Podcasts about foursquare

  • 768PODCASTS
  • 7,786EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 5, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about foursquare

Show all podcasts related to foursquare

Latest podcast episodes about foursquare

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast
TPM Episode307: Peter Line, Snowboard Legend, Forum

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 63:45


Peter Line is the legendary snowboarder responsible for the iconic Four Square and Forum brands. While these brands had a huge impact, they were rider owned, and having an impact and success, in the long run, isn't the same thing. Eventually, Burton Saved the brands from going under, ran them for a decade, and then shut them down. Ten years after that, Peter Line, Jeremy Jones, and Mack Dawg are back to re-boot the brand, and Peter and I take a deep dive into all things Forum and much more. Sean Tedore asks the Inappropriate Questions. Peter Line Show Notes: 5:30:  No alcohol for 3.5 years, partying, the lifestyle, future spins, and good style 15:00:  Bad style, bad posture, Peter the grom, and The Rawl backstory 21:30:  Stanley:  Get 30% off site wide with the code drinkfast Outdoor Research:  The best outerwear ever built just got better GoPro:  The only POV cam that matters 23:00:  Building Forum on the World Industries model, creating a super team, and the vision 31:00:  How long until Forum takes off, board numbers, what did they do wrong, and Peter's money 35:00:  Deals left on the table, what's going on behind the scenes at Forum, the positives around the Burton years, and the beginning of the end 42:00:  Peter Glenn Ski and Sports: Over 60 years of getting you out there 10 Barrel Brewery:  Buy their beers, they support action sports more than anyone Elan Skis:  Over 75 years of innovation that makes you better 44:30:  His feelings when Burton kills Forum, #GiveForumToPeter, and getting Forum back with Jeremy Jones and Mack Dawg 49:00:  Leveraging his relationship with Blue and Capita, distribution, and what differentiates Forum from the rest of the industry 65:00:  Inappropriate Questions with Sean Tedore

Adventure Church Podcast
The Name: What's in a Name

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 46:08


Today we start with our Christmas Mini Series “The Name Above All Other Names”, with Pastor Jodi teaching on what's in a name, and the meanings behind some of the most well known names of God; Elohim, Yahweh, Jehovah, Adonai, Jehovah Jireh, El Shaddai and El Elyon.

Parkside Church

Join Salmon's in worship. Cheryll shares a bit of her story of hope. Pastor Tom shares an Advent message on hope. LINKS FROM TODAY'S SERVICE Connect with us! Give online to Parkside Get email updates from Parkside Like us on Facebook FOR KIDS Parents! [...]

Valley Community Church Sermons
Wounded Warriors

Valley Community Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 57:05


Series: I Am Free Sunday sermon with Pastor Gary Clouse from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

Adventure Church Podcast
The LOVE Challenge: Spiritual IQ Test

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 44:14


Continuing with our Series “The LOVE Challenge” based on the book “1 John”, today Pastor Jodi teaches out of chapter 4 which talks about the true test of Christianity, do we love one another.

Together Digital Power Lounge
Leading with Emotional Intelligence | Liz Ritzcovan, Chief Revenue Officer at Hustle | Power Lounge S1E33

Together Digital Power Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 35:34


THIS WEEK'S TOPIC:Join us and learn what emotional intelligence (EQ) is and how it can work on a go-to-market team. As well as how to identify talent and pursue equitable hiring, and motiving folx in a remote-first culture; all while keeping numbers central to your success.We will also discuss:Leading a sales team (or any team) in a pandemic is challenging; how do we thrive together?How digital comms norms continue to evolve but human connection and trust remain central to lasting relationshipsTHIS WEEK'S GUEST:Elizabeth Ritzcovan, also known as Liz, has been the Chief Revenue Officer at Hustle since 2021. Ms. Ritzcovan is responsible for the overall leadership of Hustle's Go-To-Market organization, including sales, market development, sales operations, client services, and marketing. She has served as Global Chief Revenue Officer of Namogoo, Foursquare, Bazaarvoice, Sizmek, and Parade Media Group. Prior to that, she served as a Vice President at Yahoo! and Time. She has 20 years of print, digital media, and software sales experience with industry-leading organizations. She started her career in print media, where she held a number of roles with Conde Nast Publications, Miller Publishing, and H & H Publishing. Active in the New York community and industry, she serves as a Strategic Advisor to DigiFSi, a start-up for digital coupon solutions. She serves on the board of the New York Pops and also as an Executive Member of the Advertising Women of New York.Support the show

Fitt Insider
162. Dennis Crowley, Co-founder and CEO of Street FC

Fitt Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 32:40


Today, I'm joined by Dennis Crowley, co-founder and CEO of Street FC, a tech-enabled street soccer league. Street FC is building the world's biggest football club, organizing 5v5 street soccer games on hard-court surfaces in urban settings. Scheduled and monitored through its app and Discord channel, it runs games in NYC, Austin, Philadelphia, Atlanta, and Minneapolis, with plans to expand to 20 cities by the end of 2023.  In this episode, we discuss Dennis's experience using technology to bridge digital and real-life communities, plus Street FC's growth plans for soccer and beyond. In this episode, you'll learn: • Dennis's journey from Foursquare to creating the “SoulCycle for soccer” • How Street FC leverages playing surfaces as billboards for brands • Street FC's strategic plan to grow to 20 cities by 2023  Subscribe to the podcast → insider.fitt.co/podcast Subscribe to our newsletter → insider.fitt.co/subscribe Follow us on LinkedIn → linkedin.com/company/fittinsider/ Chapters: 00:00 Introduction 01:14 Dennis's background 03:43 Bridging the gap of digital and physical worlds 06:50 Why Street FC exists 09:49 How the community works 12:53 Street FC expansion 15:07 Getting more people to play soccer 16:39 Growth strategy 19:26 Merchandise and branding 23:50 Discord community 26:06 Soho House for soccer 27:57 International expansion and evolving into other sports 29:06 The fun and hard parts about start-ups 31:10 Conclusion

Mill Creek Foursquare Church
The Lepers Invitation

Mill Creek Foursquare Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 51:44


We are soon to begin an Advent teaching series but have a few weeks of timely messages from important voices within and to our congregation. This Sunday we have the wonderful opportunity to hear from Pastor Phil Manginelli (the younger brother of Chris). He is a fantastically-gifted communicator of Scripture and is able to share the vision of the Kingdom of God on earth. Phil, and his wife Emily, pastor The Square church in Smyrna, GA, a suburb of Atlanta. We sent them out 10 years ago to plant a church. It has become one of Foursquare's finest congregations on the east coast. Please join us on Sunday!

Valley Community Church Sermons

Series: I Am Free Sunday sermon with Pastor Gary Clouse from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

Adventure Church Podcast
The LOVE Challenge: Keeping it REAL

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 50:59


Continuing with our Series “The LOVE Challenge” based on the book “1 John”, today Pastor Jodi continues with chapter 3 in Keeping it REAL, pointing out what is fake and what is real worship that leads to real love and freedom.

