the year as I grow and evolve and what my needs are, sometimes they're more physical, sometimes they're more emotional, sometimes more spiritual. So it shifts. Right now I'm in Charleston, right outside Charleston, South Carolina on purpose to be very close to the beach because walking barefoot on the beach scene at the beach regularly for me is a huge daily practice and regulator. So that's a biggie. Um, I like breathwork. So that's also very regulating and calming to me to do some kind of some. It's a little bit of Wim Hof. But it's not total Wim Hof.   Arlina Allen  17:26   Half every morning like Monday through Friday. We host this little it's like a 25 we do Wim Hof for 10 minutes and then Tara Brock reign meditation for 10 minutes. No chit chat. No messing around, in and out. Love   Unknown Speaker  17:39   Yeah, yeah. And so I find a grounding for me like literally feet on the earth and then kind of active breathwork both are very settling and soothing to me. And I like those a lot. So those are kind of my my key things saying, you know, really hydrated, sleep, regular, predictable bedtime and wake time is helpful for me. But yeah, you know, there's when I quit drinking, I was using more herbs. There's all kinds of stuff. I mean, we can all   Arlina Allen  18:13   I know that. Yeah. Do you know I am just so glad that you highlighted that there are many tools that you don't do them every single day, like super hard, like you're not militant about it, and that there are different things for different seasons. Because often I talk to people, I even the clients that I coach, they're like, Oh, I didn't do this every single day. And it's like, you don't have to do it every day because our needs actually change and fluctuate. And so it's okay to be flexible, right? And just pay attention. Yeah, pay attention to what your needs are that day. And I have a client who called it her smorgasbord of things. But she you know, she did she put a time limit on it. She's like, Okay, I'm not gonna spend more than an hour, right? She's retired, she's like, I'm not gonna spend because then it becomes this other thing you beat yourself up with, like, all different things. So I like I like the flexibility. And I think consistency can be viewed, let's say over a month period of time, right? If you did, if you did something like 20 days out, that's pretty consistent. Right? You don't have to do something every day to be that's extreme thinking of consistent. We're so funny.   Unknown Speaker  19:30   Yeah. And you know, he's a core philosophy of mind for myself and how I work with others, especially with women. I'm very interested in you know, the cycles and the rhythms. So in our own body within this is noticing nature, so noticing the seasons in nature, but we also have that those seasons within our own body. And so it's very linear and masculine, the masculine archetype to kind of a 24 hour cycle where it's like every morning, do a spin class. And there's nothing wrong with that. But more of the feminine Yin cycle is there's different times of the month depending if we're relating bleeding coming into oscillation, you know, out of our bleed time, our energy cycle is different. And even if you know women listening are menopausal had stopped bleeding or not bleeding for whatever reason, our bodies still sync with the moon. And so there's just times with whether the moon is full or dark a new moon, are as women, our bodies really sink in with that, and it's more about peak energy time versus a low energy time. And so it you know, you don't even have to let get militant about the moon or the moon. You know, this is my work of I'm always cueing clients of notice what feels really nourishing right now, not because you should or you have to, or somebody posted about on Instagram, but does it just feel nourishing to like, take a nap. And, and noticing that and giving yourself permission. So that's so much of my work of tracking, instead of beating ourselves with a whip, really noticing what can   Arlina Allen  21:11   we Yeah, I love that you are not shame based, I can already hear it, you know, it's more nurturing and supportive. And you It's really cool. You know, a lot of the stuff, I know that you're like in the corporate world, like you're very corporate friendly, like palatable. And when I was listening to a lot of your stuff, I was thinking of my friends, you know, I'm from Silicon Valley, I did, I was corporate for a very long time. And in sales, tech sales, and so very, like male dominated very robotic, I would say, and very, like, absent of feelings. It's like, No, no, we don't talk about failing, they can talk about, they'll talk about stress, like, but that's about it, like tired or stressed. Like, the language is very limited. And so it's so it's so interesting that you have it seems like a very unique capability, capacity for being able to speak the corporate language, right, meet people where they are, but then also introduce very practical ideas, you know, paying attention to, you know, the moon and stuff like that, that that was not I did not expect that. And I think it's so refreshing when you're able to sort of live, you know, straddle the, you know, the corporate world, which is so robotic and so shot like, shallow is that I don't know if that's fair. But you know, people are trying to survive in this very, you know, a, a type driven accomplishment, don't feel anything environment. Right? Yeah. I don't know, where alcohol   Unknown Speaker  22:45   comes in. Like, it makes so much sense then, when we drive ourselves at that level. Why alcohol is also so prevalent in   Arlina Allen  22:52   the corporate world. Yeah, big time.   Unknown Speaker  22:55   Yeah. You know, and that's where I really feel like I learned how to corporate minds love physiology. And they, they're fascinated by how the brain works, and that peak performance and, and how to manage stress, you know, that those are buzzwords. And so bringing that in, in kind of a fun inspiring, like, a little bit of a different angle. It's that's where I learned to, to really speak to this, that that was kind of a universal message. And so, you know, I certainly wouldn't lock in talking about the moon. I have, I have found that weird. You know, I'm interested in those aspects that I've found by building the rapport and laying the groundwork of when there's this gut brain connection and what the bacteria in your gut is doing. And this there's this nerve in the back of the cranium called poly vagal nerve, when it's not toned. And this dysregulation, like, which I mean, I level that too. I'm fascinated by it. I you know, I love kind of that logical, yeah, give me that, you know, what is this? Like? How does it work? Why does it work? And then building that rapport where people can be like, that's so fascinating. And then it's like, oh, and do you also know that it's our bodies are 70% water and the moon regulates the tides that the ocean water? Our body is also you know, there's a thing to that it's responding to it. Yeah. And so when we set it up in the physiology which all of this can can be backed in physiology, there's data for all of it, and then it doesn't sound so Whoo. And like, well, this is just nuts.   Arlina Allen  24:43   It's like well, I love how science is explaining why woo is so fascinating, right? It's like there are those of us that less I'm pretty open minded. You know, but I need some science behind it to, but I am I almost missed the whole we should highlight the fact that Do you really like this gray area drinking expert right that's that's really how I came to know you and I thought you know that is meeting people where they are in the corporate world like in the corporate world these people are so driven and there's this perfectionism that happens in the corporate world it's like don't show any of your any of your flaws you know it's like this very robotic it's pushed yourself you know endlessly this 80 Hour Workweek is celebrated and you know they claim work life balance but you know I would be on at sales you know, quarterly business reviews where the VP would be out drinking until like, you know six in the morning and show up for the eight o'clock meeting still a little bit drunk I'm I would imagine and so it's so interesting to sort of gently like we're avoiding words like alcoholism which you know, we don't we understand that that's not really a thing anymore. There's a spectrum but the gray area drinking seems to be seems to be a very nice entry point Can you explain to the listeners like people listening they're like what is this gray area drinking because I think once you explain it everyone goes Oh, yeah, I totally know what that is. Yeah, so   Unknown Speaker  26:15   I was teaching I was doing a lot of contract work from 2004 to 2011 in corporate America trip flying and traveling around the whole United States doing on site workshops being contracted to come in for exactly what you're speaking to us Can you come do these training programs for the employees on this work life balance, they're really stressed they're you know, we're watching the biometrics we're doing these health fairs and we want to have blood pressure kind of overall more in range and their cholesterol and their BMI and we realize it's more of a comprehensive approach so when you come teach them so that you know that was that's my foundation and the work I was doing and what we never talked about around blood pressure and weight and sleep issues and stress was alcohol but you know, bringing in then these resources these regulating resources of around food and around sleep and really practical things to do some regulation in the body which which employees loved and because you know, a lot of people would come into the workshop saying I know this stuff, I'm a marathon runner, you know this it's my hobby and and then we do these workshops and they're like, I didn't know this like I didn't know that about you know, grounding and what like the omega three fat actually does in my brain with my neuro chemicals and so again, people I work with, they're very well read, they're very smart they like this information, they're already reading books listening to podcasts, but then when we can apply it to peak performance and the challenges that come up because of the you know, the corporate deadlines and and a lot of people are drinking heavily and we're not talking about it. And so I would come in from the angle of your craving brain whatever your brain is craving. Here's some ways to you know, because you don't hang the hang the poster seven come to the alcohol class in the boardroom at noon, like people are not going to be alone, right? People are not going to you know, trip over themselves to get to that boardroom but when we talk about the craving brain and ways that you can regulate and work with you know, your innate body's rhythms and cycles and systems in the gut in the brain, people were really really fascinated by that. And then to your question about you know, what is gray area drinking it's that space where people are functioning really well my clients tell me this all the time, I saw it all the time in the corporate world, people function and they drink really heavily. And if they didn't fall into that those traditional definitions of like end stage, just kind of rock bottom the wheels fall off our life but they also weren't every now and again drinkers where they had a drink or two a couple times a year, they were in between this and it was this gray area where again slipping through the cracks it was the white elephant in the room that is how everybody was drinking and nobody was talking about it. And it's how I was drinking and teaching wellness you know, it's like I love this stuff I love about functional nutrition and with the body and regulating the body and then on the weekends I'd be out with my friends drinking like everybody else around me It's how we all drank but it was just you know, and then I would stop many many times and I can't keep drinking like this and I was able to stop it wasn't a problem for me to stop what was more of the problem was after a couple months saying why am I being so restrictive I can have a drink so I would go back to drinking this the staying stopped the same stop which is very characteristic of gray area drinkers because people will say you know, I don't drink every day I you know, go weeks and don't drink. I'm like that's really characteristic. But the hard thing is Sticking with that because it's this gray area of like but nothing bad has happened like I don't have this external kind of proof that there's a problem yet it's the 3am wake up the dry mouth that mentally beating ourselves up but nobody hears that conversation except us in our own head and then going through the gymnastics of okay I'm now I'm just going to drink on the weekend I'm not going to I'm not going to drink again I'm it's this whole thing that goes on for months and years that nobody ever talked about   Arlina Allen  30:31   this it seems there there's this whole other layer of insanity that goes around trying to manage it right like oh well I'm just gonna drink a glass of water between drinks or I'm gonna have a glass of water by the bedside with electrolytes in it so that when I wake up in the morning in the middle of the night just totally dehydrated or you know having the Advil and the by Xen and the charcoal things and the oh my god I'm exhausted just thinking about it right it's like this whole insanity to make make it okay from for the drinking part and it's the whole back and forth that is was so exhausting I wonder so and we were talking a little bit about like just having the information is not enough it's about applying the information but don't you feel like there had to you had to like make a decision like at some point you got sick of the back and forth and you what what was there like a tipping point for you that you were just like this is that I'm done for good this time?   Unknown Speaker  31:29   Well that was December 14 2014 which was the the solid in my bones resolute I'm done. This is it and you know, it wasn't a Cavalier decision It wasn't easy. Alcohol is a problem for me you know, it was very typical for me I'm just gonna have a glass I can just you know, I want to just open a bottle at home pour that glass and then I would drink it and be like, ah, screw it I'll have enough it was very easy to do you know finish the bottle that was that was my kind of typical pattern and knock on wood. Fortunately nothing you know, half bad happened like I didn't have a DUI or anything like that, but there was so much of that. That's how I drank and then I would stop many many times over the years under the wellness umbrella I'm going to do a paleo challenge I'm I'm doing a yoga you know challenge I I'm just not going to drink and people get used to that and and it worked because they knew I was in wellness they knew I was and it's like oh that makes sense like you're doing so I never really it was it I flew under the radar with it. But then I would say oh I can you know be a social drinker. I want to be a social drinker. So it really to your question, it was just so much of that back and forth which is exhausting. It never changes I would go right back to where I left off whether it was one month or seven months it didn't matter and it was just this resolute because I had bad you know back and forth so many times of just I'm tired of this. I don't want to keep doing this. I've been through different seasons with it I've been through different experiences with it. You know what I've been dating not dating really high stress with work or whatever, it just doesn't change and I had that real conversation with myself December 14 2014 going through those scenarios of like you know what if I go on this romantic holiday like what if and I was like no no, I'm just I'm done. And that was seven I'm coming up on my seven year anniversary this December.   Arlina Allen  33:40   Oh my gosh, that's so exciting. Congratulations that is not easy. That is not easy. Yeah, so Okay, so you know what I love about what you do is that the science behind it the science behind like the addiction of alcoholism or alcohol the science sort of depersonalized is that right? And so it takes out the shame takes out the gill and it's like well of course you're getting addicted to alcohol Look what it's doing to your brain right and so you talk about three the neurotransmitters and a way that I thought was so good it was like oh, that's why right so you talked about GABA, serotonin and dopamine and you're gonna be able to explain it much better but when I heard you talk about it the first time I was like that as the shit Oh my god, like people need to hear this. So what is your What is your explanation behind those three neuro chemicals and how they make us feel that sort of drive the compulsion to drink   Unknown Speaker  34:46   well, so that you know there's there's four major neural chemicals I hit on three of them in my TED talk, but there's four major ones. So two are the gas pedal for our body and then two are the brakes for us. So the gas pedal dopamine and serotonin. So dopamine is the drive that shapes that with the motivation to to move. To get up out of bed and produce we need that we need to be motivated. And then the acetylcholine is the other kind of gas pedal. And that's about focus and memory. And then serotonin and GABA are the brakes. So GABA is that relaxation feeling where the mind shuts off. And there's just that feeling of kind of that downshift. And serotonin is just the feeling of happiness, bliss, life is good, I'm not really needing or craving anything to fill a void right now I'm just I'm content I'm good. And so we need the balance of gas pedal what you know, we need to move and stay motivated and produce and we're, you know, accomplish and have that drive. And we need memory to have that memory bank and our focus and like these are, you know, important things just to biologically function. But then we need to balance that with rest and relaxation, and some happiness and some bliss and just contentment. And so when you know, those get out of balance for all kinds of reasons, sleep, you know, not sleeping, well, eating a lot of processed food and sugar, drugs and alcohol, trauma, stress, so all of those things can open up the valve, where's those neural chemicals just flush through us much quicker, because we're inside that's like who there's stress, there's, you know, all this sugar, all this alcohol. So we need to compensate open the valve and then all of a sudden, it's like, we're really depleted now and gabbeh or something, you know, we're going through that scenario, and the body just can't do the uptake enough to replenish and make it quick enough to fill it up. So we're the dumping it too fast, or not making it fast enough. And so when we come into baseline, the body can do what it knows to do, it can make adequate chemicals through real food, like omega three fish oil, you know, through the amino acids, those are the raw materials that then make these neural chemicals. And we can we can hold on to our neural chemicals and not just flesh them through our system so quickly, by you know, some different practices and movement and rest and good replenishing sleep. And so to me, it's it's where the rubber meets the road with all of the practices, exercises, theories, techniques, because you spoke to it a minute ago about how we can just kind of get into like this militant, like I need to do it, I should do it. I heard it's good. I heard it's bad. I heard it's like, no, it's about noticing, what are you needed to replenish right now what's deficient and depleted. And so the body's just trying to keep us in homeostasis, and that, and then we reach to alcohol. So it's like when we understand the physiology, it's like, Oh, interesting, something's depleted and deficient, physiologically, not psychologically. And so the body's just trying to compensate. So alcohol is a physical substance, our physical body is depleted, we and our physical body, and we get a physical effect very immediately. So the body's like, keep doing it, like i don't i, this, it seems to work immediately. So and that's been where that addictive loop gets in. So where I then work is, let's lift the hood, what's depleted in the first place, biochemically, emotionally, energetically, and let's replenish what's truly needing to be replenished. It's not because you're a bad person, or you did something wrong. It's just like going to be in the body detective, the body whisperer, which I love doing. And, and often, it's just, you know, it doesn't have to be really complicated. It's just going back to the basics. And I'd find this in the corporate world all the time, too. We want the shiny, you know, stuff, the shiny next thing, and nobody's hydrated. Nobody's sleeping regularly. And this is where the application comes down. Because it's, it's like, yeah, yeah, yeah, I should drink more water should get better slide,   Arlina Allen  39:12   isn't it, nobody wants to hear that.   Unknown Speaker  39:17   It's not sexy. It's not glamorous, and we're out the other. I'm the same way I get it. But what's really cool about this work is when you have the actual experience. So when you actually have a 10 hour night of deep restorative sleep, it's mind blowing, it's a 180 it's the same way with, you know, sewers,   Unknown Speaker  39:36   or certain things. And so I'm always working with clients of like, it's not about getting a gold star from me and checking the box and doing all these things to perform and achieve. That's what makes us want to drink because we're, we're exhausted. So now it's when you put something in when you add it in, what happens because when we drink something happens and so if you're not noticing an effect that's really Positive that you can, you know, like, again, when I do breath work, there's an effect. Like, I feel that I mean, there's this bliss and this calm that moves through my body by by, you know, consciously doing different practices with my breath. So it's like I want to do that again, like that almost feels like I just had a glass of wine, what I did with that breathwork so that's the work and it's it's exciting, it can be really inspiring. And it's very empowering to go back to the physiology because that's where all the secrets and the magic are. And it puts aside the psychological shame that we've kind of gotten tangled in that's really unnecessary. Yeah,   Arlina Allen  40:40   you know, you hit on something that kind of sparked a light me which is about adding in, because a lot of recovery is about taking away, right, we're taking away the one thing like listen, when I was still drinking, and I smoked a lot of weed. Taking I was I loved those things, those were the things that receiving me, right and I crashed and burned early, I was done at 25. Because I did not manage, because not managing well. But to let them go was so hard because it was I felt like the thing that was bringing me like that was saving me so to let it so deprivation, I you know is a big thing for people that are you know, going alcohol free, or getting sober or whatever. And I love the idea that you're presenting which is adding in, right, let's add in the things that give you the feeling that we wanted from the drugs or alcohol in the first place. So it's a totally different mindset instead of deprivation. It's about adding I love that idea.   Unknown Speaker  41:46   Yeah, I do too. deprivation doesn't work for me. So I'm not going to try to talk with somebody else or coach somebody else through deprivation, like I don't want to be deprived who does. Nobody wants that. It doesn't work. So I would   Arlina Allen  41:58   be there we would be broken alone.   Unknown Speaker  42:02   And we know from behavior change from behavior, psychology, that deprivation, it never works now, but I can put it back in the physiology. So what we're dealing with is the amygdala and the animal brain, the animal brain only concern it has one concern as to keep us alive, right? And so if there's a sense of deprivation, that signals it's a biological signal, we're gonna die. So who's gonna win? Is that animal, right? Every time. So we've got to give the message then to the amygdala, that alarm center in the body that we're not in this deprivation, like we're not going to die, you're, we want to give that animal something. And, and that animal kind of limbic brain, it doesn't understand language. So this is why you know, saying, Just relax.   Arlina Allen  42:51   Don't ever tell an angry woman to relax? Yeah,   Unknown Speaker  42:54   well, it's like, it's literally like saying to an animal, just relax. They don't understand words our animal brain does literally doesn't understand words. But what it understands is sensation. And so alcohol gives us sensation in the physical body, walking barefoot on the beach gives a physical sensation. If I take a gamma boosting herb, it gives us sensation. And so that's where it's like the rubber meets the road with these practices of what we're doing is we're working on the physiology to give us sensation, that then travels up the spinal cord from the body into the brain saying, Oh, that feels good. And the animal brain is like, Okay, I'm not deprived, I feel this comfort, I feel soothing, I feel contained, which is what we're ultimately looking for. So it's not you give up alcohol and jump off a cliff and just hold your breath and hope for the best. It's, you make a decision to stop alcohol, and then open up this door and explore all of these really cold processes that give a physiological effect that no one ever taught us. But   Arlina Allen  43:59   exactly nobody ever taught us that's why we're using reaching for things that are not good for us because you know, that's what's available. We don't know about all these other things. And this is really speaks to the I want to get to the nurse thing, don't let me forget. But I wanted to also point out something that you highlight, which is it used to be that we would talk about the brain first and then the body and you flip that around, you're talking about addressing the somatic experience and and you hit the nail on the head when you're talking about experience and feelings. Right? And so talk to me a little bit about how we you're we're looking at this differently now we're looking at somatic and then neuro chemistry.   Unknown Speaker  44:45   So you know, that's the latest neuroscience, where Bessel Vander kolk, who wrote the bought the book, the body keeps the score. Oh, Peter Levine, who is the grandfather of somatic experiencing. This is the current research and it's not their opinion. It's I mean, the data is there.   Arlina Allen  45:02   Yeah, there, we have empirical data, we've got the   Unknown Speaker  45:05   data, they're doing the studies, they're you know, they're measuring gabbeh levels, then they have a group of people do 60 minutes of yoga, and then they measure their data levels again, so they're really watching this kind of stuff. But where all of this kind of somatic new neuroscience, what they find from research, not opinion, is that it's bottom up, not top down. So we work with the body, which is kind of all the stuff I've been talking about when we shift the body and the body can start to feel a sensation of calm, and soothing and grounding. That message goes up the spinal cord to the brain. And then the brain can say, the animal brain can say, okay, we're, we're okay with that. Because, again, that animal brain doesn't understand language. So we can't talk to the animal brain. We have to have feel that sensations in the body in really practical ways. This is not esoteric. Whoo, whoo, whoo, whoo.   Arlina Allen  46:01   I like blue. But this is science.   Unknown Speaker  46:03   Yeah, yeah. So that it's, you know, it's where the neurosciences and so that's where I work I work with with physiology with   Arlina Allen  46:11   physiology. Okay. And that makes perfect sense. And that maybe this is a good segue Can we talk about your acronym for nourish because it was all   Unknown Speaker  46:21   good, thank you. So as a as a functional nutritionist, my just really kind of, to pick a word that embodies my work over 20 years, it's it's nourish, which is my strength, and also my shadow, because the work for me is continually nourishing myself and not just food. So what I teach is what I also learn and keep practice. Yeah, so I'm always you know, it's not like I just quit drinking and now I've arrived and tell everybody else what they need to do. Constant practice, alright, but but the word that anchors that for me is nourish and then I created an acronym out of that for for my TED Talk. And so and is notice nature. Oh is observe your breath. You is unite with others are replenished with food. I initiate movement. s sit in stillness, and h is harnessed creativity. And I'm working on my book right now all about that, oh, there's numerous, numerous options and resources and things within each of those categories. But it really brings that whole comprehensive approach biochemical, somatic, emotional, energetic routines, that different things work for different people for regulating and nourishing the nervous system.   Arlina Allen  47:51   You just said something in my eyes lit up, because everybody is different, right? There's so many different paths to this sort of recovery, sobriety, alcohol free life, right? Not there's no one solution that works for everybody. And I think that's largely what's so confusing, is, there are so many, like everybody is so different. And there are so many different tools, but I like the idea that this nourish actually can be applied no matter what your specific situation it is. Your situation is. So what are some of the you mentioned, different supplements and things to sort of regulate those? You know, the GABA, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine? What if someone's curious about like, what they should be using? Do you have a resource on your website? Or maybe you can just rattle off a few things that people might try?   Unknown Speaker  48:50   Yeah, yeah, I'm happy to kind of talk through some of those pieces. So I work with clients one on one to really customize this piece. And kind of piggyback on what you just said, I really work with biochemical individuality. So I can rattle off some things, but it surrounds snowflakes,   Arlina Allen  49:06   unique snowflakes, right? It doesn't   Unknown Speaker  49:09   mean everybody out there then needs to take this particular supplement or eat this particular food. And B, this is my functional medicine background of what is individual for your biochemistry. And there's different ways to test that. And we can do lab testing and things. But But you know, the easiest, most inexpensive way is when you eat something, when you take something when you do something, notice what happens next, and three things happen. And it can be a really profound like, wow, that helps so much. My mind is blown right now. Or it can be kind of a neutral, like didn't really feel anything one way or the other. Or it can be I hated that, and I don't like how I feel now. And so I'm always cueing people back to that and the more kind of regulated and grounded we are in our body when the body is Calm, and there's practices and ways to do that, the easier it is then to kind of notice, like, what just happened here. Whereas if we're always kind of up in our head and just running and you know, in that intellect mental, it's hard to be like, I don't even know if I liked it. I mean, I just did it. So that's the argument of kind of somatic work. But um, but going back to just kind of some things, you know, I recommend, so biochemically whole food is king is golden. eating real food is is a great place to start. So did it grow from the ground? Can you pick it? berries? You know, bananas off the tree? Can you know, can you hunt it? If you eat meat? Can you gather it like gathering fish, or eggs or cream from the cow. So actual real food, that there isn't a list of ingredients, you know, 43 letters long and a whole paragraph. Real Food. And this is what I would teach in corporate all the time is, it's actually really, really fascinating. You know, one of the most fascinating lectures I ever heard in functional medicine, was a medical doctor who lectured about broccoli for an hour, it was fascinating. Because the chemical breakdown in broccoli, and every fruit and every vegetable, some of that we are still discovering. Because it's like, yeah, yeah, eat your vegetables. But when you really break it down, it's mind blowing, like what that, again, it's physical food and our physical body, what that does. So going back to the basics of whole food, if there's anything I can inspire people with is eat real food. That's in season, it's local, it's colorful, if possible, sometimes that's not always possible. But starting there, you know, eating regularly, because then the body breaks down into amino acids that are the raw materials for the brain. When you eat real, healthy fats, those break down into the omega three fats, some of our omega six fats, those are those necessary fats, again, for the brain, you know, good vegetables, even fermented vegetables, like sauerkraut, that's that good bacteria that goes into the gut. So there's just, it's just endless. The benefits of, you know, the exciting, like, mechanisms within food. And so I like to start there and try to you know, inspire people, and you don't have to, like clear your cupboards. It doesn't have to be radical. Yeah, I'm never radical about any of this. But the idea of adding something in instead of trying to take a bunch of stuff out, add in real food,   Arlina Allen  52:39   and real food, that isn't it? Yeah. And I think you were, I think I heard you say that the amino acids and the proteins are the building blocks to these neuro chemicals that we need. And like, at the end of the day, when maybe your gamma is low, or serotonin, or whatever it may be, all of them are low at the end, is that true that it's low at the end of the day?   Unknown Speaker  53:00   That's a good question. Um, I think it's more kind of over time, you know, like a 30 day period, a snapshot of like, what are we, you know, kind of dumping in that period, although there are urine tests that we do a 24 hour urine collection, and they are seeing like, how much of the neurotransmitter were dumped into our urine in a 24 hour period. So I think it's both you know, just kind of seeing like, the pattern that the body is on but also it's interesting, like what happens over over a longer period too.   Arlina Allen  53:32   Yeah, the reason I asked about the end of the day because I feel like that's like the witching hour for a lot of people, you know, but I think it speaks to meeting like we're so jacked up all day trying to get stuff done, that in the evening we're trying to do was deregulate down regulate to regulate, yeah, just just regulate, yeah, emotion management thing.   Unknown Speaker  53:56   So biochemistry is a huge part of it, our neuro chemicals, our blood sugar, our you know, our thyroid, our gut bacteria, our adrenal function. So adrenals are closely connected with dopamine. So if we're running on cortisol and adrenaline, then we're also pulling down on dopamine as well. Every neural chemicals connected with a hormone. So progesterone and gabbeh are connected, which I find a lot of women who are in this gray area struggle with wine are low and progesterone and low and Gabba. And you know, a common kind of symptom complaint of those two chemicals being low is anxiety and difficulty sleeping. And so a lot of women that are reaching to wine to help them sleep and to help manage their anxiety and when we lift the physiological hood, it's low gabicce, low progesterone. So there's all of these kind of physiological pieces, we can start with food, there's different nutrients that can i Find a lot of women are low and gabbeh. Dopamine is the sexy neuro chemical that everybody's like, oh, the dopamine hit the dopamine hit but but in reality, if we're really trying to boost dopamine, we tend to be more interested in things like cocaine, ecstasy, espresso, a pot of coffee, where if we're cocaine or coffee is more low gabbeh, which I'm certainly have that predisposition to be low gabbeh that's been more reaching to things like marijuana, Cannabis, alcohol to hit that off switch. So it's interesting what people you know, reach to so that's the biochemical side, there's some herbs or some nutrients to boost GABA boost dopamine, but then there's also what you're talking about kind of the witching hour, at the end of the day, that then goes into some of just the nervous system fight flight freeze response. So it's not always biochemical, but they're all interconnected, they all work together. If we're in a constant flee response, we're going to be dumping a lot more, you know, of our gas, the dopamine they see, so it all connects. But the but the fight flee freeze response. And if we're, if that valve is always on, if we're always kind of in a flee or in a fight, or we've just in that frozen kind of immobilized, protective state, that's exhausting. Any of those states if the, if the on switch is always on. So by the end of the day, it's hard to continue, we're exhausted holding that dysregulated state. So now we want to regulate it with alcohol to kind of let the valve off constantly, you know, we're fleeing, we want to move we want to, and it's like, I want to stop and slow down. So it could be some of that polyvagal kind of stress response, as well. And then there's, you know, the, the energetic side of things. So this is acupuncture, you know, they talk about, like how the energy moves in the body. So, if there's an area that's, that's more stuck, or moving really fast, and that's where body work comes in acupuncture, you know, working with the energy system, so there's no one size fits all, but I work with people to get kind of the full story. And it's like, where do we want to kind of start here with what might be a missing piece? And what might be depleted? And it's so   Arlina Allen  57:17   good, how do people connect with you if they want to reach out and work with you.   Unknown Speaker  57:23   So gray area drinkers calm is my sites where all my info is, you can email me I work with clients, one on one, I have a coach training where I train other coaches on the nourish method. And my TED Talks, there are lots of interviews I've done. And then I have did a podcast as well called edit, editing, our drinking and our lives. And so all of that on gray area drinkers calm.   Arlina Allen  57:48   That is amazing. I leave all leave links, ever. I know people are probably taking notes or driving or whatever. So I'll leave all the links in the show notes. But this has been such a fascinating conversation. I could easily talk to you for the rest of the day. So many questions. And I just think this was so helpful. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having me. It's fun to meet you and chat with you. Thank you. Yeah, definitely. Thanks so much. And I'll leave all the show notes, links in the show notes how people can get a hold of you.   Unknown Speaker  58:20   Wonderful. Thank you.   Arlina Allen  58:22   Thanks.  

