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The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
“Picky the Panda and the Tickly Tail” Author Melissa Finkelstein on Sensory Processing Disorder

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 16:24


Melissa Finkelstein is a New Jersey- based author, lawyer, and proud mom of three. Melissa has been writing and rhyming since she could form words. After graduating from Fordham Law, she began her career as a litigator in Manhattan. Because rhyming has always been her passion, she created a custom poetry business, Designer Rhymes so she could maintain that creative outlet. Once she had her son (7), and twin daughters (4), each with unique personalities and needs, the stars aligned for Melissa to publish her first children's book. Picky the Panda and the Tickly Tail is the first book in a series of three to come from author Melissa Finkelstein. Picky the Panda is a heartwarming story about a highly sensitive panda, which shares lessons of embracing sensory differences, practicing empathy, and recharging when overwhelmed. Picky the Panda was inspired by Melissa's daughter Skylar who has sensory processing disorder. Picky the Panda is now available on Amazon and in select children's bookstores. Enjoy!  In this episode Peter and Melissa discuss:   01:20 - Thank you so much for listening and for subscribing! 01:39 - Intro and welcome Melissa Finkelstein! 02:48 - So from Law to Children's books; tell us your story! 05:40 - Isn't it amazing what kids teach us. Are you finding that people are familiar with the topics in your book? 06:57 - What led to getting your daughter diagnosed? 09:30 - How old is she now and have all of your children read the book? 10:15 - Do you think that she's beginning to, (or will), benefit some from advances in awareness, research, etc? 11:18 - What's been the reaction and feedback to your book outside of the family? 12:00 - Is the book being used to explain to your daughter's classmates about Sensory Processing Disorder? 13:30 - On possessing supercharged senses 14:25 - How can people find more about you? Web: Everywhere fine books are sold Socials:  @melissafinkelsteinbooks on INSTA 14:45 - Thank you Melissa! 15:02 - Guys, as always thanks so much for subscribing! Faster Than Normal is for YOU! We want to know what you'd like to hear! Do you have a cool friend with a great story? We'd love to learn about, and from them. I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via email at peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  15:41 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits. — TRANSCRIPT via Descript and then corrected.. somewhat: [00:00:34] Peter: Hey everyone, how's it going? My name is Peter Shankman and this is Faster Than Normal. I wanted to see if you expected me to say it, try to shake things up a little bit. Okay. It is a Thursday here in a very cold New York City. We have to say a fond farewell to fall, which lasted about. Two and a half days, and we are most certainly into winter. It's about 34 degrees outside right now, sunny, but cold as hell. So I am inside with a sleeping dog and with Melissa Finkelstein. She's actually in New Jersey, but we are talking today because Melissa is a New Jersey based author, lawyer, and proud mom of three. She's been writing and rhyming since she could form words. Her words, not mine. After graduating from Fordham Law, she began her career as a litigator in Manhattan. She created a custom poetry business called Designer Rhymes. So here she is as a litigator. Did you, I, I gotta ask you later, remind me to ask you if you actually rhymed during court cases. Cause that would've been awesome. Mm-hmm. . But why are we talking to her today? We're talking to her. She has a son who's seven and twin daughters who are four. They each have unique personality and needs. That's where she decided to publish her first book called her first Children's book called Picky the Panda and the Tickly Tale. It's a first book in a series of three and Picky The Panda is a heartwarming story about a highly sensitive panda who shares lessons of embracing sensory diff differences, practicing empathy and recharging when overwhelmed, and I think we can all relate to that Picky The Panda- on Amazon and everywhere you get children's books. Welcome Melissa. Good to have you.  [00:02:15] Melissa: Good morning. Thank you so much. I'm so happy to be here. Thanks for that intro [00:02:18] Peter: And just in case you ever think that nothing good comes out of divorce. Melissa came to me through my ex, let me get this right, my ex sister-in-law.  [00:02:32] Melissa: That's right.  [00:02:33] Peter: My ex-step sister-in-law. Right. [00:02:34] Melissa: I think you're stuck with her. I think she's just your sister-in-law still.  [00:02:37] Peter: Yeah. My sister-in-law, she reached out to me and said, you know, hey, have a guest for you. I'm like, I didn't even know you knew I had a podcast. So good to know . Anyway, it is great to meet you, Melissa. Thank you for taking the time. So from law to children's books, tell us your story!  [00:02:52] Melissa: Sure. So I've always been a writer and a rhymer, um, as I said, and that's really been my passion and that's kinda how I wound up in law. Um, I thought, you know, I'm really good at writing. I'm good at. Reading and problem solving. My skill sets seem to fit. I'm gonna go be a lawyer. It sounds pretty fancy and you know, I can have all this success and, um, I did have some fun and, you know, some fulfillment doing it, but I really missed like the joy and the whimsy of my childhood, to be honest. Um, so I toyed with the idea. Maybe I would be a preschool teacher. I know that couldn't be more opposite from being a litigator in Manhattan, but I really just wanted to use my creativity. My fun, you know, happy go lucky personality and doing like corporate insecurities litigation really didn't bring me that kind of joy. Um, as you might expect. And, you know, my life was all about disputes and I, I'm all about making peace. I'm like, what am I doing? Why am I fighting for a living? So this, this isn't bringing me joy anymore. Um, so all along, as you mentioned, while I was litigating, I had my little side gig, which just really was. You know, a passion project and bringing me happiness and it was creating custom poems for people for, you know, milestone occasions and that kind of thing. And I loved making others happy through my words. And so once I had my kids, I thought, you know, this is perfect. They're all so different. You know, they're, they learned so much from children's books and I think this would be a great outlet for me to use my words and. You know, I, I'm starting a series of three books, each of which are inspired by my three kids. So they're like my little muses at this point. Um, and in doing so, I'm focusing on what, you know, one of their biggest personality, um, pieces or struggles or challenges are to, you know, try to reach children like them. And in doing so, I wrote and published my first book, Picky The Panda and the Tickly Tale as you mentioned. And it is inspired by my little girl, Skyler, who has sensory processing disorder. And I didn't realize that by sharing her story, um, you know, I actually have become kind of a sensory processing disorder advocate and someone who is working. My butt off at this point to bring awareness to this condition and to what children like Skyler and um, like so many of your listeners might be experiencing. And that has been one of the most beautiful things to come from pivoting into my role as a children's book author.  [00:05:22] Peter: It's interesting because, you know, I mean, first of all, I had some nursery school teachers who definitely could have been litigators, but, but that's neither here nor there. Um, , it's interesting, you know, you made that switch. Kids do that. They, they, they have this uncanny ability to take whatever you think is your thing and just completely flip it on its head. Um, the concept of sensory processing disorder much like ADD, a ADHD executive function disorder. Not a lot is known. And so bringing, I, I'm assuming one of the reasons you wrote the book was to bring awareness to sensory process. Absolut, what are you finding, um, when you tell people about it, what percentage would you say understand, oh yeah, of course. I've heard of that. Or, or, you know, is it, I mean, are you, are you, is it a constant battle with the teachers? Is it, how, how, how are you finding that to be? [00:06:14] Melissa: It's becoming a much more wide spread. Um, you know, thing that people are aware of right now, but I think really the book shares this Panda's experience as being a highly sensitive, um, individual and what she goes through. And I think people are really relating to her experience more than they may have known or been aware of a diagnosis or a condition, um, called sensory processing disorder. So that's really been beneficial to me. Um, so yeah, I would say. I, I don't know. It's a smaller percentage than I would like for people to be aware of because it is a very real condition and you know, a very intense experience for those who go through it.  [00:06:57] Peter: How did you discover that your, how did you get your d daughter diagnosed? What was, what was sort of the key takeaways that, that made you say, Hey, we should look into this?  [00:07:06] Melissa: So she was in, so she's a twin. I'll start with that. So, um, I was constantly seeing her right next to her twin sister, and, you know, all kids are different obviously. So she was having a very different experience as a baby, a child than her twin sister was. So I think that helped make it more apparent to me that she was going through something and she was in an obvious discomfort and, um, just kind of unsettled a lot of the time. And, you know, I knew there wasn't anything medical going on with her because she, she was doing okay medically, we were bringing her to the pediatrician. Everything was fine, but I could just tell that she was uncomfortable. And my son at the time was in occupational therapy for a different issue that was going on. Um, and so I brought Skylar when she was one years old to this pediatric occupational therapist. Who I've come to know and trust and had her assessor and right away she said, this is something sensory going on. And to be honest, I was a doubter at first. Um, I didn't really know very much about sensory processing disorder or sensory sensitivity or any of that. And, um, I can tell you later that I've come to realize that I actually have a lot of sensory challenges myself, which I've learned through my daughter. So anyway, this pediatric, uh, occupational therapist evaluated her and right away she knew it was something sensory. Um, I watched the evaluation and I was like, you know, I don't know. I'm not really seeing it because she was, um, exposing to her to certain sensory, tactile, um, you know, things like sand and foam and, you know, different manipulatives that she could touch, and I thought she was fine. I'm like, you know, I see her getting her hands messy. But all along there were these little cues that were going on that she was able to pick up on. So just for one example, she showed me that while Skylar was, you know, digging into these Orbis, which are these like liquidy beads that children can play with, she was actually salivating and had like, Drool coming out of her mouth while she was doing it because her sensory system was just so overloaded, um, that while she was willing to do it, her system actually couldn't handle it. So that's just one example of how, you know, we came to be aware of it and then, you know, all the cues and clues just sort of lined up after that. And occupational therapy has been one of our greatest tools for her so far,  [00:09:22] Peter: I'm sure. How old is she now?  [00:09:24] Melissa: She's almost five. Okay.  [00:09:26] Peter: And has she, has she. Do you read the book to her? [00:09:30] Melissa: Yes. Yes. I, all my children have read the book and they love it. And my other two children wanna know when theirs are coming out and they are in the works. ,  [00:09:39] Peter: One of the things that I've discovered, um, uh, about sort of, ADD & ADHD when you're talking to kids about it, and so I'm assuming the same thing is, is truly is, it's all about how it's framed When I was growing. Um, you know, a ADD didn't exist. What existed was sit down, you disrupt in the class disease. And, and so I, kids our age, um, if they eventually got diagnosed had also had to overcome the stigma of 30, 40 years of being told they're broken. are you seeing with kids your daughter's age because of advances in research? Advances in, uh, awareness? They're not going through the whole concept of you're broken, they're not gonna have to heal from that. They can start looking at what they have as, you know, a difference as opposed to being broken.  [00:10:36] Melissa: Yeah, I really hope that's the case, and I agree with what you said. Um, and one of the purposes of this book is to frame heighten sensitivity or. Sensory challenges as a gift. And I know that that's something that you like to speak about, um, in terms of adhd and I absolutely agree with that. Um, so in terms of heightened sensitivity, you know, yes, it can present struggles and challenges, but it can also be your greatest gift. It can be, you know, the way you use your imagination and can be creative the way you are compassionate and empathetic and can show love. So it can really be a strength. And that's one of the things that I'm hoping to share with children who may feel like Skylar, um, as term in terms of their sensitivity,  [00:11:18] Peter: What's been the reaction or the, what's been the feedback to the book or the reaction to the book, um, outside of your family?  [00:11:25] Melissa: Oh, it's been wonderful. I've been hearing from so many families saying, you know, we have a little picky at home. Um, you know, my daughter like, wants to read it every day. She feels like Pickalina so it, that's been the best part of this. When I set out to become an author, I just wanted to use my words to make children and families happy and, you know, provide them with a good bedtime story. I actually didn't have these higher goals of, you know, bringing such awareness. and acceptance to children with differences, but like that has become the greatest gift. And the thing that I'm most proud of and most excited about in my journey so far. [00:12:01] Peter: Is the book being used, um, as sort of a way to explain to your daughter's, classmates about the different, because I imagine that much like ad although ADHD manifests in different ways, I imagine that sensory processing disorder must manifest itself in some ways that would make the kids go, what the heck's that all about? [00:12:20] Melissa: Absolutely. So there's a page in the book where Picky the Panda um, has become so overwhelmed that she's feeling dysregulated and she's hiding under the table in her classroom, and she is rocking and crying because she is so overwhelmed and her body feels such big feelings. And the students. Who are her animal friends gather around her and they yell Picky. It's ok because you know, they're just trying to be kind and they're like, come outta the table, everything's great. But for her, everything's not great at that moment. So that, you know, that doesn't work for Picky and it takes different strategies to get her to be able to recharge and calm her body down. So I think, you know, empathy and understanding and realizing that we are all different is definitely one of the biggest messages. So, yes, to make children, um, and classmates who encounter kids like Skyler or who have other differences to be accepting and empathetic.  [00:13:12] Peter: I like the concept of supercharged senses in the book because, you know, adhd, I consider it a superpower and I try to frame it as a superpower. So the concept of supercharged senses sort of seems very similar in the respect that you just have to, you know, if, if when I talk about adhd, I talk about the fact that. You know, most people are given Honda Accords for brains and we're given Lamborghini's, and so that's great, but you have to learn how to drive it, or you're gonna crash into a tree. You know, anyone could drive a Honda. You need training to drive a Lamborghini. And so I'm assuming it's the same premise with supercharged senses. I really love that term.  [00:13:46] Melissa: Yeah, thank you. And absolutely, I agree with that. Something we have to learn to adapt to and adjust to. But like I said, it, and like you always say, um, it can really be seen as one of our biggest gifts. Very cool. So my daughter can, she's, you know, the first one to smell something stinky or she can see something a mile away. She can hear that train coming, you know, 10 stops away. So, you know, she really does have supercharged senses, but it also can lead her to feel very overwhelmed and heightened at certain times. [00:14:15] Peter: Very cool. How can, so I'm assuming, yeah, it's available on Amazon, it's available everywhere. Um, how can people connect with you? Are you on Instagram? Are you on Facebook?  [00:14:24] Melissa: Yes. So I am on Instagram at Melissa Finkelstein books. Um, and that is a great place to follow me. I'll have information about Picky the Panda um, sensory processing awareness and about my forthcoming books, um, the next of which will be out in early 2023.  [00:14:42] Peter: Very, very cool. Melissa, thank you so much for taking time to be on Fast Than Normal today. I really, really appreciate it.  [00:14:47] Melissa: Thank you so much. It's been wonderful.  [00:14:49] Peter: Awesome guys. Check out the book. It is a lot of fun. Picky, I love, I love, I love the title Picky, the Panda and the Tickly Tale, talking about sensory processing disorder as supercharged senses. I love it. We back next week with another interview. This is Faster Than Normal. God, talk.. I mean fast- talk about fast, right? The entire year it's, it's almost Thanksgiving here next week in New York, it's gonna be Thanksgiving and I have absolutely no idea how that happened. And it's Christmas and it's New Year's and yeah, it's essentially summer already next year. So I dunno how we got there. But we will see you next week with another interview. Thank you so much for listening. Remember that neurodiversity is a gift, not a curse. And we are all on this train together. Talk to you guys soon. Stay tuned. Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at shankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

Mom's Exit Interview
Spouses, Parents, & Coworkers: How Lisa Chu and her husband launched a multi-million dollar company PLUS Business Babes Collective founder Danielle Wiebe has tips for quick cash flow & growing through collaborations & affiliate marketing

Mom's Exit Interview

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 41:34 Transcription Available


Lisa Chu and her husband Coltrane started their company, Team Epiphany, at a conference table with one phone and a single ethernet cord... And their main goal was to get out of NYC and down to Miami to party through the winter! Today, they count themselves as the original influencer marketing agency with clients like Absolut, Nike, and HBO.  Find out how Lisa learned quickly to deal with misogyny in the corporate realm (including one CFO who refused to speak to her!), why working outside the house makes her a better mom, and the way she rebelled against the traditional postpartum expectations of her Taiwanese culture. You'll also hear one of Lisa's favorite stories from her crazy New York nightlife days (Hint: it involves P. Diddy, a Ziploc baggie, and thousands of dollars worth of jewelry).  PLUS I'm talking to Business Babes Collective founder Danielle Wiebe about her best tips for entrepreneurs looking for quick cash flow and growing a business through collaborations, partnerships, and affiliate marketing. Danielle gets detailed on what percentages you should be offering, how to find the right mutually beneficial collaborations and how to craft emails that make people want to partner with you. LINKS: -Our blog & show notes are at http://moms-exit-interview.com, grab our newsletter here & follow host Kim Rittberg on Instagram! -Want to grow your business with awesome video & podcast content and be better on-camera? Sign up for Kim's newsletter here or message her here.  GUEST LINKS: Lisa Chu |

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Revolutionizing Commercial Real Estate Due Diligence