Software at Scale
Software at Scale 52 - Building Build Systems with Benjy Weinberger

Software at Scale

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 62:57


Benjy Weinberger is the co-founder of Toolchain, a build tool platform. He is one of the creators of the original Pants, an in-house Twitter build system focused on Scala, and was the VP of Infrastructure at Foursquare. Toolchain now focuses on Pants 2, a revamped build system.Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google PodcastsIn this episode, we go back to the basics, and discuss the technical details of scalable build systems, like Pants, Bazel and Buck. A common challenge with these build systems is that it is extremely hard to migrate to them, and have them interoperate with open source tools that are built differently. Benjy's team redesigned Pants with an initial hyper-focus on Python to fix these shortcomings, in an attempt to create a third generation of build tools - one that easily interoperates with differently built packages, but still fast and scalable.Machine-generated Transcript[0:00] Hey, welcome to another episode of the Software at Scale podcast. Joining me here today is Benji Weinberger, previously a software engineer at Google and Twitter, VP of Infrastructure at Foursquare, and now the founder and CEO of Toolchain.Thank you for joining us.Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. Yes. Right from the beginning, I saw that you worked at Google in 2002, which is forever ago, like 20 years ago at this point.What was that experience like? What kind of change did you see as you worked there for a few years?[0:37] As you can imagine, it was absolutely fascinating. And I should mention that while I was at Google from 2002, but that was not my first job.I have been a software engineer for over 25 years. And so there were five years before that where I worked at a couple of companies.One was, and I was living in Israel at the time. So my first job out of college was at Check Point, which was a big successful network security company. And then I worked for a small startup.And then I moved to California and started working at Google. And so I had the experience that I think many people had in those days, and many people still do, of the work you're doing is fascinating, but the tools you're given to do it with as a software engineer are not great.This, I'd had five years of experience of sort of struggling with builds being slow, builds being flaky with everything requiring a lot of effort. There was almost a hazing,ritual quality to it. Like, this is what makes you a great software engineer is struggling through the mud and through the quicksand with this like awful substandard tooling. And,We are not users, we are not people for whom products are meant, right?We make products for other people. Then I got to Google.[2:03] And Google, when I joined, it was actually struggling with a very massive, very slow make file that took forever to parse, let alone run.But the difference was that I had not seen anywhere else was that Google paid a lot of attention to this problem and Google devoted a lot of resources to solving it.And Google was the first place I'd worked and I still I think in many ways the gold standard of developers are first class participants in the business and deserve the best products and the best tools and we will if there's nothing out there for them to use, we will build it in house and we will put a lot of energy into that.And so it was for me, specifically as an engineer.[2:53] A big part of watching that growth from in the sort of early to late 2000s was. The growth of engineering process and best practices and the tools to enforce it and the thing i personally am passionate about is building ci but i'm also talking about.Code review tools and all the tooling around source code management and revision control and just everything to do with engineering process.It really was an object lesson and so very, very fascinating and really inspired a big chunk of the rest of my career.I've heard all sorts of things like Python scripts that had to generate make files and finally they move the Python to your first version of Blaze. So it's like, it's a fascinating history.[3:48] Maybe can you tell us one example of something that was like paradigm changing that you saw, like something that created like a magnitude, like order of magnitude difference,in your experience there and maybe your first aha moment on this is how good like developer tools can be?[4:09] Sure. I think I had been used to using make basically up till that point. And Google again was, as you mentioned, using make and really squeezing everything it was possible to squeeze out of that lemon and then some.[4:25] But when the very early versions of what became blaze which was that big internal build system which inspired basil which is the open source variant of that today. Hey one thing that really struck me was the integration with the revision controls system which was and i think still is performance.I imagine many listeners are very familiar with Git. Perforce is very different. I can only partly remember all of the intricacies of it, because it's been so long since I've used it.But one interesting aspect of it was you could do partial checkouts. It really was designed for giant code bases.There was this concept of partial checkouts where you could check out just the bits of the code that you needed. But of course, then the question is, how do you know what those bits are?But of course the build system knows because the build system knows about dependencies. And so there was this integration, this back and forth between the, um.[5:32] Perforce client and the build system that was very creative and very effective.And allowed you to only have locally on your machine, the code that you actually needed to work on the piece of the codebase you're working on,basically the files you cared about and all of their transitive dependencies. And that to me was a very creative solution to a problem that involved some lateral thinking about how,seemingly completely unrelated parts of the tool chain could interact. And that's kind of been that made me realize, oh, there's a lot of creative thought at work here and I love it.[6:17] Yeah, no, I think that makes sense. Like I interned there way back in 2016. And I was just fascinated by, I remember by mistake, I ran like a grep across the code base and it just took forever. And that's when I realized, you know, none of this stuff is local.First of all, like half the source code is not even checked out to my machine.And my poor grep command is trying to check that out. But also how seamlessly it would work most of the times behind the scenes.Did you have any experience or did you start working on developer tools then? Or is that just what inspired you towards thinking about developer tools?I did not work on the developer tools at Google. worked on ads and search and sort of Google products, but I was a big user of the developer tools.Exception which was that I made some contributions to the.[7:21] Protocol buffer compiler which i think many people may be familiar with and that is. You know if i very deep part of the toolchain that is very integrated into everything there and so that gave me.Some experience with what it's like to hack on a tool that's everyone in every engineer is using and it's the sort of very deep part of their workflow.But it wasn't until after google when i went to twitter.[7:56] I noticed that the in my time of google my is there the rest of the industry had not. What's up and suddenly i was sort of stressed ten years into the past and was back to using very slow very clunky flaky.Tools that were not designed for the tasks we were trying to use them for. And so that made me realize, wait a minute, I spent eight years using these great tools.They don't exist outside of these giant companies. I mean, I sort of assumed that maybe, you know, Microsoft and Amazon and some other giants probably have similar internal tools, but there's something out there for everyone else.And so that's when I started hacking on that problem more directly was at Twitter together with John, who is now my co-founder at Toolchain, who was actually ahead of me and ahead ofthe game at Twitter and already begun working on some solutions and I joined him in that.Could you maybe describe some of the problems you ran into? Like were the bills just taking forever or was there something else?[9:09] So there were...[9:13] A big part of the problem was that Twitter at the time, the codebase I was interested in and that John was interested in was using Scala. Scala is a fascinating, very rich language.[9:30] Its compiler is very slow. And we were in a situation where, you know, you'd make some small change to a file and then builds would take just,10 minutes, 20 minutes, 40 minutes. The iteration time on your desktop was incredibly slow.And then CI times, where there was CI in place, were also incredibly slow because of this huge amount of repetitive or near repetitive work. And this is because the build tools,etc. were pretty naive about understanding what work actually needs to be done given a set of changes.There's been a ton of work specifically on SBT since then.[10:22] It has incremental compilation and things like that, but nonetheless, that still doesn't really scale well to large corporate codebases that are what people often refer to as monorepos.If you don't want to fragment your codebase with all of the immense problems that that brings, you end up needing tooling that can handle that situation.Some of the biggest challenges are, how do I do less than recompile the entire codebase every time. How can tooling help me be smart about what is the correct minimal amount of work to do.[11:05] To make compiling and testing as fast as it can be?[11:12] And I should mention that I dabbled in this problem at Twitter with John. It was when I went to Foursquare that I really got into it because Foursquare similarly had this big Scala codebase with a very similar problem of incredibly slow builds.[11:29] The interim solution there was to just upgrade everybody's laptops with more RAM and try and brute force the problem. It was very obvious to everyone there, tons of,force-creation pattern still has lots of very, very smart engineers.And it was very obvious to them that this was not a permanent solution and we were casting around for...[11:54] You know what can be smart about scala builds and i remember this thing that i had hacked on twitter and. I reached out to twitter and ask them to open source it so we could use it and collaborate on it wasn't obviously some secret sauce and that is how the very first version of the pants open source build system came to be.I was very much designed around scarlet did eventually.Support other languages. And we hacked on it a lot at Foursquare to get it to...[12:32] To get the codebase into a state where we could build it sensibly. So the one big challenge is build speed, build performance.The other big one is managing dependencies, keeping your codebase sane as it scales.Everything to do with How can I audit internal dependencies?How do I make sure that it is very, very easy to accidentally create all sorts of dependency tangles and cycles and create a code base whose dependency structure is unintelligible, really,hard to work with and actually impacts performance negatively, right?If you have a big tangle of dependencies, you're more likely to invalidate a large chunk of your code base with a small change.And so tooling that allows you to reason about the dependencies in your code base and.[13:24] Make it more tractable was the other big problem that we were trying to solve. Mm-hmm. No, I think that makes sense.I'm guessing you already have a good understanding of other build systems like Bazel and Buck.Maybe could you walk us through what are the difference for PANs, Veevan? What is the major design differences? And even maybe before that, like, how was Pants designed?And is it something similar to like creating a dependency graph? You need to explicitly include your dependencies.Is there something else that's going on?[14:07] Maybe just a primer. Yeah. Absolutely. So I should mention, I was careful to mention, you mentioned Pants V1.The version of Pants that we use today and base our entire technology stack around is what we very unimaginatively call Pants V2, which we launched two years ago almost to the day.That is radically different from Pants V1, from Buck, from Bazel. It is quite a departure in ways that we can talk about later.One thing that I would say Panacea V1 and Buck and Bazel have in common is that they were designed around the use cases of a single organization. is a.[14:56] Open source variant or inspired by blaze its design was very much inspired by. Here's how google does engineering and a buck similarly for facebook and pansy one frankly very similar for.[15:11] Twitter and we sort of because Foursquare also contributed a lot to it, we sort of nudged it in that direction quite a bit. But it's still very much if you did engineering in this one company's specific image, then this might be a good tool for you.But you had to be very much in that lane.But what these systems all look like is, and the way they are different from much earlier systems is.