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Sticking To The Science with Dr. Ken Berry - Episode 1946

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 60:54


: Episode 1946 - On this Friday show, Dr. Ken Berry joins Vinnie and the two discuss sticking to the science, knowing where your food comes from, and Type II diabetes, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2021/10/sticking-to-the-science-dr-ken-berry-episode-1946 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS DR. KEN BERRY https://vinnietortorich.com/2018/03/ken-berry-episode-1026/ He elf published his book previously (like Vinnie!), and has since come out with a new one. https://www.amazon.com/Lies-My-Doctor-Told-Second/dp/162860378X/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=ken+berry&qid=1554440457&s=gateway&sr=8-1 He knows where his fat and protein comes from. They have some acreage and raise animals. STICKING TO THE SCIENCE Dr. Berry believes he has found success because he sticks to science. Fads come and go (like diet products, certain herbal remedies, etc.). Trusting the science works. His goal is to treat his patients' chronic illnesses. He'll tell them what works and what doesn't and provide the science behind it. There is an optimal diet applicable to all human beings regardless of your feelings. It's a species-specific diet. Vegan propaganda doesn't change this. REVERSED Dr. Berry is releasing a docu-series called REVERSED. Check it out on GlewedTV. It documents the reversal of type II diabetes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1x3T9YwdYn4 WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com  

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
Straight Fire w/ Jason McIntyre - Jamal Adams is JAG, How Matthew Stafford is Like Tom Brady + FanDuel Director of Trading John Sheeran

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:34


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with a few thoughts on the Los Angeles Rams' Thursday Night Football victory over the Seattle Seahawks. Russell Wilson had to leave the game early with a finger injury, and if Russ is forced to sit out for any amount of time, the Seahawks' season is essentially over. Sticking in Seattle, is it officially time to declare the Jamal Adams trade a win for the New York Jets? Adams hasn't been able to cover for years, and now that he's no longer rushing the passer, he's just another guy in the defensive backfield. The Adams trade has been a total disaster for Seattle. Meanwhile, in the winning locker room, Matthew Stafford continues to put up big numbers in his first season in Los Angeles. Some detractors have pointed out that his actual on-field play hasn't always matched up with the gaudy stats, but do you know which other quarterback got off to an uneven start with his new team? Tom Brady with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2020. Just sayin'. Later, FanDuel Director of Trading John Sheeran swings by to discuss how and why FanDuel odds differ from other shops, why sharps are so high on the Arizona Cardinals heading into this week's showdown with the San Francisco 49ers, why the Urban Meyer soap opera doesn't really impact the line at all for the Jacksonville Jaguars, why he thinks Baker Mayfield is a very average quarterback - with or without the shoulder injury, why he actually wants bettors to beat him every now and then, how the public can actually find value betting on bad teams, who he likes in this Sunday's primetime matchup between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Buffalo Bills, and much more! Finally, Jason closes the show with the football weekend edition of the Best Bet. Click here to subscribe, rate and review all of the latest Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre
Jamal Adams is JAG, How Matthew Stafford is Like Tom Brady + FanDuel Director of Trading John Sheeran