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 14:58


Anthony Romano is the CEO of CREtelligent. He holds a business degree in management and economics from Sacramento State University. He views his role as CEO to evangelize the vision, raise & deploy capital, spread the ethos, and set the pace.  CREtelligent (Formerly eScreenLogic) is a leading national provider of end-to-end decision analytics and due diligence solutions for the commercial real estate ecosystem.   [00:00 - 03:32] How to Scale Commercial Real Estate with Automated Data Reports CREtelligent provides data aggregation and analysis to help companies make informed decisions about property acquisitions and loans. Anthony's company has signed an MSA with McDonald's, one of the largest real estate owners in the country.   [03:32 - 07:02]  CREtelligent Order Management Platform Makes Due Diligence Process Easier  The company provides automated data reports that provide risk scoring and analysis of disparate data sources. The company's order management workflow platform is easy to use and allows for the collation of disparate data sources into a single report. Their Products are designed to improve the buyer's experience with the institution and reduce the time and cost associated with due diligence.   [07:02 - 10:35] Integrate Into an Online Platform to Help with Transaction Success Offers a lot of diligence information alongside overview and cap table Provides customer success team to help navigate the deal and manage risk and cost   [10:35 - 13:58] Commercial Real Estate Platform Offers Continuity in Decision Making How the company's commercial real estate platform can be used to help buyers and sellers of small balance properties, as well as banks. One feature that the company wishes were on the platform is a decision engine that could ingest policies from different underwriters.   [13:59 - 14:57] Closing Segment Reach out to Anthony Romano!  Links Below   ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------   Tweetable Quotes: “There's a lot of firms out there that are listing and selling commercial properties where we provide a bunch of diligence information that sits alongside the overview and cap table, or cap rates and things of that nature. So before the transaction, we help with site selection, during the transaction, all that diligence.” - Anthony Romano Connect with Anthony Romano by sending him an email at a.romano@cretelligent.com Or by visiting their website at www.cretelligent.com  Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below: [00:00:00] Anthony Romano: On the automated data reports where we've got a whole bunch of disparate data and then analytics and algorithms that provide a bunch of risk scoring, that's the aggregation of data. But we do all of the full sight con sense across the country. We don't do that with an army of W two employees. We do that with a panel, [00:00:28] Sam WIlson: Anthony Romano is the CEO of one of prop techs fastest growing businesses. Cret Anthony, welcome [00:00:35] Anthony Romano: to the show. Oh, Sam, thanks for having me. A [00:00:37] Track 1: pleasure [00:00:37] Sam WIlson: to be here. Absolutely. Anthony, there are three questions I ask every guest who comes from the show in 90 seconds or last, can you tell me where did you start? Where are you now, and how did you get there? [00:00:46] Anthony Romano: Sure. Well started in in the residential mortgage in capital market space with a company called Core Logic. Was an executive and a leader there. And went on to a company called First American. You'd think of a big title insurance company, but lots underneath the hood, and watched how the transactions on residential real estate were getting compressed and contracted. And it was a better experience for borrowers and really wanted to bring that over to the commercial real estate side. So Crit is a firm that's focused on. Commercial real estate insights, end to end due diligence and asset management. We help literally hundreds of companies reach banks, brokers, insurance companies collapse the cycle time, reduce costs, and improve the experience. [00:01:22] Sam WIlson: I love the grand vision. I'm really curious as you get into the weeds on this though, What part in, in all cuz I feel like there's data everywhere, right? What about the data that was out there? Did you look at and say, okay, this is just not organized in a way such that it makes sense for everybody else and I think I can do it [00:01:39] Anthony Romano: better. Yeah, I think multiple sort of categories there. So think about site selection. Think about a firm that's going out and looking at multiple properties in a geography that they're trying to make a decision on. So we, we've signed an MSA not long ago. With McDonald's, who would tell you? They're the largest real estate owner in the country that happens to sell hamburgers. They've got, a whole team that goes out and looks at markets and has 10, 12, 15 sites, and they're trying to narrow it down. We provide a bunch of early insights and pre-screen data reports where we aggregate data from literally dozens of disparate data sets. We normalize curate data, put it into a report where they can make an intelligent decision. So things like environmental insights, property condition insights, micromarket, demographic insights, climate, carbon footprint, a whole bunch of stuff where you immediately can eliminate a couple properties and kind of narrow down onto one in a kind of pre loi prepurchase environment. And then when you get into a transaction, now you're gonna do a loan and you're gonna buy a property. There are literally 15, 18 different due diligence services and products that are required by banks, insurance companies, owner operators. And normally that process is you pick up the phone, you send an email to dozens of providers, Hey, I need an all the survey. I need a phase one environmental assessment. I need a flood zone certification and appraisal. We've got a technology platform called Radius, that's an order management platform that allows a user, To put in an address or an APN to immediately identify their property and then to order status, get delivery and archive any product, solution or service we have. [00:03:10] Sam WIlson: Wow. , that's absolutely cool. So you were saying that McDonald's one of the largest real estate owners, like, which, how'd you put it? They're a real estate owner that sells hamburgers, has come to you guys because you guys have some software and some solutions that even McDonald's didn't have. [00:03:24] Anthony Romano: Yeah, the process, I mean, you're gonna go and you have a first writer refusal on a, on a property that you know you got 10, 12 days to make a decision on. There's no way to do full diligence. So early insight, pre-screen data reports, helping that process. A lot of our kind of solutions that have data and analytics where we've got a professional over the top interpreting the data. So think of an environmental professional or certified building inspector and can provide quick information to make a decision. And then again, all of those relatively compulsory services during a transaction. The, the phase one, the property condition assessment, the alta, the zoning if you're a bank doing lending on any asset class, you've got a policy that says to underwrite this loan, I've gotta have these services done. We provide those services, across the country nationwide. [00:04:10] Sam WIlson: In order to do that you guys have to be pulling data from a lot of different sources, cuz obviously you're not sitting there , at the site level going, Okay, now there's this one particular. So would you put yourself in the category of a data aggregator or am I missing something on that front? I guess? Can you clarify for me? Yeah, [00:04:27] Anthony Romano: On the automated data reports where we've got a whole bunch of disparate data and then analytics and algorithms that provide a bunch of risk scoring, that's the aggregation of data. But we do all of the full sight con sense across the country. We don't do that with an army of W two employees. We do that with a panel, So think of an appraisal management company, right? When I was at CoreLogic, we had a 400 million appraisal management company, 11,000 license usepa Appraisers on the panel. They're all 10 99. We've done that across every due diligence category in commercial. So I think. Valuation, environmental professional surveyors certified building inspectors. And when we want something done in a location, our panel management platform does all the background check the licensing, the e o, it selects the individual. They use our mobile app and they actually go out and collect photos as subject and adjacent whatever data's required. It all comes back digitally in our report writing tool. One of our W2 professionals puts the, report together and off it goes to the. [00:05:23] Sam WIlson: Wow, that's that's really, really fascinating. And you, and you said one of the biggest things that you've been able to do is collapse the timeline that it takes to get all of these resources [00:05:33] Anthony Romano: put together. No doubt. I mean, , if you think about let's use a bank as an example. So Celtic Bank is , I think the largest 5 0 4 7 a SBA lender in the country. They're a big client of ours and they've been able to take three and a half of us four days out of their lending process, and they think they can do more. So to the extent, if you're the bank, , you want to collapse the time so the bar has a better experience. B, you wanna reduce the cost to the bar cuz many of those products I just mentioned are pass through. Right? They hit the settlement package and the buyer pays for it. So, and then ultimately all that improves the buyer's experience with the institution. [00:06:05] Sam WIlson: Wow. That's, And not only that, but then your people, your banks and people like that are saving money cuz they're, they're cutting three or four days of work out of this [00:06:14] Anthony Romano: process. Absolutely. Yeah. You're managing armies and armies of vendors normally, where you're placing phone calls, sending emails, trying to get everything back. Now you've got it all contained in an order management workflow platform. Super easy to use. And, [00:06:28] Sam WIlson: Yeah, does Credt interface with other softwares and other platforms and I, and I, I can't even, I probably don't have the right question for this, so I guess what I'm thinking about is this, is this a one stop shop for everything or is this one part of the puzzle that we need to be thinking about, as it pertains to getting deals done? [00:06:47] Anthony Romano: I think as it relates to the, what I would just call due diligence, so due diligence before, during, and after a transaction. It's a commercial real estate storefront in that regard. But to your question, , we integrate via API or, or XML into a loan origination system. We integrate into an online platform. These there's a lot of firms out there that are listing and selling commercial properties where we provide a bunch of diligence information that sits alongside the overview and cap table, or cap rates and things of that nature. So before the transaction, we help with site selection, during the transaction, all that diligence. And then post transaction, whether it's a bank, a corporation, an insurance company, have got all these assets inside a radius you can manage. From an asset management portfolio perspective, each one of those properties. So on a quarterly cadence, we'll show you the change in risk profile on that property. So the change in environmental risk, the change in micromarket demographic risk, the change in climate risk. So these are, you're trying to arbitrage an opportunity or mitigate a risk. If you're a bank, you're sitting with a, an OCC examiner auditor who's looking at a Cecil stuff, and how do you manage your, your commercial assets. So it really is end to. Sort of due [00:07:54] Sam WIlson: diligence that that's absolutely cool. I mean, what's it been like building a business like this? I mean, is your background, your background's not as a tech guy, is it? [00:08:05] Anthony Romano: I mean, part of it's tech, it was really, on business operations and, and from but it was all on the residential side. So if you think about the amount of capital that's been deployed to help institutions , get transactions done. Faster in residential mortgage. And I would tell you, look, it's still broke, right? I, I can get a hundred thousand dollars loan for a Tesla an hour and it took me 60 days here in Sacramento to refinance my house at a 30 ltv, no cashout, same lender. So it's still broke , on the commercial side. We just saw it was so fragmented, so dislocated. It'll be evolution, not revolution. These are much more complex and larger transactions. We've got a lot of the largest rates in the country that, they're buying 15, 20, 30 properties at once. And , we actually, we kinda have a slogan that says high tech when you want it, high touch when you need it. So you can have a frictionless transaction on our technology platform radius. But we've got a customer success team that actually becomes part of the deal team of a lot of our. Kind of a closer your white glove service, navigate the deal, help you with bundles, help interpret data and reports and things of that nature. So it's, it's very much what I call tech enabled services. It's not just a pure software and data company, It's, it's a, there's a lot of humans involved as well. [00:09:16] Sam WIlson: Yeah, Tell me about the, the, the, the, I guess the process of building this business. How many years ago did you guys start and then, I guess let's, let's ask that question first. Like, how long have you guys been building this? [00:09:28] Anthony Romano: Yeah. The, the legacy, it was a, we, we rebranded the company to crit in the middle of 2020. And the business started very much in the environmental consulting world. And, and so we had, remediation business, we had. Geotechnical drilling businesses. I divested a number of those businesses because we really wanted to focus , on the transaction on before, during, and after this transaction. And I think about, there, there are a lot of great firms out there that provide engineering and environmental consulting. And to me it was such a conflict of interest where. Hey, here's my phase one. Here's my proposal for a phase two. Oh, by the way, here's a proposal for groundwater monitoring and take your tank out. And it was just seemed like it was revenue generating proposal creation that, hey, a football field from the building in 95 feet down, we gotta go check some things out. We'll never compromise our integrity and tell you there's not an issue if there is, but, but we're not looking, we're, we're helping people get transactions done. And manage the risk, and manage the cost of doing that. Is this, [00:10:21] Sam WIlson: is this a service that you can use on a deal by deal basis? Where somebody can come and say, Hey, look, I've got this, whatever it is, apartment complex, industrial facility, whatevers they're looking to buy and I need help getting this done. Is that where they can, Is that when they plug into, into your platform or is this something where it's like, Hey, this is , part of the software suite that you need to have on board and use [00:10:44] Anthony Romano: in perpetuity and there's nothing on board. It's on cloud based. So I, I send you an email with a username and password. And you log on radius and, and hey, I got a deal. I'm buying a, a storage unit or a multifamily property or a warehouse. And , on that transaction, I'd like to have a couple of these pre-screens to check it out. And then I'd like to order a, phase one environmental assessment and mii appraisal and an all to survey. And those get ordered and you status where they are, they get delivered right back to the platform. So it's deal by deal. We have a lot of clients that are doing bulk deals, buying multiple properties at once. We have six of the top 10 specialty insurance firms that are putting, pollution abatement policies and underground tank policies that are using the platform to ton of owner operators. A lot of. Real estate attorneys, so legal advisory firms that work with corporations. If you go out to a real estate law firm's website, it looks just like elli. They just don't do any of it. They tell you, Here's all the things that have to happen. We partner with them to help them get those pieces done. A lot would think, think Marcus and Milsap. Kushman and Wakefield. I mean a lot of, lot of brokers are using these, these tools and technologies, helping with listings and helping buyers look at multiple properties. And then of course banks as they're doing, 8, 10, 12 commercial loans a month, they continually need to order these things to satisfy their policy to underwrite the loan. Right. [00:12:00] Sam WIlson: Is there a deal size that where your platform doesn't make any sets? [00:12:06] Anthony Romano: That's such a cool question. I, yeah, cuz I would tell you, when people think of commercial real estate, at least the lay person, and I included myself in that category cuz I was on the Rezi side. You think a downtown, Memphis or Nashville, or San Francisco or New York. We're not doing a lot of that. These are, these are retail centers. They're gas stations, they're storage units, their, their warehouses. So I think about the vast majority of our transactions are, small balance stuff, two to 5 million, up to a hundred million dollars. When you're talking multi billion dollar properties. , that's a different. Hmm. But those are, one, 2% of the transactions that we don't play in. Right, right, [00:12:41] Sam WIlson: right. Yeah, absolutely. No, that, that's interesting. And so, so if I'm hearing you right, you're saying that there's, there's an upper end where it doesn't make sense. Not a lower end necessarily. [00:12:51] Anthony Romano: Yeah, not a lower end. I mean, we have clients that, a guy or gal is buying a deli, and on that deli, I need to do a couple things to due diligence and can I order these products from you that Absolut. [00:13:00] Sam WIlson: , that is absolutely awesome. I love it. When you think about your platform, what is, what is one service or feature that you haven't yet developed that you wish was on there? [00:13:11] Anthony Romano: Well, when I look at our roadmap we've thought through a lot of the vision and where this can go, and most of that comes from feedback from, our clients and, and folks that we're working with. You think about a bank and they've got all the LO's and all kinds of underwriters, and they, they try to have continuity, consistency where we're building a decision engine where we can ingest their policy. So they have a policy based, again, on property, geography, ltv, loan amounts a max code, whatever, the scoring that they get back from our, our prescreens so we can build some bump logic so that across the enterprise there's, there kind of continuity in how they get deals done. [00:13:42] Sam WIlson: Got it, got it. That's absolutely awesome. I , love what you're doing. Anthony, tell me this if our listeners wanna learn more about credt you or get in touch with you or a member of your team, what's the best way to do that? [00:13:55] Anthony Romano: Yeah, I mean, we are, we've made our website really functional. It's crit.com. They can look at every product, solution and service we have. They can . Download any. Of our reports and samples and, and things of that nature. My personal email is “a dot romano r om a n o @cretelligent.com” I love to chat with anybody about what we're doing and how we can. [00:14:13] Sam WIlson: That's awesome. And for those of you who are listening, Cretelligent is spelled c r e intelligent, T E L L I G E N T. So just like it sounds Cret. Anthony, thanks for coming the show today. I'm looking forward to checking out your platform and what it is that you guys do. This has certainly been insightful. Thank you so much. Well, you're [00:14:30] Anthony Romano: welcome, Sam. Thanks. Appreciate you.

From Passion To Profession
BASECAMP // CASPER DE WIT

From Passion To Profession

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 46:16


In this episode of Basecamp Luuk Roks and Tony Boakye talk to Casper de Wit from Pernod Ricard. Casper has made it his profession to be the best brand ambassador he can be, and has done so for brands like Absolut, Havana Club and much more. In this episode, he talks about how he got started, where he is now and the struggles he's faced along the way, all and so much more in this episode of Basecamp.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Interviews - Deutschlandfunk
Aktuelle Flüchtlingssituation - Stübgen (CDU): "Verhalten von Serbien ist absolut inakzeptabel"

Interviews - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 9:45


Brandenburgs Innenminister Stübgen hat angesichts steigender Flüchtlingszahlen schärfere Grenzkontrollen und Grenzschließungen gefordert. Durch die liberale Visapolitik Serbiens entstehe ein neuer "Asyltourismus" nach Deutschland, sagte er im Dlf.Grieß, Thielkowww.deutschlandfunk.de, InterviewsDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Wirtschaftswoche
«Der Nobelpreis für Bernanke ist absolut verdient und richtig»

Wirtschaftswoche

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 20:38


Der Ex-Chef der US-Notenbank habe den Wirtschafts-Nobelpreis zu Recht bekommen, meint Ökonom und Publizist Rudolf Strahm. Dank Bernankes Forschungen und seiner Tätigkeit als Notenbank-Chef würden die Zentralbanken heute viel aktiver gegen Banken- und Finanzkrisen vorgehen.  Weitere Themen in der Wirtschaftswoche: Zwei wichtige sozialpolitische Entscheide des Bundesrates geben zu reden: Kein voller Teuerungssausgleich für die AHV-Renten, dafür eine gezielte Erhöhung der Ergänzungsleistungen. Und ein Prozent Mindestzins in der Beruflichen Vorsorge trotz eines schwierigen Anlagejahres für die Pensionskassen Die weltweite Teuerung bleibt hartnäckig auf hohem Niveau. Der IWF, der Internationale Währungsfonds, warnt vor dem Risiko einer globalen Rezession und ruft zur Unterstützung der ärmeren Bevölkerung auf

The CMO Podcast
Pam Forbus (Pernod Ricard North America) | Data is the Key to Being Consumer- Centric

The CMO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 53:10


Pam Forbus is the the Chief Marketing Officer of Pernod Ricard North America. Headquartered in France, Pernod Ricard is the second largest wine and spirits company in the world, with global sales of nearly $10 billion. Among their most recognizable brands are Absolut, Jameson, Kahlua, Glenlivet, and Malibu. Pam began in agencies, working for four of them in 13 years, and transitioned to the client side when she started at PepsiCo in 2000, and then moved to The Walt Disney Studios in 2017. Pam is now CMO at Pernod Ricard, and in her two years there, has overseen a period of high growth for the North American arm of the business.In her chat with Jim, Pam goes through some of the philosophies that guide her in marketing and leadership, remaining vulnerable yet confident, and the challenges-and rewards-of being an outsider in her industry. CMOs often hold one of the most innovative and challenging roles in business today. Those who excel can operate at the highest level to drive growth and create value for their organizations. To learn more how Deloitte helps bolster the value CMOs deliver, visit www.cmo.deloitte.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MeddlCast
Meddl Kaschpa - Triggerwarnung! Das Ding ist nichts für schwache Nerven! Dullistream, Passanten anpöbeln inklusive!

MeddlCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 107:09


Absolut utopischer Bullshit! Quelle Antimobbing Guys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSJlwxwCeoc § 24 FREIE BENUTZUNG (1) Ein selbständiges Werk, das in freier Benutzung des Werkes eines anderen geschaffen worden ist, darf ohne Zustimmung des Urhebers des benutzten Werkes veröffentlicht und verwertet werden. (...) FAIR USE: "Fair Use" erlaubt die Wiederverwendung von urheberrechtlich geschützten Inhalten ohne Erlaubnis des Rechteinhabers. "Fair Use" ist ein Prinzip, das Ausnahmen vom Urheberrecht begründet. Was jeweils als "Fair Use" gilt, wird nicht von YouTube definiert. Das möchte ich noch mal ausdrücklich betonen: YouTube legt nicht fest, was unter "Fair Use" fällt. Das kann nur ein Gericht entscheiden. Hier reagiert eine Kunstfigur satirisch auf eine andere ohne die Intention die Privatperson hinter der Kunstfigur persönlich zu beleidigen. Andere Kaschpa:

Polyneux Podcast
Polyneux macht’s kurz 57 – Musikantenstadia

Polyneux Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 140:31


Kennt Ihr das? Ihr habt Euch angeboten für diesen Monat mal wieder den Begleittext zum Podcast zu schreiben – und dann fällt Euch nichts ein? Absolut überhaupt gar nichts? Völlige Leere. Sowohl im Kopf, als auch auf dem virtuellen Papier? Weiße Pixel, wohin man auch nur schaut? Nun… da…

financial health
Wie bewertet man die Anlageentwicklung? absolut vs. relativ

financial health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 17:58


Deine Anlage hat 11000€ Verlust gemacht? Das klingt erst einmal furchtbar viel und vielleicht ist es das auch. Aber die Zahl 11000 lässt erst einmal keine Rückschlüsse darauf zu, ob es sich bei dem Verlust um viel oder wenig handelt. In dieser Folge lernst du, wie du deine Anlageentwicklung korrekt bewertest. Viel Spaß beim Hören. --- --- --- Hallo und herzlich willkommen bei financial health, dem Podcast mit spannenden Inspirationen zu deinem privaten Finanzmanagement. Du bist neugierig? Hier findest du mehr noch über uns: - Email: team@financial-health.de - Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/julian-kr%C3%BCger-25358b204 - Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/amelie-lider-a97960208 - Xing: www.xing.com/profile/Julian_Krueger2 - Xing: www.xing.com/profile/Amelie_Lider - Instagram: www.instagram.com/julian_und_akino - Instagram: www.instagram.com/amelie_lider - Facebook: www.facebook.com/julian.kruger.338 - Facebook: www.facebook.com/amelie.lider Bei Fragen, Wünschen und Anregungen nehmen wir uns gerne Zeit für dich. Komm einfach auf uns zu. Wenn dir diese Folge gefallen hat, dann freuen wir uns, wenn du den Podcast abonnierst und eine Rezension auf iTunes hinterlässt. Damit hilfst du uns, dass noch mehr Menschen diesen Podcast finden und das Thema Finanzen eine positive Kraft in ihrem Leben wird. Viel Spaß & Erfolg beim Hören und Umsetzen der heutigen Folge wünschen dir Amelie & Julian. Die Inhalte dienen inspirativen Zwecken und ersetzen keine individuelle, professionelle Finanzberatung. Die Speaker übernehmen keine Haftung. ___________________ Mit ♥ produziert von Klangmagneten & beraten von uncover. www.un-cover.de www.klangmagneten.com

OMR Media
Absolut überfällig: Kasia Mol von EMOTION im OMR Media Interview

OMR Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 37:06


In dieser Folge zu Gast: Dr. Kasia Mol-Wolf, Gründerin & Verlegerin von EMOTION, HOHE LUFT und FINANZIELLE. In einem Medienhaus für Inspiration und Netzwerken hat Kasia um die Print-Produkte eine gesamte Content-Plattform mit digitalen Events, Newslettern und unterschiedlich fokussierten Nischen-Zielgruppen erschaffen. Hostin Pia Frey diskutiert mit Kasia die Fragen, wie man eine Nische identifiziert, wie man eine Community für Special Interest Themen für sich gewinnt und wie wichtig dabei eine starke Personal Brand ist.

Ich hab Dich trotzdem lieb
#100 Heimlich beim Rauchen erwischt

Ich hab Dich trotzdem lieb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 51:33


100, 100! 100? - 100! ... 100!!! Und sonst? Herzlichen „Glühwurm“, um kurz aus dem unendlichen Sprüche-Reservoir unserer Helden Loffi und Oli zu schöpfen, zum Tag der Deutschen Einheit, liebe Leute. Hier, in der Oase der selten erwiderten Zärtlichkeiten, packen wir uns die Taschen voller Drogen und düsen kurz zum Urknall und wieder zurück! Könnte man also die gegebene Zeit besser nutzen, als jede verdammte Episode dieses Podcasts zu hören? Nein, sagen wir entschlossen in der New Yorker Redaktion, nein, kann man nicht. Die eingesetzte Hörzeit ist ein Investment in Weisheit, Geisteskraft und Güte. IHDTL hat verdientermaßen ein Triple A-Rating, der ROI ist beachtlich, und auch die Nachhaltigkeit ist hier eindeutig geklärt. Mit jeder verbrachten Minute wächst das fleischlose, alkoholfreie, gewissensreine Ich. Reichtum für alle. Mehr kann unsere kleine Show nicht wollen. Haben wir trotzdem Angst im Dunkeln? Absolut! Und der Glotzer, der glotzt sich mal wieder ein Ast. Grüßen wir also alle Industrieschauspieler da draußen, außerdem die vielen Universal-Dilettanten, den Trickkünstler Roy - und alle ignorierten Gespenster. Die Folge wird Dir präsentiert von: KIKKOMAN MEHR KIKK FÜR ALLES! Gewinne jetzt eines von 50 Kikkoman-Probierpaketen und gib Deinen Lieblingsgerichten den KIKK. https://www.kikkoman.de/podcast OUTFITTERY Trau dich -dich zu zeigen, neue Facetten von dir zu zeigen! Probiermal was Neues! https://www.outfittery.de/ 15% auf die Bestellung mit dem Code: LIEB15 Feedback an: ich@habdichtrotzdemlieb.de

Passive Income, Active Wealth - Hard Money for Real Estate Investing
241 How To Find Emerging Markets | REI Show - Hard Money for Real Estate Investors

Passive Income, Active Wealth - Hard Money for Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 29:22