[15:46] They're designed to work in large scalable code bases that have many moving parts and share a lot of code and that builds a lot of different deployables, different, say, binaries or DockerDocker images or AWS lambdas or cloud functions or whatever it is you're deploying, Python distributions, Java files, whatever it is you're building, typically you have many of them in this code base.Could be lots of microservices, could be just lots of different things that you're deploying.And they live in the same repo because you want that unity. You want to be able to share code easily. you don't want to introduce dependency hell problems in your own code. It's bad enough that we have dependency hell problems third-party code.[16:34] And so these systems are all if you squint at them from thirty thousand feet today all very similar in that they make that the problem of. Managing and building and testing and packaging in a code base like that much more tractable and the way they do this is by applying information about the dependencies in your code base.So the important ingredient there is that these systems understand the find the relatively fine grained dependencies in your code base.And they can use that information to reason about work that needs to happen. So a naive build system, you'd say, run all the tests in the repo or in this part of the repo.So a naive system would literally just do that, and first they would compile all the code.[17:23] But a scalable build system like these would say, well, you've asked me to run these tests, but some of them have already been cached and these others, okay, haven't.So I need to look at these ones I actually need to run. So let me see what needs to be done before I can run them.Oh, so these source files need to be compiled, but some of those already in cache and then these other ones I need to compile. But I can apply concurrency because there are multiple cores on this machine.So I can know through dependency analysis which compile jobs can run concurrently and which cannot. And then when it actually comes time to run the tests, again, I can apply that sort of concurrency logic.[18:03] And so these systems, what they have in common is that they use dependency information to make your building testing packaging more tractable in a large code base.They allow you to not have to do the thing that unfortunately many organizations find themselves doing, which is fragmenting the code base into lots of different bits andsaying, well, every little team or sub team works in its own code base and they consume each other's code through, um, so it was third party dependencies in which case you are introducing a dependency versioning hell problem.Yeah. And I think that's also what I've seen that makes the migration to a tool like this hard. Cause if you have an existing code base that doesn't lay out dependencies explicitly.[18:56] That migration becomes challenging. If you already have an import cycle, for example.[19:01] Bazel is not going to work with you. You need to clean that up or you need to create one large target where the benefits of using a tool like Bazel just goes away. And I think that's a key,bit, which is so fascinating because it's the same thing over several years. And I'm hoping that,it sounds like newer tools like Go, at least, they force you to not have circular dependencies and they force you to keep your code base clean so that it's easy to migrate to like a scalable build system.[19:33] Yes exactly so it's funny that is the exact observation that let us to pans to see to so they said pans to be one like base like buck was very much inspired by and developed for the needs of a single company and other companies were using it a little bit.But it also suffered from any of the problems you just mentioned with pans to for the first time by this time i left for square and i started to chain with the exact mission of every company every team of any size should have this kind of tooling should have this ability this revolutionary ability to make the code base is fast and tractable at any scale.And that made me realize.We have to design for that we have to design for not for. What a single company's code base looks like but we have to design.To support thousands of code bases of all sorts of different challenges and sizes and shapes and languages and frameworks so.We actually had to sit down and figure out what does it mean to make a tool.Like this assistant like this adoptable over and over again thousands of times you mentioned.[20:48] Correctly, that it is very hard to adopt one of those earlier tools because you have to first make your codebase conform to whatever it is that tool expects, and then you have to write huge amounts of manual metadata to describe all of the dependencies in your,the structure and dependencies of your codebase in these so-called build files.If anyone ever sees this written down, it's usually build with all capital letters, like it's yelling at you and that those files typically are huge and contain a huge amount of information your.[21:27] I'm describing your code base to the tool with pans be to eat very different approaches first of all we said this needs to handle code bases as they are so if you have circular dependencies it should handle them if you have. I'm going to handle them gracefully and automatically and if you have multiple conflicting external dependencies in different parts of your code base this is pretty common right like you need this version of whatever.Hadoop or NumPy or whatever it is in this part of the code base, and you have a different conflicting version in this other part of the code base, it should be able to handle that.If you have all sorts of dependency tangles and criss-crossing and all sorts of things that are unpleasant, and better not to have, but you have them, the tool should handle that.It should help you remove them if you want to, but it should not let those get in the way of adopting it.It needs to handle real-world code bases. The second thing is it should not require you to write all this crazy amount of metadata.And so with Panzer V2, we leaned in very hard on dependency inference, which means you don't write these crazy build files.You write like very tiny ones that just sort of say, you know, here is some code in this language for the build tool to pay attention to.[22:44] But you don't have to edit the added dependencies to them and edit them every time you change dependencies.Instead, the system infers dependencies by static analysis. So it looks at your, and it does this at runtime.So you, you know, almost all your dependencies, 99% of the time, the dependencies are obvious from import statements.[23:05] And there are occasional and you can obviously customize this because sometimes there are runtime dependencies that have to be inferred from like a string. So from a json file or whatever is so there are various ways to customize this and of course you can always override it manually.If you have to be generally speaking ninety.Seven percent of the boilerplate that used to going to build files in those old systems including pans v1 no. You know not claiming we did not make the same choice but we goes away with pans v2 for exactly the reason that you mentioned these tools,because they were designed to be adopted once by a captive audience that has no choice in the matter.And it was designed for how that code base that adopting code base already is. is these tools are very hard to adopt.They are massive, sometimes multi-year projects outside of that organization. And we wanted to build something that you could adopt in days to weeks and would be very easy,to customize to your code base and would not require these massive wholesale changes or huge amounts of metadata.And I think we've achieved that. Yeah, I've always wondered like, why couldn't constructing the build file be a part of the build. In many ways, I know it's expensive to do that every time. So just like.[24:28] Parts of the build that are expensive, you cache it and then you redo it when things change.And it sounds like you've done exactly that with BANs V2.[24:37] We have done exactly that. The results are cached on a profile basis. So the very first time you run something, then dependency inference can take some time. And we are looking at ways to to speed that up.I mean, like no software system has ever done, right? Like it's extremely rare to declare something finished. So we are obviously always looking at ways to speed things up.But yeah, we have done exactly what you mentioned. We don't, I should mention, we don't generate the dependencies into build for, we don't edit build files and then you check them in.We do that a little bit. So I mentioned you do still with PANSTL V2, you need these little tiny build files that just say, here is some code.They typically can literally be one line sometimes, almost like a marker file just to say, here is some code for you to pay attention to.We're even working on getting rid of those.We do have a little script that generates those one time just to help you onboard.But...[25:41] The dependencies really are just generated a runtime as on demand as needed and used a runtime so we don't have this problem of. Trying to automatically add or edit a otherwise human authored file that is then checked in like this generating and checking in files is.Problematic in many ways, especially when those files also have to take human written edits.So we just do away with all of that and the dependency inference is at runtime, on demand, as needed, sort of lazily done, and the information is cached. So both cached in memory in the surpassed V2 has this daemon that runs and caches a huge amount of state in memory.And the results of running dependency inference are also cached on disk. So they survive a daemon restart, etc.I think that makes sense to me. My next question is going to be around why would I want to use panthv2 for a smaller code base, right? Like, usually with the smaller codebase, I'm not running into a ton of problems around the build.[26:55] I guess, do you notice these inflection points that people run into? It's like, okay, my current build setup is not enough. What's the smallest codebase that you've seen that you think could benefit? Or is it like any codebase in the world? And I should start with,a better build system rather than just Python setup.py or whatever.I think the dividing line is, will this code base ever be used for more than one thing?[27:24] So if you have a, let's take the Python example, if literally all this code base will ever do is build this one distribution and a top level setup pie is all I need. And that is, you know, this,sometimes you see this with open source projects and the code base is going to remain relatively small, say it's only ever going to be a few thousand lines and the tests, even if I runthe tests from scratch every single time, it takes under five minutes, then you're probably fine.But I think two things I would look at are, am I going to be building multiple things in this code base in the future, or certainly if I'm doing it now.And that is much more common with corporate code bases. You have to ask yourself, okay, my team is growing, more and more people are cooperating on this code base.I want to be able to deploy multiple microservices. I want to be able to deploy multiple cloud functions.I want to be able to deploy multiple distributions or third-party artifacts.I want to be able to.[28:41] You know, multiple sort of data science jobs, whatever it is that you're building. If you want, if you ever think you might have more than one, now's the time to think about,okay, how do I structure the code base and what tooling allows me to do this effectively?And then the other thing to look at is build times. If you're using compiled languages, then obviously compilation, in all cases testing, if you start to see like, I can already see that that tests are taking five minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes.Surely, I want some technology that allows me to speed that up through caching, through concurrency, through fine-grained invalidation, namely, don't even attempt to do work that isn't necessary for the result that was asked for.Then it's probably time to start thinking about tools like this, because the earlier you adopt it, the easier it is to adopt.So if you wait until you've got a tangle of multiple setup pies in the repo and it's unclear how you manage them and how you keep their dependencies synchronized,so there aren't version conflicts across these different projects, specifically with Python,this is an interesting problem.I would say with other languages, there is more because of the compilation step in jvm languages or go you.