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:34


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with a few thoughts on the Los Angeles Rams' Thursday Night Football victory over the Seattle Seahawks. Russell Wilson had to leave the game early with a finger injury, and if Russ is forced to sit out for any amount of time, the Seahawks' season is essentially over. Sticking in Seattle, is it officially time to declare the Jamal Adams trade a win for the New York Jets? Adams hasn't been able to cover for years, and now that he's no longer rushing the passer, he's just another guy in the defensive backfield. The Adams trade has been a total disaster for Seattle. Meanwhile, in the winning locker room, Matthew Stafford continues to put up big numbers in his first season in Los Angeles. Some detractors have pointed out that his actual on-field play hasn't always matched up with the gaudy stats, but do you know which other quarterback got off to an uneven start with his new team? Tom Brady with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2020. Just sayin'. Later, FanDuel Director of Trading John Sheeran swings by to discuss how and why FanDuel odds differ from other shops, why sharps are so high on the Arizona Cardinals heading into this week's showdown with the San Francisco 49ers, why the Urban Meyer soap opera doesn't really impact the line at all for the Jacksonville Jaguars, why he thinks Baker Mayfield is a very average quarterback - with or without the shoulder injury, why he actually wants bettors to beat him every now and then, how the public can actually find value betting on bad teams, who he likes in this Sunday's primetime matchup between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Buffalo Bills, and much more! Finally, Jason closes the show with the football weekend edition of the Best Bet. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

LOUDKICKS PODCAST
LK024 - Scooney

LOUDKICKS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 70:21


In this episode we have Recording artist Scooney on the show and we talk music and inspirations. The transition in music from the 90s to now(6:25) Content vs Lyrics(10:05) Where did the name "Scooney" come from?(15:35) What is music missing if anything?(17:32) Most important part about music(20:20) Scooney person favorites(36:00) What would you ask?(48:00) Sticking to the script(52:20) Worse performance and lesson from it (59:55)

Govcon Giants Podcast
Making A Giant 010: Maria Martinez and Demetrius Walker - Finding your niche and sticking with it

Govcon Giants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 91:19


On today's episode with Making a Giant, our guest is Demetrius Walker, a Marine Corps veteran and the CEO of Fhito Logistics. Demetreus' company specializes in logistics services, facilities support and management services, and supply chain management. Originally from Alabama Demetrius worked odd jobs prior to the military. Including being a DJ in Atlanta. As a veteran Marine he thought like many others that he would be guaranteed a job for the post office or State worker. That didn't pan out so well. So he went off and found work in a manufacturing facility on the Assembly line. This episode takes you from the beginning stages of founding Fhito Logistics all the way to the point of winning his first 5 contracts. I hope you enjoy this episode with Maria Martinez and Demetrius Walker.

The Lucie Beatrix Podcast
Sticking With Sobriety (...Even When It Sucks): On Relapse Ideation, The "Freelapse," and Being A Dry Drunk

The Lucie Beatrix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 21:09


On staying sober these past 2.5 years and investigating what sobriety can mean -- since it's not always about abstaining from alcohol. RUN WITH ME 10/14: COMMUNITY RUN @ FICS NYC

Two Amazon Sellers and a Microphone
#152 - Launching New Products and Sticking the Landing with Joshua Porter from EliteSeller

Two Amazon Sellers and a Microphone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 41:14


On this episode we are chatting about product launch efficiency with Joshua Porter. Joshua Porter is the Sales Director and Brand Ambassador for Elite Seller, a premiere Amazon Software suite. It's designed for sellers by sellers to help manage, automate, research and launch your business to 7 figures and beyond. Make sure to subscribe to the podcast so that you are notified of new episodes!

The Barcelona Podcast
Reverse Decision! Koeman sticking around, Gavi's Spain call-up, and an Ownership Hypothetical

The Barcelona Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 53:29


On episode 293, Dan and Levon discuss the loss to Atlético Madrid and what that might have meant for Ronald Koeman, if not for Laporta changing his mind. They talk Koeman's new timeline, manager options, Gavi's Spain call-up, questions for the general assembly, and much more! Running Order: Would Koeman resign if results don't improve? Are the mistakes against Atleti fixable? Was Gavi ready for his Spain call-up? What question would you ask at the general assembly? Listen on Apple Podcasts iOS App, Spotify and, if you want to support the show, head over to Patreon for more content! Become a Patreon to support the show and check out our Quick Take Match Reviews – Thank you! Access our exclusive, listeners-only Facebook Group here. Follow us on Instagram! Find us and watch exclusive content on YouTube! Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via Spotify We are excited to partner with Fanatiz! Use this link to sign up: https://bit.ly/2YAHuDd Submit your Blue Wire Hustle application here: http://bwhustle.com/join Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 24: Part One - Questions and Answers