https://youtu.be/YmfjzV0YiwI Bill Fairman 00:00:01 Not this time. Oh, we're on now. What a surprise. So there's been a lot of discussion about how to get into markets that are not overpriced. So we're gonna do a show today about finding emerging markets, and you will get that information right after this.   Bill Fairman 00:00:44 Good afternoon everyone. It's Bill and Jonathan and or special guest hunter. But we were, we were gonna tease him in, but too bad he's already here. Thank you again for, well, not again, but thank you this time for joining us on the Real Estate Investor, Show Hard Money for Real Estate Investors. We are Carolina Capital Management. We are a private lender for real estate professionals in the Southeast. If you have a project you'd like us to take a look at, please go to carolina hard money.com and click on the apply Now tab. If you're a passive investor looking for passive returns, click on the accredited investor tab. Don't forget to like, share, subscribe, hit the bell, all that good stuff. Excellent. And don't forget, Hey, Brian. What? Oh, Wendy. Wendy. Don't forget about Wednesdays with Wendy. She, and yes, I will talk right through the graphics. Anyway, Wendy devotes 30 minutes per person on Wednesdays that wants to talk anything about real estate. So there's her link. It will also be on the comments and chat section on the right side or underneath, depending on the platform that you are viewing us from. She usually gets booked out about two months in advance. So book your spot now   Jonathan Davis 00:02:16 For everyone out there wondering. I'm six foot two hunter's, just seven foot.   Bill Fairman 00:02:24 Yeah, I'm   Jonathan Davis 00:02:25 Just sure. I'm trying to keep my head in the   Bill Fairman 00:02:26 Frame for you. I can go ahead and admit that I'm vertically challenged. Oh, that I don't have an issue with that. No. So yes, we have our, our guest Hunter B he is with Elevate Capital. We have what about a three year history? Guess? 4, 4, 4   Jonathan Davis 00:02:45 And a half. Four and a half year history.   Bill Fairman 00:02:47 It's a great story. We're gonna let him tell it instead of me or Jonathan tell   Jonathan Davis 00:02:52 It. Yeah. And before he tells that, I just wanna get some quick information in for everyone. Just want, this was some data that we have that will kind of lead into what Hunter's gonna talk about, but also about the emerging markets. We are, this is what, the third month in a row where we've seen rents slow, but they are still rising. Charlotte is kind of, I think in the top seven on still rent increases, which is 11.5% year over year. The median rent in Charlotte right now is almost $1,800. And if you've followed the show, you also know that the median house payment for a mortgage is 18, 18 50. So they're, they're right there with each other, which is, you   Bill Fairman 00:03:49 Know, that means there's room to grow.   Jonathan Davis 00:03:50 I suppose so. I suppose so. So we're also seeing, give me a second.   Bill Fairman 00:03:57 No issues.   Jonathan Davis 00:03:58 We're also seeing a slow down and starts on single families and a slow down and starts on multifamily. However, construction that is in process is up on multifamily by 27% and up on single family still by 4%. So we're still seeing, you know, there's still growth, but we're next, you know, Hunter and I were talking a little offline a little earlier, and you know, as the next month and, and two months comes in, we're gonna see that decline and that slowing down hit even harder and boasted because of the interest rates. Supply chains, picking up lumber, you know, as we were talking about earlier, as, you know, back to pre pandemic levels, which is good. So also if the, if you're in the way of the hurricane, we're very sorry. I think, Bill, did you lose a home?   Bill Fairman 00:04:51 Well, yeah, that's what I was gonna jump in into before we got too, too far into this that you guys pray for the folks in Florida, we have some short-term rentals down there, but we don't live there full time. So it's not affecting us like it would the people that live down there full time. And there are people that are missing as well. So keep 'em in your prayers. It's gonna be a while to recover where it hit the hardest. Yeah. That said, starts almost always do this when there's a coming recession.   Jonathan Davis 00:05:24 Exactly.   Bill Fairman 00:05:25 People are being a little bit more cautious. Banks are kind of holding off on commercial and residential development because through every downturn, or we'll just call it a crash. Yeah. What's the first thing that goes under? And it's the start of a development. Exactly. So it, it, here's the problem though. We're still 5 million homes behind where we need to be based on the population growth. So all it's gonna do is increase demand for what's out there. Yeah. Right. Yeah.   Jonathan Davis 00:05:57 Well, talking about increasing demand, want, you know, get Hunter talking here. We wanna know kind of, you demanded each stop by we demand. So wanting to know kind of how you all got started, What was the first project, and then just kind of take us through and, you know, I'm sure Bill and I will interrupt and jump in from time to   Hunter Bick 00:06:17 Time. Okay. So like the three to five minute version, not the 20. Hey, you   Jonathan Davis 00:06:21 Take all the time you need. We're on your time, man. Yeah.   Hunter Bick 00:06:23 All right, cool. So we kind, we, our, our partnership Elevate Cowboy Group got started really, we started 2017 ish, mid 2017. And one of our partners, it was high school, buddy of mine, his name's Matt. And then we met our third partner, Shannon, pretty shortly thereafter. And we just really clicked really well. And you know, we at the time, even, even now, but like the, the whole idea is effectively we do is value add multifamily, where we can go in, find something that's underpriced because of distress or a bad rent roll or whatever it is. We can go in, renovate, improve the quality of life, improve the asset. And   Jonathan Davis 00:07:06 You pulling those off with mls, right?   Hunter Bick 00:07:08 No. Now the very first one had been on LoopNet, believe it or not, our very first deal was in an emerging market. So good segue. Yeah. In Fayetteville, North Carolina. And it had been on loop net, we made an offer, didn't get it, came back to us a few months later, fell out a contract and it was $2 million for 56 doors in Fayetteville, which in today's world would be Absolut absolutely unheard of. That was, and that was in   Jonathan Davis 00:07:33 2018.   Hunter Bick 00:07:34 It was 2018. And at the time, everyone told us we were idiots for wanting to buy anything in Fayetteville, and we'll get into that in a minute, but they were wrong. And so we had an appraisal for this property and we had like a hundred grand to buy an apartment building. And we had an appraisal, said it was worth two and a half million. And Shannon and I were talking about it, We were like, Well, why don't we put hard money on it? So we came down here to Carolina Hard Money, aka Carolina Capital Management now, Excuse me. Yes. Yep. And showed you guys what we had and you guys got it. And that's what helped launch us. We wouldn't be here today without, without that first deal and all the other ones we've done together and, and you guys gave us a hundred percent of the purchase and some rental money five months later, that thing appraised for 3.3. Yep. And we did a cash out. I think our new loan on it was two and a half, maybe paid you guys back, took some cash out to put towards future renovations. And that's kind of how we found our model. It's basically like a leveraged buyout private equity type model. Yeah, we've done that. We've done what, 20 deals now? We've done most of them in some similar structure. I was gonna say on this first deal. Yeah.   Bill Fairman 00:08:55 It was based on market conditions. It was pretty much fully occupant, right?   Hunter Bick 00:09:00 Yeah. It was like 85 something.   Bill Fairman 00:09:02 Yeah. And while it, there might have been some updates that could be made. It wasn't that it was in bad shape, it was just outdated. Right? It   Hunter Bick 00:09:13 Was, it was compared to some of the stuff we've seen, it was not in bad shape. Yeah. It, it definitely needed some deferred maintenance. It had some issues. The that one though, the, the income statement was where lot of the value add was, right? Like the expenses were off the charts. Like the previous owner was, this is not, this is no joke. He was spending $400 a month to lease a copy machine. Why on earth does an apartment comp? First off, you could buy one for half of that. Second of all, what is an apartment comp? Like what is it like, why would that be on an apartment complex as   Bill Fairman 00:09:45 Books? Right? It was installed in a new car. That's the difference.   Hunter Bick 00:09:48 It must have been. Right. And so, you know, we knew enough to say, okay, 400 times 12 is $4,800 a month, $4,000 a year to divide that by, at the time it was like a seven cap. I mean, the math on that is big money on the valuation. And so we, we, we fixed a lot of stuff like that.   Jonathan Davis 01:10:09 And that's, you know, just, just to jump in. I mean, when you're looking at these that it's not what you can increase. Everyone thinks what can, you know, what's the rents that I can increase, You know, and under market rents. That's, that's, you know, a great way to look at it. However, this particular asset that when I was underwriting it, it was actually the, you know, when I joined with Wendy Bill, this was the first multifamily that I under underwrote for them. We could see immediately there was exorbitant amount of expenses on there that shouldn't have been there, that created hundreds of thousands of dollars of value once they just removed them.   Bill Fairman 01:10:44 No. Now on, I was gonna say on the reverse side of that, if your brother-in-law is gonna be able to do stuff a lot cheaper than the market Yeah. That's not gonna count than the valuation. So something to keep an eye on when you're looking   Jonathan Davis 01:10:57 At these things. Yeah. You can't say like, you know, well my expense ratio is gonna be 20 when market's 35. Right. You can't say that.   Hunter Bick 01:11:04 No. I mean, you can, but no one's gonna believe you.   Bill Fairman 01:11:06 No   Jonathan Davis 01:11:06 One no, no price's   Hunter Bick 01:11:07 Gonna use that. Yeah, no, no. Good lender will buy it. Yeah. Yeah. And so, you know, the commercial real estate is valued on the operating income, the, the, the net operating income, the noi, and that's the game. And depending on the deal, it could be that could be through, you know, buying an empty property and fixing it and, and leasing it to market. It could be cutting expenses from mismanagement. It can come in many different ways. Yep. And you know, a lot of 'em, the CapEx, some of them need so much CapEx that doesn't generate revenue. Like we looked at one where capital   Jonathan Davis 01:11:40 Expenditures, things that you have to do to the property is what CapEx is. Yeah.   Hunter Bick 01:11:45 Thank you. Yes. And so, but there's different types like roofs, structures,   Jonathan Davis 01:11:52 Hvac,   Hunter Bick 01:11:52 H H V C   Jonathan Davis 01:11:53 Sales things don't add value because people expect a roof and they expect, you know,   Hunter Bick 01:11:57 Exactly. A lease is a two-way document and these things are supposed to work per your side of the leasing, the lease contract. And so you don't get bonus, you don't get anything for that. But if all of the, all of the CapEx that a property needs is unit upgrades or improving the landscaping or the curb appeal or things like that, those things drive value immediately. And that, and so you ideally you want properties that have new roofs and new parking lots and don't need structural work. Yep. And you can just go renovate doors. Now all your CapEx money is going to where it makes the biggest difference. Yep. And so you can see any combination of that. Some, you know, some deals work, some people don't. But you know, that's definitely something to, to look for.   Bill Fairman 01:12:41 And and your typical business model is essentially whatever the, the best deal is. Right. It's not just about buying hold, it could be buy or renovate and sell at the same time, depending on the high   Jonathan Davis 01:12:55 Best use for the   Bill Fairman 01:12:56 Property. Cause there could be some great offers that are coming in. Yeah,   Hunter Bick 01:12:58 It could be. Yeah. You know, when we go in, we, we don't want to be married to a particular exit strategy. Sure. You know, and so if, if the deal only works, if we can turn around and sell it in a year, 18 months, probably not gonna do it. Right. There have been a couple, there would, I can think of a couple exceptions to that, depending on markets and different types of assets. But in general, like, you don't wanna be locked in to one path because if that one path doesn't work and you're gonna, if if it doesn't work and you're gonna lose money, that's tough. That's not a situation you wanna be in because real estate's illiquid, it's expensive to sell. You don't wanna be in a situation where path A you lose X and path B you lose X times two. That is not a situation. Our job, my job is to keep us outta that situation. Right. So everything we do, we wanna be able to have the option to refinance it. Yeah. We   Jonathan Davis 01:13:48 Sell it. Absolutely. Yeah. That's, we talked about multiple exits always. So why, why is Hunter here on this show for emerging markets? That's because when I talk with him and his partners, what's really important and what they're really good at is sourcing deals and underwriting deals. So much so that like, you know, in 2018 they were, you know, in Fayetteville before a lot of people got into Fayetteville. And what we want to talk about is, Hunter, what are some of the metrics that you look at when you're underwriting a, a project or a property and maybe it's in a, you know, a market that you're not familiar with or you're thinking about getting there, or it seems like it's a great deal, but, you know, what are the metrics you look at for those particular markets?   Hunter Bick 01:14:38 Sure. Yeah. So the first thing we, the first thing I wanna look at for any deal is the rent roll, right? Is I wanna know where are these rents compared to the average or median in that market, right? You look at some markets where maybe the rent roll 600 bucks, it's like, okay, well that, that could be high, that could be low. It depends on the rest of the market, right? Yeah. And so then the, you know, the, the second thing, if it's a new market, we wanna see rent to median income. Yep. Where, how low are the rents compared to the median income? And if you look at, But that only matters if you look at a bunch of other cities too, right? Everything's relative. So when we were looking at Fayetteville, for example, in 2018, Fayetteville's rent media income at that time it was like 18%. If you, Charlotte was like 32, all these other cities were like high twenties, like Raleigh times 20,   Jonathan Davis 01:15:24 They're 25 and up.   Hunter Bick 01:15:25 Yeah. Yeah. They're all 25 up. And then here's Fayville, like all the way at the bottom, like way below like every other, you know, 30 other cities. And we're like, okay, clearly the media income in Fayetteville can support higher rents, you know, in the near   Jonathan Davis 01:15:38 Future. And, and in rents to median income, it's, it's just a, a hunter's way or someone who's buying multifamily or lender. It's the same way as looking at like your debt to income. That's, it's it's the exact same thing. So kind   Hunter Bick 01:15:52 Of at scale it's   Jonathan Davis 01:15:53 Yeah, yeah, exactly. At scale. So it's instead of an individualized debt income, it's a generalized debt to income for what are the average people making and what are the average rents. Right?   Hunter Bick 01:16:02 Exactly. And so, and, and so then, so you wanna have an idea of not only where, where are rents at this particular asset, relative to this particular market, but what higher risks can this market in general support? Yeah. So that's kind of the by far away when you,   Jonathan Davis 01:16:17 When you 18% you think could   Hunter Bick 01:16:20 Rise. Yeah. Yeah, it could rise. Absolutely. Yeah. When plenty of other cities are sustaining at 30, right?   Jonathan Davis 01:16:25 Yeah. But when you see something at, at 28, you're like, hm. You know, Yeah. It might rise a little bit, but there's not a lot of potentially a lot of meat   Hunter Bick 01:16:32 There. And it may not disqualify it either because even, let's say, let's say it's a 28 or 30 for the market, but this particular asset is still $200 below the average in that market. Still a great deal. Right?   Jonathan Davis 01:16:43 Exactly. Yeah.   Hunter Bick 01:16:44 So, you know, so you wanna, you just wanna have the perspective of all that together. The other, the other big one of course is what kind of employers, what's the job base? How stable are these jobs? The case with Fayetteville and you know, we tell the story a lot, but so many people told us we were crazy to be buying in Fayetteville because obviously Fort Bragg is in Fayetteville. That is the biggest military base on the planet by far.   Jonathan Davis 01:17:10 By personnel. Yeah.   Hunter Bick 01:17:11 Yeah. By, by by count is 45,000 active duty soldiers. It is the home of the US special forces and, but then there's another like 30 or 35,000 civilian contractors that work on that base every day. So obviously that's a key economic driver of Fayetteville. No question. They also have a lot of healthcare, higher education. They have other job, the other industries that are doing well and growing. Yeah.   Jonathan Davis 01:17:37 This their support systems all around for for that.   Hunter Bick 01:17:40 Yeah, exactly. So people were like, Well, you're crazy mother, what if Fort Bragg goes away? It's like, okay. It's like, can we talk in probabilities please? Because okay, sure that might happen. But what is the probability of the US government moving the biggest military base on the planet out of fort away from Fayetteville? Why would they do that? That will probably never happen. So, I mean, I'm a former poker player, everything's a probability to me. Let's put a probability on this point. Oh oh 1% maybe? Sure. Maybe oh oh two, maybe oh two. Perfect. I can model that. Yeah. Great. I'm willing to take that chance to buy something that is half off. Yeah. That is half, literally half of what this asset is worth all day long. Yep. No problem. I'm happy with that risk.   Bill Fairman 01:18:25 Now do you still have that asset?   Hunter Bick 01:18:27 We actually did sell that one. Okay. That one we 10 31 into try house. Oh   Bill Fairman 01:18:32 Nice. Now let's start at the beginning. What'd you pay for it   Hunter Bick 01:18:37 For? For Apple Applewood. AK metal metal 0.2 million. Right. 2 million. And then   Bill Fairman 01:18:43 And you sold it, You exited for what?   Hunter Bick 01:18:45 Four three. Four four. And   Bill Fairman 01:18:47 You did that and how many years   Hunter Bick 01:18:50 Was it two years? Yeah, it was 18 months. 1818 months was 18 months was 18 months. I think it was 18   Bill Fairman 01:18:55 Months. So not a bad roi.   Hunter Bick 01:18:58 No, that's going, That's going. Yeah. I wish, you know, I wish all of them were as easy to underwrite as that one and that one, you know, our thing with FA too is like the cash on cash yield for buying doors at 40 grand a door in Fayetteville when the rents were like 700 average, the cash on cash was ridiculous. It was like almost double digits, right? Yeah. And so we were like, it is only a matter of time until bigger institutions who already love North Carolina noticed this. Yep. And these properties are gonna bid up like crazy cuz the cash yield is so good. And so we, everything we could find under, I think under 50 a door, like we bought a couple hundred doors under 50 a door and we didn't say no, whatever it was, we just, we said we had figure out to own this and that's what we did. And just a couple years later, man, I mean a hundred a door on average, I've seen things straight for 1 25 a door in Fayetteville. Like Yep. Decent bs not even a's or anything. The A is over 180. Yeah. You know? Exactly. So that did end up happening. So we were fortunate there, but trust your analysis, you stick your guns   Bill Fairman 02:20:00 As these larger markets and, and even Charlotte is not exactly a major market. It's approaching one, but it's the largest market between Atlanta and say DC Yeah, right. So we'll, we'll   Hunter Bick 02:20:13 Call it And multi in multifamily is a major market though.   Bill Fairman 02:20:15 Yeah. Well, we'll call it a major market. That said, how do you, how do you find or how are you marketing to get properties in these smaller tertiary markets?   Hunter Bick 02:20:28 Yeah, I mean really just building relationships. You know, one of our partners, you don't know Margaret, do you, We don't only do much, you know, one of our partners, his, his primary focus is, is our deal sourcing. And without, you know, we talk about this a lot, but without a deal that has a lot of money, you know, money made on the buy basically like built in equity off market has a lot of upside. Once you fix the problems, you can, you can come up with the most brilliant financial strategy in the world and you can be the best operator once you own it. You can be the best operator in the world and you can have the best construction crew in the world, but none of that's gonna matter if you overpay for a deal. Sure. Like you can't engineer your way into a great return if you're overpaying at, at the beginning. And so, but do we always   Bill Fairman 02:21:16 Say you make your money on the bank?   Hunter Bick 02:21:17 Hundred percent. Absolutely. Even   Jonathan Davis 02:21:19 In multi-family money. Even in   Hunter Bick 02:21:20 Multi-family or you   Jonathan Davis 02:21:21 Have forced appreciation because you can only force that appreciation based off of the cap rate, the capitalization rate in that area. And you can only force it to market rents and maybe slightly above. So it's, there's, there are limitations even there.   Hunter Bick 02:21:37 Absolutely. And, and so, you know, we realized pretty early we're like, look, we have to have, we have to be able to find off market deals that need a ton of work and have a lot of upside. And and that's really, that's really where it starts and makes   Jonathan Davis 02:21:52 Me think of what's, was it that one off of Arrowwood   Hunter Bick 02:21:56 Victory aka Greenwood Village Town Homes.   Jonathan Davis 02:21:59 That's okay. Greenwood. Yeah. So this was in Charlotte and what was it, 24 units, is that right? 24   Hunter Bick 02:22:07 Doors, Yeah, 24 doors. Town   Jonathan Davis 02:22:08 Homes. And   Bill Fairman 02:22:09 They were big units too. They   Jonathan Davis 02:22:11 Were, they were   Hunter Bick 02:22:11 Beautiful. It's a cool property.   Jonathan Davis 02:22:13 I'm, I'm, I'm going off here, but didn't you like, wasn't that the highest per door sale for a B asset in Charlotte?   Hunter Bick 02:22:21 I believe it was. That's what the broker said. Yeah. And that was a good exit and I think those guys did, did well on the purchase. I mean it was just a rapidly improving part of town, so they hoped they did well with it. Yeah. But yeah, then we sold that in the one 30 s for   Jonathan Davis 02:22:38 One 30 a   Hunter Bick 02:22:39 Door ish. Yeah. Something   Jonathan Davis 02:22:40 Like that. And what'd you buy it for a door? Do you remember?   Hunter Bick 02:22:43 I need a lot of work. I mean we, we put in Yeah. 30 a road.   Bill Fairman 02:22:49 Yeah. You you did a lot of work on   Hunter Bick 02:22:51 That place. Yeah. Yeah. It was a total redo that   Bill Fairman 02:22:54 This place was located off the nations for road, but you had the south end was kind of creeping up towards that area and it, it was a neighborhood that was turning around   Hunter Bick 02:23:05 And that big cpcc campus right   Bill Fairman 02:23:07 Across the street from CPCC campus down there. And you guys did a nice job going in and rehabbing that place too. Well thanks. It had great large apartments. It had three bedrooms in some of 'em,   Hunter Bick 02:23:21 Didn't it? Yeah, I think two thirds of 'em were three beds.   Bill Fairman 02:23:23 Yeah. So it's, it may have been a B property to start with. When you get a lot of room like that there are, you know, larger families that are moving temporarily because they couldn't find a home in Charlotte buy because it was so hard to find inventory. And it's, that's the perfect place for people to move in to have larger families too.   Jonathan Davis 02:23:43 And when we say like, you know, A is, you know, new construction, then you have B, C, and even like D properties. So you have the, the c and D level assets, but you also have the c d level locations. So picking up a D level asset in a B location is what Hunter looks for   Hunter Bick 02:24:04 For an a   Jonathan Davis 02:24:04 Location or an a location   Hunter Bick 02:24:05 Motor landings an a location. Yeah. Dset and an A and you know, so that's, that's the best possible. The dset in the A location is like assuming the price reflects the dset, you know? Right. Yeah. That's, that's really the nice, the dream deal. And they're going Fayetteville like that where, you know, they were c minuses in an A minus location and Yeah. You know, you, you just, they'd been ignored for   Jonathan Davis 02:24:31 40 years. I mean cuz think about it. I mean we're talking about Fayetteville cuz that, you know, again, they, they got in there in 20 17, 20 18, which you know, was, you know, a couple years before I think really? I didn't see a lot of activity there until 2019 from other guys.   Hunter Bick 02:24:43 Everybody started noticing   Jonathan Davis 02:24:44 It. Yeah. But I mean you realized quickly it was like anything near and supportive to a base that has 70 plus thousand personnel on it is probably an a minus location.   Hunter Bick 02:24:57 Unless the base goes away.   Jonathan Davis 02:24:58 Unless the base goes away. Which is a, we, you know, we can see at 0.002. So,   Bill Fairman 02:25:03 And what was unique as well about his apartment complex, there was, so there was a certain number of unit units that were kind of like an Airbnb. Right. They had short term, you talking about   Jonathan Davis 02:25:12 Victory or are   Bill Fairman 02:25:13 You talking about the one in Fayetteville? Were, weren't there any furnish   Hunter Bick 02:25:16 Yeah, there furnished to bunch   Bill Fairman 02:25:17 If you had contractors that would come in and wanna stay and, and that's a perfect thing to do in some of these. Yeah,   Hunter Bick 02:25:23 Yeah. And that's not a, depending on we, our system is a lot better. We learned and we learned a ton since a couple of these man, I would love to go back and do 'em again. Yeah. Just cuz like we always learned. I know right. What we do for some of our properties now that are in decent proximity to Fort Bragg, what we do is our property manager has like a, like a furniture rental place and we actually rent the furniture for whatever it is and then charge, you know, upcharge on that to the tenant. That way we don't have to be in the furniture storage, furniture maintenance business. That's a nightmare. So anything, we always look for ways to like smooth out the logistics. You make a little bit less money, but it's more worth Yeah. You make it back in the time.   Bill Fairman 02:26:01 Nice. Absolutely   Hunter Bick 02:26:02 Damage.   Bill Fairman 02:26:04 Get   Jonathan Davis 02:26:04 A question real quick.   Bill Fairman 02:26:05 Yeah, go ahead.   Jonathan Davis 02:26:06 Yeah, let's throw up the question of the week guys if we could. It's got it. All right. So the question of the week is, we want to know what metrics do you look at to identify emerging markets? I know we, we talked about, you know, the, the average rents, the median income. We also look at, you know, migratory patterns. We're looking at, you know, what are some other metrics that you all   Hunter Bick 02:26:38 Look at Who, who the employers are, the employers state, How stable are those jobs? Yep.   Jonathan Davis 02:26:42 Yeah. Is it, is it a medical or a base or is it, you know, a telecom service? You know those, those have different weights to them. Education's good. Yeah. A lot of people work there. It's stable. Yep. Yeah. So what metrics do you all look at to identify emerging markets that we didn't list or maybe something we did list? And you have a better explanation than we do.   Bill Fairman 02:27:05 I will say that North and South Carolina, both are a bunch of medium size cities or are a little smaller than medium size city. We have large populations in both states, but they're not, it's not like Atlanta where Atlanta covers most of the states.   Jonathan Davis 02:27:21 It is Georgia. Exactly.   Bill Fairman 02:27:24 So there's a lot of opportunities spread out all, all throughout the southeast really. Yeah. So yeah. Answer that question. Put it in our, our chat. We'll keep up with and we'll talk about it next week. I hate to do this. We're running out of time before   Jonathan Davis 02:27:40 We run outta time. I have one more thing. It surprised me. It was a metric that I read this morning that surprised me. One like in multifamily starts, the northeast has seen an increase year over year that I did not I, and in a 4.6% increase in multifamily starts Wow. In the northeast. It's only beat out by the south, which is at 5.6, which, you know, every other region is actually declining but the northeast is increasing. I and but we expected the south to, but I didn't expect the northeast,   Bill Fairman 02:28:13 I, I'm wondering if you dig deeper, are those areas that are further outside the larger cities? Cuz people wanted to be a little bit more into the suburbs and there wasn't enough single family housing to support those people have   Jonathan Davis 02:28:25 Remote work, they want more space nexts. They can maybe.   Bill Fairman 02:28:27 Absolutely. All right. So folks, I know we had a great time and but it ran out quickly. So thank you so much for joining us. And Hunter, thanks for being a guest. Thanks for having me. We are Carolina Capital Management. We are lenders in the southeast for professional real estate individuals. If you want us to take a look at one of your deals, please go to carolina hard money.com. Click on the apply now tab. If you are a passive investor looking for passive returns, go to our accredited investor tab. Don't forget to like, share, subscribe, hit the bell. And don't forget about Wednesdays with Wendy. We'll see you next week.

Podcast von Digitaler Chronist
Berliner SPD-Abgeordneter: Keiner kümmerte sich in der Notaufnahme um meine Tochter.