[30:10] Encounter the need for a build system much much earlier a bill system of some kind and then you will ask yourself what kind with python because you can get a bite for a while just running. What are the play gate and pie test and i directly and all everything is all together in a single virtual and.But the Python tooling, as mighty as it is, mostly is not designed for larger code bases with multiple, that deploy multiple things and have multiple different sets of.[30:52] Internal and external dependencies the tooling generally implicitly assume sort of one top level set up i want top level. Hi project dot com all you know how are you configuring things and so especially using python let's say for jango flask apps or for data scienceand your code base is growing and you've hired a bunch of data scientists and there's more and more code going in there. With Python, you need to start thinking about what tooling allows me to scale this code base. No, I think I mostly resonate with that. The first question that comes to my mind is,let's talk specifically about the deployment problem. If you're deployed to multiple AWS lambdas or cloud functions or whatever, the first thought that would come to my mind isis I can use separate Docker images that can let me easily produce this container image that I can ship independently.Would you say that's not enough? I totally get that for the build time problem.A Docker image is not going to solve anything. But how about the deployment step?[32:02] So again, with deployments, I think there are two ways where a tool like this can really speed things up.One is only build the things that actually need to be redeployed. And because the tool understands dependencies and can do change analysis, it can figure that out.So one of the things that HansB2 does is it integrates with Git.And so it natively understands how to figure out Git diffs. So you can say something like, show me all the whatever, lambdas, let's say, that are affected by changes between these two branches.[32:46] And it knows and it understands it can say, well, these files changed and you know, we, I understand the transitive dependencies of those files.So I can see what actually needs to be deployed. And, you know, many cases, many things will not need to be redeployed because they haven't changed.The other thing is there's a lot of performance improvements and process improvements around building those images. So, for example, we have for Python specifically, we have an executable format called PEX,which stands for Python executable, which is a single file that embeds all of your Python code that is needed for your deployable and all of its external requirements, transitive external requirements, all bundled up into this single sort of self-executing file.This allows you to do things like if you have to deploy 50 of these, you can basically have a single docker image.[33:52] The different then on top of that you add one layer for each of these fifty and the only difference in that layer is the presence of this pecs file. Where is without all this typically what you would do is.You have fifty docker images each one of which contains a in each one of which you have to build a virtual and which means running.[34:15] Pip as part of building the image, and that gets slow and repetitive, and you have to do it 50 times.We have a lot of ways to speed up. Even if you are deploying 50 different Docker images, we have ways of speeding that up quite dramatically.Because again, of things like dependency analysis, the PECS format, and the ability to build incrementally.Yeah, I think I remember that at Dropbox, we came up with our own, like, par format to basically bundle up a Python binary with, I think par stood for Python archive. I'm notentirely sure. But it did something remarkably similar to solve exactly this problem. It just takes so long, especially if you have a large Python code base. I think that makes sense to me. The other thing that one might ask is, with Python, you don't really have,too long of a build time, is what you would guess, because there's nothing to build. Maybe myPy takes some time to do some static analysis, and, of course, your tests can take forever,and you don't want to rerun them. But there isn't that much of a build time that you have to think about. Would you say that you agree with this, or there's some issues that end,up happening on real-world code basis.[35:37] Well that's a good question the word builds means different things to different people and we recently taken to using the time see i more. Because i think that is clear to people what that means but when i say build or see i mean it in the law in in the extended sense everything you do to go from.Human written source code to a verified.Test did. deployable artifact and so it's true that for python there's no compilation step although arguably. Running my pie is really important and now that i'm really in the habit of using.My pie i will probably never not use it on python code ever again but so that are.[36:28] Sort of build-ish steps for Python such as type checking, such as running code generators like Thrift or Protobuf.And obviously a big, big one is running, resolving third-party dependencies such as running PIP or poetry or whatever it is you're using. So those are all build steps.But with Python, really the big, big, big thing is testing and packaging and primarily testing.And so with Python, you have to be even more rigorous about unit testing than you do with other languages because you don't have a compiler that is catching whole classes of bugs.So and again, MyPy and type checking does really help with that. And so when I build to me includes, build in the large sense includes running tests,includes packaging and includes everything, all the quality control that you run typically in CI or on your desktop in order to go say, well, I've made some edits and here's the proof that these edits are good and I can merge them or deploy them.[37:35] I think that makes sense to me. And like, I certainly saw it with the limited number of testing, the limited amount of type checking you can do with Python, like MyPy is definitelyimproving on this. You just need to unit test a lot to get the same amount of confidence in your own code and then unit tests are not cheap. The biggest question that comes tomy mind is that is BANs V2 focused on Python? Because I have a TypeScript code base at my workplace and I would love to replace the TypeScript compiler with something that was slightly smarter and could tell me, you know what, you don't need to run every unit test every change.[38:16] Great question so when we launched a pass me to which was two years ago. The.We focused on python and that was the initial language we launched with because you had to start somewhere and in the city ten years in between the very scarlet centric work we were doing on pansy one. And the launch of hands be to something really major happened in the industry which was the python skyrocketed in popularity sky python went from.Mostly the little scripting language around the edges of your quote unquote real code, I can use python like fancy bash to people are building massive multi billion dollar businesses entirely on python code bases and there are a few things that drove this one was.I would say the biggest one probably was the python became the. Language of choice for data science and we have strong support for those use cases. There was another was the,Django and Flask became very popular for writing web apps more and more people were used there were more in Intricate DevOps use cases and Python is very popular for DevOps for various good reasons. So.[39:28] Python became super popular. So that was the first thing we supported in pants v2, but we've since added support for or Go, Java, Scala, Kotlin, Shell.Definitely what we don't have yet is JavaScript TypeScript. We are looking at that very closely right now, because that is the very obvious next thing we want to add.Actually, if any listeners have strong opinions about what that should look like, we would love to hear from them or from you on our Slack channels or on our GitHub discussions where we are having some lively discussions about exactly this because the JavaScript.[40:09] And TypeScript ecosystem is already very rich with tools and we want to provide only value add, right? We don't want to say, you have to, oh, you know, here's another paradigm you have to adopt.And here's, you know, you have to replace, you've just done replacing whatever this with this, you know, NPM with yarn. And now you have to do this thing. And now we're, we don't want to beanother flavor of the month. We only want to do the work that uses those tools, leverages the existing ecosystem but adds value. This is what we do with Python and this is one of the reasons why our Python support is very, very strong, much stronger than any other comparable tool out there is.[40:49] A lot of leaning in on the existing Python tool ecosystem but orchestrating them in a way that brings rigor and speed to your builds.And I haven't used the word we a lot. And I just kind of want to clarify who we is here.So there is tool chain, the company, and we're working on, um, uh, SAS and commercial, um, solutions around pants, which we can talk about in a bit.But there is a very robust open source community around pants that is not. tightly held by Toolchain, the company in a way that some other companies open source projects are.So we have a lot of contributors and maintainers on Pants V2 who are not working at Toolchain, but are using Pants in their own companies and their own organizations.And so we have a very wide range of use cases and opinions that are brought to bear. And this is very important because, as I mentioned earlier,we are not trying to design a system for one use case, for one company or a team's use case.We are trying, you know, we are working on a system we want.[42:05] Adoption for over and over and over again at a wide variety of companies. And so it's very important for us to have the contributions and the input from a wide variety of teams and companiesand people. And it's very fortunate that we now do. I mean, on that note, the thing that comes to my mind is another benefit of your scalable build system like Vance or Bazel or Buck is that youYou don't have to learn various different commands when you are spelunking through the code base, whether it's like a Go code base or like a Java code base or TypeScript code base.You just have to run pants build X, Y, Z, and it can construct the appropriate artifacts for you. At least that was my experience with Bazel.Is that something that you are interested in or is that something that pants V2 does kind of act as this meta layer for various other build systems or is it much more specific and knowledgeable about languages itself?[43:09] It's, I think your intuition is correct. The idea is we want you to be able to do something like pants test or pants test, you know, give it a path to a directory and it understands what that means.Oh, this directory contains Python code. Therefore, I should run PyTest in this way. And oh, Oh, it also contains some JavaScript code, so I should run the JavaScript test in this way.And it basically provides a conceptual layer above all the individual tools that gives you this uniformity across frameworks, across languages.One way to think about this is.[43:52] The tools are all very imperative. say you have to run them with a whole set of flags and inputs and you have to know how to use each one separately. So it's like having just the blades of a Swiss Army knife withno actual Swiss Army knife. A tool like Pants will say, okay, we will encapsulate all of that complexity into a much more simple command line interface. So you can do, like I said,test or pants lint or pants format and it understands, oh, you asked me to format your code. I see that you have the black and I sort configured as formatters. So I will run them. And I happen to know that formatting, because formatting can change the source files,I have to run them sequentially. But when you ask for lint, it's not changing the source files. So I know that I can run them multiple lint as concurrently, that sort of logic. And And different tools have different ways of being configured or of telling you what they want to do, but we...[44:58] Can't be to sort of encapsulate all that away from you and so you get this uniform simple command line interface that abstract away a lot of the specifics of these tools and let you run simple commands and the reason this is important is that. This extra layer of indirection is partly what allows pants to apply things like cashing.And invalidation and concurrency because what you're saying is.[45:25] Hey, the way to think about it is not, I am telling pants to run tests. It is I am telling pants that I want the results of tests, which is a subtle difference.But pants then has the ability to say, well, I don't actually need to run pi test on all these tests because I have results from some of them already cached. So I will return them from cache.So that layer of indirection not only simplifies the UI, but provides the point where you can apply things like caching and concurrency.Yeah, I think every programmer wants to work with declarative tools. I think SQL is one of those things where you don't have to know how the database works. If SQL were somewhat easier, that dream would be fulfilled. But I think we're all getting there.I guess the next question that I have is, what benefit do I get by using the tool chain, like SaaS product versus Pants V2?When I think about build systems, I think about local development, I think about CI.