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:11


This week we tackle our first Q & A episode from The Ridership Community. Randall and Craig tackle your questions in part 1 of 2 fun filled episodes. The Ridership Support the Podcast Book your free Thesis Bike Consult Automated transcription (Please excuses the errors): Episode 24 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to in the dirt from the gravel. The ride podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton. And i'll be joined shortly by my co-host rental jacobs In this week's episode, we're tackling our first Q and a episode.  [00:00:14] We've mentioned the ridership community on a number of occasions on this podcast. It's a community that's full of vibrant questions all the time. So we thought we'd put out an ask to say, what are the things you want to learn about what should Randall an IB discussing? And we were overwhelmed by. By the number of questions we received.  [00:00:34] So much. So in fact that we're going to break this episode down into two parts. So today we'll focus on part one. And in the coming weeks we're released part two. [00:00:44] Before we jump into this week's episode, I'd like to thank this week. Sponsor Thesis bikes. As you know, Randall Jacob's my co-host in these, in the dirt episodes is the founder of Thesis bikes. Which you might not know is it's the bicycle I've been riding for the last let's say year and a half.  [00:01:01] Over the course of this podcast, I've had the opportunity to ride many bicycles and I keep coming back to my Thesis. As my number one bike in the garage, it really does deliver on the promise of a bike that can do anything. As many of, you know, I operate with two wheel sets in the garage. So I've got a 700 C wheel set with road tires on, and my go-to six 50 B wheel set for all my off-road adventures.  [00:01:26] In the many, many hours of conversation I've had with Randall, I've really come to appreciate how thoughtful he was in designing this bike and everything that goes in the Thesis community. Randall and the team are available for personal consults, which I highly recommend you take advantage of. If you're interested in learning more about the brand and figuring out how to get the right fit for your Thesis bicycle.  [00:01:49] In a shocking statement. I can actually express that Thesis has bikes in stock. It's something we haven't been able to say about a lot of bike brands these days during the pandemic. It's October as we're releasing this episode and they have bikes available for November delivery with the SRAM access builds. They also have frame sets available.  [00:02:10] So I encourage you to head on over to Thesis.bike, to check out more about the brand, the story. Cory and the product and book one of those free consultations with a member of the Thesis team. With that said, let's dive right into this. Week's. Q and a episode [00:02:25] Craig: Randall, how are you today? [00:02:26] Randall: I am doing well, Craig, how are you my friend?  [00:02:30] Craig: I am doing good. I'm particularly excited for this episode because it essentially came entirely from the Ridership community. We're doing our first ever Q&A episode.  [00:02:42] Randall: Yeah, people have a lot of trust in us, maybe too much in terms of our knowledge here. So we'll try not to get over our heads in terms of uh what we claim to know, but a lot of good questions here and hopefully we can answer most of them.  [00:02:54] Craig: Yeah, I think that's been one of the cool things about the ridership is I see these questions going on all the time and I quite regularly. See them answered by people Smarter than you and I in a specific area of the sport. They have particular knowledge about a specific region. So it's really cool to see those happening in real time, every day for the members of that community. [00:03:17] Randall: Yeah, everything from fit related questions where we have some experts in there. Professional fitters like Patrick Carey, who I just did the episode with just before this one, I was in there answering questions, but then also if you've got a question about tires, nobody's going to have ridden all of them, but somehow every one has been written by someone in the forum there. And it's one of our most popular topics.  [00:03:38] Craig: Yeah. And I've seen some really detailed, help transpire between members as well, just like random disc bait break problems or compatibility problems. And I'm always shocked when someone raises their hand digitally and start to answering a question saying, no, I experienced that exact same weird problem in combination of things. [00:03:57] Randall: Yeah, it really fits into the spirit of The Ridership in which embodied in that word was this idea of fellowship, like writers, helping writers. So it's been super cool to see that community develop organically. And so thank you all members who are listening, and to those who aren't in there yet, we hope you'll join us.  [00:04:15] Craig: Yeah. just head over to www.theridership.com and you can get right in and start interacting as much, or as little as you want. I think the uniqueness of the platform is it is designed inherently to be asynchronous. So you can put a question in there give it a little time to marinate and a couple of days later Get lots of answers. [00:04:35] This is pretty cool.  [00:04:36] Randall: And in addition to that, there's also rides being coordinated. So myself and another writer here in the new England area or leading a ride. And we have about 10 or 15 people who chimed in wanting to join. And we've seen quite a bit of that in the bay area as well. So that's another use case for this in addition to sharing routes and general bicycle nerdery.  [00:04:54] Craig: Yeah, it's super cool. [00:04:55] So this episode, we're clearly going to jump around a bunch. We've tried to organize the questions, so there's, there's some pairing around them, but these are questions that all came in from subset of individuals. So They are what they are and we wanted to jump on them. So with that, let's let's dive right in. Okay.  [00:05:12] Randall: All right, let's do it.  [00:05:14] Craig: Cool. So the first question comes from Keith P E. And he says, every time I go out for a gravel ride, I think why is this roadie where I'm like Rhonda trails when there's no podium to win or anybody watching. What is this obsession with wearing skin tight clothing in a sport that resides in the dirt.  [00:05:31] Randall: I don't know about you, but I'm just showing off.  [00:05:34] Craig: Your physique.  [00:05:35] Randall: My, my Adonis like physique, sure. It's just more comfortable for me. And I like to go pretty hard and I'm sweating a lot. And if I had baggier gear on, I would tend to have, potential issues with chafing and the like so for intensity I definitely find that the Lycra is a lot more comfortable.  [00:05:54] Craig: Yeah, I'm sorta with you. Like I do I desire to be that guy in baggy shorts and a t-shirt, but every time it comes down to it, I'm grabbing the Lycra. I think for me, there's a couple of performance things, definitely on the lower body. I appreciate the Lycra just cause I don't get any binding and less potential for chafing. So I'm like, I'm all about a big short for riding, unless it's a super, super casual outing for me.  [00:06:21] And then up top. I think it comes down to, I do having the pockets in the Jersey. So that sort of makes me tend towards wearing a Jersey, even if it's just solely to carry my phone in my pocket.  [00:06:34] Randall: And if you really want to be pro show up to an elite race and like a led Zeppelin t-shirt and some cutoff jorts, and hairy legs and just rip everyone's legs off that would be super impressive. But for the rest of us,  [00:06:45] If you ha, if you have those sorts of legs,  [00:06:47] Yeah, it would be very impressed. Send pictures in to the ridership. If you actually do that .  [00:06:50] Craig: Yeah. So you'll see me. You'll see me. Rock a t-shirt you. As a performance t-shirt instead of a cycling Jersey on occasion. And I just jam stuff into bags, but yeah, nine times out of 10, unfortunately I'm that Lycra. Reclad. Gravel cyclists. [00:07:06] Randall: MAMIL, I think right.  [00:07:08] Middle aged man in Lycra.  [00:07:11] I'm right behind in the age category.  [00:07:13] Craig: Second question comes from Tom Schiele. And forgive me if I mispronounced your last name, he'd love to get our insights into winter riding, especially tips for those of us in new England who go out on cold dark mornings.  [00:07:29] I'm going to, I'm going to go out on a limb here and Randall and say, it's probably not the guy. [00:07:32] from California that should be offering this advice.  [00:07:34] Randall: Let's have you go first for that reason.  [00:07:38] Craig: Look. I mean you, new Englanders will throw hay bales at me and make fun of me, but I do find it cold here. And it's all about layers.  [00:07:48] Randall: Okay. [00:07:48] Carry  [00:07:48] Craig: all about layers.  [00:07:49] Actually, in fact, I just got some great gear from gore and I was Scratching my head because it's really designed for way cooler Temperatures. [00:07:58] than I have available to me. So a fleece lined tight is something that's just outside of the weather that I'm going to experience as much as I'll complain about it being cold. But I do appreciate a thermal Jersey for the Dawn patrol rides and things like that.  [00:08:12] But for me, it's always come down to layering. And as someone who's Been around. [00:08:16] the sport for a while, what I really do like about my wardrobe today is I think I have a really good understanding about what to layer on for what temperature And having been in the sport long enough. I've just acquired a lot of clothing along the way. So I even go down to having.  [00:08:32] Like a thicker vest. Than just a standard thin, vast, and they're very nuanced and it's only because of, I had decades worth of clothing kicking around that I've really started to understand and embrace how each garment is for a particular degree temperature. And the layers will get me to a certain point.  [00:08:51] Randall: Yeah. I'm a hundred percent with you on layers. I like to go like Jersey and then maybe a base layer or older Jersey underneath add to that thermal sleeves a vest that has a wind breaking layer on the front. A balaklava. Is also a great thing to have when the weather gets a bit colder, one to keep your head warm and your ears warm, and to keep the wind off your face, but then also you can breathe through it. So you're preheating the air and when it gets bitingly cold, which I don't know, you may not have experienced this, but I've definitely written around the Boston area and five degree temperatures and you got, ice crystals forming on the front of it, but at least you're getting a little bit of that preheating first.  [00:09:29] Definitely wants some wind breaking booties. Wind breaking layers on the front of the body. Generally when it gets really cold. If you must, you could do like heat packs on the backs of your hands. So over your arteries, delivering blood. If you're in real extreme conditions,  [00:09:44] Let's see, Tom also mentioned riding cold dark mornings, which means low pressures for grip. And then also lots of lots of lights, lots of reflectivity. You definitely don't want to be caught out and that's a good general rule, but especially riding in dark conditions when people might be tired.  [00:10:00] And then what else?  [00:10:02] Craig: Going to add the other big thing that I really enjoy is a thermal cap with the little flaps over the years, I find that really just, keeps the heat in there.  [00:10:11] Randall: Yeah, that's a nice intermediate solution before it's too cold to expose your face.  [00:10:16] Going that route. Other things pit stops with hand dryers. So I knew where all the Dunkin donuts were along my routes. I could just go in there on a really cool day and just dry off and heat up. People around here sometimes like in embrocation, gives you like a Burnie tingling sensation on the skin.  [00:10:30] Vaseline. It's actually a big one. It helps with insulation on exposed skin and helps it from getting dried and raw and so on. So I'll put Vaseline on my face and that actually makes a big difference in keeping me warm. And I don't find that it has any negative effects on my skin, my pores and things like that.  [00:10:48] I'm trying to think. Did we miss anything? Oh, tape the vent holes on your shoes. That's a big one. 'cause even with booties sometimes the holes will still, oftentimes the holes will still be exposed. And so close that up. Otherwise you just going to get air flow into the shoe and you'll know exactly where it's coming from. Once you get on the road.  [00:11:08] Craig: Yeah. And I remember. When all hell broke loose. I would even stick my foot in a plastic bag and then put it in the shoe.  [00:11:16] To get a little extra warmth. I don't necessarily recommend that. And I do know and aware em, aware that, you can get like Russ socks now in different kind of obviously wool is a great material to have underneath your shoe. It, yeah. [00:11:28] Randall: I love wool and I'll take like old wool sweaters and stuff and cut the sleeves and then put it in the dryer to shrink. So it's tight against the body and that'll be a base layer. Cause it's just great for loft and for wicking. So if you're trying to be cheap, that can be a way to go about it.  [00:11:43] Craig: I'm Now like off in my head, imagining sleeveless Randall in a tight fitting wool sweater. And it's more reading burning man then cycling performance.  [00:11:54] Randall: with the jorts, I might show up at a race near you.  [00:11:56] Craig: Our next couple of questions are from Alan Collins and the first one's around everyday carry. What do you always carry with you on every ride tools, parts, spares, pumps, hydration, snacks, gels, et cetera. Are you traveling light or packing an RV?  [00:12:14] Randall: So I'm now back in new England, so I'm often relatively near civilization, so I'm not as comprehensive as I would be say, like riding in Marine where I might be a good five, six mile walk over some mountains to get to anywhere. But critical things. I bring plugs like tire plugs. In my case, dynaplugs bacon strips, same deal.  [00:12:36] Spare tube. A tool that has all the critical things I need. If you're one of our riders, make sure you got a six mil on your tool because that's what you need for your through axles. What else? If there's any risk whatsoever. Me getting caught out in the dark. I'll have lights front and rear might as well.  [00:12:54] I'm trying to think of anything else that I always bring along. That's the key stuff. How about you?  [00:12:59] Craig: Yeah, I'm a mid-weight packer. Like I've really embraced that quarter frame bag. So I just tend to be ready for most eventualities that I expect. And obviously I gear up depending on the amount of hours I plan on being out. I tend to bring one nutritional item per hour that I'm going to be out. Obviously if I'm going out for an hour, I tend to be forgetful about hydration and nutrition. I don't really think too much about it.  [00:13:26] But I do think about it in terms of the number of hours I'm going to be out and then building Certainly my nutrition and hydration on top of that.  [00:13:33] my basic everyday carry same with you. I just want to make sure I can handle. [00:13:37] the most likely kind of repair scenarios out there on the trail. And I don't go overboard with it. There's probably many more things I would bring on a bike packing trip than I do on a five-hour ride.  [00:13:50] Randall: Yeah.  [00:13:51] And one thing I forgot to mention.  [00:13:53] Yeah, we did the everyday carry in the dirt episode nine. So listen there. That's where we go. Deep nerd on all the things. If you want a comprehensive list of what you might bring. The other thing, I don't know if I mentioned a pump. Duh. So I forgot that one there.  [00:14:06] Craig: Pump and CO2 for sure. [00:14:07] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:14:08] But otherwise it really depends on the ride. These days, I'm doing mostly like hour and a half, two hour higher intensity rides actually oftentimes even shorter, lower intensity rides. So I don't need to bring as much. But I'll where you are, you have micro-climates all over the place on Mount Tam.  [00:14:23] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. So. I'm always rocking like a full spare jacket in there, unless I'm going out mid day, which is rare these days. I just figure if I'm going downhill, I might as well be warm and it just makes it more pleasant. So that's why, again, like I have that quarter frame bag and I just jam it full of stuff.  [00:14:40] After our everyday carry episode, I did get a magic link. Cause it's it's nothing like this. Obviously no weight. And I just threw it in there. [00:14:48] Fortunately, I haven't had to use it, but it's there. If I ever did need it. [00:14:51] Randall: Oh, you don't have the technique for breaking the chain and being able to piece it back together without the magic link.  [00:14:57] Craig: I'm fairly skilled at that, But I don't have a chain breaker that I bring with me.  [00:15:01] Randall: Got it. Okay.  [00:15:02] Craig: Yeah.  [00:15:04] Alan's next question was, do you have any tips for prepping a gravel bike for competition in road, gravel mix or cyclocross?  [00:15:11] Randall: Don't do it the night before.  [00:15:14] Craig: Yeah. I I think there's a couple of different ways to go with this question, right? Obviously if you're a cross specialist, there's going to be lots of things you're going to do. For me, if I got the courage to raise cross again, I would just show up with what I got and I wouldn't really mess with it too much.  [00:15:29] Randall: Yeah, I would do basic checks. A couple of weeks out, I would just be making sure that I don't have anything that's about to fail because especially now parts are a challenge to find in many cases, even brake pads. And in fact, if you don't already have a set, get some extra brake pads, just have them around just in case.  [00:15:47] But otherwise checking chain lengthen and the lubrication making sure the sealant and the tires. I'm having all my gear and kit and nutritional stuff laid out, making sure the brake pads have have enough life in them. This sort of thing would be the basics. And I would do this several days in advance and I would make sure to get a ride in before I actually did the race, just to make sure that I didn't mess up anything that's going to bite me later. Like the worst thing you can do is be working on your bike the night before, or the morning of, and then, potentially miss something or break something or have to replace something.  [00:16:18] Craig: Yeah, I forget who I was listening to. It might've even been kate Courtney or perhaps a professional female gravel rider who was saying they arrived at actually the Sarah Sturm. Sorry. She arrived at the start line of an event and realized that her brake pads were totally thrashed. And her mechanic slash partner said. [00:16:39] I'm going to change them right now. And that would stress me the heck out.  [00:16:43] But he did add new successful. She's Thank God. because I never would have been able to stop on the way downhill. I was swapping bikes from one, the one I had written the other day and just didn't think about it.  [00:16:54] Randall: All right, everyone you've been warned.  [00:16:57] What have we got  [00:16:58] Craig: reminds me, I need to get an order in for some brake pads, because I'm definitely reaching the end of the life of the current ones.  [00:17:06] All right. So the next couple of questions are from Ivo Hackman, and he's asking thoughts on red bull entering gravel with a race in Texas. I don't know if you caught this Randall, but it was calling strict Lynn and pacing pace and McKell then. I have bonded together and are doing a race out of Marfa, Texas that red bull is sponsoring, which is, I a natural because both of those athletes are red bull sponsored.  [00:17:31] Randall: So I'm assuming like extreme gravel jumps, flips things like this. It's just the evolution of the sport.  [00:17:38] Craig: Exactly. I think, both those two guys are so grounded in the culture of gravel racing And in my opinion have been good stewards of conversation as we bring these mass star gravel events forward. I think it's great. I think the bigger question probably within this question is about is red bull coming in as an, as a quote unquote, an Advertiser and sponsor of the event. Is that somehow changing the Experience, is it becoming more corporate? Is it something other than the community wants to see? Again, with those two people involved. I think it's a positive thing.  [00:18:12] Randall: Yeah, I don't see it as a problem, even if it's not not any, my personal thing, for me, I love the really local. Really community oriented events that are much more like mullet rides and yeah, this is a little bit of a competition going on upfront, but it's not a huge deal.  [00:18:27] And, we definitely do see more of a professionalization of gravel. There's a space for everyone and there's a space for different types of events. So I don't see them displacing the events that are even more kind of grassrootsy. So yeah, I don't have a problem with it, especially if they end up doing flips.  [00:18:45] Red bull.  [00:18:47] Craig: The next question from Ivo is how to transition from weekend warrior to competitive rider.  [00:18:54] I feel like I'm better suited to answer the reverse question, to move from a competitive rider to weekend warrior. That one is easy.  [00:19:02] Randall: Yeah. Let's see. Step one. Have a kid.  [00:19:06] Craig: Yeah.  [00:19:07] Randall: That'll That'll take care of that in a hurry.  [00:19:09] Craig: Yeah. For me, this trend, it's all about structure.  [00:19:13] Like I, and I don't have any or much in My writing anymore, but I recognize in listening to coaches and Talking to them, it really is all about structure. And Even if that structure just means. You have one specific interval training session a week, and then your long endurance rides on the weekend to me, by my likes, I think you'll see a lot of progression. And as you progress, I think then you start to see the potential for coaching, more multi-day structured program in your week, If you're willing to go down that route. But to me, from what I've seen first stop is intervals.  [00:19:50] Randall: Yeah. Structure. Intervals is. Is one. And then within the context of a period iodized training program, Which is to say you do different types of training at different times during the season, based on the amount of training time you have available and the events that you're preparing for, because there's no sense in doing a lot of intensity several months out from a race and then, be firing on all cylinders, say, three months out and then just be totally kicked by the time your van comes around, you have that build, you do base training, and then you're doing more tempo. And then towards the events, your hours are going down and your intensity is going up and you're really trying to peak for that specific event.  [00:20:33] The book that was one of the Bibles when I was racing some time ago was Joe Freels I think it was called like the training and racing Bible or the mountain bikers, Bible or something. A book like that would be a good starting point. And then if you have the budget working with the coach, especially early on to really just accelerate your learning and to get someone to bounce ideas off of, and to use them as a way of learning your body. And that last part I would add at the very least heart rate monitor, learn how your body responds to stress, but then a power meter as well It's just a tremendously helpful tool and they're cheap. Now you need a four I power meter bonded onto a lot of cranks for 300 bucks. So there's really no reason not to make that investment if you're spending all this time to train and to, go to events, 300 bucks is pretty low lying fruit.  [00:21:25] Craig: Yeah, it is a great source of truth. Having a power meter. [00:21:29] For sure.  [00:21:29] Randall: yeah. One last thing would be a bike fit, actually if you haven't done it already, I think everyone should invest in a bike fit if you're doing any reasonable amount of riding, but if you're gonna be racing and training and trying to squeeze out every last bit and not get injured go get yourself a bike fit.  [00:21:44] Craig: Next question, moving on to what we've deemed at components category. JC Levesque probably pronounced that wrong. Sorry jC, appreciate the question he's asking. What about handlebars? There's a move towards wider flared bars and gravel and a few odd ones out there. There's the kitchen sink candle bar from our friends at red shift. The coefficient bar. From our friend, Rick Sutton. Obviously he's mentioned the canyon hover bar, although that isn't an add on it's integrated into that bike.  [00:22:14] But he asked him maybe worth going over the different expectations are for drop bar bikes that is tackling. Gravel versus pavement versus term.  [00:22:22] Randall: Sure you want to. Take a stab at this first.  [00:22:26] Craig: So for me, I think we're going to continue to see more and more riders explore Wider and flared bars. Like when I jumped on that trend and went out to a 48 millimeter with a 20 degree flare, I immediately felt more comfortable. My orientation as a gravel cyclist is towards rougher terrain, More like pure off roady kind of stuff. So I really appreciate. Appreciated that with.  [00:22:52] It is a pretty easy component to you forget about when you get a bike, right? So many things are going through your mind when you're buying a bike. The handlebars just the handlebar it comes with. If you're working with a good shop from a good direct manufacturer, they're going to ask you appropriate questions about what width you should get. But I do think there's going to be this continued trend towards exploring these different types of bars as the gravel market continues to see people ride these bikes in different ways.  [00:23:21] Randall: Yeah, I generally agree. And I think it's a good thing. I'm not sold on the extremes of flare. I just don't see it as necessary. There's not so much torque being delivered through the steering column when I'm riding, even on technical terrain that I'm finding myself needing more control. With a dropper post of course that's the big caveat, right? Cause that's lightening up the front wheel taking, mass off of that front wheel, putting it on the back, allowing the body to access suspension more. So that helps a lot in reducing the need for leverage. We do a 10 degree flare and I find that for me, that's the max I can do with a traditional flare and I was still having my hands in a comfortable position. And I actually find that flair is helpful in terms of my risk comfort in hand comfort.  [00:24:06] And you see this as a trend, actually on road bars to, four to six degrees of flare on road bars starting to happen. You also see a trend towards leavers coming standard with a bit of kick out a bit of flair at the lever itself which goes along with these trends. The thing that I'm actually really interested in is bars like the 3T Aero Ghiaia. I think that's how it's pronounced.  [00:24:26] This bar has a pretty compound bend. So it's relatively standard on the hoods, but then flares out below the hoods and gives you that extra leverage while at the same time giving you more of a roadie position on top. And I really like. Sticking with this one bike trend and making, keeping these bikes as versatile as possible, just because they can be. And in the case of that bar, it's also that arrow profile, I don't think is super important. Frankly, people overblow the value of arrow and we can talk about that. But, it's certainly not a problem. And that arrow profile probably gives it some more vertical flex.  [00:25:02] And I think that's actually a great way to get some additional compliance on gravel bikes is to have some flare in the wings of the bar.  [00:25:10] Craig: Yeah, I think you're right. I think people are going to continue to explore that. It's a market that I think is tricky for manufacturers to play in because people are so entrenched with what they know and have, and exploring some of these new trends can often be costly. It might be $100 to $300 to get a handlebar and try it out. [00:25:31] Randall: Yeah. For. $400 plus in some cases you can spend a lot of money on a carbon bar.  [00:25:36] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. A related question comes from east bay grants. Just question on Aero bars and gravel.  [00:25:42] Randall: Yeah. Pretty trivial gains. All in all. If you're going to be spending money on, even just on arrow, get an Aero helmet. I think that would be a bigger impact. Then arrow, handlebars. These are just very marginal gains and I wouldn't at all compromise ergonomics or control in order to go arrow. So if you're already getting a new bar and there's an arrow version and a non arrow version that you like. And there aren't any other compromises sure. Go with the arrow version, but I don't think that this is where your low lying fruit is.  [00:26:17] Craig: Yeah. I was reading it as arrow bar extensions on the handlebar and my perspective is it just depends on what you're doing at the end of the day. If you're hauling across the Plains for 200 miles, I understand having a variety of hand and body positions is required and useful, and I'm all for it. If you're ripping around Marin I think you're going to find that you never.  [00:26:39] You never set your arms in a gravel bar if you're actually in the dirt, but that's just where I live.  [00:26:44] Randall: Without, now that you've reframed the question. Yeah, they definitely has their place. And in addition to offering another hand position that's particularly useful if you're just bombing down a really straight road and into a headwind it can be a real aerodynamic advantage there. It also gives you another place to secure gear too. So if you're doing extended bike packing tour. It has that added benefit. There's a place for it, for sure.  [00:27:08] Craig: Yeah. Next question comes from our friend, Tom boss from Marine county bike coalition. He was out riding and he mentioned that he was thinking about how things get named in the cycling world. And how his gravel bike. If he thinks of as an adventure bike effectively, the way he rides it. And then he had a funny note is just about why clipless pedals are called clipless when there's actually no clip.  [00:27:32] Randall: Yeah.  [00:27:33] Craig: Actually. Yeah. So anyway. I think this is something you've been on about the naming convention in cycling, just about these bikes being adventure, bikes, more than anything else. [00:27:42] Randall: Yeah, it's really like adventure is what we're doing with it. Gravel is one type of surface that we're riding. And I like the idea, granted not only a subset of bikes fall into this category, but we call our bike a onebike. And I think bikes like the the allied echo, the servo, a Sparrow, and a few others fall into this category of being, an endurance road or even in the case of the echo,  [00:28:07] borderline, crit type geometry that you can achieve. While at the same time being very capable for adventure riding. And for that type of bike, you could call it a one bike, but then otherwise, what is being called a gravel bike on the more off-road technical end of the spectrum. I think it's an adventure bike.  [00:28:23] And in fact even if it doesn't has have bosses and other accommodations for bags and bike packing. A lot of these bags and so on, or you can strap on or mountain other ways. So you could go and do some adventuring with it.  [00:28:36] Craig: Yeah, I think they, these names. Of category starts to take hold at the grassroots level and then manufacturers just get behind them. And certainly in the early days of the quote unquote gravel market, It was just easy to call it gravel as opposed to road or mountain.  [00:28:54] Presently, obviously we can acknowledge there's so many, there's so many nuances there and there's this spectrum of what gravel means. So yeah, they are adventure, bikes, plain and simple. But I guess I understand where gravel came from.  [00:29:06] Randall: What's good though, is we have another category, right? So we can get you to buy an adventure bike and a gravel bike and endurance road bike, and a crit bike and a cyclocross bike. And even if all these bikes could be the same bikes. Let's not tell anyone because that gets them to buy more bikes. I think that's the marketing perspective on some of the naming conventions.  [00:29:26] Craig: Next up comes a series of questions from Kim ponders. And we should give a shout out to Kim because she's the one who really set this off. She actually recommended and suggested in the ridership forum that, Hey, why don't you guys do a Q and a episode? And I immediately thought that great idea, Kim, I'm all about it. [00:29:44] Randall: Yeah. Thanks, Kim.  [00:29:46] Craig: So our first question is what should I do not do to avoid damaging a carbon frame?  [00:29:52] Randall: So I'll jump in on this one. Carbon is strong intention, but not in compression, so never clamp it in a stand or sit on the top tube, use a torque wrench, always. And avoid extreme heat sources like car exhausts, which generally isn't a problem with frames because they don't end up in the main stream of the exhaust, but is definitely a problem with carbon rims.  [00:30:13] We've seen a number of molten rims. And it's usually they fail at the spoke holes first. Cause there's just so much tension on those spokes that as soon as the resin starts to transition. Into more of a liquid glass it immediately starts to crack at the rims that'd be my main guidance for carbon generally.  [00:30:32] Craig: And as we've talked about it a little bit before on the podcast, I think as a frame designer, You're layering in carbon, in greater, greater levels of material in more sensitive areas.  [00:30:44] But you are. Yeah. [00:30:45] So like your, your down tube and by your bottom bracket. They can take a ding from a rock and they're going to survive. [00:30:52] Randall: Generally. Yes. So if you're kicking up a lot of rocks, adding a layer of thicker film is definitely a good idea. We put a very thin film on ours. It's mostly to protect the paint. And then film on the insides of the fork plates seat stays and chain stays where the tire passes through.  [00:31:08] I can save you a lot of grief. If you end up with mud caked on your tires. Cause that'll just grind right through the paint and potentially to layers of carbon. So we do that stock for that reason. And it's a good idea. If you don't already have it, get yourself some 3m protective film.  [00:31:22] Craig: Yeah, and for me, I actually run it's essentially a sort of protective sticker layer from a company called the all mountain style and they just, in my opinion, do great visual designs. And check them out because personally, I love when you look underneath my, down to that, you see this. Digital cammo kind of thing on my nice pink bike.  [00:31:43] Randall: Yeah, it's rad. It's definitely a way to pretty things up.  [00:31:47] Craig: Next question from Kim is their basic regular maintenance checklists that I should be aware of. You things I should check every ride every month, every season, every year.  [00:31:57] Randall: Yeah. When you got.  [00:31:59] Craig: I think there's a lot there, obviously, we've talked about the importance of making sure your chain is lubed your tire pressure. Those are the things I check every single ride. Be aware of how your brakes are changing and performance. So keep an mental eye on.  [00:32:14] Your brake pads and how they're wearing, I'm not going around tightening bolts at all. Unless I've removed something, I'm not really messing with Any of that. I do find my Thesis to be pretty much ready to go. As long as I'm paying attention to the tire and the chain lube. [00:32:31] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, that's that's about right. I would add to that, check the chain length every so often. And there's a question in here about how to do that. Get one of these go-no-go gauges. I've got the the park tools, CC three.  [00:32:44] There's a bunch of good ones out there. And if it has multiple settings to check, go with the most conservative one. Swap your chains early and often, because it will save you a lot of money on your expensive cogs and cassettes.  [00:32:58] And it'll just make everything perform better. And then every so often, if you feel any looseness in your headset, that's a common thing that will come up over time, potentially just, just check that every so often. If you feel any looseness, you want to tighten it up early. So it doesn't start to wear down the cups or things like that.  [00:33:14] Craig: Yeah. And if you can afford it and you don't have the skills in your own garage, definitely bring it in for an annual tune-up. I think the bikes are going to come back working great and you've got some professionalize on them. [00:33:26] Randall: Yeah.  [00:33:26] Craig: Next question. Kim asked was what's the best way to pack a bike for air travel.  [00:33:31] Randall: So if you try to be. The cheapest option for the packaging. Cardboard box. And if you're not doing it frequently, that's a good way to go.  [00:33:41] Craig: Yeah, agreed. There's a reason why every bike manufacturer in The world is shipping with a cardboard box. As long as you protect the bike. Inside the box with some bubble wrap or some additional cardboard, they generally arrive where they need to go intact and safe. And I've had multiple occasions where I've used the cardboard box on an outbound trip and the box is Perfectly intact for the return trip. [00:34:05] Randall: And we should say specifically. Carbo box that a bike would have come in. Cause generally this'll be a five layer corrugated box. It'll be a thicker material. And if you need to reinforce it with some tape, At the corners and so on. And if you get, if it gets a hole in it, patch up the hole, but you can go pretty far with the cardboard box.  [00:34:24] I have a post carry transfer case, which I love, it's a bit more involved. I got to pull the fork and it takes me usually about 15 minutes or so. 20 minutes to pack it up, and to squeeze some gear in between the wheels and the frame and things like that.  [00:34:38] But I generally get past any sort of oversize baggage fees and I have the bigger of the two bags too. So oftentimes I don't even get asked what it is and if I get asked, it's oh yeah, it's a sports gear. Massage table. Yeah, whatever.  [00:34:50] Craig: That's the key for me that post carry bag or or, okay. This is another company that makes one of these bags where as you said, you've got to do a little bit more disassembly, whereas typically it might've been take the handle Bazaar off the pedals and your wheels, and you can get into a cardboard box. Would these particular smaller bags, you do need to pull the fork, which seems incredibly intimidating. When you first talk about it, but in practice, it's actually not. [00:35:15] Randall: It's not too bad. Probably the biggest issue is if you have a bike with integrated cabling, Then it can be a real nightmare. And in fact I might even go as far as to say, if you don't know what you're doing, don't mess with it. A bike with external cabling, or at least partially external, like our bike, you just have to be careful not to kink the hoses. That's the big, probably the biggest city issue, kinking the hoses, or bending the housings and cables in a way that affects the breaking or the shifting.  [00:35:44] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. If you've, if your cables are particularly tight, It then becomes a problem. I think my routing is just on the edge. I do feel like I'm putting a little bit of stress. On the cables when I'm disassembling in that bag, but so far so good. [00:35:58] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:35:59] And then of course you have the full sized bags where if you don't care about paying the airline fees, then get one of these was it Evoque I think makes a really nice one that has good protection there's a bunch of companies that make good ones where you just  [00:36:11] Craig: Yeah, I've.  [00:36:12] Randall: the front wheel and throw it in.  [00:36:14] Craig: I've got a Tulay one that is like bomber. It's got like a through axle slots, but one it's hard as hell to move it around. And two, I got dinged on both weight and access size on my trip to Africa. It's out. I was pretty ticked. [00:36:31] Randall: Yeah. And then the other thing is on the other end can you get it into the trunk of a cab. And so that's actually another advantage of bags like the post transfer case in the oral case ones is you can. I think I know the post one has backpack straps, and then you can fit it in the boot of pretty much any vehicle.  [00:36:49] Craig: Yeah, totally under emphasized attribute and benefit of those types of bags. Totally agree. [00:36:54] Like you can get into a sedan. With a, a Prius, Uber Lyft driver and make it in. No problem. [00:37:00] Randall: Oh, yeah.  [00:37:01]  [00:37:01] Craig Dalton: Pardon the segue that's going to do it for part one of our Q and a episode. I thought that was a great time to break and we'll jump into another half hour of questions and answers in our next episode of, in the dirt, which we'll release in the coming weeks. As always, if you're interested in communicating with myself or Randall,  [00:37:20] Please join the ridership www.theridership.com. If you're able to support the podcast, your contributions are greatly appreciated. You can visit, www.buymeacoffee.com/thegravelride to contribute in any way you can to support the financial wellbeing of the podcast. If you're unable to support in that way, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated.  [00:37:46] On any of your favorite podcast platforms. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels. 