Podcast von Digitaler Chronist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 8:23


Liebe Zuschauer, der Berliner SPD-Abgeordnete Orkan Özdemir kommt in der Realität an. Er verbrachte Stunden in der Notaufnahme eines Berliner Krankenhauses mit seiner kranken Tochter (gute Besserung von uns aus an sie!) ohne dass sich jemand um sie gekümmert hätte. Von welcher Partei ist unser Gesundheitsminister? Wer hat dafür gesorgt, dass wir noch mehr Personalnot in der Pflege haben? Euer Thomas Alle Videos, die wir veröffentlichen (also auch die, die für YouTube ungeeignet sind) findet Ihr hier: Netzseite: https://www.digitaler-chronist.com https://t.me/DC_Mediathek Bitte abonniert unsere Alternativ-Kanäle odysee, Bitchute, rumble: https://odysee.com/@Digitaler.Chronist:8 https://www.bitchute.com/channel/TIIWbiMf6vvT/ https://rumble.com/user/DigitalerChronist Digitaler Chronist auf Telegram: https://t.me/DigitalChronist Alle unsere Kanäle auf einer Seite, bitte folgt uns auch auf den anderen Plattformen, man weiß nie... https://www.digitaler-chronist.com/alle-unsere-kanaele-auf-einen-blick/ Wenn Ihr unsere Arbeit unterstützen möchtet... Neue Bankverbindung, bisheriges Konto wurde mit Hinweis auf die AGBs ohne weitere Begründung gekündigt. Bankverbindung: N26 Thomas Grabinger IBAN: DE76 1001 1001 2624 5985 47 BIC: NTSBDEB1XXX Ko-fi https://ko-fi.com/digitalerchronist Mit Apple Pay oder Kreditkarte bei Stripe https://buy.stripe.com/cN229tfIdb749KU288 Bitcoin: 3Mq26ouX6QZAQcyyb79hjPjFcrgENBVBec Hintergrund: Eigenproduktion Es handelt sich hierbei um Polit-Satire. Falls sich irgendjemand beleidigt fühlt, bitte ich um Entschuldigung!  Art. 5 III Satz 1 GG, Kunst- und Wissenschaftsfreiheit Sind gerade in der Notaufnahme des St. Joseph Kinderkrankenhaus'. Nach zwei Stunden wurde noch nicht mal eine Anmeldung oder Ersteinschätzung gemacht. Absolutes Chaos und Überforderung. Gerade wurde eine Frau einfach weggeschickt, die mit ihrem Neugeborenen ankam und kaum laufen https://twitter.com/orkanoezdemir/status/1574493197119631360 konnte. Keine Aufnahme o Ersteinschätzung. Wenn der Frau oder dem Baby nun was geschieht, wer ist verantwortlich? Absolut katastrophale Bedingungen. Ohne Worte. Fieber unserer Tochter ist mittlerweile auf 40 Grad gestiegen. Noch nicht mal eine Anmeldung erfolgt.  @BeatrixSchmidt https://twitter.com/orkanoezdemir/status/1574493199598776320

Kvanthopp
Avsnittet om absolut ingenting – hur tom kan en låda bli?

Kvanthopp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 32:26


Att verkligen skala bort allting från någonting, till den grad att absolut ingenting återstår, det är mycket svårare än det verkar vid första anblicken. Till och med filosoferna får huvudvärk av att definiera ”ingenting”. Men hur definierar fysiken ingenting, det vill säga frånvaron av både någonting och allting? Hur ser en på riktigt tom låda ut? Redaktör: Marcus Rosenlund. E-post: kvanthopp@yle.fi

Körber-Stiftung: Audio
Johanna Klug bricht das Schweigen um den Tod

Körber-Stiftung: Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 29:42


Sterben, Tod und Trauer – das sind Themen, die wir alle am liebsten verdrängen. Aber muss das so sein? Hilft uns die Auseinandersetzung mit dem Lebensende, um besser mit ihm umzugehen? Und macht uns das vielleicht sogar glücklicher? Absolut!, sagt Johanna Klug. Denn sich dem eigenen Ende bewusst zu sein und mit Menschen über Wünsche, Sorgen und Bedürfnisse zu sprechen, nimmt die eigene Angst und führt zu einem bewussteren und glücklicheren Leben. Was es mit uns macht, wenn wir nicht mehr die Augen verschließen und warum auch unsere Gesellschaft einen offeneren Umgang mit dem Tod braucht, diskutiert Johanna Klug mit Diana Huth in dieser Podcastfolge „Gesellschaft besser machen”. Mehr zum Thema Leben mit dem Tod: Dialog mit dem Ende • Körber-Stiftung (koerber-stiftung.de) Der letzte Tag • Körber-Stiftung (koerber-stiftung.de)

Creative Confidential with Jude Kampfner
Episode 27: The Look of Food, with Lisa Homa

Creative Confidential with Jude Kampfner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 32:37


Lisa Homa is a Philly-based food stylist and recipe developer. She shares some of the tricks of her trade. How to make fake ice cream, how to raise the vegetables in a soup and how to make a turkey look golden in just the right places although it's had to be undercooked for the shoot. She talks about her journey from graphics and publishing pre-press to culinary school allowed her to combine a love of photography and the visual arts with a passion for food.  Her food styling career has taken her as far as Korea, Cyprus and Italy. She relishes collaborating on cookbooks such as The New York Times bestseller Antoni in the Kitchen by Antoni Porowski.  Her clients have ranged from Absolut and Hennessy to  KitchenAid, Knorr and Bon Appetit.  Influences Delores Custer - Lisa's mentor.  http://lisahoma.com/blog   Paul Grimes - initially knew as a chef and then excellent food stylist. He did a lot for Gourmet Magazine in it's heyday. Juan Sanchez Cotan – Spanish Baroque painter 1560 - 1627 @lisahoma. lisahoma.com Radio Feature Jude made with Lisa for Studio 360 on PRI: https://www.wnyc.org/story/107549-still-life-sells/ Each week in Creative Confidential Jude Kampfner chats to an independent professional performance or visual artist about how they survive and thrive. They share details of moving between projects, becoming more entrepreneurial, finding the best opportunities and developing a signature image and style. Her guests range from lyricists to novelists, videographers to sound designers. A broadcaster, writer and coach, Jude gently probes and challenges her so that whatever your line of creativity you learn from her advice and the experiences of her lively guests. REACH OUT TO JUDE: -  Jude's WebsiteJude on TwitterJude on LinkedInJude on Instagram Theme music composed by Gene Pritsker. https://www.genepritsker.com/ Show Producer and Editor, Mark McDonald. Launch YOUR podcast here.  

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“IVU Zug-Software ist Weltmarktführer” - Hypoport -46%, Varta -34%, Politik-ETF

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 10:50


Schlechte Stimmung durch und durch: Credit Suisse hat faule Geschäfte, Continental verkauft faule Schläuche und JPMorgan verkauft faule Kryptos. Außerdem gab's den Mega-Crash bei Hypoport und Varta und einen Mega-Deal für Apple. IVU Traffic (WKN: 744850) lenkt die Züge der Welt und bei der Bewertung fehlt vielleicht bisschen Geld. US-Politiker investieren nur in Aktien, die sie verstehen. Interessenskonflikt? Vielleicht. Rendite? Absolut. Diesen Podcast der Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) vom 26.09.2022, 3:00 Uhr stellt Dir die Trade Republic Bank GmbH zur Verfügung. Die Trade Republic Bank GmbH wird von der Bundesanstalt für Finanzaufsicht beaufsichtigt.

RikaTillsammans | En podd om privatekonomi
#269 - Ekonomisk brandövning | Konkreta frågor, tips och råd inför vinterns tuffare tider

RikaTillsammans | En podd om privatekonomi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 82:22


Här får du RikaTillsammans-forumets bästa förslag inför vinterns tuffare tider. Vi går bortom "tre snabba tips" och tittar på riktigt bra frågor som kan hjälpa dig att vänta vinterns tuffare tider till din fördel och komma ut starkare och på en bättre plats på andra sidan. Få kan ha missat att vi redan nu befinner oss i tuffare tider. Räntan ökar, energipriserna skenar, maten blir dyrare, bränslet är dyrt och börsen är -25 %. Den här ekonomiska stormen kommer drabba alla - det enda som skiljer är när den kommer över en. Bor man i hus med rörligt elavtal och rörlig ränta har man redan börjat bli drabbad. Bor man i BRF så kommer det snart när föreningens avgifter blir dyrare. Bor man i hyresrätt har det redan börjat pratas om 10 %-höjningar. MEN! Det är på intet sätt kört. Allt som händer har både för- och nackdelar. Det finns väldigt mycket som man kan göra. I RikaTillsammans-communityn har vi de senaste veckorna diskuterat alla möjliga saker som man kan göra, men framförallt så har vi fokuserat på vad som ger mest effekt. Vad är det som gör mest skillnad? Var får jag mest betalt för insatt arbetsinsats. Dagens avsnitt är en sammanfattning av vår diskussionstråd i forumet: https://bit.ly/rtep269 Vi rekommenderar verkligen att läsa den då den sammanfattar tipsen och framförallt frågorna vi ställer. De bästa svaren till hur du ska agera nu framgent för att få en bättre ekonomisk situation beror till stor del vilka unika möjligheter just du har. Där får du tips och förslag på frågor såsom, t.ex. den bästa fråga hittills från min vän Charlie: - Hur kan du ta dig genom denna storm med bibehållen sparkvot? (dvs. samma sparande som förut?) Som om man bryter ner den betyder hur kan du jobba med att: - öka inkomsterna? - sänka utgifterna? - effektivisera bland tillgångar och skulder? - arbeta med de resurser du redan har? som på nästa nivå kan översättas till t.ex. - inkomster: löneförhandla? Byta jobb? Sälja något? Hyra ut något? - utgifter: energieffektivisera? förhandla låneränta? handla billigare varor? skippa resan nästa år? - tillgångar och skulder: kan du amortera? investera i något (tillgång, isolering, utbildning, eget företag)? sälja av något (tillgång, bil, fritidshus, saker i förråd)? öka / minska skuldsättning? - resurser du har: optimera värmepump? sänka temp i något rum? engagerade dig i BRF-styrelse? som sedan kombineras med frågor såsom: - Vad ger mest effekt? - Är det en 30 eller 3 000 kr fråga? Notera att det handlar om att unna dig att gå och bära på en av frågorna i några dagar. Att inte besvara den direkt, utan att klura, prata med andra, brainstorma för att sedan ta ett informerat beslut. Annars är risken att man agerar både i panik och affekt. Vilket inte gagnar någon. Glöm inte att ta hjälp i forumet om du fastnar. Vi är många här som hjälps åt. Ingen har blivit framgångsrik på egen hand. Jan och Caroline PS. Tack till Patreon-gänget som finansierade detta avsnitt: https://www.patreon.com/join/rikatillsammans Innehållsförteckning 00:00:00 Introduktion 00:04:50 Vår elräkning blir nog 100 000 i vinter 00:06:00 Oro för den svenska medelklassen 00:10:20 Lösningen på höga priser, är höga priser 00:11:34 Ekonomisk brandövning 00:17:25 VD-metoden för att effektivisera 00:18:04 Frågorna är viktigare än svaren 00:21:18 Hur kan jag ta mig igenom denna stormen med bibehållen sparkvot? 00:27:00 Vad gör mest skillnad och ger mest effekt? 00:33:45 Absolut många bäckar små, men hitta den stora bäcken först 00:40:50 Skala löken med hjälp av olika nivåer av frågor 00:41:25 Effektivisera bland kostnaderna 00:49:00 Hur funkar värmepumpen egentligen? 00:52:30 This too shall pass 00:56:00 Gör det till ett spel, en lek eller tävling 00:59:20 Liten summering 01:03.45 "Fear of using buffert" 01:05:50 Bunden eller rörlig ränta? 01:12:10 De flesta som binder binder alldeles för kort 01:15:00 Bundet eller rörligt elavtal? 01:19:25 Har det varit värt det? Nej, inte än (men det har varit roligt)

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast
Kann man CO2 als Rohstoff nutzen?

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 23:08


Außerdem: Miese Laune durch Hunger - deshalb wirst du "hangry" (12:10)/ Absolutes Gehör - genetisch oder erlernbar? (17:12) // Mehr spannende Themen wissenschaftlich eingeordnet findet ihr auf www.quarks.de // Kritik, Fragen? Schreibt uns! --> quarksdaily@wdr.de Von Yvonne Strüwing.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
American Invents Act Has Destroyed Innovation - Cops want to keep mass surveillance secret - Hackers Hide Malware in James Webb Space Telescope Images - TikShock: 5 TikTok scams - Ukrainian Police Bust Crypto Fraud Call Centers