[46:29] Why would I want to use the SaaS product? That's a great question.So Pants does a huge amount of heavy lifting, but in the end it is restricted to the resources is on the machine on which it's running. So when I talk about cash, I'm talking about the local cash on that machine. When I talk about concurrency, I'm talking about using,the cores on your machine. So maybe your CI machine has four cores and your laptop has eight cores. So that's the amount of concurrency you get, which is not nothing at all, which is great.[47:04] Thanks for watching![47:04] You know as i mentioned i worked at google for many years and then other companies where distributed systems were saying like i come from a distributed systems background and it really. Here is a problem.All of a piece of work taking a long time because of. Single machine resource constraints the obvious answer here is distributed distributed the work user distributed system and so that's what tool chain offers essentially.[47:30] You configure Pants to point to the toolchain system, which is currently SAS.And we will have some news soon about some on-prem solutions.And now the cache that I mentioned is not just did this test run with these exact inputs before on my machine by me me while I was iterating, but has anyone in my organization or any CI run this test before,with these exact inputs?So imagine a very common situation where you come in in the morning and you pull all the changes that have happened since you last pulled.Those changes presumably passed CI, right? And the CI populated the cache.So now when I run tests, I can get cache hits from the CI machine.[48:29] Now pretty much, yeah. And then with concurrency, again, so let's say, you know, post cache, there are still 200 tests that need to be run.I could run them eight at a time on my machine or the CI machine could run them, you know, say, four at a time on four cores, or I could run 50 or 100 at a time on a cluster of machines.That's where, again, as your code base gets bigger and bigger, that's where some massive, massive speedups come in.The other aspects of the... I should mention that the remote execution that I just mentioned is something we're about to launch. It is not available today. The remote caching is.The other aspects are things like observability. So when you run builds on your laptop or CI, they're ephemeral.Like the output gets lost in the scroll back.And it's just a wall of text that gets lost with them.[49:39] Toolchain all of that information is captured and stored in structured form so you have. Hey the ability to see past bills and see build behavior over time and drill death search builds and drill down into individual builds and see well.How often does this test fail and you know when did this get slow all this kind of information and so you get.This more enterprise level.Observability into a very core piece of developer productivity, which is the iteration time.The time it takes to run tests and build deployables and parcel the quality control checks so that you can merge and deploy code directly relates to time to release.It directly relates to some of the core metrics of developer productivity. How long is it going to take to get this thing out the door?And so having the ability to both speed that up dramatically through distributing the work and having observability into what work is going on, that is what toolchain provides,on top of the already, if I may say, pretty robust open source offering.[51:01] So yeah, that's kind of it.[51:07] Pants on its own gives you a lot of advantages, but it runs standalone. Plugging it into a larger distributed system really unleashes the full power of Pants as a client to that system.[51:21] No, I think what I'm seeing is this interesting convergence. There's several companies trying to do this for Bazel, like BuildBuddy and Edgeflow. So, and it really sounds like the build system of the future, like 10 years from now.[51:36] No one will really be developing on their local machines anymore. Like there's GitHub code spaces on one side. It's like you're doing all your development remotely.[51:46] I've always found it somewhat odd that development that happens locally and whatever scripts you need to run to provision your CI machine to run the same set of testsare so different sometimes that you can never tell why something's passing locally and failing in in CI or vice versa. And there really should just be this one execution layer that can say, you know what, I'm going to build at a certain commit or run at a certain commit.And that's shared between the local user and the CI user. And your CI script is something as simple as pants build slash slash dot dot dot. And it builds the whole code base for,you. So yeah, I certainly feel like the industry is moving in that direction. I'm curious whether You think that's the same.Do you have an even stronger vision of how folks will be developing 10 years from now? What do you think it's going to look like?Oh, no, I think you're absolutely right. I think if anything, you're underselling it. I think this is how all development should be and will be in the future for multiple reasons.One is performance.[52:51] Two is the problem of different platforms. And so today, big thorny problem is I want to, you know, I want to,I'm developing on my Mac book, but the production, so I'm running, when I run tests locally and when I run anything locally, it's running on my Mac book, but that's not our deployable, right?Typically your deploy platform is some flavor of Linux. So...[53:17] With the distributed system approach you can run the work in. Containers that exactly match your production environments you don't even have to care about can this run.On will my test pass on mac os do i need ci the runs on mac os just to make sure the developers can. past test on Mac OS and that is somehow correlated with success on the production environment.You can cut away a whole suite of those problems, which today, frankly, I had mentioned earlier, you can get cache hits on your desktop from remote, from CI populating the cache.That is hampered by differences in platform.Is hampered by other differences in local setup that we are working to mitigate. But imagine a world in which build logic is not actually running on your MacBook, or if it is,it's running in a container that exactly matches the container that you're targeting.It cuts away a whole suite of problems around platform differences and allows you to focus because on just a platform you're actually going to deploy too.[54:35] And the...[54:42] And just the speed and the performance of being able to work and deploy and the visibility that it gives you into the productivity and the operational work of your development team,I really think this absolutely is the future.There is something very strange about how in the last 15 years or so, so many business functions have had the distributed systems treatment applied to them.Function is now that there are these massive valuable companies providing systems that support sales and systems that support marketing and systems that support HR and systems supportoperations and systems support product management and systems that support every business function,and there need to be more of these that support engineering as a business function.[55:48] And so i absolutely think the idea that i need a really powerful laptop so that my running tests can take thirty minutes instead of forty minutes when in reality it should take three minutes is. That's not the future right the future is to as it has been for so many other systems to the web the laptop is that i can take anywhere is.Particularly in these work from home times, is a work from anywhere times, is just a portal into the system that is doing the actual work.[56:27] Yeah. And there's all these improvements across the stack, right? When I see companies like Versel, they're like, what if you use Next.js, we provide the best developer platform forthat and we want to provide caching. Then there's like the lower level systems with build systems, of course, like bands and Bazel and all that. And at each layer, we're kindof trying to abstract the problem out. So to me, it still feels like there is a lot of innovation to be done. And I'm also going to be really curious to know, you know, there'sgoing to be like a few winners of this space, or if it's going to be pretty broken up. And like everyone's using different tools. It's going to be fascinating, like either way.Yeah, that's really hard to know. I think one thing you mentioned that I think is really important is you said your CI should be as simple as just pants build colon, colon, or whatever.That's our syntax would be sort of pants test lint or whatever.I think that's really important. So.[57:30] Today one of the big problems with see i. Which is still growing right now home market is still growing is more more teams realize the value and importance of automated.Very aggressive automated quality control. But configuring CI is really, really complicated. Every CI provider have their own configuration language,and you have to reason about caching, and you have to manually construct cache keys to the extent,that caching is even possible or useful.There's just a lot of figuring out how to configure and set up CI, And even then it's just doing the naive thing.[58:18] So there are a couple of interesting companies, Dagger and Earthly, or interesting technologies around simplifying that, but again, you still have to manually,so they are providing a, I would say, better config and more uniform config language that allows you to, for example, run build steps in containers.And that's not nothing at all.[58:43] Um, but you still manually creating a lot of, uh, configuration to run these very coarse grained large scale, long running build steps, you know, I thinkthe future is something like my entire CI config post cloning the repo is basically pants build colon, colon, because the system does the configuration for you.[59:09] It figures out what that means in a very fast, very fine grained way and does not require you to manually decide on workflows and steps and jobs and how they all fit together.And if I want to speed this thing up, then I have to manually partition the work somehow and write extra config to implement that partitioning.That is the future, I think, is rather than there's the CI layer, say, which would be the CI providers proprietary config or theodagger and then underneath that there is the buildtool, which would be Bazel or Pants V2 or whatever it is you're using, could still be we make for many companies today or Maven or Gradle or whatever, I really think the future is the integration of those two layers.In the same way that I referenced much, much earlier in our conversation, how one thing that stood out to me at Google was that they had the insight to integrate the version control layer and the build tool to provide really effective functionality there.I think the build tool being the thing that knows about your dependencies.[1:00:29] Can take over many of the jobs of the c i configuration layer in a really smart really fast. Where is the future where essentially more and more of how do i set up and configure and run c i is delegated to the thing that knows about your dependencies and knows about cashing and knows about concurrency and is able,to make smarter decisions than you can in a YAML config file.[1:01:02] Yeah, I'm excited for the time that me as a platform engineer has to spend less than 5% of my time thinking about CI and CD and I can focus on other things like improving our data models rather than mucking with the YAML and Terraform configs. Well, yeah.Yeah. Yeah. Today you have to, we're still a little bit in that state because we are engineers and because we, the tools that we use are themselves made out of software. There's,a strong impulse to tinker and there's a strong impulse sake. Well, I want to solve this problem myself or I want to hack on it or I should be able to hack on it. And that's, you should be able to hack on it for sure. But we do deserve more tooling that requires less hacking,and more things and paradigms that have tested and have survived a lot of tire kicking.[1:02:00] Will we always need to hack on them a little bit? Yes, absolutely, because of the nature of what we do. I think there's a lot of interesting things still to happen in this space.Yeah, I think we should end on that happy note as we go back to our day jobs mucking with YAML. Well, thanks so much for being a guest. I think this was a great conversation and I hope to have you again for the show sometime.Would love that. Thanks for having me. It was fascinating. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.softwareatscale.dev