Amie Kaufman On Writing
Sticking the Landing with Jay Kristoff (Season 2, Bonus Episode 1)

Amie Kaufman On Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 9:02


When I asked you all who you'd like a guest episode from in our break between seasons, today's guest was a very popular answer. I think Jay's sense of storytelling is incredible, and when I saw today's question in the mailbag about what makes for a satisfying ending, I knew I wanted you to hear from him. You can find Jay on Twitter or on Instagram at @misterkristoff or at his website. If you loved this advice, you're going to love his latest, Empire of the Vampire, which is out right now! You can find me at my website – you can subscribe to my newsletter there, for behind-the-scenes peeks at how I write, and any other news about new books, events or the podcast. You can also submit a question for the podcast there. You can find me on Instagram at @AmieKaufmanAuthor or on Twitter at @AmieKaufman. 

Salad With a Side of Fries
Nutrition Nugget: Goat Milk

Salad With a Side of Fries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:04


Nutrition Nugget! Bite-size, bonus episodes offering tips, tricks and approachable science. Sticking with the Fall season, Jenn's talking about goat milk. For real, goat milk. Jenn thinks it's weird that humans are the only animals who drink the milk of another species. Goat milk, though, might be the answer. Turns out, it's not as weird as it sounds; pver 65% of the world's population drinks it. Listen in to find out why! Like what you're hearing? Be sure to check out the full length episodes; new releases every Wednesday.  Have an idea for a nutrition nugget?  Submit it here: https://asaladwithasideoffries.com/index.php/contact/         Become A Member: https://glow.fm/saladwithasideoffries/Want a Free Menu Plan from Jenn? https://www.tlsslim.com/bettermylifenow/weight-loss-profile/?

Nation Real Life
The preseason Kool-Aid goes down smooth

Nation Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:15


Another Thursday has landed on the calendar and that means the boys from the Real Life Podcast are back with a brand new episode of the show to help you get you through what's left of your week. Today, the boys were talking National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, fans being back at Rogers Place, and a whole lot more. Kicking off this week's podcast, the guys kicked off the Thursday episode of Real Life with a conversation about National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and why it's important to keep the conversation going beyond just this one day. Here at the Nation, the guys talked about how important it is for stories being posted online to take the time to learn about what happened in this county. Changing gears, the guys spoke at length about the preseason that's in full swing and whether or not we should be getting excited about how well the Oilers have done so far. From Zach Hyman finding a home on McDavid's wing to Lamborghini Perlini scoring goals en masse, the Kool-Aid was going down smooth as the guys had a hard time containing their excitement for the new season. Sticking with sports, the guys did another round of NFL bets ahead of the Thursday Night Football matchup between the Bengals and the Jaguars, which kicked off another round of chirps from the guys as they're all trying to muscle their way up the ladder as the podcast's best bettor.

Cyber Humanity
45: Tales from the Crypto

Cyber Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 47:59


First story is about someone who was “relieved” of their Bitcoin by some kids wielding malware back in 2018, when it was worth an awful lot less than it is now. There are some techie bits to this, as well as a few ethical and legal issues with the way the perps are being sued, so it's a cracking story to get stuck into.  What do NFTs – non fungible tokens – and Banksy have in common? It's pretty confusing as far as stories go, but our resident clearer-upperer, Kev, is on hand to help, leaving us to wonder if this is just Banksy himself having a bit of fun.  Sticking to the currency theme, we get knee deep in China's digital Yuan in our next segment, and finally wrap up with a beautiful bit of OSINT from the Twitter Infosec community.  *** https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-58399338 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-58399338)  https://www.reuters.com/world/china/china-rolls-out-new-rules-minors-online-gaming-xinhua-2021-08-30/ (https://www.reuters.com/world/china/china-rolls-out-new-rules-minors-online-gaming-xinhua-2021-08-30/) https://twitter.com/brechtcastel/status/1432642649312333829?s=20 (https://twitter.com/brechtcastel/status/1432642649312333829?s=20)

The Podcast by KevinMD
An American doctor in Rome

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 20:21


"The idea was to try working in Rome for a year and see how it went. This sensible American plan collapsed under the weight of Italian bureaucracy. Luckily I didn't investigate every angle before starting off; if I had known the true lay of the land I might not have kept going after that Italian medical license like a donkey after his carrot. I'd have taken a job in some clinic in the Bronx, where I'd be seeing four patients an hour to this day. Instead, I made those steps you can't retrace: gave up my three-bedroom apartment on the Upper West Side with views of the Empire State Building and the Tri- borough Bridge, and sold my Dodge Challenger convertible to a pinky-ringed Turkish importer-exporter who planned to strip it down to the skeleton of an Oriental low-rider. Months beforehand I started focusing my Manhattanite efficiency on getting registered in Italy, my Italian husband leading me by the hand through the wilderness of Old World red tape. The first step was “getting my documents together,” an Italian ritual repeated before every encounter with officialdom. Sticking to a list kindly provided by the Italian Consulate, I collected my birth certificate, passport, high school diploma, college diploma, college transcript, medical school diploma, medical school transcript, certificates of internship and residency, National Board Examination certificates, American Board of Internal Medicine test results, and specialization diploma. Then I got them transfigured into Italian by the one person in New York authorized by the Italian Consulate to crown his translation with an imprimatur. We judiciously gave him a set of our own translations as crib notes, tailored by my husband to match the Rome medical school curriculum." Susan Levenstein is an internal medicine physician and author of Dottoressa: An American Doctor in Rome. She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, "An American doctor in Rome." (https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2019/09/an-american-doctor-in-rome.html)

DREAM. THINK. DO.
335: The Evolution of a Dream with Jon Mero

DREAM. THINK. DO.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:37


Singer and entertainer Jon Mero is with us! His voice is incredible… his musical acumen is nothing short of astounding… but his heart… and who he is as a human... is even more impressive.  He was born and raised in Des Moines, Iowa… and now resides in Atlanta, Georgia building an incredible career. He's been a finalist on NBC's The Voice. He's gotten to sing on movie soundtracks like Pitch Perfect 3 (alongside Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson).  And most recently… a single he did with LONIS… was featured on the ABC tv show “Station 19.”  He's walking out a true story of talent, grit, faith and entrepreneurial spirit and I can't wait for this conversation! RESOURCES: Jon's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonmero/ Jon's Linktr.ee: https://linktr.ee/jonmero Jon Mero's The VOICE Blind Audition:  https://mitchmatthews.com/335 Jon's first appearance on DREAM THINK DO: www.mitchmatthews.com/151 “3 Keys for Sticking with a Dream (in 15 minutes or less): mitchmatthews.com/320/  “Dreaming BIG No Matter What” with Amberly Lago: https://mitchmatthews.com/310/ “True Grit: Stories you didn't hear in History Class but should have!” with Ben Stein: www.mitchmatthews.com/173  MINUTE BY MINUTE: 0:02 What to expect today 1:30 Get to know Jon 7:00 What gave Jon the confidence to sing 15:24 Looking within and bettering yourself 23:30 Developing a life of continual growth 26:58 What success looks like for Jon 31:27 Mitch's favorite The Voice moment 35:30 Tips for staying in the moment 46:36 Jon's little known dream 53:32 Mitch's minute MITCH'S MINUTE: I loved this convo.   One of my favorite moments was Jon's quote: “The reason why we miss today is because we think there is a moment in the future that's more important than today.” Whew… that's wisdom.  AND a cautionary tale… right? I love how Jon says he's still working on living in the moment, BUT that understanding was at the core of him KILLING his blind audition for The Voice.  He was in THAT moment… fully.  And you could TOTALLY tell.  True joy.  Fully there.  No matter the outcome.  Okay… it didn't hurt that 4 chairs turned and they almost got in a fist fight over him… BUT living in the moment helped.  HA! How about YOU?  What stood out to you?  Was it something Jon said?  Was it the vibe?  Was it a thought or a memory that this convo sparked?  Let me know.  I shared some of my favorites… now I want to hear from YOU!  Leave a comment below and let's do this!

The Dave Ramsey Show
I'm Having a Hard Time Sticking to the Budget (Hour 2)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:09


Debt, Budgeting, Home Buying, Investing As heard on this episode: Christian Healthcare Ministries: https://bit.ly/2XBZfE3  Sign up for a FREE trial of Ramsey+ TODAY: https://bit.ly/3rZTUAx Tools to get you started:  Debt Calculator: https://bit.ly/2Q64HME Insurance Coverage Checkup: https://bit.ly/3sXwUn5 Complete Guide to Budgeting: https://bit.ly/3utmVXi Check out more Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3fHhbVE

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News
Market Predictions and Emotional Investment Decisions | Brandon Averill, Erik Averill, Justin Dyer | AWM Insights #80

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 25:43


Last week had the largest market down day of 2021, yet the markets finished slightly up on the week. What can and should you expect from the market?Markets moving up and down is normal and should be expected. As an investor, you will live through many rough market days. You will experience many fear and greed cycles. The key to weathering these storms is creating an investment game plan and sticking to it. You shouldn't panic when the market is down 2%. Patience pays off in sports and in investing - you don't bench your best player because they strike out once or twice. Emotions cause bad decision making, but staying rational can be easier said than done. It is why the plan is so important, because reacting can destroy your returns.EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:1:18 The news you should know: US households' net worth hit record highs and the largest increase in real estate holdings ever.1:54 Congress looks primed to pass tax increases on corporations, individuals, and estates. The capital gains rate is slated to move higher and also the top tax rate. Tax minimization strategies are also being targeted for removal including the backdoor Roth IRA.3:35 Evergrande, a real estate company in China, is in danger of defaulting on their debt. This creates uncertainty which causes volatility in the markets. When a company as large as Evergrande defaults it can cause shockwaves that impact other companies and markets. 5:30 Market volatility is a normal and healthy part of financial markets. If markets only went up and there was little to no risk then you would not be rewarded in the form of higher expected returns. Risk and return are always related. It is a basic foundation of investing.11:00 No one is surprised when a hitter strikes out. It's a natural part of baseball and no one panics when it happens. This is no different than markets and the selloffs, corrections, and recoveries that occur every year. 17:00 Risk aversion is an investor bias of losses hurting more than gains. Sticking to your investment plan and controlling emotions allows you to capture the returns you deserve. 18:00 Herd mentality and why it feels good to be doing what everyone else is doing. If you follow the herd instead of your own investment plan, you will damage your wealth.21:00 Be careful where you get your advice. There is no need to feel insecure like you should know how to invest. CNBC and other financial media are preying on your emotions to drive their advertising revenue. Professionals that give advice only in your best interest would be able to help you focus on what matters for only you. 23:25 Brandon's book recommendation: Get Wise to your Advisor. A great resource when it comes to finding an advisor.