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 85:22


American Invents Act Has Destroyed Innovation - Cops want to keep mass surveillance app secret; privacy advocates refused - Hackers Hide Malware in Stunning Images Taken by James Webb Space Telescope - TikShock: Don't get caught out by these 5 TikTok scams - Ukrainian Police Bust Crypto Fraud Call Centers Well, the birds are coming home to roost. Well, not the chickens in this case, but this is called the death warrant for American ingenuity. We'll start by talking through this great article from this week's newsletter. [Automated transcript follows.] Well, I hate to say this, but in reality, we are looking at some very, very bad times for inventors, and I've had some of these problems myself before, but last September, there were scores of patent holders who demonstrated in six cities across the US. [00:00:34] They had on these black t-shirts that said homo sapiens, inventor. Endangered species. They were protesting America's decade of stolen dreams. Great article here in the American thinker. It was in my newsletter this year, or excuse me this week, but, uh, but here here's weirdly what happened here. Back in 2011, president Obama pushed through Congress and signed into law. [00:01:04] What they called the America invents act. Now just like the inflation reduction act is going to increase inflation, right? It's all double speak. Isn't it? The American invents act turned over the patent process basically to the biggest Democrat party donors. Big business billionaires, right? Because that's who really is funding them, the Hollywood millionaires, these massive billionaires, Zuckerbergs and, and others. [00:01:35] And what happened here? Is they changed the whole patent law and the basis for it. They flipped the table here, basically. Here's the idea behind the patent law that we've had in place in the United States for well, over a century and patents that are guaranteed in the cons. It used to be that you, if you were first to invent something, if you could show that you were first to invent something, you could file a patent and gain that patent. [00:02:14] Well, what happened is because of all of the donations that went into the Democrats in 2011, from these big, big companies that were lobbying. A, and this is part of the reason I have a huge problem with all this money going to Washington DC, frankly, because it just attracts rodents like these big companies that want to use the law to control you, to gain profit for them. [00:02:39] And really in this case, squash. Potential patent holders. You see there have been piracy for years in the patent field. And this happened to me. I spent a year of my life designing some software, writing some software that emulated an older computer system and allowed you to take. Any of that software and run it on the new system. [00:03:05] And it would run exactly the same way. And a lease on the new hardware was cheaper than just a maintenance contract on the old stuff. Plus it was faster, used less electricity, had more options, et cetera. Right. It was, it was really something, frankly, and I was invited to their headquarters to show them a little bit about. [00:03:27] Did, and, and I was so excited because they wanted to start selling it, right. So they need to understand a little bit better. So I went to the headquarters and met with them, you know, of course paid my own way. Flew down there, stayed in the hotel, rented a car, you know, all the stuff that you have to do. [00:03:43] And then nothing happened afterwards. Wouldn't return phone calls. It just, all of a sudden went silent. And then about a year and a half later Tata, they had an alternative product out on the. . Yeah, and they tried to emulate what I had done, but they did a very, very poor job at it. That's patent theft, that's piracy in this particular case, uh, if you are an inventor, you've probably experienced that sort of thing before, you know, you can put employees all of the non-disclosure agreements you want to have in place, but in reality, good luck enforcing those, especially against a big company. [00:04:25] Well, piracy went on steroids because of president Obama's America and events act. They, as part of that established something, they called the patent trial and appeal board. And it's just gone downhill ever since. So a professor that has more than 40 patents, I'm gonna read a little quote of his, this includes some inventions used in the space shuttles, by the way, which by the way, my invention was used with the space shuttle. [00:04:57] Um, so Dan brown invented something called the bionic wrench. I have one of those. I bought one of those some years back, this is a one size fits all wrench that does not strip bolt corners like it does if you're trying to use vice scripts or some pair of pliers, right. Because you're just too lazy to go and get the right socket size or box wrench or whatever it is. [00:05:22] That's the right size. It very, very. And professor brown says that Sears stole his idea for this bionic wrench right down to the marketing pitch. And then Sears, according to him, went out and hired a Chinese company to make it. And all of a sudden now, what kind of invention does he have? How's he gonna battle somebody like that? [00:05:49] I know a guy who is, uh, completely unethical. You know, I've done many shows from the consumer electronic show and it's really kind of cool, cuz I would get in depth with the inventors and, and explain what they were doing on the air. It was really neat all the way around. It was just a whole lot of fun. [00:06:08] And I met a guy there who was going to the consumer electronic show to find cool new consumer electronics. He thought might be popular. And then he'd go and talk to the people who were exhibiting that wonderful new electronics and say, Hey, I'm interested in, in selling your stuff. I have, you know, retail space and, uh, you know, kiosks in the mall. [00:06:33] What can, uh, what kind of deal can we work out here? Well, you know, first I, can I, let me get a, I, I need a copy of, uh, of your device here. I want a copy of it so I can mess with it and see, see if we really wanna follow through on. Oh, and I, I don't want to carry it around the floor of the consumer electronic show. [00:06:51] So I need you to ship it to me. So they'd ship 'em off. They might be a little speaker. They might be a charger. They might be who knows what? And consumer electronics is pretty broad. And if he liked it, he wouldn't buy it from them. He sent them over to his contacts in China. And had them reverse engineered and make the same thing with his brand label on it. [00:07:16] And he'd sell it in the stores. Now, when it comes to software and a lot of consumer electronics patents, aren't really a big deal because things. Changed so quickly. Right? And if you're a small guy, it's very hard to file a patent. And that's how president Obama sold this American Bens act to us. I remember this very, very clearly where he said, Hey, listen, this is gonna make the patent process way more streamlined, way easier for the small guys to be able to get patents, uh, not only applied for, but actually get them out to market. [00:07:52] And it's just gonna be an absolutely wonderful. It, it isn't because what happens now? Is big companies are not investing in research and development. That is true across the board. Now you might say, Hey Craig, well, how about big companies? How about Tesla? That's R and D. How about SpaceX? That's R and D. [00:08:14] Yes, but they are R and D companies. They're not big companies out there like Facebook, does Facebook try and come up with this or that new invention? Well, yeah, they kind of do from time to time, but most of the time what's been happening is corporate America looks for a winner. And then tries to buy the winner. [00:08:35] Microsoft has been doing that forever. Microsoft in court has lost cases because of what they did to inventors. And now it's been codified in law for over 10 years. So our American ingenuity, which is what we rely on in order to grow our economy, the ingenuity, the, the brain skills, the science, the true science that we have gives us a major competitive advantage because that particular, uh, type of intellectual property has a much higher profit margin than something like manufacturing a widget. [00:09:14] When you get right down to it, that's where the real money is. so a very interesting article and I would suggest you take a little bit of time to read it. If you've ever thought about patenting something, if you had a great idea, it used to be, you know, this is kind of the, the, uh, old wives tale. If you will, if you've got a great idea, you think you might wanna patent it, write it all out, take all of your notes, do it in a, a, a workbook that you can. [00:09:43] Alter right. You can't tear out pages or things. Uh, mail it to yourself in a Manila envelope and make sure you put stamps on it. And then the post office is going to date, stamp it for you or send it to your attorney even better. Right. And your attorney's gonna go ahead and keep that on file. And then when it's time to file the patents, you can say, Hey, look, it here's the proof. [00:10:06] I invented this in April of 2019. It doesn't matter because if some other company sees what you're doing or comes up with a similar or the same idea, and that company has the money to have the lawyers that know patent law inside out and backwards and can go ahead and file that patent claim. You've lost it. [00:10:31] you know, as early as the constitutional convention of 18 or 1787, our founding fathers recognize the need to promote innovation and we have to be promoting it. We've gotta get rid of this Obama era law. Absolutely. We've gotta go from first to file, which is what it has been for a decade. The first person to file you. [00:10:54] And move back to the way it was intended, the way it worked for well over a hundred years where it is a first to invent, it's very, very important for all of us, for economy, et cetera. The, the third law of Congress was a patent act of 1790. It it's just man, have we come a long way, stick around. We'll be right back online. [00:11:19] Craig peterson.com. [00:11:22] You know, we've had firewalls in our cars for a very long time for a very good reason. Right? You wanna keep the engine stuff out of the passenger compartment? The same thing is true. When we're talking about our networks, we're using firewalls to keep things out. [00:11:39] Firewalls are there to keep things out. And we have firewalls in our homes. [00:11:44] If you've got an internet service provider, you've probably got a firewall right there. Something that you don't even think about, right. It's just, there's gonna protect. You, it might, it's providing some services. You might be familiar with them. It's obviously doing a network address translation for you in this day and age. [00:12:06] Pretty much everything is especially with the internet transition that's been going on for years now from, um, IP four to IP six, but, uh, the firewall. is critical for every person and every business out there. But when we get into the configurations of firewalls, frankly, they are really a touchy subject. [00:12:29] You know, every network security professional has their own preferred hardware and software, uh, use Cisco. As a rule, Cisco has some great stuff. What I like the best about the Cisco equipment that we use in software and install at our clients is it is one pane of glass. It's a single vendor that covers everything from endpoint security. [00:12:54] In other words, security on your desktop, through the network itself, the switches, the firewalls, the email filters Absolut. Everything is there and is taken care of by all of the Cisco gear. It it's really quite something to look. I saw, in fact, a survey just last week at businesses who are trying to consolidate, there's just too many vendors in there selling this piece of endpoint, that piece of endpoint. [00:13:25] And, you know, that's part of the problem that I see happen pretty frequently, which is people look at Gartner report. Gartner, of course, a research company. They've got a lot of great research out there that I've used before. I've had Gartner on the radio show before, as well as some of their competitors talking about trends. [00:13:44] Well, There is something known as the upper right quadrant in those Gartner reports where they are rating various vendors for various pieces of software. So there might be for instance, a report on firewalls and the upper right hand cor quadrant is kind of what you want, cuz it's new, it's innovative. It, it innovative. [00:14:06] It's uh, really cool and wonderful. And it's the best. Since life spread. So they go out and they buy that cuz it's upper, right. Gartner quadrant. And then man, they find out, uh, okay, so now we need desk desktop, desktop. Okay. So they find the or buy actually the Gartner report for five to 10 grand. That's like a page long is crazy how expensive these things are. [00:14:32] They then look at that and say, okay, so the best desktop is vendor Y so let me see, we got X for the firewall. We've got Y for the endpoint and then, oh, they need switches. So let's go to the Gartner report. Who's in the upper right quadrant here for switches. Oh, it's uh, vendor Z. Okay. So we got Z. So now all of a sudden. [00:14:51] You end up with all of these different pieces of hardware, different pieces of software that have limited offerability at best interoperability at best. Right? So the, this day and age, when we're talking about cybersecurity, There are so many legitimate attacks every day. I mean, thousands of attacks going on even against a single business. [00:15:18] And there are hundreds potentially of false alarms every day. So how do you deal with that? That that's a good question. So, uh, a lot of businesses turn to companies like mine now, you know, full disclosure, I've been doing internet security work for businesses since, uh, early 1990s. So whew, 30 years now. [00:15:40] And I've been doing internet work for even longer than that, helping to develop it. So they'll go and they'll say, Hey, we need a managed security services provider. Uh, there's a big problem with that. And I, I was watching, uh, Yellowstone that TV show and I, it was a great little example of what we're seeing in the world today. [00:16:05] And Frank, frankly, we've seen forever obviously. And that is if there's a demand for something, all of a sudden, a lot of people will be hanging up shingles. and if they know, if that vendor knows more than you do, or is able to kind of turn, twist your ear and convince you to buy from them, you'll buy from them. [00:16:26] We saw that man around the year, 2000, all of the people who were trying to sell web services that had no idea what they're doing now, we're seeing all kinds of people trying to sell network services, security services that have little idea of what they're doing. We support. These companies that call themselves manage security services providers, where we actually go in, we design the system, we build the system and we implement the system. [00:16:53] We run the system and the third party here builds the client. Right. Cuz it's their client. And you know, that's all fine. It's so well and good, but what should you be looking. Particularly if you are a business, if you want to have a managed firewall, which is, I think important again, it's kind of a long tail thing to have a firewall vendor and, uh, this vendor and a managed vendor, and now it can get to be a headache pretty quickly. [00:17:23] But if you're going to focus on one thing, It's probably the firewall and your end points. Right? So maybe it's two things. So here's what a managed firewall service provider should be able to offer you. First of all, firewall system health and alerting. Software life cycle management, which means your updates, your patches, service, and incident management. [00:17:48] Whenever there's an alarm, they should know about it and they should be handling it. Security policy implementation your reporting, your analysis, your remediation, some of that is required by these various regulations and laws that are out there. You. To do it, uh, you know, without getting in a lot of detail right now, um, network monitoring, uh, the traffic monitoring, you know, the idea here behind any kind of managed service is to bring in a true expert rather than just completely outsourcing. [00:18:24] So you're partnering with someone. One of the things I've, I've bated my head against the wall for, for decades now, is that the it department. Thinks that they're up to snuff to be able to do something, or maybe they just want to do it because it's gonna be wonderful for them on the resume for the next job. [00:18:45] Right. Uh, man, I've seen that a lot of times when, when you are looking at all of this stuff and you've got an it department, maybe you're better off bringing in a very narrow expert to support your it department rather than fight against your it depart. good questions here. Uh, bottom line, they should have better expertise than what you have. [00:19:11] And you've got to read between the lines between your it staff that are currently doing it and the other vendors reducing the burden on your staff. So that maybe what they can do is. Focus more on things that are, uh, revenue generating that are more important to your business. You'll get faster incident response with any luck here. [00:19:33] With service level agreement, proactive security from the managed security services providers, or just regular service providers. Your burden on updates is going to be lower, improved manufacturer support. Because a lot of times, like we do my company mainstream, we have direct connections to the manufacturer. [00:19:56] Our case is usually Cisco because of the volume or services that we have and the equipment that we buy from them, uh, easier to scale there. There's a whole bunch of things, right. Uh, But be careful. One of the things you gotta watch out for too is where are their service people, their support people physically located, and are they us citizens? [00:20:20] A lot of the regulations. In fact, pretty much everyone. I can't think of an exception require us persons to be the ones in control of your network and data. So lots to consider. But keep that all in mind. I think it's an important thing to understand. Stick around. We'll be right back. And in the meantime, visit me online. [00:20:42] Craig peterson.com and sign up for my free newsletter. [00:20:49] The best way to secure a system is something, you know, and something you have, well, many systems have been securing themselves with your phone, right? They send you a text message, but it turns out that that isn't working well. [00:21:05] Having an SMS message sent to you in order to authenticate who you are, has turned out to be well, a problem we've seen over the last few years, people who have things like cryptocurrency who have a cryptocurrency wallet who are keeping their money, if you will, in this wallet and are using. [00:21:30] SMS to verify who they are. So here's how that works. You log into a website using a username or perhaps an email address. Again, it should not be asking for an email address for a login because you probably use the same email address or maybe two or three. And. Have for what? 50, a hundred different sites, maybe a thousand, I've got 3000 records, uh, logins on my one password account. [00:22:02] Okay. So there's a lot of them. They really should be letting you set up your own username so that it can be unique. For every single website that you go to. So, but anyway, that aside, you've got your username, which may be your email address. You've got a password and we've talked about passwords before. [00:22:21] Hopefully you're following the current guidelines, which are, don't worry about random characters, make sure it is long. And that means. A past phrase. So you string three or four words together. You put some digits, some special characters in between the words, maybe, you know, one word is all upper case. You, you play with it a little bit, but it's easy to remember. [00:22:48] So if someone then gets your email address and they get your password, they can potentially log into a website. Correct. And that website might be your bank account. It might be your work account. We've had a lot of problems lately. The FBI is saying that about every 12 hours, they're filing a new report of a company that got their intellectual property stolen. [00:23:22] one of the ways the bad guys steal it is they'll log to your RDP server, your Microsoft remote desktop server, using your credentials that you used at another website. It's that easy. It really is. They might be trying to log in via a VPN again, the same thing. So how do you secure this? How do you secure this? [00:23:47] Well, how to secure this properly? That's where the something you have comes into play. We all have a smartphone of some sort, even if it's not considered a smartphone, it can still receive text messages. So what a lot of these companies did is they asked their underpaid it people to set it up so that when you enter in your username and your password, it then sends you a text message. [00:24:16] Usually with a six digit text message and you then have to type that into the website as well. Seems pretty good. Doesn't it? Well, and, and in 30 it is pretty good. There are however, a few problems. Those people I mentioned who have cryptocurrency accounts and have been using this SMS methodology, which is SMS, of course, text messages have found that sometimes their phones have been hijack. [00:24:48] easy enough to do. And if they know you have a fair amount of cryptocurrency, it's probably worth their effort to spend a few hours to try and get into your account. And they have been getting into your account and people notice, Hey, wait a minute, I'm a kid. They do phone calls or text messages. What's what's with that. [00:25:07] And you found out that they have dismissed you, they have stolen your. Your, uh, SIM card, basically, even though they don't have to physically have hold of it. And there's a number of ways that they do that there's a new scam or newer scam that's out right now that the fishers are using. And that is they're sending out these SSMS, these text messages that are trying to get people to respond. [00:25:34] So how do they get people to respond? Well, In this case, they're primarily going after this company called Octo Octo post. And, uh, there's a number of different types of Octos out there, but anyways, they are trying to get you to. Do something you shouldn't do let me just put it that way. Right. So what they're trying to do is get you to, uh, enter in your username and your password. [00:26:04] Okay. Well, that's been around for a long time. Craig, you're telling me we've had fake bank account, uh, bank website. So they'll send you an email and in it, they'll say, Hey, I need you to go right now. to our bank page and, uh, authorize this $2,000 transaction that wasn't you. And so now you're freaking out, you click on the link, you go to the bank, you try and log in and the login doesn't work well. [00:26:31] That can be because what the fishers did is a made a webpage that looked like the bank's web page. And when you went there and entered in your username and password, you just gave it to the crooks. That's happened a lot. Well, there's a company called Octa O K T a. That is an authentication company. And what the bad guys have done is they have registered domains similar to a company. [00:26:59] So for instance, they went after CloudFlare, which is a huge, um, company they're number one, I think they have like 80% of all of the protection for denial of service and caching a business on the internet. It's just amazing. Cloudflare's huge. And I've used them and continue to use them for some customer. [00:27:19] So, what they did is they found a whole bunch of people that worked for CloudFlare sent them a message. And, and here's what it said. It said alert, your CloudFlare schedule has been updated. Please tap cloudflare-okta.com to view. The changes. So you go there, it looks like a regular Okta login page and they go ahead and ask user name and password, but CloudFlare is smart. [00:27:47] They're using Okta. So they're sending an SMS message to the user to make sure it's really, them turns out what was really happening is yeah, it was sending that guy a text message and it was using telegram. To relay that his response back to the hackers. So now the hackers have your username, they have your password and they have your six digit login key. [00:28:15] That's supposedly unique that supposedly went to you. And in this case, they didn't even have to bother a hijacking your SIM card. In this case, they just sent you that text message. So it's been causing some serious problems. They've been going after all kinds of different companies out there, uh, food service company, DoorDash you've heard of them. [00:28:37] Right? August 25th, they said that there was a sophisticated fishing attack on a third party vendor that allowed a attackers to gain access to some, a door dashes internal company. Tools DoorDash said, intruders stole information on a small percentage of users that have since been notified, big deal, or what a tech crunch, by the way, reported that the incident was linked to the same fishing campaign that targeted Twilio. [00:29:07] That also, as we just mentioned, targeted cloud. So we have to be careful with this. We cannot be using SMS text messages to authenticate ourselves. Some banks now allow you to use one time passwords from things like one password or others. However, some banks don't turn off the SMS, the text messages for authentication, which they really should be doing. [00:29:36] And the other thing I wanna let you know is I like UBI. Y U B ico.com. Yubico check them out. I'm not making a dime off of this, but they have a physical token. That you either have to plug in or the connects via Bluetooth. That is something you have that authenticates you to all major popular websites out there, and many of the tools. [00:30:03] So if you have any questions, just email me, me@craigpeterson.com gimme a few days, but I'll get back to you. [00:30:12] Have you heard about fog reveal? They it's almost invisible when you search for it online, but it's something that police departments have started using. And they're trying to keep all of this secret. So we're gonna tell you what's happening there and got a few others too. [00:30:29] Great little article that was in the newsletter this week. [00:30:32] Hopefully you got my free newsletter, but it is about fog reveal. This is an ours Technica. Often some of these ours Technica stories are carried in multiple places online. It's kind of interesting because we know to some degree what the federal government's doing to collect information on people, they go to open source. [00:30:57] Sources of information. In other words, things that are put out there publicly online, so they might search you your Facebook information or what you've been saying on Twitter, uh, or more, they go to data brokers that anybody can go to. And those data brokers have more information. They probably. Bought records from the states and they know from each individual state what property you own. [00:31:25] If you have a car, if there's liens on it, any mortgages that you might have, right. Putting all of the stuff together. It's kind of an interesting problem, frankly, but that's a, again, they say it's legitimate. Now the federal government is not allowed to collect this information. So they just go to third party data aggregators. [00:31:45] And remember again, If you have apps on your phone, if you have an Android phone, this does not apply to iPhones. Generally it does apply to iPhone apps. However, but, and this is part of the reason I say never, ever, ever use Android. Okay guys, I, I just. Blows my mind. I, I was talking to an old friend of mine. [00:32:09] Uh, he was the, the CTO in fact for the state of New Hampshire. And he was telling me that, uh, you know, we were talking and telling me, yeah, yeah, I got an Android phone. He says, don't you just love Android? And he knows that I do cybersecurity. He knows I've been in it. He hired my company to do a bunch of different tasks for the state, right over the years, we still do business with the state and he's using Android. [00:32:41] He's probably listening right now. BU get a little note from him, but, uh, it, it, it's a problem to use Android any. Those free apps that you're using, that Google maps app that you're using. And of course you can use that on iOS as well is tracking you. They know where you live because they know where your smartphone stays at night. [00:33:04] They know all of this stuff. How do you think the FBI is able to seize a smartphone at a Hardee's drive through. they know where you are. Well, they have some more access to information as it turns out. Uh, one Marilyn based Sergeant, according to the article wrote in a department, email TDY, the benefit of quote, no court paperwork and quote before purchasing the software. [00:33:37] And the Sergeant said the success lies in secre. interesting. So the electronic frontier foundation, FF, who I have supported over the years and the associated press got together. Now, the associated press won a Pulitzer center for crisis reporting, uh, award, I think. But anyways, the Pulitzer center for crisis reporting also got involved here. [00:34:05] So she had these three different organizations trying to figure out. what could, or what would be considered local places best kept secret. So they went online. They started doing some searching, trying to figure this out. And according to ours, Technica, the reporting revealed the potentially extreme extent of data surveillance of ordinary people being tracked and made vulnerable just for moving about. [00:34:38] Small town America. So it isn't just the big cities where you're tracked anymore. Reports showed how police nearly two dozen agencies. One record shows the total figure could possibly be up to 60. Use Google maps, like technology called frog reveal. now this is licensed by fog. I, I keep saying frog it's fog licensed by fog data science, and it gives state and local police a power to surveil. [00:35:10] Hundreds of billions of records from 250 million mobile devices. And if that doesn't scare you, I don't know what does now FF, the electronic frontier foundation found that fog reveal gets its data from veal. That's the same data source the feds use. neither companies disclosing the nature of their business relationship. [00:35:33] Okay. They fog, reveal. Didn't say what Tel is providing and vice versa, right? Yeah. But it really appears that fog reveal is getting data location services to local police at its steep discount. So it's making it more affordable for smaller police departments and private security companies to access major amounts of data and trace devices across months or even years. [00:36:03] isn't that something. So typically FF found that police agencies license the software annually for costs as low as six grand to nine grand. Some agencies spend even more on this tech to track people as they are moving and exactly where they are. Again, think being in a Hardee's drive through having the FBI show up. [00:36:27] Knowing you're there. Uh, ours reviewed one annual contract in Anaheim, California. That was for more than $40,000. So it took months for these three organizations that are used to digging into this sort of stuff, uh, to figure this out, took more than a hundred public records requests to gather thousands of pages of evidence to trying to compile a picture of how local law enforcement. [00:36:55] Is using and mining the location data. Now, to me, this is scary because we look at abuses of power. Through the years and I it's happened again and again and again, we are smelling more and more like Venezuela than we are free us. It's frankly scary, scary to me, but I'm talking about it cuz I think it's important. [00:37:21] That I bring this to light to everybody else out there. Okay. Now fog data science, managing partner, Matthew Brodrick told the associated press that fog reveal has been critical to police to save time and money on investigations, suggesting police who are under-resourced and investigation suffered from