Adventure Church Podcast
The LOVE Challenge: Paternity Test

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 42:16


Continuing with our Series “The LOVE Challenge” based on the book “1 John”, today Pastor Jodi teaches out of chapter 3, which reminds us that we are made in His image and that if we want to be like Him, we don't have to like our neighbor but we are to love them unconditionally.

Valley Community Church Sermons
A Fight for Your Life

Valley Community Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 61:31


Series: I Am Free Sunday sermon with Pastor Gary Clouse from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

Adventures in The Spirit with Jared Laskey
Maureen Broderson: Victorious Spiritual Warfare (S3:E45)

Adventures in The Spirit with Jared Laskey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 36:14


You can overcome the assaults of the enemy! Maureen Broderson joins us to show us how to walk in victorious spiritual warfare! She is experienced in deliverance and healing ministry, is on pastoral team at Church on the Way in Van Nuys, CA., and brings Biblical and revelational insight on this topic. Receive a free trial of our members only podcast that saves lives at Spirit Empowered Living Members Only Podcast. Membership of ‘Spirit Empowered Living with Jared and Rochelle Laskey' starts at $5 a month or a contribution of your choice, helping us rescue sex trafficking victims. Download our free resource, '3 Secrets to Dialoguing with the Holy Spirit.' 

Adventure Church Podcast
The LOVE Challenge: What WOULD Jesus Do?

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 46:03


Continuing with our Series “The LOVE Challenge” based on the book “1 John”, today Pastor Jodi teaches on chapter 2 about “What would Jesus Do” and how He lived the 1st commandment, we are to model Jesus not the pharisees, in our daily lives. 