City Cast Chicago
'Boystown' Became 'Northalsted' Last Year. Is it Sticking?

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 12:25


Last year, the Northalsted Business Alliance surveyed residents and business owners in “Boystown” about whether the name should change. Although “Boystown” is not an official neighborhood name, it's what the area in Lakeview has been called for decades to signify it as a safe and welcoming area for LGBTQ Chicagoans and tourists. But not everybody felt included there, including lesbians, transgender individuals, and young people of color. So the Northalsted Business Alliance declared the area would now be advertised as “Northalsted,” saying a name nodding to the geographic area would be more inclusive. We talk with Block Club Chicago's Jake Wittich about the fight to change the name, why some people wanted to keep “Boystown,” and whether the change has really caught on. Guest: Jake Wittich — Lakeview, Old Town, Lincoln Park Reporter, Block Club Chicago Pride Fest 2021 kicks off Friday in Northalsted, and Pride South Side takes place Saturday at the DuSable Museum of African American History Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
Straight Fire w/ Jason McIntyre - Jimmy G is JAG, the Rams are the Class of the NFC & All Hail Justin Herbert

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:08


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with a deep dive into the Green Bay Packers thrilling Sunday night victory over the San Francisco 49ers. Aaron Rodgers did what Rodgers does, but the real story to come of this game was the play of the much-maligned Jimmy Garoppolo. It's hard to kill Jimmy G considering he put the 49ers in position to win the game with :37 left, but it's also hard to praise him considering he was just okay most of the night. Jimmy G isn't going to make you great, but he's definitely good enough to win. The only question at this point is who he'll be playing for next year because it darn sure won't be San Francisco (Maybe Pittsburgh or Miami?). Sticking in the NFC West, Matthew Stafford has absolutely unlocked the Sean McVay offense for the Los Angeles Rams. Jason tried to tell you when the Stafford trade went down that it made the Rams the Super Bowl favorites, and after the way they handled Tom Brady and the Buccaneers on Sunday, it's hard not to feel the same way today. Not to be outdone, Justin Herbert and the Los Angeles Chargers put the rest of the League on notice when they beat the Chiefs on Sunday. Herbert is arguably the most talented young quarterback in football outside of Patrick Mahomes, and he should be in the NFL MVP race this year and for years to come. Finally, Jason closes the show with a very special Monday Night Football (Philadelphia Eagles vs Dallas Cowboys) edition of the Best Bet. Click here to subscribe, rate and review all of the latest Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre
Jimmy G is JAG, the Rams are the Class of the NFC & All Hail Justin Herbert

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:08


On today's episode, Jason kicks things off with a deep dive into the Green Bay Packers thrilling Sunday night victory over the San Francisco 49ers. Aaron Rodgers did what Rodgers does, but the real story to come of this game was the play of the much-maligned Jimmy Garoppolo. It's hard to kill Jimmy G considering he put the 49ers in position to win the game with :37 left, but it's also hard to praise him considering he was just okay most of the night. Jimmy G isn't going to make you great, but he's definitely good enough to win. The only question at this point is who he'll be playing for next year because it darn sure won't be San Francisco (Maybe Pittsburgh or Miami?). Sticking in the NFC West, Matthew Stafford has absolutely unlocked the Sean McVay offense for the Los Angeles Rams. Jason tried to tell you when the Stafford trade went down that it made the Rams the Super Bowl favorites, and after the way they handled Tom Brady and the Buccaneers on Sunday, it's hard not to feel the same way today. Not to be outdone, Justin Herbert and the Los Angeles Chargers put the rest of the League on notice when they beat the Chiefs on Sunday. Herbert is arguably the most talented young quarterback in football outside of Patrick Mahomes, and he should be in the NFL MVP race this year and for years to come. Finally, Jason closes the show with a very special Monday Night Football (Philadelphia Eagles vs Dallas Cowboys) edition of the Best Bet. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Rink Wide
September 24 2021 - Canucks Training Camp Day 2

Rink Wide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 60:11


Week one of Rink Wide is in the books and it lines up with Day 2 of Canucks training camp. Andrew Wadden and Jeff Paterson go through the day to talk about what Jeff saw out in Abbotsford.Patrick Johnston of Post Media joined Wadden and JPat and he started off talking Klimovich. Sticking with the Russian speaking players there, PJ talked about the comprehension the players have of the English language. You can tell that Podkolzin has a good understanding of the language and that he put work in the offseason. He talks about where Podkolzin is in his development and that there is a difference between an NHL player and an NHL star. It's not a surprise that he is fitting in after playing two seasons in the 2nd best league in the world, PJ tells the guys. Patrick went into what he thought of Olli Juolevi and his performance and how disappointing it is so far. Questions if we could actually see him start on the NHL roster. Talked about how many games we could see Juolevi actually play this year. PJ addressed the curious case of the whereabouts of Travis Hamonic. From one player not here, to another, the guys talk about when we might see Brandon Sutter back. Talked about Chiasson and if the PTO he signed could lead to a spot on the roster. Andrew and Jeff finished off the show by breaking down how Pettersson and Hughes contracts could be divided between what the Canucks have left in their salary cap. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Intentionally Lola
What's sticking to our ribs from "Getting to know Kim DiGiovanni"

Intentionally Lola

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 61:23


In today's episode the 4 Intentionally Lola discuss how Gina's conversation with Kim DiGiovanni impacted us.We discuss divorce, managing expectations, customs, and the importance of communication. Be sure to listen to the "Getting to know Kim DiGiovanni" episode and let us know what is sticking to your ribs. Please leave us 5 stars and a written review on iTunes!Let us know what is sticking to your ribs after listening to this episode! You can find us on Facebook and Instagram or by visiting our beautiful website Lolahairandsoul.com where you can also shop our boutique, learn about our luxury salon, read our written insights, and access all of our Intentionally Lola podcasts. Music by Matt Biskie and the Island City band "Little Flaws"Recorded at Kiwi Audio by Brad Showalter Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Intentionallylola)

Salad With a Side of Fries
Nutrition Nugget: Honey

Salad With a Side of Fries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 10:56


Nutrition Nugget! Bite-size, bonus episodes offering tips, tricks and approachable science. Sticking with the Fall season, Jenn's talking about Honey. We see the bees and run from them but is their produce a magical sweetener or just something else that will keep us addicted to the taste of sweet and spike blood sugar levels? In just a few minutes Jenn gives us the rundown honey and answers our burning questions. Like what you're hearing? Be sure to check out the full length episodes; new releases every Wednesday.  Have an idea for a nutrition nugget?  Submit it here: https://asaladwithasideoffries.com/index.php/contact/         Become A Member: https://glow.fm/saladwithasideoffries/Want a Free Menu Plan from Jenn? https://www.tlsslim.com/bettermylifenow/weight-loss-profile/? 

Nation Real Life
Mickey Mouse, Oilers Training Camp, and McDavid on TNT

Nation Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 57:21


Another Thursday has landed on the calendar and that means the boys from the Real Life Podcast are back with a brand new episode of the show to help you get you through what's left of your week. Today, they're talking about new projects, podcast censorship, NFL betting, and a whole lot more. To kick things off, the podcast got started with a conversation about Jay's pitch call to ESPN about a potential new deal that the Network is working on for DailyFaceoff.com. From the legal talk to contracts with a massive company like Disney, it was interesting to hear Jay talk a little bit about what it's like for a deal like this to come together. From there, the guys started talking about all of the stuff that got bleeped out of Monday's podcast and the feedback that came in as a result. Did Tyler cut things out that needed to be cut to save the podcast? All unnecessary? Who's to say. Getting to the Oilers, the guys spoke a little bit about training camp, specifically the video that Ryan Rishaug posted that showed Connor McDavid blowing the doors off his teammates in a skating drill. Sticking with McDavid, the guys spent a few minutes talking about how the Oilers will be featured heavily on TNT in the USA this season and how it makes perfect sense to showcase the league's best player in an attempt to grow the game. Lastly, the guys wrapped up this week's podcast with a little bit of betting talk as week 3 of the NFL season kicks off tonight. 

Moment 2 Moment
Ep 24: Sticking to Her Guns: Filmmaker Diane Paragas Talks the importance of staying true to your Vision

Moment 2 Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 63:45


It took Diane Paragas 17 years to get her film The Yellow Rose on screen. On this episode of Moment 2 Moment, the Filipina filmmaker discusses all the trials and tribulations that come with getting an independent film made in the modern age and why getting it right was so important. A firm believer that releasing a bad film can be career ending, Diane discusses how she stuck to her guns when she had to, lied to an investor for the chance to get it right, and always knew that Jeff Bridges was destined to be a washed up country singer.

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 2: Brady's Sticking Around For Awhile

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 43:18


Keyshawn, Jay and Max react to Tom Brady's comments about him wanting to play until he's 50. They debate on how long they think Brady can play. The guys also break down the big match ups this weekend in a segment called "4 Downs" and welcome in Waddle and Silvy on ESPN 1000's Tom Waddle to the show to weigh in on the Bears' QB Situation. 

Golic and Wingo
Hour 2: Brady's Sticking Around For Awhile

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 43:18


Keyshawn, Jay and Max react to Tom Brady's comments about him wanting to play until he's 50. They debate on how long they think Brady can play. The guys also break down the big match ups this weekend in a segment called "4 Downs" and welcome in Waddle and Silvy on ESPN 1000's Tom Waddle to the show to weigh in on the Bears' QB Situation. 

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 2: Brady's Sticking Around For Awhile

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:03


Keyshawn, Jay and Max react to Tom Brady's comments about him wanting to play until he's 50. They debate on how long they think Brady can play. The guys also break down the big match ups this weekend in a segment called "4 Downs" and welcome in Waddle and Silvy on ESPN 1000's Tom Waddle to the show to weigh in on the Bears' QB Situation. 

Keyshawn, JWill & Max
Hour 2: Brady's Sticking Around For Awhile

Keyshawn, JWill & Max

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:03


Keyshawn, Jay and Max react to Tom Brady's comments about him wanting to play until he's 50. They debate on how long they think Brady can play. The guys also break down the big match ups this weekend in a segment called "4 Downs" and welcome in Waddle and Silvy on ESPN 1000's Tom Waddle to the show to weigh in on the Bears' QB Situation. 

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis
Hour 2: Brady's Sticking Around For Awhile

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:03


Keyshawn, Jay and Max react to Tom Brady's comments about him wanting to play until he's 50. They debate on how long they think Brady can play. The guys also break down the big match ups this weekend in a segment called "4 Downs" and welcome in Waddle and Silvy on ESPN 1000's Tom Waddle to the show to weigh in on the Bears' QB Situation. 

Brand Risk Podcast
FaZe Kalei talks Cancel Culture, Cheating Accusations, & Hentai Addiction | #94

Brand Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 90:03


Kalei Renay is the epitome of a Brand Risk who never changed for anyone. Sticking to her roots of hentai addiction, gross tweets, & brand risk entertainment; Kalei became the FIRST WOMAN on FaZe Clan.Check out Skinny Mixes: http://skinnymixes.com/discount/brandriskBrand Risk Clips Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpesjs3qHT8IHdg3_rKPy2gBrand Risk Vlogs: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT740TGslTDW3-C0teYTbdwPodcast Socials:https://twitter.com/BrandRiskGGhttps://www.instagram.com/brandriskgg/https://www.tiktok.com/@brandriskFind Kalei Renay at her socials:https://twitter.com/KaleiRenayhttps://twitch.tv/Kalei❤️WE'RE ON SPOTIFY & APPLE PODCASTS❤️https://open.spotify.com/show/04vtsIZrVvG9EyOvFGCYeZ?si=sIkErUTfRGqMV5AbMqF_1ghttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/brand-risk-podcast/id1548242427Podcast Hosts:Arab - https://twitter.com/YourFellowArabQuick - https://twitter.com/EdwiinPODCAST MOMENTS0:00 - Intro3:41 - Joining FaZe10:43 - Start15:10 - Dropping out17:47 - Cheating TikTok 21:27 - Emo25:02 - Dealing With Hate28:33 - Getting Cancelled34:03 - Being in FaZe Clan46:38 - Cancel Culture51:56 - Being Stalked1:07:25 -  Female Streamers1:18:13 - Future Plans1:24:15 - Outro

Deep Questions with Cal Newport
Ep. 130: LISTENER CALLS: Leadership vs. Availability

Deep Questions with Cal Newport

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 41:59


Below are the topics covered in today's listener calls mini-episode (with timestamps). For instructions on submitting your own questions, go to calnewport.com/podcast.- Balancing availability and depth as a leader. [5:12]- Being available to students without being overwhelmed. [12:08]- Rapid fire questions (each answer under 1 minute). [18:18]     -- Working eight hours in a row.     -- Quarterly plan format.     -- Reading metrics.- Sticking to a schedule once made. [26:36]- Keeping up with an academic literature. [30:24]- Taking breaks between big projects. [35:20]Thanks to Jay Kerstens for the intro music and Mark Miles for mastering.