reliance on outdated. [00:37:44] Outdated tech now that's true. Isn't it? But isn't it also true that, uh, that's why we have some of these policies and procedures in place. That's why the Supreme court Miranda decision has some policies and procedures. That's why a warrant, a search warrant is supposed to be specific in what they're looking for and where it is located. [00:38:11] We don't allow these broad warrants that the king used to issue, but we are doing that nowadays. It seems against political enemies and that's where it starts really, really scaring me. It isn't that I think that the, the current administration it, or even the next administration in Washington, DC, is going to be rounding up its enemies and putting them up against a. [00:38:38] But when would it happen? Well, it would happen if everything were in place for it to happen. What's one of the most important things for fastest regime. It's to have a citizenry where they know everything about everyone. It, it reminds me of the Soviet era. Show me the man. I'll show you the crime. There's a great book out there right now. [00:39:04] I think it's called, um, three felonies. a day, I think is what the name of it is. But the, it points out how every last one of the people that call ourselves Americans in the United States of America, every one of us commits at least three felonies a day. Now a lot of these things are just absolutely crazy. [00:39:26] You know, there's been a lot of jokes about, oh, did you chair the label off of that pillow? Well, you can cuz you're the consumer, right? It's. The people that are selling it that are in distribution chain that cannot tear that off by law. Okay. But in reality, there is a lot of stuff that could be used against you. [00:39:46] So it it's like when they say, uh, you know, give me this, or why don't you answer that question? It's none of their business. You have a right to be secure in your papers right now, if they have a warrant that's specific, then you need to surrender it. But hopefully the warrant's actually issued by real court. [00:40:08] Some of these agencies now, uh, like the IRS have their own courts that are paid for by the agency. The judges are working for the agency. So you really think they're gonna be fair. I wonder, I wonder. Okay. Couple more things. Next up these pictures taken by the James web space telescope. Have you seen these? [00:40:35] It is amazing. I've seen them side by side with our latest or, you know, our previous high tech pictures. And we're seeing what maybe galaxies that we never could see before. It's just absolutely crazy. Well, guess what bad guys have seen them as. And they are embedding malware inside of some of these amazing images taken by the James web space telescope. [00:41:05] If you can believe this, by the way, they're writing them in go. Uh, so the Phish and emails, they've got a Microsoft office attachment. That's the entry point for the attack chain when you open it, it retrieves and obfuscated, VBA, macro, which in. Auto executed. all of a sudden there is a macro that is de obfuscated and run on your computer. [00:41:34] So be careful careful with that again. And good news. Microsoft is now turning off the execution of macros by default. Double check your machine, making sure that macros are blocked by default. So, yay. Okay. So they are, by the way, changing campaigns to rogue link and ISO files because of the blocked macros. [00:41:56] But, uh, it's good that Microsoft is doing that. Thank goodness. And you Ukraine, the police busted a crypto fraud call center. In fact, more than. And they're also shattering two more Russian bot farms. So we shouldn't be getting as many of those, uh, phone messages from the, uh, the bad guys scammers as we used to get. [00:42:20] Thank you, Ukraine. All right. Online Craig peterson.com. Get that newsletter and stay on top. [00:42:29] Well, we got some election news here from our friends at Google and at Twitter, they are taking opposite directions about exactly how they're gonna handle news postings about the elections. This is an interesting thing. [00:42:46] The federal election commission is the branch of the us government that monitors elections. [00:42:53] It does things like impose fines for misuse of funds. It sets some of the standards for funds and for their use. And. and one of the things it looks at is what are called in kind contributions. This is where someone might, uh, for instance, run a whole bunch of ads on behalf of a candidate. And those ads are coordinated with the campaign and that is illegal. [00:43:24] You're not supposed to do that. And because it's illegal, you know, they try and stop it. But most of the time they end up finding after the fact. And that's part of the reason they want campaigns to be filing their financial reports fairly frequently so they can catch it quite quickly. Well, There have been many complaints from the G O P about what has happened with some of the campaign finance stuff, where you have someone like Facebook or Twitter or Google, who seems to be meddling with the election. [00:44:02] They are running ads for your competition. They are really screening the results from people's searches. And from that those results they're, they're benefiting. There was a study down in orange county here a few years back where they looked at. Google results that were related to the elections going on in orange county and found that the Google results were tainted in such a way that it dramatically favored the Democrats that were running in those districts in orange county, California. [00:44:39] Pretty interesting when you get right down to it. So the GLP says, wait a minute, now that sort of thing is worth millions, tens of millions of dollars, because if they were going to run TV ads, for instance, to get as many eyeballs, to get as much attention to convince people that this is the way they should vote, that would cost them tens of millions of dollars. [00:45:02] So how much is it worth? Where do you go to really straighten things out in order to ultimately make fairness work and well, you know, that's kind of what the federal election commission's supposed to do. Well, here's, what's happening with the next elections. The federal elections commission has decided that Google. [00:45:28] Getting rid of their anti spam measures for. Candidates does not violate a ban on contributions on inkind contributions. So this is an interesting approach because Google's saying, Hey, listen, we want to allow pretty much any political message to come right through to Google Gmail users, inboxes, and not filter those. [00:45:59] Which I frankly think is a smart move on their part. Now some of these campaigns get pretty crazy. They're sending money requests all of the time. It it's been crazy to watch both sides do this and both sides complain about the other side, doing it. But at least by getting rid of these spam rules for the politicians, their messages are gonna get through. [00:46:24] I think that's ultimately a very good thing. So what kind of messages are gonna get through how and why? Well, ultimately they're saying we're gonna let all of them through. and what that means for you. If you already get some of these messages from the politicians, it means your mailbox. At least if it's a Google Gmail box, you are going to be seen even more during elections. [00:46:51] And I think this is gonna go on for very long time. Because Google doesn't want to get caught in the middle. When we're talking about these in kind contributions. If this were to be done for the Republicans or were to be done just for the Democrat, can you imagine the noise that would be made? By both sides and in kind contributions where the Republicans tens of millions of dollars Googled get dull tied up in some of these, uh, you know, lawsuits that would really be inevitable. [00:47:23] Bottom line. Well, Republicans have accused. Google of giving Democrats an advantage in its algorithms. And, and as I said, there have been studies on that that have proved that they have. The big question is why. And there's an article in ours, Technica talking about a meeting that happened in may 20. 22 between Senate Republicans and Google's chief legal officer. [00:47:52] And he said that the most forceful rebuke came from Senator Marco Rubio from Florida who claimed that not a single email from one of his addresses was reaching inboxes. And the Washington post, which of course is a mouthpiece for the Democrat party reported in late July. That the reason it was getting blocked was that a vendor had not enabled an authentication tool that keeps messages from being marked to spam. [00:48:21] Now, if that's true, The Washington post accidentally reported the truth here. And it might be true. I had a company call me up this week. They had their Google ads account banned, and they were trying to figure out the details of why and what happened. And I went in and we solved that problem, and I noticed that they had. [00:48:44] Properly configured their email. There's there's gets technical here. I have a paper we've put together on this, a special report talking about what's called D K I M. These, uh, SPF records DMAR records and how they should all be set up and why I need to use them. So this company was doing marketing. [00:49:04] Obviously they had a Google, Google ad account. They were sending out emails, but because they had not properly and fully configured their email. They were not getting delivered at the rate that they could get delivered. Now that's kind of a very, very big deal when you get right down to it. And the Washington post is saying, well, that's what happened to center to Rubio. [00:49:26] Now there's other things that might happen too. There are. Keywords that are used. There's software called spam assassin. That's very, very common. I have used it since it came out decades ago. I can't even remember how long spam Assassin's been out there, but it looks for certain things in the emails. , it looks for a lot of graphical content, a lot of HTML, even a lot of links and it kind of, it gauges, you know, this is likely spam on this scale. [00:49:56] And typically if the, the score is higher than five or eight, or in some cases, some people said as high as 15, that email is bounced. Well, one of the real big checks as to whether or not this is legitimate email is to check and see. Who is the domain? Does that domain have these special keys that tell us? [00:50:19] Yes, indeed. This did come from us. In other words, in this case did come from Marco Rubio or in the case of my client, it came from their company.com. And is it signed encrypted so that we know that nobody's kind of playing a man in the middle thing, trying to mess things up on us. And they say, okay, well that's a really good score. [00:50:40] So we will, we'll lower that spam score. And, and that's how that game is played. So what by Google doing what it. Talking about doing it's really gonna help out because I have of every company I've checked for email, email deliveries, we've got a, a new customer that is a startup and you know, what do they know? [00:51:02] They they're very narrow. Right? They understand their. Basic technology and their email again, was set up kind of like apparently Senator Rubio's email was set up and, and didn't have these things. And just like this company that I helped this week, they didn't have it set up properly. And, uh, they had experts who supposed experts who had set it up, but both cases, right. [00:51:26] It was outsourced. Yeah. You know how that goes. Now, some Gmail users submitted comments to the federal elections commission and they were criticizing Google's plan cuz they did not want to get more spam. Okay. And there were more than 2,500 comments. You can find them by the way, online, all of the stuff is a matter. [00:51:48] Public record and they call it the docket. And so there's a page out for this particular docket and the commissions through Republicans and Democrat commissioner voted for the order appro Google's plan. I think this is a very, very good deal. And it's really kind of the opposite of what Twitter is planning on doing Twitter has. [00:52:12] essentially announced that it's going to. In the elections. Yeah. So you got Google on the one side saying our hands are clean. We're staying away from this. We don't want anything to do with this. Thank you very much. We love you, but, uh, forget about it. We're just gonna let all the emails. Through, Twitter's saying that it's going to have its wonderful sensors who have been proven right. [00:52:39] Every time he said with his tongue firmly planted in his cheek, and they're gonna have those wonderful sensors that, you know, they're sitting in the basement and, and eating pizza and drinking Coke or red bull. I, I still kinda understand why somebody that's 30, whatever years old needs, energy drinks, you know, come on, come on. [00:53:00] Uh, but anyways, They're they're saying that they, Twitter is going to be the determiner as to whether or not something that is posted on Twitter is correct. Or if it should be censored or if it should be blocked entirely. And they're admitting that they're gonna shadow ban conservative content, they don't like isn't that. [00:53:25] So. Yeah. Uh, that's from the gateway pundit good article. And you'll find it in this week's newsletter. Uh, I think it went out Monday this week and you can follow the link through to these articles on Google and Twitter and the elections or any of the others that we have out there. So stick around, we'll be right back and make sure you sign up. [00:53:46] If you didn't already get that newsletter. Absolutely free. Craig, Peter son.com/subscribe. [00:53:59] I'm not sure a week goes by where I don't hear from a listener saying that somehow Facebook is tracking what they're talking about because all of a sudden ad starts showing up. And they're related to things that they've been talking about. [00:54:16] Meta is the owner of Facebook and Instagram and, and some other things like WhatsApp, which is part of the reason I don't trust WhatsApp, but we've had, I don't know how many complaints from people saying that Facebook is listening in to what they're talking. [00:54:36] And people are kind of wondering, well, wait a minute. Is it listening in on my phone calls? Is it listening when and how? It's a very, very good question. Now Facebook says in a statement that Facebook does not use your phone's microphone to inform ads or to change what in the newsfeed. Some recent articles have suggested that we must be listening to people's conversations in order to show them. [00:55:06] Ads. This is not true. We show ads based on people's interests and other profiled information, not what you're talking out loud about. We only access your microphone if you've given our app permission. And if you are actively using a specific feature that requires audio, this might include recording a video or using in an optional feature. [00:55:30] We introduced two years ago to include music. Or other audio in your status updates. So there it is. There's the official word from our friends over at Facebook. But do you notice there's a little bit of an out in there, right? Facebook does not use your phone microphone to inform ads or change what you see in your news. [00:55:55] Doesn't use your microphone. So there's a study out right now. That is from an X Google engineer. And this article is in the guardian and they are talking about what he found. So, let me explain the background on some of this technology. First, if you are an app developer, if, if you're a developer of any software of any kind you use libraries and these libraries do things like search for a specific set of characters called a string or in search. [00:56:31] Them or move things around or open a connection to another machine. So rather than having implement the whole T C P I P stack and ethernet underneath it and, and all of the operating system work that you'd have to do with all of the interrupts and the buffer fills and reading, toggling. As switches in the hardware, doing all of that sort of stuff. [00:56:52] You just make one library call and say, listen, and you give the port and TA anybody who tries to connect you. It just comes right through. It's all taken care of for you, right? That's what libraries are all about. And they've become much more complex, more recently libraries nowadays can do things like provide you with a full web browser. [00:57:16] Many of the applications that we use on a daily basis, these apps in our phones, particularly, but it's also true with some of the apps on our computers are actually. Just web browsers. They're web browsers that talk to a server out on the internet and yeah, there might be wrapped in various things, but oftentimes if you're trying to pay within an app, it'll go to a third party site. [00:57:44] And part of the beauty of that is. Becomes a, a service to them. They don't have to worry about coding it all up. Right. They don't have to worry about taking your money, keeping everything safe. Am I using really good algorithms here to encrypt it can bad guys hack in? No, no, no. There's, they're just calling this routine that spins up a little web browser. [00:58:07] Inside the application and uses a secure connection to talk to the web server somewhere who cares? Not mine. I'm just the app developer, right? I'm letting you play your farming game or whatever it might be. That makes sense to you guys. So it makes their life much, much easier. Why bother if you've got a website that does everything, why bother coding it all up from scratch in an app? [00:58:34] They don't people don't. Why would. Well, we've seen that again. And again, for instance, look at Microsoft's latest browser out there, edge, not the original edge, but the latest edge, you know how Microsoft is, right. They call it the same thing, even though it's entirely different. Uh, yeah. How many versions of windows where they're like 20 at one point, right? [00:58:56] Different ones or different architectures and just crazy. But now the edge browser is. Built on chromium, which is Google Chrome, which is built on Apple's libraries to manipulate, draw things, et cetera. So you're running your edge browser on your Microsoft windows, computer. You're actually running code libraries. [00:59:21] If you will, from Google and from apple. And that way, if you're developing a browser like edge, you don't have to worry about every little nit bitty thing. That's all taken care of by other programmers who are making a smaller piece of code. Now that's been the whole Unix philosophy forever, by the way. [00:59:42] Instead of having these monolithic applications. That could be just full of bugs and security problems. You just have nice small, easy to maintain, easy to research applications and let other people worry about the little pieces, which is really kind of cool. It's great. Many browsers in fact are based right there on chromium and they modify it around a little bit. [01:00:07] Microsoft added all kinds of spyware to it. Well, it turns out. According to this research from an ex Google engineer that both Facebook and Instagram apps have been taking advantage of this in-app browser technology. And what they're doing is users who click on links inside the Facebook app or inside the Instagram at gram act are actually taken to the webpages. [01:00:39] Using an in-app browser controlled by Facebook or Instagram rather than sending you to your default browser. So if you are using iOS, your default browser might be safari, which is a rather safe. Browser and good for privacy, or you might have decided you wanna use the Chrome browser on iOS or maybe Firefox or brave, or one of dozens of different browsers that are out there. [01:01:10] No, no, it's not gonna use those. It's not gonna use your default browser. It's going to use the in-app browser. And what it's doing with that in-app browser now is here's a quote from him. The Felix Crouse, he's a privacy researcher founded an app development tool that was acquired by Google in 2017. He says, quote, the Instagram app injects their tracking code into. [01:01:37] Website shown, including when clicking on AB ads, enabling them to monitor all user interactions. Like every button that you press, every link you taped, every piece of text that you select or highlight any screenshot you take, any forms, you fill out any user forms, things like passwords addresses, credit card numbers. [01:02:06] Are all seen by the Instagram app? Yes, indeed. So in the statement, of course, uh, medicated that injecting a tracking code, obeyed users preferences on whether or not they allowed apps to follow them. And there was only used to aggregate data before being applied for targeted advertis. Now, this is interesting because according to Crouse, this code injection, uh, was tracked and he was able to look at doing, doing it right for normal browsers. [01:02:42] His test code detected no changes, but for Facebook and Instagram, it finds up to 18 lines of code added by. App into the webpage. So there you go. JavaScript injection and more from our friends at Facebook and Instagram. So they are tracking you, but apparently. They're not listening to your microphone, but they're watching you as you cruise around the web thinking you're using your browser, but no, no. [01:03:18] You're using theirs. Hey, stick around Craig peterson.com. [01:03:24] Cell phone security is something I've talked about for a long time. And you guys know my basics here. If you've been a listener for really any length of time, when it comes to smartphones, we're gonna get into this in more detail, particularly after this raid. [01:03:41] Well, of course everyone's heard, I'm sure about the rate on Trump's property, Mar Lago. [01:03:48] There was something else that happened right. About the same time. And that was representative. Perry Scott Perry was traveling with his in-laws, uh, who are described as elderly. They were on vacation. He's a Republican representative in the house of Congress from Pennsylvania. And he told the Fox news people that three FBI agents approached him, issued him a warrant and demanded he hand over his. [01:04:24] He said they made no attempt to contact my lawyer, who would've made arrangements for them to have my phone, if that was what they wanted. He says I'm outraged. Although not surprised that the FBI. Under the direction of Merrick Garland's DOJ would seize the phone of a sitting member of Congress. My, my phone contains info about my legislative and political activities, personal private discussions with my wife, family constituents, and friends. [01:04:53] None of this is the government's business. Now that's really an interesting point. And, and it brings up the discussion about our smart devices, you know, what should we be doing with our phones and, and what is it frankly, that our phones have in them. Now, just think about that for a minute. Scott Perry rec he, he not recommended. [01:05:21] He mentioned that he had all kinds of records. That were in that phone. You do too. You've got your contacts. Of course. The phone contains information about who you called, where you went, cuz it's got a GPS tracker, but even if GPS is turned off, it's still tracking which cell towers you've connected to. [01:05:43] Uh, we've got all kinds of email in our phones, which are gonna contain business documents, private documents, attorney, client, privilege documents, all kinds of stuff there. And we have the fourth amendment, which protects the right of privacy against unreasonable searches and seizures by the go. Now, in this case, obviously the government got a warrant we could argue about, you know, how legitimate is the warrant and should they have issued it, et cetera. [01:06:16] Right. That that's not what I'm talking about. This is not a political show. In reality. What we're talking about here is the technology. The technology we're using to store this information, this personal information, what should we be using? What shouldn't we be using? How should we use it? Right. All of that sort of stuff. [01:06:38] Well, okay, so we've established that there was not apparently a fourth amendment violation here. There, there might have been, we don't know. We may never know. It doesn't really matter, but if someone gets a hold of your smartphone or your tablet or your computer, what information does it have on there? [01:07:01] And we also have a right under the fifth amendment. against self-incrimination. So if someone's thumbing through our phone, what are they gonna find? People plead the fifth amendment all of the time, because they don't want to get trapped in one of these traps where maybe you don't remember the date. [01:07:24] Right. And all of a sudden you're in a perjury trap because you said something that wasn't true. Well, you know, our, our memories aren't the best, particularly when we're on vacation, we've been drinking a little bit, right. if someone finds your phone, opens it up, someone steals your phone and opens it up. [01:07:44] Someone gets a warrant for your phone and opens it up. What's in there. Now some people have in the past said, okay, what I'll do is I'll just go ahead and I'll wipe my phone remotely and they've done it. Right? The police have had the phone in evidence and in evidence locker and somebody remotely went ahead and wiped their phone. [01:08:04] The police are onto. And what the police have been doing more recently is they put it into a special bag that blocks any sort of signals coming in or out as well as the room. Right. It's kind of a fair date cage anyways, and that way, bad guys, good guys who, if the phones are stolen, they can't remotely wipe them, which is a good thing here, frankly. [01:08:30] But what are we ultimately trying to protect from? That's the question, right? It it's, who's gonna have your phone and what are you trying to protect it from personally? I'm not someone who truly trusts the government. I'm a firm believer in our constitution and our bill of right. Ultimately governments become corrupt. [01:08:52] It happens every time. And even if the whole government isn't corrupt, there's guaranteed to be people within the government, within their bureaucracy, the deep state, if you will, who are out there to get you right. makes sense to you. Makes sense to me. I don't know, but our phones, our smartphones, our computers have a lot of stuff in them. [01:09:14] I've talked on the show before how you should not be taking them to China. If you go to China, because of the evil made. T where they are grabbing your phones. They are duplicating them. Same thing with Russian travelers. Not as much as has been happening in China, but it's happened in Russia, probably a lot now with the whole war thing. [01:09:36] Right. But you shouldn't be taking them because they can be duplicated just like rep Scott. But Scott Perry's phone was duplicated. Now the, the FBI apparently said, well, we're not gonna look through well, why you're duplicating it then. And you know, maybe it's just to preserve evidence. I really don't know, but the bad guys can get at your phone employers if they own your phone can get at your phone and they can get a lot of data out of that. [01:10:06] What do you do? Well, bottom line, if you are traveling internationally, you're gonna wanna make sure to wipe your phone and just bring along maybe a, a basic little flip phone. Uh, cetera. Now there is software that we use. For instance, we use one password and duo in order to keep track of all of our stuff, right. [01:10:31] Our personal information. And. That's the two factor authentication stuff that we use, and we can tell it, Hey, we're traveling out of the country and we will only need these passwords. And it goes ahead and wipes out the password database so that we're not carrying a whole bunch of stuff with us that might be compromised by, uh, a government agency right within what is it? [01:10:54] The USS 50 miles of the border. They can confiscate and examine anything that you have, even if you're not trying to cross the border. and they'll do that at airports. They'll do that at a whole bunch of places. And then you've got the employer side and then you've got the bad guy side. Look at what happened to Khai with the Saudis right here. [01:11:16] He was, uh, you know, a journalist. We could argue that I suppose, but he's a journalist. He is abducted and he is murdered by the Saudis. They get their hands on the phone and they decrypt the. this has happened and it'll happen again. So Apple's done something here that I think is a good step in the right direction. [01:11:40] Apple, of course I've recommended for a long time. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever use Android. Okay. Don't. Use it, Google's using it to track you. You're losing your privacy and the security. Isn't very good. Particularly if your phone's more than three years old, apple has come up with this new lockdown mode on their phones and the lockdown mode is meant for. [01:12:09] People who are really under thumb, you know, people living in Russia or Ukraine, or you name it, Iran, all of these countries that are really out to get their citizens and it it's coming out in iOS. You'll see it there. You probably don't want to use it as a regular person, cuz it does block some of the things you can do, but it also locks it down against these Israeli based companies that have been selling software and hardware to break into cell phones. [01:12:44] So consider iPhones. And if you are one of these people, who's at a high risk consider lockdown mode. [01:12:51] I warned last week about using the ring camera as well as Google's camera. We've got some more news about that today. I was right. A major breakthrough in nuclear fusion and a new toolkit released. Talk about it all now. [01:13:08] Well, quite, quite a time, you know, I, I remember when I first started doing the radio show, uh, 22 years ago, now it started right there year 2000 Y two K and I, I was, uh, wondering, you know, am I gonna have enough stuff to talk about? [01:13:27] and my wife, who was just the most amazing person had been helping me and we subscribed to a bunch of newspapers. Yeah. There used to be newspapers back then. And she went through and was clipping articles that we thought might be good, that people might want to, uh, to hear about. And so she had all. Files. [01:13:49] And we, we subscribe to like four or five different newspapers, including the trashy ones like USA today, just so we knew what was going on out there. We had the financial times and the London times and New York times, and we got just files and files worth of stuff. And didn't take us long to realize, Hey, wait a minute. [01:14:14] There is so much tech news out there and stuff to talk about, uh, that weren't, we don't have to worry about that. So we canceled our subscriptions to all of these different things. I, I have actually a subscription to the New York times still, cuz they gave me a buck a week, which is not a bad deal for the online version because the old gray lady still does have some good text stories. [01:14:39] Some of the other stuff obviously is a problem, but, uh, yeah, tech stories anyways. Now we do a lot of this stuff online, the research, and I put it together and send it out in my newsletter every week. And man, did we have a lot of you guys reading it on Monday was the most, most, uh, red newsletter of mine. [01:15:01] The insider show notes newsletter. Of any of them ever. It was really great. It was like I had a, almost a 50% open rate there within the first day. So that's cool. Thank you guys. And obviously you really value it or you would not have opened that newsletter and click through you. See what I do? Is, uh, you probably know, I appear on radio stations all over the place and I I'm also of course have my own radio show here and elsewhere, and my podcasts, which are on every major podcast platform out there. [01:15:40] And I've been doing this for so long this week. What am I at here? Show? Number, I think it's like 1700. I'm trying to remember weeks. Okay. That's weeks of shows and, uh, we, we have never hit the same stuff twice, which is really rather cool. One of the things I brought up and this was in, uh, a recent show is about. [01:16:09] These ring cameras. And I warned everyone not to use ring and went through the whys. So if you have my newsletter from. A few weeks back, you can just probably search your email box