Valley Community Church Sermons
I'm Still Standing

Valley Community Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 47:44


Sunday sermon with Pastor Bob Rufener from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Making location easier for developers with new data primitives

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 23:45


When Foursquare launched in 2009, the app was consumer facing, letting you know where friends had checked in and what spots might appeal to you. People competed to be the “mayor” of certain locations and built guides to their favorite neighborhoods., The service expanded to allow merchants to offer discounts to frequent guests and track foot traffic in and out of the stores. While you can still use the Swarm app to find the best Manhattan in Manhattan, the company realized that real estate and data share the same three key rules: location, location, location. On this sponsored episode of the podcast, Ben and Ryan talk with Vin Sharma, VP of Engineering at Foursquare, about how they're finding the atomic data that makes up their location data—their location data—and going from giving insight to individual app users about the locations around them to APIs that serve these location-based insights to developers at organizations like Uber, Nextdoor, and Redfin, who want to build location based insights and features into their own apps. Show notesIf you still want to check in at your local bakery and remember all the place you'll go, the original Foursquare app is now Swarm. If you're looking to build on their data instead, you can start with their developer documentation. They have almost 70 location attributes that they are starting to deconstruct and decompose into fundamental building blocks of their location data. Like data primitives—integers, booleans, etc.—these small bites of data can be remade with agility and at scale. Through the recent acquisition of Unfolded, Foursquare allows you to visualize and map location data at any scale. Want to see patterns across the country? Zoom out. Want to focus on a square kilometer? Zoom in and watch the data move. Today's lifeboat shoutout goes to Rohith Nambiar for their answer to Visual Studio not installed; this is necessary for Windows development. You can find Vin Sharma on Twitter. 

Cocktails & Capitalism
Halloween and Día de los Muertos with Death and Friends

Cocktails & Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 85:20


Join us for a fun deep dive into the history of Halloween and Día de los Muertos with Nash and Angel of the Death and Friends podcast. We talk about the ancient origins of Halloween, beginning with the Celtic bonfires, feasts, and drunken festivities that took place during Samhain. When the forces of colonialism, Catholicism, and capitalism arrive on the scene, the Pagan celebration is appropriated and severely distorted. We discuss how these communal celebrations slowly morph into the capitalist holiday that we now celebrate by purchasing candy, decorations, mass-produced costumes, and scary movies. Angel Luna helps us understand the connections between Halloween and Día de los Muertos. He explains the anticapitalist origins of sugar skulls – a tradition that grew out of political art critiquing the Mexican bourgeoisie. To give you a bit of Angel's background, he is a Chicago-based comedian and magician. If you need a magician for a wedding, a bar mitzvah, or a quinceniera, you should hit him up! Follow him on Twitter and IG.Nash Flynn is actually a returning guest who previously appeared on the show to talk about how capitalism ruined funerals. In addition to being a comedian, Nash is also a death historian who studies death-ways and burial rituals. She's also the host of the Tomorrow Today podcast that explores current research about the shape of the future.Follow Death and Friends on IG and TwitterFollow Nash on Twitter and IG~~~~~~~~~~Our cocktail pairing for this episode is the “October Veil,” a name that refers to the ancient belief that the veil between this world and the next is thinnest during Samhain. It was believed that the veil became so thin during this time of year that spirits could cross over into the world of the living. Big thanks to Jesse Torres for crafting this beautiful Halloween drink!October Veil CocktailUse your favorite spiced rum but we recommend using Chairman's Reserve, Bounty, or Foursquare. Any good dry fortified wine that isn't sweet like Madeira, Sherry, or Port will work great here too. 60 ml Chairman's Reserve St. Lucian Spiced Rum22 ml Dry Madeira or Sherry 22 ml Cinnamon syrup30 ml Pumpkin puree (canned)15 ml Lemon Juice15 ml Cranberry Juice2 dash Aromatic BittersAdd all ingredients to a cocktail shaker and shake well with one ice cube. Dump into a brandy snifter or other lovely glass and top with pebble or crushed ice. Add a straw and garnish with a rosemary sprig, fresh cranberries, and a dusting of powdered sugar. Glassware:  Brandy SnifterGarnish: Rosemary Sprig, Fresh Cranberries, Powdered SugarABV: 18%Cinnamon syrup2:1 ratio by weight of granulated demerara sugar to water. Using a pan and stove, add sugar to water and bring to a simmer (≈88°C—DO NOT BOIL). Add three broken cinnamon sticks to every 250ml of water and let simmer for twenty minutes until sugar is completely dissolved. Fine strain, bottle, and label. Shelf stable up to one month.Support the show

Adventure Church Podcast
The LOVE Challenge: Walk In The Light

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 41:21


Today we start a new 5 part Series “The LOVE Challenge” based on the book “1 John”, with Pastor Jodi teaching out of chapter 1 on how to walk in the Light and in Fellowship (with the body of Christ).

Valley Community Church Sermons
We Need to Check the Door

Valley Community Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 67:04


Series: I Am Free Sunday sermon with Pastor Gary Clouse from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

The Digital Insider with Sinan Aral
Albert Wenger: Investing Mindfully

The Digital Insider with Sinan Aral

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 95:18


Sinan and fellow MIT alumnus, Albert Wenger, partner at Union Square Ventures, a New York-based early stage VC firm focused on investing in disruptive networks, whose portfolio companies include: Twitter, Tumblr, Foursquare, Etsy, Kickstarter and Shapeways. Albert shares some excellent business advice and the lessons he's learned along the way. The Winding Road from MIT PhD to Venture Capitalist (2:07-15:34)What Makes an Investment-Worthy Entrepreneur (15:42-21:51)Technology Trends and Transformations and AI Automation (21:59-41:22Web3, Blockchain, NFTs, Crypto + Decentralization (41:30-1:06:04)The State of the Global Political Economy and Solving the Climate Crisis (1:06:12-1:15:56)The Future of Social Media and Network Regulations (1:16:04-1:25:18)The Worst Investment Mistake You Can Make and How Mindfulness is Key to Success (1:25:26-1:30:13)The Biggest Fear + Hope for Our Kids (1:30:21-1:34:30)Visit ide.mit.edu/podcast for more.Follow @sinanaral and @mit_ide on Twitter and @professorsinan and @digitalinsiderpod on Instagram and TikTok.Please remember to rate us and leave a review - the best way to support the podcast.

The Conversation Factory
Building an Integrity Culture: Co-Founder Conversations

The Conversation Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 53:46


In this conversation, I sit down with Huddle Co-Founders Stephanie Golik and Michael Saloio. Huddle is a platform for designers and builders to invest in startups with their time.  Stephanie has spent her career building alongside founders at studios and leading design and product at fast-growing tech companies. She was an early design leader at Cruise, building user experiences for self-driving cars. Before that, Steph was Head of Product at Mapfit (acq. by Foursquare). She's a proud Cuban-American born, raised and currently residing in Miami. Michael is a product and team-focused entrepreneur and investor. He's spent his career working with technology executives and investors. As an investment analyst at Oppenheimer & Co., he followed some of the biggest names in technology including Cisco, EMC, and Apple. Prior to Oppenheimer, Mike covered special situations at Sidoti & Co. Over the past five years, Michael reimagined his career to focus on early-stage businesses. He was the first employee at SuperPhone, a messaging application backed by Ben Horowitz, Betaworks, Bessemer, and more. Since 2014 he has consulted with, invested in, or advised more than 35 startups that have raised more than $200M in venture financing. I met Michael years ago and have tracked his rise…when I saw that his latest venture raised 3.3M and was a co-founded company, I reconnected to include him in my co-founder conversations series. My question throughout this series has been simple - what does it take to build and sustain a powerful co-founder relationship?  Michael and Stephanie shared some of the insights and principles that helped them do exactly that. The biggest aha was the umbrella concept of an Integrity Culture, and how many powerful values fall into place with a focus on Integrity. As Michael points out, it's not just “I do what I say I will” it's also about a culture of Coaching and Feedback to help everyone right-size their commitments and to give themselves (and others) feedback along the way when they find themselves falling short. Stephanie and Michael share a conversation format that they use over the course of each week to keep their team on track and in integrity! Integrity Culture also implicates one of my favorite words: Interoception, a concept I learned from Food Coach Alissa Rumsey. Michael and Stephanie's vision of an integrity culture is one where you commit to a thing because you are intrinsically motivated to do it, not through force or pressure…you self-select the thing you are going to do. And that means you know what you want! Interoception is the ability to feel and know your inner state.  Some additional keys to a powerful co-founder relationship that line up with the other conversations in this series are the ability to have Healthy Conflict (rather than an unhealthy “peace”) and the regular asking and giving of generous and generative deep feedback. One other insight that was fresh for me in this conversation was Michael's idea of a good co-founder relationship as one that is “Energy Producing” vs. energy sucking. A powerful co-founder relationship is like a flywheel - the more energy you invest into it, the more energy it throws off. Be sure to check out my other co-founder conversations, like this episode with Jane Portman and Benedikt Deicke, co-founders of Userlist, on how they connected through shared communities and learned how each other really worked through real-world, previous projects. You may also enjoy my interview with Carolyn Gregoire and Scott Barry Kaufman, the co-authors of the 2015 bestseller, Wired to Create, where we unpack how they managed their working relationship. And if you really want to dive deep into the idea of being a conscious co-founder, make sure to check out my conversation with my friend Doug Erwin, the Senior Vice President of Entrepreneurial Development at EDAWN, the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada. Head over to theconversationfactory.com/listen for full episode transcripts, links, show notes  and more key quotes and ideas. You can also head over there and become a monthly supporter of the show for as little as $8 a month. You'll get complimentary access to exclusive workshops and resources that I only share with this circle of facilitators and leaders. Links Huddle website