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca
A Long, Healthy Life with Dr. Anna Cabeca

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 49:58


Nourish your body from the inside out to live a long, happy, and healthy life. Dr. Anna breaks down the science behind longevity and explores the key supplements to promote health and reduce inflammation, how to reduce and avoid the toxins and endocrine disruptors we face everyday in our lives, and why love is the best medicine of all. [0:15] Longevity begins in the womb. What we do for our health matters for generations. In the past episode Dr. Anna talked about a number of different treatments that were meant to help maintain a pregnancy, but instead resulted in a plethora of negative effects generations down the line. [1:05] There are age reversal techniques that everyone can do that can have tremendous genetic and generational positive benefits. [1:40] The healthier we are as a community and with our relationships the longer we live with a high quality of life. Love, laugh, and give is a great mindset to start your day and end your life with. [3:50] Treatments can have generational effects. Endocrine disruptors like Diethylstilbestrol (DES) were touted as a wonderful, universal drug for pregnant mothers but resulted in numerous negative effects. [4:50] Dr. Anna recently attended the Da Vinci 50 conference and Dr. Gregory Church recommended that the FDA should require third generational animal studies before releasing a medication out to the public. Most medications today do not meet that standard. [6:30] Protect yourself from toxic overload and hormone disruptors. In many places, disruptors can even be found in tap water. [7:30] Another key area that affects our longevity is our epigenetics. If you don't have your 23andMe health yet, it can be a good idea to get it. Knowing how well you methylate will determine the best types of supplementation for you. [8:40] You also need to pay attention to toxin exposure. Things like fireproof treated fabric can be absorbed through the skin, and particular GMOs can cause issues. [10:05] Anything with PCBs is considered highly toxic. Dioxin, a byproduct from chloride containment processes, can linger in the environment for years and diminishes the production of thyroid hormones. [10:50] A recent patient came to Dr. Anna with low testosterone. Before dealing with the symptom, it's important to address the cause of the problem. Her approach was to do an endocrine toxicity screen and address the thyroid issues. [12:40] If you're suffering from low testosterone, we have to ask where the testosterone is going. Is it being converted to estrogen? Is it becoming dihydrotestosterone? These could result in either man boobs or hair loss, so it's important to understand what is going on. [13:55] Most of us haven't been aware of the potent complication of endocrine disruptors. We are seeing an overall increase of infertility, early menopause, and early andropause. [14:20] Phthalates are very common in the plastic drinking bottles we use. Avoiding BPAs is also important, which are found in plastics as well as metal food containers. The rule of thumb is to reduce our exposure to toxins as much as possible. [17:30] Off-Gassing of chemicals can also occur in your shower curtain and dry cleaning bag. Switching to a natural fiber shower curtain is an easy, quick fix. [18:00] Even something as innocuous as the receipts you get at the store have BPAs on them. Cashiers should think seriously about using gloves while handling receipts all day. [19:10] Seek out products that have the FDA-certified Organic label. The reverse should be the norm, where foods are labeled as grown with pesticides, but that's the reality we live in. [20:55] Heavy metals are major endocrine disruptors. Mercury from fish, and lead in air pollution, all impact fertility and cause complications in pregnancy. Dr. Anna often tests patients for heavy metals and recommends natural chelators. Vitamin C and certain foods like garlic, ginger, broccoli sprouts, and more help reduce toxic heavy metals in the body. [27:00] Chromosome maintenance and repair will improve all the downstream symptoms. Telomere erosion and genetic errors age us rapidly. Natural aging can be accelerated through life and environmental stresses like smoking, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and inflammation. [27:50] Inflammation accelerates aging universally, from your hair to your skin to your brain cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell, and when they are functioning poorly for a number of different reasons, it leads to rapidly declining energy and fatigue. [29:15] Anyone with autoimmune issues is affected by rapid aging. The lower your basal metabolic rate, the more unhealthy you are. [30:30] Glucose regulation is the number one recommendation from experts in longevity. Keeping your glucose levels steady throughout the day with a diet like Keto Green will certainly help. Especially for women going through menopause, a stable blood sugar and a habit of fasting can drastically improve the quality of your life. [34:10] Sticking with the Keto Green lifestyle leads to more benefits the longer you persist. [34:40] Maintaining a stable glucose level and avoiding the peaks and valleys of snacking and card heavy meals throughout the day is a true hack for longevity. [34:55] If you're a poor methylator because of your genetics, you will age faster if you don't intervene. [36:20] We live in a climate-controlled world, and exposing yourself to extreme temperatures can have a major positive impact on your metabolism. Cold plunges have been used for thousands of years to improve performance. [37:10] Supplements can also promote longevity. Things like turmeric, green tea extract, and resveratrol increase antioxidants in the body and promote healthy aging. [39:10] DHEA levels are something you should also try to keep high. Supporting the adrenal gland can help your body produce its own DHEA and keep your levels in the optimal range. [40:35] MNM is a precursor to NAD, a powerful anti-inflammatory and supports the mitochondria. [41:25] Dr. Anna breaks down her daily supplementation regimen which can be found in her Super Woman packs. [45:15] Another supplement mentioned during the conference is spermidine. Certain exercises can help you increase your flow of this natural longevity-promoting substance. [46:40] Stem cell injections have also shown anti-aging effects. As more science is produced supporting those results, the more likely it will be the future of anti-aging treatment. [48:10] If we have an unhealthy gut, we are unhealthy. Keeping the gut as healthy as possible is crucial to hormone balance and longevity. [48:25] Gratitude, meditation, being out in nature, and getting a good night's sleep are all components of a long, healthy lifestyle. [49:25] Most of the time, it's the things we say no to that make the most difference in your life. [49:50] Love is the best medicine. Love, laugh, and give is the mantra that Dr. Anna lives by and recommends others to do as well.       Mentioned in this Episode: youtube.com/thegirlfrienddoctor dranna.com/show     Always seek the advice of your own physician or qualified health professional before starting any treatment or plans. Information found here and results are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional and are not intended as medical advice.

Eric Roberts Fitness
ERF 256: Have Trouble With Consistency & Sticking To A Plan? This Is What You Are Missing

Eric Roberts Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 33:07


In this episode of the Eric Roberts Fitness Podcast I talk in depth about if you are someone who has trouble staying consistent with your fitness. Whether it be your nutrition plan, your exercise, your mindset. I dive deep into why that could be happening and more importantly what you can do to fix it. How you can get to a point where your confidence is so high you know you can conquer and achieve anything. Hope you enjoyed the episode and if you did please leave a 5 star rating and review. Thanks a ton. -E

Sixteen:Nine
Jackie Walker, Publicis Sapient, On QSRs

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 37:20


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT I've yet to meet Jackie Walker in person, but in our chats over the phone and video, she's quickly impressed me with her knowledge, insights and enthusiasm for digital signage. Many of the people I've dealt with at big media companies speak an unfamiliar, very buzz-phrasey language that I barely grasp, but Jackie works for one of the biggest - Publicis Sapient - and speaks like normal people. Based in Houston, she's the head of strategy for that giant agency's work in what's called dining and delivery. That puts her front and center in planning out and then executing things like digital menu displays and the overall ordering experience at major QSRs. Drive-thrus and their digital displays were a big part of how many QSRs got through COVID lockdown periods - when in-store ordering was restricted - and now we're seeing a lot of operators who didn't have drive-thru adding that capability. Jackie and I had a great chat about the value proposition and ROI model for drive-thru display technology - including mashing up a lot of things like loyalty apps, readers and other technologies to customize or optimize what consumers see when they get in front of screens. If you sell into or service the QSR space, this is a valuable listen. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Jackie, welcome. We've spoken in the past and know each other a bit. I don't think we've actually met in person, and who does that any more?  You work for Publicis Sapient, and you've been leading strategy for digital menu boards for a couple of big QSR brands. What does all that entail?  Jackie Walker: Yeah, absolutely. Publicis Sapient, for those of your listeners who aren't super familiar with us, we are a digital business transformation firm. So we work with many brands, many QSRs in particular, around how they can use digital to really optimize the way that they are connecting with their customers. It's on a lot of fronts, there's some mobile work, of course, loyalty work, customer relationship marketing, all of these suspects. But I specifically have really been working very closely on digital menu boards which have been really interesting. The brands that I've been working with and I've now worked with five of the top twenty-five and different categories, right? A couple of the burger brands, a coffee brand, a chicken brand. What's really interesting, I think, for these larger brands is that they're really trying to push the envelope on what they're trying to achieve with their digital menu boards. But nobody has really figured out how to do that yet. So when we go in on the strategy engagements, we're really focused on the customer experience as a lens. So the team is generally, me, a couple of strategists, a product manager sometimes, and a couple of UX people, so visual designers and user experience folks who can really think about the way you organize an experience for our customer to make it super easy, and we really look at three lenses, right? We look at where the brand is from a brand identity customer experience perspective. So as they think about how to transition from just translating a print menu, which is generally the way that this starts, right? How do you move from translating a print menu to actually thinking about broader digital capabilities? So we try to understand where they are with that. What's their mobile experience? How do they think about this on their digital channels today?  We think about where they are from a technology standpoint. So that's really interesting work, right? Talking to their restaurant technology groups, sometimes their customer technology groups, trying to understand what they're doing from a loyalty standpoint, where they are with the point of sale capability where they are with their digital menu board vendor. If they're already down a path, so what are the capabilities they have and what do they don't have, and really thinking about those lenses so that we can get to a view on where they go from a user experience standpoint and then also, how do they continue to push the envelope as they build in more and more digital capabilities?  So you've talked about pushing the envelopes. When digital many boards first started being applied in larger QSR chains, it was all around the operational issues that changes could be made a lot more efficiently and you can do dayparting. I gather what you're saying is the larger brands, at least in their heads, are way beyond that now?  Jackie Walker: Yeah. It's a funny thing, right? I think we're still talking about some of those basics. Everybody thinks of Mcdonald's as the gold standard, which makes sense. They're the largest, they were the first to scale outdoors. But that's recent, right? So they just finished their rollout in the US at the beginning of 2020. So it's not actually that long ago that some of this hardware was being installed. So I think dayparting is still something that brands are very much thinking about. They're thinking about how to leverage dayparting. So if you look at the McDonald's menu, there are some obvious changes with the dayparts. You look at the background color, for example, breakfast is blue, lunch is yellow, dinner and late-night is black, right? That's the most obvious, but if you squint, you can't really tell the difference between the products that are laid out for lunch, dinner, and late at night. They're doing very subtle things with reorganizing products, but they're not really leaning into that capability yet. So as brands are starting to think about dayparting, thinking more about. What can you do from a business perspective with that? Can you do promotions that are specific to a time of day, right? Can you have a special late-night menu that has different pricing on some of your most snackable items, as an example, do you play with brand voice?  So some of these QSR brands really have quite playful brand identities. You think that some of these brands could have a really fun and differentiated late-night experience versus what they're trying to accomplish during lunchtime, that would be consistent with their brand. So still thinking about that, I think now the big thing is loyalty, and so with loyalty and I keep beating the drum on this one, that is really going to fundamentally change the drive-thru experience. Again, McDonald's pushing the envelope here.  They completed their national loyalty rollout in July, in the US, which is their largest market, and what's sneaky, and I don't know if everyone's recognized it is now in McDonald's app, you can actually set it up so that when you go through the drive-thru, you can pay with your stored credit card via your app. So you go to the window, just you go up to the menu board, just like you normally would, you talk to the crew member, you place your order. You give them this code, and now it's applying loyalty points. It's using any coupons or offers or points redemptions that you've applied but it also does the payment through that mobile interface, which is really interesting. It's subtle but if you think about the experience of a customer, they don't have to go to the pay window anymore at all. You've just really streamline that. You don't have to hand your credit card out through the window. You avoid all of that kind of silliness. So I think that's a really interesting change, and I think other brands are really going to be forced to emulate that, and that's going to be a huge shift.  Yeah, and that's part of it, right? If you have a lot of active use of your loyalty app, also blends payment in there when they get into the drive-thru lane long before they even get to the presale window, a system like what McDonald's bought with that Israeli company Dynamic Yield is that they pick that stuff up, they know that Jackie's back in and she's got her kids with her maybe or whatever, and when you get to the presale and when you get to the order window, they can dynamically recast that menu to suit your preferences or what they think might be your preferences and how they can upsell you on stuff? Jackie Walker: That's where it's headed, yeah. So no one is really doing that particularly effectively yet, but that is absolutely where it's headed. The challenge that a lot of these brands are still working on is customer identification, and we've been talking about that for so long, we used to talk about license plate recognition, still talk about Bluetooth. How do you figure out who's in the car? Are you creepy and use cameras? What are you doing? So brands are really still experimenting and figuring out what is the best tech for that. McDonald's right now is just doing a shortcode so the customer still has to do some work, they have to open their app, they have to see that code, they read it to the crew, right? Code is different every time. So you have to actually look to see it, in that transaction, what your code is.  But certainly even testing Bluetooth, DNKN is interesting. DNKN's been partnering with a company called Blue Dot not so secretly, which does pretty advanced geolocation. So they're actually using really tight geofencing to trigger customer identification and doing some customer greeting based on that.  So it would actually say, “Hi Dave, or Hey Jackie”? Jackie Walker: Exactly, which is, I think still a questionable use case, right?  Yeah. People will start looking in the rearview mirror and go, “okay, who's following me?”  Jackie Walker: Yeah, exactly. My favorite actually is not the “Hi Dave!” at the beginning, but the “Thanks, Dave!” at the end of the transaction like that's been a topic is how do you personalize that screen at the very end of the order confirmation, which is funny because if you actually sit in a drive-thru for a while and watch, which I do, because that's part of my job as the digital menu board super-nerd.   “Who's that strange woman standing in the parking lot?” (Laughter)  Jackie Walker: Oh God, Dave, I have so many funny stories. My husband always makes fun of me. It's like, “Excuse me, there's a suspicious woman in leggings and a Volvo in the drive-thru!” It's yeah, it's funny. But you realize that most customers have already driven away by the time that thank you sign presents anything, so they're not seeing that. So if you're investing a bunch of time and energy figuring out how you're personalizing that screen, all you're really doing is creeping everybody out because you're showing the next customer in line, the previous customer's information. That's an interesting thing, and then Tim Horton's is playing with scanners. So actually installing QR scanning hardware in the drive-thru lane, the customer opens their app, has the QR code open, and scans on the scanner, which I'm intrigued to see how that's going to go. I think there are definitely some pretty strong cons with that in terms of that hardware investment is not going to be small, and then, we've all done grocery checkout, self-checkout, and you try to scan something even in good lighting, that can be quite challenging. So now you have a mobile phone trying to scan in direct sun. I'm predicting, there'll be some challenges with that.  In Canada with snow and -30 and everything else.  Jackie Walker: Yep. Sticking your hand out the phone with a big mitten on. Edmonton in February doing that. I'm not sure it was going to be a big take-up, but you never know.  Jackie Walker: So I think, brands are, to go back to the original question, what are they doing? There are still a few basics, right? Let's figure out how we're going to identify the customer. Let's build that foundation. It's really about how we're going to use dayparting more effectively really, gets the promise of that, suggestive selling is another area. That's quite interesting. So we've been using those examples in the industry for 10 years. Show ice cream when it's hot out, show hot coffee when it's cold out, but now the technology is definitely there to do much more sophisticated things. So that's where things like McDonald's dynamic yield do come into play in a big way, is making some suggestions for customers that go well beyond what you could do with rules-based kind of recommendations, and then now it's like let's start using our imagination and getting creative.  What does personalization look like if you know a customer, do you make it really easy to reorder recent items? That's a great benefit for both the operator and the customer, right? So if you show somebody buys their Whopper Jr., mine is no pickle, no Mayo, with cheese, if you know that I order that every single time you show that on the board and you just say, I want my Whopper Jr. my way, and there's a POS integration for the crew member to hit one button. You just saved a bunch of time, and really provided some additional value for the customer. So I think those types of executions are going to be really interesting. Certainly in places like Canada, where you have a pretty substantial number of commuters who would go into a Tim Horton's every morning and they're going to order their Double Double or whatever it is, and they're not going to move off of that because that's what gets them on the road. To be able to just know that, okay, Dave's here and he's gotten his Double Double, and there's nothing involved other than payment, or maybe even not that if if you flash your phone right away. Jackie Walker: Absolutely. Yeah, it's really powerful, and it's those moments, I think that are going to be the most interesting or where there's clear value to the customer and there's clear value to the operator, right? Everyone benefits from that kind of investment.  Is that seamlessness a big part of it where there are different systems and it all just works and it makes your drive-thru experience better? Jackie Walker: That is I think the kind of gold standard and that's where it's headed. I think it's really interesting, for a long time, brands were buying digital menu boards and it was really, they're buying a piece of hardware, especially outdoor because everybody's really terrified about making this big hardware investment. You really focus on the hardware and then you get some software along for the ride and you hope that the software has the out-of-box capabilities that you need to do what you want to do with it.  I think now more and more brands are recognizing that that's not really how it's going to work for them. It's really about creating this customized experience that can integrate with their systems. It can integrate with their point of sale. It can integrate with their loyalty program. It can integrate with their master product data. These are really powerful benefits to an integrated system, that is software first and experience first and the hardware is just supporting it.  I'm curious about drive-thru right now because of COVID. Prior to COVID, the idea of selling drive-thru was that it could do all these things, here's the value proposition, and so on, and it was being marketed that way.  With COVID and the inability, at least in some jurisdictions, to even go inside to dine and order stuff, if you didn't have to the drive-thru, you were in a world of pain in terms of operating your business. Has that deferred the whole idea, that you could do all these things with it and just made it operational for the moment, or at least in the past year, we needed to put in drive-thru just so we could do transactions and sell food? Jackie Walker: Yeah, I think that was a huge benefit for QSR. You think about the drive-thru that was pre-built for COVID, it's the ultimate kind of contactless almost service method. So I think quick-serve has a huge advantage over other types of restaurants, even if you think about fast-casual where some of them may have had drive-thru or curbside pick up, but that was a very small part of their business, whereas quick service has been trying to optimize drive-thru for years and years, and spend a lot of time and energy and money investing in ways to make that channel more seamless. I wonder what's different now, and exciting is that the emphasis for a long time has been on the operational aspects of drivers. So how do you improve the speed of service and how do you improve order accuracy? Those are the two big things, and how do you drive throughput? Now there's this question and I think loyalty is a big part of the impetus for that. How do you create meaningful customer interaction? So not only how are you getting the customer the food they want, at the speed you want to get it to them and they want it to go. But how do you actually provide some additional value in that interaction and provide a differentiated experience? Which is exciting!  How would that work and look?  Jackie Walker: Yeah. So I think one of the things that's different about quick-service restaurants is that they still have a very large portion of their customers that are cash customers. You think about Starbucks, they've been extraordinarily successful at getting a ton of customers to just use mobile order pay and it's easy peasy. And then the challenge from an operation standpoint is just how do you get those mobile orders customers served quickly.  QSRs are going to have a steeper hill to climb with that. They're trying to drive digital adoption. They're trying to drive known customer rates, like what percentage of their customers do they actually know that are registered customers or credit cards that they can attribute to a customer. But that behavior of people is gonna start on mobile ordering everything. So far, there's not really any evidence that there's going to be consistent. Customers like deals and offers that provide a lot of value. But if there's a way that you can hook into deals and offers without the customer actually having to complete the transaction in the mobile app, that's really powerful. Drive-thru is all about impulse. I can just pull in and grab my thing and go, and I don't have to think about it. I don't have to sit here go through the fifteen steps and in a mobile app to order. So I think it's really going to be that balance between bringing forward that enhanced digital capability with loyalty, which includes reordering, personalized offers. It includes all of those things and bringing that to bear in the drive-thru lane itself, and the menu board becomes a very powerful tool in reinforcing those value adds.  If your customer is asking questions in the drive-thru you're in big trouble, right? So if you have a loyal customer, they don't know that you've registered with them, but you know it's them that's there, or they can't tell that you applied their points the way that they thought the points were going to get applied, to get a free ice cream cone you really create some significant operational challenges. So menu boards, I think, are becoming more and more of a tool to be able to reinforce to customers that you've got their back and things are going to be accurate in the way that they expect them to be. That's super powerful. Is there an easily defined, easily sold, and easily acknowledged ROI model now for these drive-thru displays? Because by and large, they are being put in by the local franchise owner, not the head office, so that there's a significant $10-30k infrastructure investment to do this, and local operators are looking at this one and going, “I didn't save for that,” or, “Why would I do this?” or “What am I going to see?”  Jackie Walker: Yeah, I will say that there does seem to be a pretty big sea change with regard to the franchisee's state of mind when it comes to this investment. I think there's real acceptance and I've worked with a couple of brands now where the initiative is spearheaded at the brand level, right? There's much more power when it comes from the brand and that capability is built centrally. The franchisees are just footing the bill for installation in their individual restaurant or set of restaurants but the franchisees are basically saying, let's go faster. How fast can I get this thing installed? And, they can't go as fast as the franchisees want them to go.  I think what's interesting with the ROI model, in the early days, the math worked better for indoor because the capital investment indoors is a lot cheaper. There's a little bit of the cost savings of printing and having people up on ladders and the liability that goes along with that, the inflexibility of print. You could make a pretty good case for the return on investment with those indoor boards on cost alone. With drive-thru, your capital investment is quite a bit higher because the hardware has to be much more rugged to be able to withstand that outdoor environment. I think what is shifting is now the value prop is not just about the cost savings and the increased flexibility. But it's also about the direct upside. So now that you have these additional digital capabilities, how do you actually build a customer's check by adding capabilities that are unique to digital? So getting really strong with the way you're using day partying or really thinking about suggestive selling and how do you do that in a consistent way, which is really driving. How do you encourage customers toward your more premium menu items? And you can get quite sophisticated in the way that you use that channel to build checks. Is there an acknowledged metric around that? So pulling this out of my head, if you make this investment, it should pay for itself in the first 18 months or the first 26 months or whatever it is?  Jackie Walker: Yeah, the economics depend a little bit on the restaurant, but generally the kind of rule of thumb has been, you're going to get like a 3% to 5% lift just by moving from analog boards to digital because the customer experience is just much better. I think the challenge is that wears off eventually is your customers get used to digital. You don't have that Disney effect on the third visit and fourth visit. But over time, it's all about driving that incrementality and the numbers are hard there, Dave, because a lot of people don't want to share. The brands don't want to share how successful or not successful their suggestive sales capabilities are. But generally speaking, it's all about driving that ticket over time, and then you can do the work back on the break-even time.  But I think in general, what you said 18 to 24 months is in most cases probably about right.  And I'm sure as in many things, the other QSR operators, regardless of category or size, pay very close attention to what the giants do, like a McDonald's and if they're doing a full rollout across their whole estate, across the United States, they're not doing that for giggles and they've thought this through? Jackie Walker: Absolutely. With the ROI model, part of it is, what is the direct benefit, from an economic standpoint, but then the other part of it is very much keeping up with the Joneses kind of mentality or keeping up with the McDonalds in this case. How do you actually ensure that you're meeting customer expectations because once customers get used to that slick experience, you pull into a random Taco Bell with a ten-year-old backlit WITH half of them are blown out and they're all scratched up and dingy, customers do notice that stuff? So I think there is a little bit of just leveling up that guest experience and it is going to be contagious.  All the big brands are really starting to think about how they do this, and I think now with the price of hardware coming down and the big players converting, so McDonald's is already there, RBI is rolling out across Burger King, Popeye's, and Tim Horton's, they're going to be the next big player to reach scale. It's really just a matter of when, and not if everyone's going to go digital on these drivers.  So let's talk about inside the store. We talked mostly about drive-thru displays, but inside the store, digital menu boards have been around a lot longer, but they're changing too because you're going to see a lot more service ordering and a lot more pickup and you need digital menu boards that have to also function as queue management or notification, right?  Jackie Walker: Yeah. So I think what's happening is there's actually a proliferation of use cases if you want to think about it that way. So the digital menu board at the front counter is really just about providing a menu to customers that are in the restaurant and you're right, it's pretty well understood. I think that's interesting when I talk to customers about drive-thru, they get really excited about its personalization, and the word I always pushed to use is optimization even more than personalization because you get the benefit for unknown guests as well. But once you get that working like a well-oiled machine, you start to understand customer behavior at the store level, you can actually apply those same principles at the front counter, right? So you're not targeting your messaging to an individual customer because that front counter board is meant to be a one-to-many experience, but you can 100% tailor that experience to the restaurant. So you can curate the menu for the types of purchase behavior that exists in that store or that type of store. So I think the front counter is going to continue to evolve, with regards to that, to become a little bit more curated benefiting from the investment at the drive-thru.  The kiosk is another huge piece. I laugh and I think we've talked about this before, when COVID started everyone thought, oh my God, it's like the death of kiosks, nobody's ever going to touch it, touch screen ever again. But actually, it's done quite the opposite as we've understood better, that face-to-face is much worse than touching a screen and using some hand sanitizer. But what's interesting is that from a rollout perspective. Brands still think of kiosks as very different from menu boards, which I find fascinating. The way that it ends up shaking out is, brands think about their mobile experience and most brands are furthest along on mobile ordering. Then when they think about kiosks, it's the app, but on a big screen and a lot of brands actually manage it that way. So it's not the in-store tech groups that are managing that kiosk, it's actually the digital groups, the customer experience, technology groups that are delivering them. And then you have the menu boards and they are very much firmly still in the restaurant technology side of the house. So there are different problems to solve altogether. I think more and more, there's going to be a little bit of consolidation across that. I always encourage customers to think about as you're doing drive-thru, you're building these mechanisms from a backend standpoint to actually deliver curated content and be smart in how you're merchandising product dynamically. There's absolutely a play for that on front counter boards and a play for that on kiosks, and the kiosk is after all another piece of in-store hardware, and then to your point, Dave, there are these other use cases, right?  So are brands going to start to put more queue management screens up like McDonald's has, where they have now served these customer numbers and they have the list for in-store and list for mobile. Do they start to do some things with digital displays near pickup areas as more and more customers are starting to use take-out options? I've even heard some thought around, are there going to be digital screens at mobile pickup? I'm still not sold on that one. Like a sign made out of metal does just great for, telling you a customer where they need to park. We'll see who's able to first define a use case that has a clear ROI for putting screens at those parking spots.  The last thing I wanted to ask about was some fundamentals around digital menu boards. One of the things that I've found through the years and seems to be getting better as people learn is you have these eye charts that they try to cram so much stuff into a single display that you really can't read anything and it's mentally overwhelming, you look at it and go, oh my God, I'll just order the thing that I've got in my head and get the hell out of here.  Is that sort of thing important? Color choices, font choices, certainly the volume of text, the size or point size, all those things? Jackie Walker: 100%. Yes, and I think I'm glad you asked this question because this is my favorite question, right? If you look at how most of the brands: McDonald's is a good example, Burger King is a good example. It looks like the problem they've been trying to solve is how do you jam all the shit that you had on six panels print now on to two or three digital screens. Like if you just look at it, you can see that's what they thought they were trying to do. Really the opportunity with digital menu boards is to get more precise about what the content is because you can have advanced analytics, you can link what you display to a customer to a transaction. You can start to have a much better data-driven merchandising strategy. So you can really think about the use case for the drive-thru, which to your point is you have a customer that's freaked out, they're going to be in front of that board for probably 10-15 seconds looking at it at a peak time before they start talking or the crew member starts talking to them. So if you're trying to show them 85 SKUs, there is no way that any human is understanding 85 SKUs in 10-15 seconds. So the opportunity is really about curation, and I think when we approach menu board design, we don't think about it from an old-school menu sings print menu point of view. We think about it from a digital frame of reference.  How do you guide wayfinding for a customer? How do you establish a kind of system design and a foundation that's going to allow the operator of the brand to substitute products in and out and see how they perform when they're in these different slots? Think about designing a poster, you think about designing a digital framework. I think curation is key. That's that to me really all of these personalization tactics that you talk about, it really comes back to how do I show less stuff that's more meaningful and the tactics are all different ways of getting at that problem. So I think that's what's most exciting about the move to digital menu boards is we can start playing there and as an industry get much smarter about how you actually serve the customer at that moment? How do you show them the least amount of information to get them through success? Either help them get what they wanted to get, they knew they wanted, or inspire them to try something new. Build tickets, improve their level of confidence. These are all the things that become front and center in this new digital menu board experience. All right. Super interesting. I appreciate you taking the time.  Jackie Walker: Lots of fun. Dave, always looking forward to talking to you soon and maybe meeting you in person.  Yes. If we ever travel once again and do things like Trade Shows.  Jackie Walker: Amen. Thanks so much, Dave.  