Campus & Karriere - Deutschlandfunk
Lehrermangel - Sachsen-Anhalt trifft es mit am härtesten

Campus & Karriere - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:53


Absolut gesehen hat Nordrhein-Westfalen die meisten nicht besetzten Lehrerstellen zu verzeichnen. Die rote Laterne im Ländervergleich hat jedoch Sachsen-Anhalt. Dort fehlen so viele Lehrkräfte, dass mit der Viertagewoche experimentiert wird.Regina Brinkmann/ Claudia van Laakwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Campus & KarriereDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Gareth's Tech House Sessions
Episode 29: Café Mambo x Absolut DJ Competition Mixed by Gareth Davies

Gareth's Tech House Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 30:01


Studio Allsvenskan
"Det är absolut världsklass!"

Studio Allsvenskan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 62:17


Vi finns även på Patreon, där du får ALLA våra avsnitt reklamfria direkt efter inspelning. Dessutom får du tillgång till våra exklusiva poddserier där vi släpper avsnitt tisdag till fredag varje vecka. Teckna upp dig här!Måndag och Sverige vaknar upp till...Ett fullmatat nytt avsnitt av Studio Allsvenskan.Vi ger er allt från helgens matcher!Vi börjar med en hetsig diskussion om ordet prestation.Kan man, som Daniel Bäckström, stå i teve och säga att man gjort sin bästa halvlek på säsongen när man ligger under hemma med 0-2 mot Värnamo?Degerfors och Mjällby spelar 0-0 och vi funderar lite över domarnas (brist på) spelförståelse...Sedan tar vi ett rejält grepp på derbyt och toppmatchen Hammarby-Djurgården.Birro vill se en blivande kulturminister klassa läktarkultur som en konstform. Det borde gå att söka statliga medel. Svenska tifon håller absolut världsklass.Vi har lite olika åsikter om matchens kvalité också. Missa inte det snacket.Sedan tänder vi en fackla och kliver rakt in i det norrländska mörkret. Varför protesterade Patronerna? Vad händer egentligen i Sundsvall? Vi reder ut.Äntligen får vi hylla Malmö FF igen, som efter en tuff period och en tuff första halva mot IFK Norrköping tar sig samman och vänder och vinner. I Norrköping hyllar vi målvakt Oscar Jansson som är tillbaka i storform.Jockes Varberg vinner mot AIK med 2-0 och bevisar att det finns flera sätt att spela fotboll på i Allsvenskan 2022. Vi älskar och hyllar mångfalden.Finns ute för alla överallt. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Web3 Academy: Exploring Utility In NFTs, DAOs, Crypto & The Metaverse
The Biggest Sports Leagues in the World are Using NFTs | LENS Whitelist | Metaverse Report

Web3 Academy: Exploring Utility In NFTs, DAOs, Crypto & The Metaverse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 66:37


The biggest sports leagues in the world are using NFTs, LENS whitelist, new metaverse report, open source NFT licenses and more web3 news and highlights.

The Hospopreneurs Podcast
144: FELLR and The Seltzer Market with Will Morgan and Andy Skora

The Hospopreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 34:00


Co-Founders of FELLR, Andy Skora and Will Morgan join the program and share a fresh angle on the beverage world. In the highly competitive space that is seltzers, these two are doing incredible work to stand out. Both bring global experience from iconic beverage brands - like Red Bull, Jameson and Absolut - and each have spent time working with Pernod Ricard (as the astute listener will recognise with those brands). Through FELLR, they're striving to create something new and different to innovate in the fast-paced seltzer market. 

Studio Allsvenskan
Linn Nordström: "De kan absolut ta guld"

Studio Allsvenskan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 67:07


Studio Allsvenskan finns även på Patreon, där du får ALLA våra avsnitt reklamfria direkt efter inspelning. Dessutom får du tillgång till våra exklusiva poddserier där vi släpper avsnitt tisdag till fredag varje vecka. Bli medlem här!Vi välkomnar Sportbladets Linn Nordström till Studio Allsvenskan!Det handlar om den inre glöden, drivkraften att få skriva om sport, den första tiden på lokaltidningen i Kristianstad och hur hon hamnade på Sportbladet.Det handlar om resorna med Erik Niva, ångesten och mörkret och hur Ulf Lundell kan trösta och guida en när det stormar i ens huvud.Givetvis handlar det om Allsvenskan och hur det är att arbeta med den. Utöver det det går vi igenom topplagen i serien och analyserar säsong och förutsättningar.Missa inte.Ute för alla överallt. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Recept tack!?
59. Broccoli, mynta och världens absolut märkligaste mattrend

Recept tack!?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 65:16


I "Recept tack!?" kommer Nichlas och Jerka varje vecka – inspirera med, fokusera på och avhandla en rätt de upptäckt och kommit att älska. En rätt som alla måste laga så snart tillfälle ges!För recept, tutorial och handfasta grepp följ @recepttack. Varje avsnitt och rätt finns tillagad och går att pedagogiskt följa på Instagram.

Smart Venture Podcast
#112 Convivialite Ventures Partner, Brandon Yahn, Pernod Ricard portfolio: Absolut, Jameson, Glenlivet

Smart Venture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 42:14


Brandon Yahn is the Partner and Co-founder of Convivialite Ventures, a VC firm backed by Pernod Ricard. Pernod Ricard is the #1 premium spirits organization and the second largest wine and spirits company in the world. The Group represents 240 premium brands available in more than 160 countries. Brands under their portfolio include Absolut Vodka, Jameson, Malibu, Ricard, and Chivas Regal, among others. Convivialite Ventures invests in technology companies that are changing the way people socialize, entertain, and share experiences together. Some of their portfolios include Zola, Wave, AvantStay, Fever, Liquid Death, ChowNow, and Sanzo, among others. You can learn more about: 1. How to start a consumer tech fund 2. How to invest in the best consumer tech companies 3. Career development in venture capital Check out our brand new YouTube Video Podcast!  https://www.SmartVenturePod.com IG/Twitter/FB @GraceGongGG LinkedIn:@GraceGong YouTube: https://bit.ly/gracegongyoutube Join the SVP fam with your host Grace Gong. In each episode, we are going to have conversations with some of the top investors, super star founders, as well as well known tech executives in the silicon valley. We will have a coffee chat with them to learn their ways of thinking and actionable tips on how to build or invest in a successful company. ===================== Brought to you by: https://link.blockfolio.com/9dzp/stwlap68 Use code: smartventure    

NICE.TO.MEAT.YOU - Der Grillpodcast
Andreas Rummel - "Ich bin am Ende immer der Held"

NICE.TO.MEAT.YOU - Der Grillpodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 78:51


Andreas Rummel kommt aus dem Harz und war einer der ersten Grillexperten in Deutschland. "BBQ hat mich bereits um die ganze Welt begleitet". Was diese Aussage genau bedeutet und warum Physik & Chemie für Andreas sehr wichtig sind, erfährst du in diesem Podcast. Absolut spannende Empfehlung!

The Boozebuddy Update
8/8/22 - The Beast In A Can, An Absolut Reboot, & The Best Scotch Whiskies

The Boozebuddy Update

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:51


Brought to you by Green Mountain Payments - helping local business owners save thousands of dollars by providing complimentary credit card processing equipment and zero cost credit card processing. Visit greenmountainpayments.com or posandzero.com today! The Beast In A Can, It's about to be unleashed. Monster will be calling it “The Beast Unleashed” and it will be available nationally by the end of 2023 as a canned RTD beverage. Get more info at https://vinepair.com/booze-news/monster-energy-rtd/ An Absolut Reboot is hitting shelves. Absolut Vodka remixed and refreshed their entire line of Vodka. Get more info at https://www.beveragedaily.com/Article/2022/07/27/flavored-vodka-drinkers-want-true-to-fruit-flavors-says-absolut The Best Scotch Whiskies - according to masters in the biz. Out of 14 Master medals, 76 Gold medals, and 34 Silver medals throughout a blind tasting - these ten stood out above the rest. Get the full list at https://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2022/08/top-10-award-winning-scotch-whiskies-4/ Remember to like, comment & subscribe. Stay safe, drive sober and support the booze that supports your local community. Find me online - social media profiles & links at https://BoozebuddyUpdate.com Learn more about your host and voice over talent The Real Voice - Mel Allen at https://TheRealVoice.com #Absolut #vodka #scotch #whisky #Monster #TheBeastUnleashed #RTD #HardMTNdew --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/boozebuddy/support