New Foundation Church
Time With You is Prioritiy to Him | Chad Budlong

New Foundation Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 41:31


Valley Community Church Sermons
Believers Set Free From Bondage

Valley Community Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 60:31


Series: I Am Free Sunday sermon with Pastor Gary Clouse from Valley Community Church in El Monte, CA. Note: This message is available in both audio and video formats on our website. Notes are also available in PDF format.

Adventure Church Podcast
Psalms-A Playlist for Life: Psalm 139: Search and Rescue

Adventure Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 49:45


Wrapping up our Series “Psalms~A Playlist for Life” today, Pastor Kuulei teaches out of Psalm 139 where David the psalmist points out God's Omnipotence, Omnipresence and Omniscience as he pleads for humility in self-examination.

The Homeschool Advantage Podcast
Homeschooling Simplified With Ann Troast CEO and Founder of Without Doors A Unique Charlotte Mason Curriculum

The Homeschool Advantage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 20:07


Intro  Ann Troast is the CEO and Founder of Without Doors a unique Charlotte Mason curriculum inspired by the successful lessons at Four Square Community. Using Without Doors has revitalized their homeschool and she hopes it does the same for yours. Ann is passionate about sparking JOY in home education, one family at a time.  She began her education career teaching in an elementary classroom for several years, and has  spent well over a decade becoming a veteran homeschool mom.  In 2016, she founded Four Square Community – a Charlotte Mason-inspired homeschool co-op that has grown to over 500 local students. Four Square offers academic and enrichment classes for students in preschool through high school.   Beginning in 2019, her husband Matt joined her in leading and serving the growing Four Square Community. Matt brings twenty years of traditional classroom experience ranging from preschool through university. Together they authored The Book of Centuries: A Personal Timeline of History.   In 2022, I created Without Doors, I am grateful for God's goodness and faithfulness and give Him all the glory! Top three takeaways  Homeschooling does not need to look like a traditional classroom and does not operate on the same schedule as a traditional classroom. When we reduce the teacher/student ratio to the size of a family, we gain freedom and opportunity.   In Homeschooling the lessons are efficient and effective, lessons are targeted to student learning style/interests, different tools are available for comprehension - such as having students narrate instead of filling out worksheets.  The focus of Without Doors is to provide a simplified, family-style, Charlotte Mason curriculum for students in 1st-8th grade. The content in the Bible, History, Geography, Literature, Enrichment, and Nature Study lessons are coordinated around a time and place such as Early America or Ancient World, creating a rich, immersive experience and a harmony of lessons.  Call to Action  Resources  Without Doors Shop  There are samples available to view on the website. Also, for a limited time, parents can get 10% off the curriculum using the coupon code: homeschooladvantage.  The Book Of Centuries: A Personal Timeline of History  Social Media Links  Without Doors Curriculum Website   Without Doors Curriculum Instagram  Without Doors Curriculum Youtube   Without Doors Curriculum Facebook Group   What is Next!  Thank you for supporting this show by listening and sharing with friends! If you like this podcast please rate and write a review of how this show has impacted or helped you!   Great ratings will accelerate the show's visibility to the nation so others can learn more about homeschool and find quality curriculum and the potentially join the homeschool community thus change the face of education forever!!   Who would have thought that we could change the education world with a click and a share!  Also if you would like to hear more about any specific educational topic please email me at realedtalk@gmail.com I would love to support your families educational needs in all areas!!   Bex Buzzie  The Homeschool Advantage Podcast      

The Local Maximum
Ep. 248 - Seeing the Globe as Hexagons with Isaac Brodsky

The Local Maximum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:30


Today's guest is Unfolded Founder and Foursquare engineer Isaac Brodsky, talking about the mission of location visualization and how this was achieved by tiling the world with Hexagons using the H# open source framework and Foursquare's Hex Tiles. We learn a lot about the geometry of the globe! localmaxradio.com/248

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven
Renovation Story- Hickory Haven, a special foursquare in Wisconsin

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 34:12


Architect Daniel Steger designed a renovation for his parents Mary and Bob Steger and then managed the construction over zoom from half a continent away. We talked about construction challenges, the right amount of detail to include in architectural drawings, the importance of design, replacement windows and working with family. Instagram, DGS/a: https://www.instagram.com/dgs_architecture/ (https://www.instagram.com/dgs_architecture/) Link to their AirBNB listing: https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/20785627?source_impression_id=p3_1665437191_cbvJ4DOufaHPxSLq&modal=PHOTO_TOUR_SCROLLABLE (https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/20785627?source_impression_id=p3_1665437191_cbvJ4DOufaHPxSLq&modal=PHOTO_TOUR_SCROLLABLE) ************************************************************************************************ Thanks so much for being with us this week.  Please see the episode enhancement for this and other episodes athttps://www.talkinghomerenovations.com/ ( talkinghomerenovations.com) Do you have feedback you would like to share?  Would you like to be a guest on the podcast?  Email me at thehousemaven@talkinghomerenovations.com If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with your friends Don't forget to subscribe to the show and get automatic updates every Wednesday morning with the latest episode of Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven.   Clickhttp://eepurl.com/gFJLlT ( here) to get the episode enhancements sent directly to your inbox every week. Reviews and ratings help my show gain traction and credibility.  Please leave a review here-https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218 ( https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218) Visithttps://my.captivate.fm/www.Talkinghomerenovations.com ( Talkinghomerenovations.com) for episode enhancements, containing photos and more information about the episodes as well as transcripts.  There you can leave a voice message through speak pipe that could be included in a future episode. Follow me on instagram: @talkinghomerenovations Join me on Facebook: Talking Home Renovations Follow me on Twitter: @talkinghomereno Join me on TikTok: @The House Maven Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven is part of Gabl Media, the largest, most engaged AEC network on the planet.  Visit http://www.gablmedia.com/ (www.Gablmedia.com) for great content.  Sign up for the weekly newsletter- I send out the episode enhancements every Wednesday morning, http://eepurl.com/gFJLlT (  sign up here) Music at the beginning and end of the episode is The House Maven's Jig, written and performed by Neil Pearlman, https://neilpearlman.com/ (www.neilpearlman.com) Show Cover Art by Sam Whitehttp://www.samowhite.com/ ( www.samowhite.com) This podcast is a production of dEmios Architects.http://www.demiosarchitects.com/ ( www.demiosarchitects.com)