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-14-21 - Entertainment Drill - TUE - Hubba Bubba Commercial Cowboy Has Died - Lady Jay Still Sticking By Her Story

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 10:24


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - The Entertainment Drill - Tuesday September 14, 2021

Secret Leaders
Saved from the Nazis, she started a unicorn software company in the 1960s staffed with only women and just £6 - Dame Stephanie “Steve” Shirley

Secret Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:43


Dame Stephanie Shirley, known as ‘Steve' for reasons explained in the podcast, escaped Nazi persecution before founding a software startup in 1962 with just £6 which provided employment to hundreds of women when they weren't taken seriously in the workplace. “I remember selling a six figure software project to a junior minister, and he was trying to pinch my bottom. It was very hard to maintain a sort of professionalism.”  Steve's story is one that reminds us both how much the world has moved on since the early days of her startup, and sadly how little has changed. “I can't believe how today we're still talking about the same sorts of things that I was talking about 50 years ago: feeling undervalued, women's ideas taken and presented by men as their own, women being talked over, women being patronised, women being sexually assaulted.” From coming to England on the Kindertransport in 1939, to falling in love with mathematics, being appalled at pay inequality, founding her own company (Xansa plc, now part of the Sopra Group) in 1962, and navigating the 1975 equal opportunities legislation: “We tried to laugh at the ridiculousness of it all. But all in all, we realised that that was the way the world was going. And now of course, all of business is much more inclusive. But it was a struggle. In the early days, women were second class citizens.” Having retired from the business aged 60 (she's now 88), Steve is now a full time philanthropist, focusing on things she knows and cares about, treating her various charities as businesses. Her advice to listeners? “All the important things that I've done have been either disruptive or long term. Sticking with 11 years for this, 17 years for that, five years [there]. These are not things that are done overnight with a burst of energy.” We chat about: From refugee to entrepreneur Why she had to become Steve to get traction Surviving a nervous breakdown Becoming a good philanthropist Links: Book - Let It Go Book - So To Speak Want to receive our podcast on a weekly basis? Subscribe to our newsletter!

OverDrive
Marcellus Wiley on the Packers blowout loss, Bills-Steelers & Matt Nagy sticking with Andy Dalton

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 13:23


Longtime NFLer, FS1 Host & TSN NFL Analyst Marcellus Wiley joined OverDrive earlier today following a busy weekend in the NFL to get into the Packers blowout loss, the Bills loss to Pittsburgh & how the Bears locker room feels about Matt Nagy going with Andy Dalton.

Women Inspired!
0313 [MINDSET] Manage Your Emotions by Sticking to the Facts

Women Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 2:07


As human beings, one thing we simply have to learn to contend with is our emotions. They can get the best of us at times. The thing to remember is that an emotion typically arises when we're interpreting the facts of a situation or applying a judgement to something that is happening, has happened, or will happen. What happens when you remove the judgement? Join us for our FREE live webinar Foundations of Psychological Strength by registering at: www.peakmindpsychology.com/webinar 

Clear Creek Community Church
Sticking Out for the Right Reasons

Clear Creek Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 35:02


Clear Creek Community Church
Sticking Out for the Right Reasons

Clear Creek Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 35:02


Sickboy
Warning: Stop Sticking Eels Up Your Butt - Feel Good Friday

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 62:28


This week gets a little out of hand. While Jeremie is dodging Tornados in Ontario, the gang talk about the worlds largest grave yard, a dad who strips down at a school board meeting in protest, a badass young woman with down syndrome going to UCB, a guy who chopped off his pee pee in a police chase, several poor chaps who stuck one too many eels up their bung hole, and a worse-off chap who backwards ejaculated to death... maybe? Yeah, it's one of those weeks.

Ramsey Call of the Day
My Spouse Isn't Sticking to Our Budget!

Ramsey Call of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 7:45


The Ramsey Call of the Day is a quick, daily dose of advice on life and money in under ten minutes. Hear from experts like Dave Ramsey, Ken Coleman, Rachel Cruze, Christy Wright, Dr. John Delony, and George Kamel. Part of the Ramsey Network. Delivered to you five days a week.

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Sticking to This Way of Life - Episode 1917

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 45:32


: Episode 1917 - On this Saturday show, Michael Just joins Vinnie to talk his weight loss journey, sticking to this way of life, getting off of medication, beating COVID-19, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2021/08/sticking-to-this-way-of-life-episode-1917 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS WAY OF LIFE Michael has been on the show before. https://vinnietortorich.com/2019/05/losing-120-lbs-gaining-life-back-episode-1327/ He committed to this lifestyle when he realized he had nothing left to lose. At his lowest, he was around 160 lbs. Currently, he sits around 245. His clothes that fit at 225 still fit -- he's primarily gained muscle. During the shut down, he fell off the wagon. He lost track of this way of life. He got lazy in shutdown and the like. Importantly, Michael lost 8 medications! He feels better and he is quite clearly healthier. He's been on meds for so long, and it's freeing to get off. Drugs mask the real problem; this way of life has allowed him to address the real problem: his diet and weight. FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com Https://www.bit.ly/fatdocumentary

The Playbook
The #1 Common Denominator of Success

The Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 24:02


Perform a self-evaluation. Think about how much time per day you are committed to the pursuit of your potential. Are you consistent? Are you persistent? Do you need to improve in these areas? Consistency is a massively important because it allows you to focus on what you want. Focusing on a goal and working toward it every day allows you to utilize the power of intention. That focus yields exponential growth and results. You need to do something every day in order to be great at it. Meditate, use gratitude, practice a skill, work on a relationship, tell somebody that you love and appreciate them. Each of those activities can take as little as 30 seconds a day, if you are efficient, and make a resounding impact in your life. (Consistent) drive for dough My favorite example to use when it comes to consistency is golf. If you play golf 30 minutes every single day, you'll be far better than someone who plays one of two rounds on the weekends. In fact, people who play six hours on the weekend are often worse after one year compared to those who consistently practice. There are many examples of this in sports, people who push on despite being told "no" again and again. They stick to their guns, whether it be during one game, one season or an entire career, and it pays off in the end. Persistence in business: These same principles hold true for all of the successful entrepreneurs we've come to know. Individuals like Walt Disney and Henry Ford all had lived in the consistent, persistent enjoyment of the pursuit of their potential, pushing past the many difficulties they faced. You will always run into obstacles, voids and shortages along the way. Sticking to your goals every single day will allow you to increase your enjoyment of that pursuit. In order to reach your potential, it is essential to be consistent and persistent in the enjoyment of the pursuit of it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices