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  • 2,209PODCASTS
  • 4,189EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
passwords

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Best podcasts about passwords

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Latest podcast episodes about passwords

Random but Memorable
Secure Sharing Mug Collection

Random but Memorable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:19


PSST! Want to know a secret? You can now securely share 1Password items with anyone! Tune in to learn more about our new secure sharing tool and how it will transform your digital life. We also go behind-the-scenes with Beyer and Nick to discover how they created the browser experience for iOS15 and what the future holds for 1Password in the browser.Plus, it's us vs the memorable password generator for our last ever Three Word Password, and Matt randomly, but memorably, shows off his royal mug collection. Don't say we don't spoil you. ☕️

The Common Man Progrum
FULL PROGRUM PASSWORD

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:16


Marney & Lil' B take on Common & Rosen in Progrum Password!

The Common Man Progrum
Progrum Password Part 1: Common Man Progrum HOUR 2

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:07


Common Man Progrum HOUR 2 --Lil' B --Goldfish Drama --Progrum Password Part 1

The Common Man Progrum
Progrum Password Part 2: Common Man Progrum HOUR 3

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:11


Common Man Progrum HOUR 3 --Progrum Password Part 2 --Mark Rosen --Password Controversy? --Dark Star Memorial Hour --Vikings/Panthers Predictions

Something You Should Know
Why You Make the Choices You Make & The Upside of Being Selfish

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 54:43


Passwords are a real pain. If it is too random, you can't remember. If you it too easy, you could easily be hacked. So this episode begins with a simple formula to create a new password that you will remember and no one else will ever guess. Source: Eran Katz author of Where Did Noah Park The Ark (https://amzn.to/3at5fmx). When you are asked to make a choice, your decision on what to choose is influenced by so many things including how the options are presented to you, who is presenting them and so much more. This is called “choice architecture” and it's important to understand. One of the leading experts on choice architecture is Eric Johnson, Director of the Center for Decision Sciences at The Columbia Business School and author of the book The Elements of Choice: Why the Way We Decide Matters (https://amzn.to/3mK49bN). Listen as Eric explains how other people and situations influence your choices and how you influences the choices other people make - often without even realizing it  Everyone lies. And we do it for all the same reasons. Listen as I explain why we lie, how lying works and how it starts at a very early age. https://www.ted.com/speakers/kang_lee Selfishness is primarily seen as a negative. Yet, maybe we should be a little more selfish a little more often according to Michelle Elman. Michelle is a coach, speaker and author who has been named 1 of the 50 most inspirational women in the UK. Her book is called The Joy of Being Selfish (https://amzn.to/3AvyQq8) and she joins me to discuss the benefits of taking better care of yourself and setting boundaries for others. PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! We really like The Jordan Harbinger Show! Check out https://jordanharbinger.com/start OR search for it on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.  You can grow thicker, healthier hair AND get $15 off at https://nutrafol.com Promo code: SOMETHING Download the GetUpside App and use promo code SOMETHING to get up to 50¢/gallon cash back on your first tank! Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically and is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that take credit cards! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes Listen to Build For Tomorrow with Jason Feifer, our favorite new podcast, right here! https://apple.co/3rPM8La or visit https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow/ JUSTWORKS makes it easier for you to start, run and grow a business. Learn more: https://justworks.com Omaha Steaks is the best! Get awesome pricing at https://OmahaSteaks.com/BMT T-Mobile for Business the leader in 5G, #1 in customer satisfaction, and a partner who includes benefits like 5G in every plan. Visit https://T-Mobile.com/business Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Anna & Raven Show
Wednesday October 13, 2021: Ethics of Password Sharing; Embarrass Your Kids; What Job Makes You a Jerk

The Anna & Raven Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:04


Does your dog eat gross stuff?  Anna found a list of the top ten things your dog shouldn't eat, and she's pretty sure her dog has eaten all of them!  (:30) Do you want to become a billionaire one day?  Most people do, and Anna found the one thing that all billionaires have in common!  (3:31) People make empty threats all the time when they're angry, but if you threaten to steal someone's social security number that's all I need to know about you!  (7:14) Do you share your passwords for streaming services?  Everyone does it right?  Anna's having some ethical questions about it, so she's leaving the decision up to the callers!  (10:19) When was the last time you were in a library?  Even if it's been a while, you may want to go back after hearing about this big rule change!  (16:26) Are you an embarrassing parent?  Odds are if you have a child over the age of 10, the answer is yes.  Anna wanted to find out what makes her an embarrassing parent, so she went right to the source…  (19:58) Can you tell if someone's a jerk based off of their job?  Anna had a preconceived notion about someone she interacted with yesterday based entirely on their job, only to be pleasantly surprised when she actually spoke to him!  (27:30) Nick Lauren.  Lauren is going on a girls trip this weekend, but her fold friend Billy is going on the trip too.  She says that Billy was always like a brother to her and her friends, but her husband Nick says it's totally inappropriate!  Whose side are you on?  (38:11) Hannah has got a shot at $900!  Can she beat Raven in pop culture trivia and claim the prize? (46:11)

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More
How to Get Your Family to Actually Use a Password Manager

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:29


Whether it's about sharing your Netflix login or getting your affairs in order, here are tips for convincing your loved ones to organize and protect their accounts too.

The CyberWire
Espionage by password spraying, and espionage via peanut butter sandwich. Ransomware and DDoS warnings. Two journalists get the Nobel Peace Prize

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:59


Teheran is running password spraying attacks (especially on Thursdays and Sundays). More on the renewed popularity of DDoS attacks. NCSC warns British businesses against ransomware. Two journalists win the Nobel Peace Prize. Joe Carrigan shares his thoughts on GriftHorse. Our guest is Bindu Sundaresan from AT&T Cybersecurity football season and cyber risks. And watch out for small data cards in your peanut butter sandwiches, kids. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/196

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

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Live 95.5
Did You Eat My Password

Live 95.5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 4:59


Did You Eat My Password by Live 95.5

Jubal's Phone Taps
Phone Tap: Did You Eat My Password

Jubal's Phone Taps

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:53


Being a good neighbor usually means you loan out power tools or get their mail... And in today's Phone Tap, Jeff has a favor to ask HIS neighbor... And let's just say it crosses the boundaries of what any good person should do for another.

Brooke and Jubal
Phone Tap: Did You Eat My Password

Brooke and Jubal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:53


Being a good neighbor usually means you loan out power tools or get their mail... But in today's Phone Tap, Jeff has a favor to ask his neighbor... And let's just say it crosses the boundaries of what any good person should do for another.

Super Random Podcast
Episode 16: Battlefield 2042 Might Flop? Twitch Got Hacked..Change Your Password! Demon Slayer Season 2 Has Started!

Super Random Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 92:01


The consistency is immaculate! Battlefield 2042 beta finished this weekend and....we give our impressions. Twitch got hacked so you know what that means....they really don't care, change your passwords. Demon Slayer 2 explores Rengoku and more! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gasthepodcast/support

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HD)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video LO)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1836

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Common Man Progrum
Password Part 1! Common Man Progrum HOUR 2

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 38:40


Common Man Progrum HOUR 2 --Lil' B --Two Toilets in One Bathroom? --Progrum Password 1st Half

The Common Man Progrum
Password Part 2! Common Man Progrum HOUR 3

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 50:47


Common Man Progrum HOUR 3 --Progrum Password 2nd Half --Mark Rosen --Dark Star Memorial Hour --Vikings-Lions Predictions

The Common Man Progrum
Best of Common: Progrum Password!

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 31:58


Lil' B & Marney Gellner take on Common and Rosen in Progrum Password!

The Gear Patrol Podcast
Why Did Ferrari Hire Jony Ive?

The Gear Patrol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:46


Ferrari hires Jony Ive, livestream shopping's rising popularity, and a biometric security dongle.Episode Navigation:02:41 – Ferrari Hires Jony Ive and Marc Newson17:45 – Is Livestream Shopping... a Thing?30:08 – Yubico's New Biometric Security DonglesFeatured and Related:Former Apple design boss Jony Ive partners with Ferrari – Road ShowEx-Apple designer Jony Ive is now designing expensive things for Ferrari, too – The VergeJony Ive and Marc Newson's LoveFrom joins forces with Ferrari – WallpaperFerrari to partner with Jony Ive's new design firm on its first electric car – Fast CompanyThe Most Iconic Apple Products Designed by Jony Ive – Gear PatrolFord 021C Concept Car by Marc NewsonIs Live-Stream Shopping the Future of Retail? – WSJLivestream shopping is the next big thing in retail – FortuneIt's showtime! How live commerce is transforming the shopping experience – McKinseyWhatnot raises another $150M for its livestream shopping platform, evolves into a unicorn – TechCrunchOp-ed: Live commerce's secret sauce, decoded – GlossyThis Live-Stream Entertainment Shopping Company Wants to Bring Live-Host Commerce to the World – Investorideas.comNTWRK - How Mobile Video Digital Shopping Is Shaping The Future Of Ecommerce – ForbesNew Global Start up Shopstream Rolls Out B2C Live Social Marketplace – Business WireNew Yubico security keys let you use fingerprints instead of passwords – Ars TechnicaEric Limer weighs in via SlackBest security key 2021: Protect your online accounts – ZDnetTitan Security Key – Google CloudFingerprint ID in YubiKey Bio security key helps banish passwords – CNETYubico's new hardware key features a fingerprint reader for passwordless logins – TechCrunchWhat are security keys, how do they work, and which is the best to buy? – Pocket-lintHow to use a two-factor security key – The VergeThe Best Security Key for Multi-Factor Authentication – Wirecutter

Carlton Fields Podcasts
No Password Required: An Infowar Expert Paved the Path From Rock-And-Roll to Cybersecurity

Carlton Fields Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 71:21


Winn Schwartau is a security, privacy, infowar, and cyber-terrorism expert who has been paving the way in cybersecurity since 1983. He is often referred to as the “Civilian Architect of Information Warfare” and is known for his straight-shooting, no-BS originality. In this episode, Winn joins the No Password Required team to talk about how he […]

Cloud Talk
Combatting Security Threats With a Multi-Layered Defense

Cloud Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 35:32


The cyber world has grown risker in the past five to 10 years. To combat the threats, organizations need multiple layers of defense. Microsoft Senior Security Architect, Matt Soseman, shares his view of the new world of cybersecurity — from the basics to advanced solutions. Special Guest: Matt Soseman.

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
Change Your Twitch Password – DTNS 4126

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


Google added options to Search, Maps, Travel, and Nest Thermostats. Twitch confirms a data breach with the site’s entire source code, commit history, an unreleased competitor for Steam from Amazon Game Studios and details of creator payouts being accessed. And Restofworld.org has a story about the effect India’s banning of TikTok in June 2020 has had on creators. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
Change Your Twitch Password - DTNS 4126

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 31:14


Google added options to Search, Maps, Travel, and Nest Thermostats. Twitch confirms a data breach with the site's entire source code, commit history, an unreleased competitor for Steam from Amazon Game Studios and details of creator payouts being accessed. And Restofworld.org has a story about the effect India's banning of TikTok in June 2020 has had on creators.Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe.Link to the Show Notes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Laura's List
'What's Laura's Password' 10/06/21

Laura's List

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 20:03


The Cybrary Podcast
401 Access Denied Podcast Ep. 38 | Password Cracking with Ethical Hacker Dustin Heywood

The Cybrary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:49


X-Force Red Hacker Dustin Heywood aka EvilMog joins us during the first week of Cybersecurity Awareness Month to share how to be cyber smart with your passwords. He shares critical steps for protecting passwords and some insight into his world of password hacking. Don't forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and YouTube! Follow Dustin on Social Media! ~LinkedIn ~Twitter Follow Joe on Twitter ~@joe_carson Follow us on Social!! ~Cybrary Twitter ~Thycotic Twitter ~Instagram ~Facebook ~YouTube ~Cybrary LinkedIn ~Thycotic LinkedIn

COW's Podcast
What's the Password

COW's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 54:08


Posted 10/4/21This week the C.O.W.boys are lamenting, "what's the password!" Along with some fun and lively conversation on the topic, you'll also hear some great music from Corb Lund (All I Want to do is Play Cards) , Pop Wagner (Old Fashioned Cowboy), Dan Roberts (Cowhand.com) , and Trinity Seely (Old Poly Rope). There is also some great cowboy poetry this week from Dick Warwick (Said Hanrahan). We'll have the ever popular Dick's Pick (Big Iron), Cowpoke Poetry, and a whole bunch of goofin' off too!

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
iOS 15 Privacy & Security Features

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 68:21


I admit it. I'm an Apple fan. Are they perfect? Definitely not. But in most cases, they're actually trying to be good. And at the end of the day, their business model doesn't rely on hoovering up your personal data. Apple just released a big update to its devices, iOS 15, and it's got some really cool security and privacy features. I'll tell you all about them in today's show. In other news: thousands of Netgear routers can be hacked via a Disney parental control feature even if you didn't ask for it; yet another company is scraping social media and public info to sell it to law enforcement; the NSA and CIA are warning their employees to block ads for cybersecurity reasons; Microsoft has rolled out a "passwordless" login system; EFF is ending support for its wonderful browser plugin HTTPS Everywhere - because HTTPS is now already everywhere; Amazon's new house robot, Astro, is a privacy nightmare (shocker); and this is the first week of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month in the US. Article Links National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, Week #1: Own your role in cybersecurity https://staysafeonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Own-Your-Role-in-Cybersecurity_-Start-with-the-Basics-.pdf Thousands of Netgear routers can be hacked — here's what to do https://www.tomsguide.com/news/netgear-router-circle-patches Researcher drops three iOS zero-days that Apple refused to fix https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/researcher-drops-three-ios-zero-days-that-apple-refused-to-fix/ ShadowDragon: Inside the Social Media Surveillance Software That Can Watch Your Every Move https://theintercept.com/2021/09/21/surveillance-social-media-police-microsoft-shadowdragon-kaseware/ The NSA and CIA Use Ad Blockers Because Online Advertising Is So Dangerous https://www.vice.com/en/article/93ypke/the-nsa-and-cia-use-ad-blockers-because-online-advertising-is-so-dangerous You Can Now Sign-in to Your Microsoft Accounts Without a Password https://thehackernews.com/2021/09/you-can-now-sign-in-to-you-microsoft.html HTTPS Is Actually Everywhere https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2021/09/https-actually-everywhere Amazon Astro is ‘terrible' and will ‘throw itself down' stairs, developers reportedly claim https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/28/22699284/amazon-astro-real-world-stairs-fragile-developer-claims-documents-tracking National Cybersecurity Awareness Month https://www.cisa.gov/cybersecurity-awareness-monthApple's iOS 15 Privacy and Security features: https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/ios-15-security-privacy-features/  Further Info The challenge coin promotion is BACK!! https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-challenge-coins-are-back/ Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 83:13


Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You? I had a good friend who, this week, had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his password. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. Let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most companies do so in some way; we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition. Some customers go away. So how do we keep them? We do what we can. How do we get new customers? For him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line you have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. The same thing's true. Google. And then, on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course, you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, about those already. And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookies are about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel that gets set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there are many people interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising. I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads related to that, which I've always said. It is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. It isn't like TV where it sometimes seems every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me. After all, I don't want those things. And it's also not only just annoying in money-wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically, the Facebook pixel gets to know you. All of the people who like you that might've bought from you. Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebook and their ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. So there's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account. Years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done precisely that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a terrible thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. So now there are really two or three problems here. We'll talk about one of them. Why was the bad guy going after him? He has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can go up almost immediately. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. So our bad guy can get an account like his that has years' worth of advertising credibility and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. Also, of course, very bad, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week, and I was out on a trip with just a vacation trip. It was absolutely fantastic. I never just do vacation. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on a trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGard program. So I had him reach out to my friend, and he helped them out, and they talked back and forth. So here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a perfect way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. And if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. So go ahead and drop me an email at me@craigpeterson.com if a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count and many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, email account, et cetera. And. He has people who manage his ads for him. Who operates his website for him, who put up some promotions, advertising, and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private property. And how does he do it, or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was going to haveIbeenpwned.com. I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most, and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five various sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. All bad. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said put in the password because have I been, pwned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredible of all of these known passwords. So he put in his password, and no, it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I'd love to get him. But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or vaults, or maybe all of your vaults. And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the US and people would work for me overseas, and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. If a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about the last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, Me@craigpeterson.com. That's ME at Craig Peterson dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on-off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think they agree One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Easily simply. When we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six-digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases, take control of your phone. Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile a T and Tone of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or passcode that you gave them. And once they have that passcode now, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really it may not make a huge difference. But I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? There are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the freeway to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. But you can tell it. And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authenticator. By the way. That's why I advise you to don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the sites, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. And then it asks for that code identification code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy-paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six-digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O N.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of the special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. There's a great article that came out in the Wall Street Journal. And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms.  Now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. So that is studies again, that looks like yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. Apparently, for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard, of course, of how this I don't know what it is. Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. I'm trying to remember, but of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. There's a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. And what an influencer is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. They have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. We've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire. I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. So you get a micro-influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. I'll look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together and people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the US each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. Facebook it's getting the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. And also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics. Quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate and win with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook. Another post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said Mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. He says they're proud of this research. I'm just summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. They have a paywall and I hate to use payroll articles, but this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. Give me a few days to respond. But me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your mac pro if you need four screens, it's really handy. No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paperback in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be, connects to the company's network. Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. So once they get in that front door where there's through a website and email that you clicked on or in a computer that you're bringing into the office, they can start to move around. Now it's not just your activity. And this is an interesting article from the verge by Monica chin. It's not just your activity that they can see on your laptop, but in many cases, they're also able to look at anything you're downloading any of your photographs or videos that you might've sinked up from your smart. Laura loading these types of things, your text messages on your work device for safekeeping, or just because it's your primary device might seem harmless, right? Cause you're just going to remove them before you hand it in. But some companies such as Apple won't allow you to wipe your device before handing it in regardless of how personal the contents are. And that makes sense too, because many times an employee leaves. And they don't give the company all of the information that they have, that they're obliged to give back to their employer. Things that they've been working on, customer information, et cetera. So Manalive, there are plenty of other devices out there. Hopefully if you leave your company with plenty of notice, moving a bunch of things off your work device in the last few days, uh, might raise some eyebrows at the. And I'm saying hopefully, because they should notice that sort of thing, because it could be malicious activity. It could be an insider risk that maybe they're not even aware of. There's so much you could go wrong here. So bottom line don't use the work laptop for home. So what should you use? You know, my personal recommendation. Almost always is get a Mac. They are safer to use the patches that they get are usually not destructive. You know, sometimes you can install a patch for windows and now your machine just won't work anymore. Right. You've had that happen. I know every last one of us out there that are tried to install Microsoft patches for a while have had that happen to them. All of a sudden the patch has completely messed up your computer and you are so out of luck, it's ridiculous. Right? So don't, you know, hopefully don't do that, but I like the max because they are basically safer than windows. And also because the patches just work on them, apple tends to get them out in plenty of time to try and protect us the next level. If he can't afford an apple and. Apple laptops really are not expensive when you consider how long they last and the quality that components, they are not expensive at all. But if you can't afford that, the next thing I would look at is getting a Chromebook. There are a lot of companies that make Chromebooks Chrome is an operating system from Google. It's similar to Android. Google keeps the Chromebooks up-to-date. They patch them quite regularly and make sure that there aren't nastiness is going on. You just have some of the same issues and Android has patches might take a while to get to you because it has to go through the vendor that made the Chromebook. You might have a Chromebook for Sam from Samsung, for instance, it's not Google's even though it's called a Google Chromebook. Now Chromebooks rely heavily on the cloud services that Google provides, but they can also run just locally. So with a Chromebook and you can get them for as little as 150 bucks, but remember you get what you pay for. Or as much as I've seen them in the $2,000 price range with fancy GPU's, local storage and other things, but at 150 bucks, it could be well worth it for you. It lets you do the regular word processing. Just think of what you can do with Google docs, spreadsheets against Google docs, spreadsheets, all of those types of things are built into it. You can. Cruz the web, obviously using Google Chrome on your Chromebook. And send and receive email, which is what most people do. That's really kind of all, most people do at home. So consider that as well. I also like iPad. They are quite safe again, but they tend to be more expensive and they can do pretty much everything. And now with Android support built right into Google Chromebooks, you can even run Android apps. So there you go. Keep safe and be safe out there. Right. Have a hack free life. Make sure you get my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. The national cyber director, Chris Inglis said that we need cyber bullets, that cyber bullets are part of the war on hacks. And it makes sense on one level. But when you get into the reality, it's a much different story..  I had an interesting email this week from a listener. Actually he sent it about two weeks ago when I finally was able to get to it this week and responded, and he was pointing out how there are some things that I talk about on the show that I put into my newsletter that are really good. And. I'm paraphrasing here but theoretical to so many people, there's some things that you can figure out pretty easily yourself. Some things you can do yourselves and other things that are just different. To do still. And a lot of that has to do with the websites you go to in order to maintain your passwords. And he was complaining specifically about bank of America and how you can, according to what he has found here in the real world, you can come up with a. Password a 20 character long password that is going to keep everything nice and safe at trend to be generated. You're using one password and great. So you set your password up in bank of America's account, and then you try and log in later, and it doesn't work because it lets you put 20 character passwords and when you're creating it, yeah. But the login screen only takes the first 16. So of course they'd home match. You see it's things like that really are pushing us back, holding us back. But I'd say pushing us back from being secure as a country, there, there just aren't enough people paying enough attention to make sure this cyber security, even the basic stuff like passwords and two factor authentication are being done properly. So one of the things I wanted to make sure you guys were aware of is I need to know when you're having these problems, because what I want to do is put together some trainings to show you exactly how to do it. Because on some websites you were saying, it's pretty hard to use one password he's paying for it, but it's kinda difficult for him. And I think in some ways, a lack of understanding. Then, it can be difficult to spend a bunch of time trying to watch some training videos for some of the software. And so I want to hear when you're having problems so I can do what I did for him this week and spend a little time, write some stuff up, and I even am reaching out to some of this website. People like bank of America who are really messing up cyber security for people who are trying to do the right thing and writing them and saying, Hey, listen, I'm part of the FBI InfraGard program. I'm a member of it. I paid a lot of attention to cybersecurity. Heck I ran the training for the FBI InfraGard program for a couple of years, and there are some real things lacking. In the login anyways, and this one particular case of the cybersecurity, but I don't know all of this stuff. I'm not using all of these things and I have a disadvantage over you guys, and that is that I've been doing this for so long. I've forgotten what it's like to not know it. Does that make sense? So if you have something that I've talked about on the show, that's appeared in my newsletter and you're having some confusion over, let me know. Just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. What he did is he just hit reply to my newsletter. And of course, that goes to me and me@gregpeterson.com and it tracks it. So I know I need to reply, so I can sit down and go through and answer people's questions. I sent out a lot of the copies of my password, special report to people you guys had requested specifically some of the. People out there had requested a little bit of help. And I had sent out an email to most of the people that I could identify as being business people. I sent out a little thing saying, Hey, listen, if you could use half-hour my help, let me know myself or my team. And then, again, you can just send me an E Craig. So I answered a lot of those questions this week. And in fact, that's how I come up with much of what I cover here on the show. You guys ask the questions and that's how I know that it's a real problem. If I understand it, that's one thing. But for the people who don't do cybersecurity as their primary job or a strategy, I get it. I can get why you guys are confused. So make sure you get my weekly newsletter. So you can find out about all of the trainings, the free stuff, the paid courses, and. It's easy. Just go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson, P E T E R S O N. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. And I'm more than glad. Add you to that list. And there are now thousands of people on that list to get my email pretty much every week. If you miss it one week, it's probably, cause I just got too busy, but I put out all my show notes. I put it all a little bit of training notes, all. The us government is supposedly getting ready to fire what they're calling cyber bullets in response to these significant hacking attacks. This is what they're calling a comprehensive strategy to dissuade. Adversaries. And this is all from the national cyber security director, Chris Inglis. This is from an article in American military news.com by Chris Strome. That was out this week. And of course I included that in my newsletter this week as well, coming out. Today or tomorrow, depends on how this all goes right with the weekend. I got to help a buddy out today, but president Joe Biden has been really talking about how do we use cyber weapons to retaliate. For instance, he gave a list of industries that Russia should not be. As though Putin himself is running all of these hacks or come out of Russia. Yeah, certainly there are some that are part of their military, but there many of them that are just bad guys that are trying to make some money, we should feel sorry for them. So Biden gives him this list and says, Hey, listen, if you attack any of these various industries or actually portions of our economy, We are going to retaliate. We have seen the us retaliate under President Trump and the retaliation. Of course he did all kinds of economic stuff to stop it. And much of which has been reversed by president Biden's administration, but also he attacked them directly in. Down some power systems there in the Moscow area, which I thought was really kinda cool. So kudos to President Trump for doing that and for president and Biden now to say, Hey, we are going to attack back. Of course. The biggest question is. What would we be attacking? How would we be attacking it? And for what reason, for instance, the red Chinese have gone after our office of personnel management, OPM records and got them all back in 2015. So they now know everything about everybody that had a secret security clearance or the took a paycheck from the federal government. All of those records, they would get their hands on them and get them on all of the records a lot. So Inglis was in front of the let's see here, the, yeah, he was a former director of the national security agency. He's the first to hold his Senate-confirmed position at the white house, this national cyber director position. And he says there is a sense that we can perhaps fire some cyber bullets and shoot our way out of this English set at the conference. It was hosted by the way, by the national security agency and a nonprofit group, he said that will be useful in certain circumstances. If you had a clear shot at a cyber aggressor and I can take them offline, I would advise that we do so as long as the collateral effects are acceptable. Yeah. What we have done here under president Biden administration is we have shut down some people who were operating illegally, we have shut down some cyber actors that were attacking us. So we've been doing that, but it isn't exactly. Wow. We just saw a muzzle flash over there. And so we are returning fire to the area of that muzzle flash, because as I've said many times before, we just don't know. Where in fact that bullet is coming from, it makes it a lot more difficult. English went on to say there's a larger set of initiatives that have to be undertaken. Not one of those elements is going to be sufficient to take this. Out let's see here, the us should make clear to Russia now their adversaries, what kinds of attacks would prompt a response, which is what president Biden did when he was talking with, of course, President Putin over there, red lines of both good and bad red lines are clear and crisp. Although I got to say many of our administrations have. Really done anything about it. It's the red line in the sand and Syria president Obama didn't do anything when they stepped over that red line. So yeah. And then with what we just finished doing in Afghanistan, where we drew a red line and said, we're going to protect all of you who helped us. And then we not only abandoned them, but we abandoned Americans behind there. I don't think a lot of people aren't going to believe us. So here's the last statement here. And again, this is an article in American military news from our cyber chief is the government actions. Aren't always going to be broadcast. In some cases, it's not helpful to broadcast those for all of mankind to see another one. We are doing some things behind the scenes. And I have certainly seen some of the results of those over the last few years. Stick around.  You're listening to Craig Peterson online@craigpeterson.com. You've got a smartphone and there are some new versions out, right? New hardware, new software, Android iOS. How long should you keep that device? How long can you stay safe with that older device? Apple has now done something. Different something they've never done before. One of the reasons that apple equipment tends to be safer than almost anything else out there is that they have, what's known as a closed ecosystem. There's arguments both directions here on whether that's safer or not. But the real advantage when it comes to cybersecurity is there are only. So many versions of the iPhone out there. What are we now in a couple of dozen versions of the hardware platform that makes it easier for apple to be able to support older versions of the software and multiple pieces of hardware, much easier than for, let's say Microsoft windows. It doesn't even have a single. Platform or Android, where there are hundreds of hardware platforms out there and tens of thousands of versions of the hardware, because one model phone can contain many. Changes different types of hardware to talk to the cell towers or the screen you name it. So it's very hard to keep up. Android has for quite a while now supported three versions of their operating system. Of course, we're talking about Google, but Android operating system. So they support the current release. Of Android and the Breviary release is two previous releases in fact of Android. Now that is frankly a pretty good thing to know, but there's over a billion Android devices out there that are no longer supported by security updates. We've got Android 10, nine, and eight that are fairly supported right now. We're actually up to Android 12. So here's how it works. If you've got Android version 10 out, if that's the main one, then you can continue to do. Eight and nine and get updates, security updates. But then here's the problem, everybody, those security updates are coming out of Google, but that does not mean that they are making it all the way to you. So there you go. It's one thing for Google to provide updates, but if you can't get them because your phone manufacturer is not supporting them, you've got trouble Samsung. Is probably the best company other than maybe Google and the Google Pixel phone. Samsung's the best company to go to. If you want some longer-term support. Many of these other companies just don't provide support past the current version. So keep that in mind as well. Android 12 was the 12th major version of Android announced by Google, February, 2021. And it is starting to roll out a Android. The 11th, 11 is the one that was out in February of last year. At least it was announced then. And we're, they're coming out, they're getting pushed out. So basically Google is saying the current version plus two prior versions. And that usually gives you about a four or maybe even a five year window. So if you're. An Android device from a major manufacturer, particularly Samsung on the Android side, your device is going to be good for at least four years, maybe five years now on the, and by the way, you don't necessarily have to upgrade the. You could be continuing to run an older release saw, as I mentioned earlier, if it version 11 is the current one that's out there being supported, which it is right. 12 is early still, but version 11, that means two prior versions still get security updates. You don't get featured. Dates, you don't get the new stuff, but you get security updates. So Android 11, the current one that means 10 and nine get security updates. So you don't, you're not being forced to do an upgrade. Most people don't upgrade their phones from an older major release to a newer major release. In other words, they don't try and go from Android eight to Android 11. Because in fact, most of the time, the hardware manufacturer doesn't support it. That's why there's over a billion Android devices out there right now that cannot get security updates. So have a look at your phone and your vendors. See what you're running. You probably want to do an update because most phones cannot get any support on the, in the apple side. Things are a lot different with Apple iOS, which is the operating system used on the iPhone and the I pad apple has always forced you to move to the next major version. No, they only force you to do that. If they support the hardware. And I've got to say kudos to them, they're still supporting the iPhone six S which came out quite a while. The iPhone success is something that my wife has been using and that I had as well. In fact, she got my old iPhone success, but that's a six-year-old. Phone came out in September of 2015. So it is still getting security updates, and we'll probably continue to get them. Not only is it getting security update this six-year-old iPhone success is getting the latest and our iOS operating system. It's getting iOS 15. Isn't that just amazing? Yeah, exactly. And so not just security updates, like you might get from some of the other vendors out there, Android vendors. So the apple keeps their arms around you for quite a while. Here's, what's changed now with Apple and iOS, the, for the first time ever in the iOS world, Apple is not forcing you to upgrade. So you're not being forced to upgrade to iOS 15. You can continue to run iOS 14. And that's how apples got around the security patches in the past, because what happens is you get the updates and installs them. Basically. There's no reason for you not to upgrade your phone. And so you do so apple never had to worry about releasing some of these fixes for really old versions of iOS. Although they have done that from time to time. In the Mac iOS side, Apple has done a couple of good things. The, where they always have supported basically three releases, what Google's doing with Android. So you now have a new feature. If you will, with iOS, here's a PSA for everyone. Public service announcement. You don't have to take the iOS 15 upgrade. Now I did. I put it on my iPhone and I seem to have some sort of a problem with messages where it's telling people that my phone has notifications turned off, which it does not. So I haven't figured that one out yet. I'll have to look into that a little bit more, but. This is nice because that means you're not going to have to upgrade your iPhone to iOS 15. You'll still get security updates for iOS 14, something Apple's never done before. We'll see if they continue this. We will see if they match Google going back. Three releases in Android. It just never been done before over on the iOS. So good news for them. Also course in the windows world and the Mac world, you really should upgrade the operating system as much as you can. Windows 11 though, man, windows 11. And I said this to my newsletter. I warned you guys is going to be a nightmare. For many people. You are not going to be able to do an automatic upgrade unless you have the newest of hardware, with the highest end of features, Craig peterson.com. One of the very big ransomware operations is back online. And now we have some inside information from one of the contractors working for this ransomware organization and oh yeah, there's an FBI tie, too.. This organization, ransomware gang, almost business, whatever you might want to describe them as is known as revolt. They have a few other names, but that's the really big one. And they are basically the 800 pound gorilla in the ransom. Business, you might be using cloud services right now. Maybe you use Microsoft's email service. Their Microsoft 360, I think, is what they call it now and use it for email and various other things pretty handy. It's mostly in the cloud. Computers you own or operate or have to maintain. I think that makes some sense too, but here's the bottom line it's software as a service right now, salesforce.com software as a service, Oracle has their accounting stuff. QuickBooks online, all software as a service. It isn't just those legitimate businesses that I just mentioned. That are using the cloud that are providing software as a service where you're paying monthly or however frequently. And you're getting this software as a service. That's what that means. Typically it means it's in the cloud and you don't have any real control over it. That's what this ransomware gang has been doing. This gang known as rebill. They all appear to be in. And there's some interesting stuff. That's come out. A transcript was released of an interview with one of their contractors. Now the original interview was in Russian. So I read through a translation of the Russian. I have no idea how good it is, but it is being quoted by a bank. Insider magazine that you might be familiar with bank info, security. That's one of the places that I follow. And there's a few interesting things that he talked about that I want to get into, but these are the people who have been behind things like the colonial pipeline attack and some of the other very large attacks, the way they work, their business model is. You can license their software, their ransomware software, and you go after a business or a government agency, whatever it might be, you get that ransomware software inside. And the reveal gang will take a percentage of the money that you have in rent. Now, how is that for a, an interesting business model, right? Taking something that the rest of the world has been using, and then take that model and put it into the legal side of the world. For three weeks, during this whole reveal ransomware attack, this summer turns out that the FBI secretly withheld the key that could have been used to decrypt. And computers that reveal had infected with ransomware and looks like kids up to maybe 1500 networks. Now those are networks, not just computers. That includes networks run by hospitals, schools, and businesses, including critical infrastructure businesses. The way the FBI got their hands on this decryption game. Is by penetrating reveal gangs servers. So they got into it. They were able to grab the keys and then the FBI waited before. Did anything with it. See, what they were trying to do is catch the people behind reveal. And so they didn't want to release information, get information out there to the press that might tip off those bad guys over there in Russia. And then shut down their operations. But as you might know, because I mentioned it here before the reveal gang went offline on July 13th, before the FBI could really track them down. And then the FBI didn't release the key until July 21st. And then I think it was Malwarebytes released a decryption tool. So if you had been hacked by the gang, you could. Now, remember it isn't reveal itself. That's doing most of them. Ransomware hacking if you will or a placement it's small guys. And that's why some people, including this contractor that apparently worked for the reveal gang itself says, people think that it's the Russian government, that it's Putin, that's doing this. He said, in fact, it's not it's small guys. And people like me are getting four or five hours a night. Because we're working so hard trying to make a whole of this work, come up with the new software approaches. We have to provide code tech support unquote to our affiliates, as well as tech support to the people who have had their computers and their data ransomed. So it a real interesting mix. Absolutely. Interesting mix. Now Christopher Ray here a couple of weeks ago, he's the FBI director told Congress that cool. We make these decisions as a group, not unilaterally. To the FBI and working with other government agencies, these are complex decisions designed to create maximum impact. And that takes time and going against adversaries, where we have to marshal resources, not just around the. But all over the world. So this Russian based gang first appeared in 2019, they've been around, they've been exporting large amounts of money from businesses for a very long time. One of the interest he'd things I think about all of this is that this reveal gang has their software as a service, and they provide it to quote affiliates, quote that, go ahead and then install the software, get you to install it on your computers in order to ransom you a double whammy ransom you, but there's now reports out there that there's a secret back door in the ransomwares code that allow. Rebill to go around their affiliates and steal the proceeds. How's that for hilarious, you've got a bad guy who goes in and gets the software from revolt, pays them a commission, and then reveal apparently has been jumping in on these customer support chats. In other words, you just got nailed and because you got nailed with ransomware, you have to go to. Chat room. And so you go in there and you're getting customer support on how to buy Bitcoin and how to transfer to their wallet. And apparently revival is getting right in the middle and is extorting money from these people directly instead of having the affiliates do it pretty amazing. So here's this part of this interview? It was aired on the Russian news outlet, London. And was trans translated by yeah. Flashpoint. Here are the guys that got the full transcript of the interview. He says in the normal world, I was called a contractor, doing some tasks for many ransomware collectives that journalists considered to be famous. Money is stolen or extorted with my hands, but I'm not ashamed of it. I do. And again, this goes into the thinking of many of these bad guys of Americans are all rich and they don't deserve what they have. He said, let's put it this way. This is a very time consuming job. And if you've earned enough, then you can quit the game. But chronic fatigue, burnout, deadline. All of these words from the life of ordinary office workers are also relevant for malware developers. So there you go. You should feel sorry for these malware developers who are developing software to steal millions from you and. Down our critical infrastructure. Hey, join me online. Craig peterson.com. And if you subscribe to my weekly newsletter right there on the site, I'll send you a few of my special reports. The most popular ones will come to you right there in your email box. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We all pretty much have some form of insurance. And we're going to talk right now about the types of cyber insurance you may have. Now this might be through your homeowners policy or perhaps a rider on a business policy.  Many of our homeowners policies have started coming with cyber insurance. So we're going to talk about that. What is it? Businesses as well are also using cyber insurance and I'm sure you've heard of insurance basically called LifeLock and what that's all about. So let's kind of start. When we have a breach in a business, usually what happens is information about our customers is stolen. Look at some of the biggest breaches in history where we. Hundreds of millions of our personal records stolen Equifax breach is an example of a huge breach where we had all kinds of personal information that was stolen by the bad guys. Now, some of this information gets stale pretty quickly, but of course, other parts of it like our address, our social security number, they are probably not going to change for years. If for. No, of course our social security number will never change the social security administration. Just doesn't reissue them for very many reasons at all. And they do not reissue a social security number was stolen online because. Just about everybody's has, so what does a company like LifeLock do? They keep an eye on your credit report for you. And they're looking at what's going on new accounts that are open. They look at various other things, just related to that. And they, at that point say, wait a minute, something weird is happening. Now my credit cards, for instance, I have a credit card that if let's say I buy two of the same thing, one after the other and the, both the same price that credit card company pops a message right up on my phone saying, Hey, did you just buy two? Of these $15 things from and I can say yes or no, if I'm out on the road and I am purchasing gas, the credit card can pop up on my phone and it does and say, Hey, will you just trying to buy gas at this gas station? Because what'll happen as you use the credit card at the pump. And the pump says it was denied and then up at pops and yeah. Okay. No, that was me. And they said, okay, we'll try the transaction. Okay. And we'll approve it next time. And that's all automated. And that has nothing to do with LifeLock. LifeLock is there to more or less detect that something happened and if something happened and it was a bad guy and basically your identity was stolen. So they might be trying to buy a Ferrari in your name or maybe a 10 year old, four Ford focus, whatever it might be. And. They will help you try and clean it. That's what they do. So that's why it's cheap. And I don't know that it's terribly useful to you if you're really concerned. Go ahead and do that, but do keep an eye on your credit report. I do as well. My bank has free credit reporting for me, my credit card. Same thing. Free credit reporting that lets me know everything that's going on. So that's an easy way to tell WhatsApp. And there are different types of cyber insurance beyond this sort of thing, beyond the LifeLocks of the world. And many of us just get our cyber insurance through our homeowner's policy. It's a little rider. And businesses can buy cyber insurance as well. We have cyber insurance, that's underwritten by Lloyd's of London and we provide a $500,000 or million-dollar policy to our clients. As well, because that's what we do is cyber security, right? So the idea is if one of our clients gets hit, we have some insurance to back us up, but of course we go a lot further. It's almost like the LifeLock where if you do get hit by ransomware or something else, we will help you get back in business. We'll help restore your data. We'll help you with providing you. The information you need in order to do press releases, which agencies you need to contact, which of your customers you need to contact. And we've got scripts for all of that. So you can send it all out and just take care of it. So the idea is you don't want ransomware. So you hire us. We are extremely likely to keep ransomware out of your systems. And on top of that, if you are hit with ransomware, we restore everything. LifeLock does not do that. Obviously they all, I'll only do stuff after the fact and the cyber insurance you buy from an insurance agency is much the same, and there's a huge caveat with these policies that we're buying for our businesses and for our homes. And that is. They have a checklist at the insurance companies. Did you do this and this? And if you did, then they might payout if you did not, they may not payout. In fact, pay outs on cyber insurance policies are not known because. Bottom line. They really don't payout. Okay. I'm looking at some numbers right now and about paying ransoms and everything else. You may or may not. You got to have a look at it. Many of these policies are never paid out by the cyber insurance covers. They usually just regular insurance companies, but it's a special rider. And what they do is they say, Hey, listen, you did not follow the rules, so we're not going to payout. And there are many cases. If you go online and do a search, just use duck, go and say cyber insurance, payout. Lawsuits I'm doing that right now is. And it'll come up and show. Oh, okay. Does it cover lawsuits? Why are liability claims so costly? Yeah, exactly. A 2% payouts is talking about here. I'm invoicing, the most common cyber insurance claim denial. Yeah, it goes on and on. There are a lot is an act of war clause could nix cyber insurance payouts. That's another big one that they've tried to use. So the cyber insurance company will say, Hey, that was China attacking you. Therefore it was an act of. And you can bet if there is a big hack, they will use that. Think of what happens with the hurricanes coming onshore. How much do they push back on payouts? Especially with the real big one, it would bankrupt them. So we gotta be very careful. There are some different types of  cyber insurance. Policies do which have different types of coverages. You've got the first party lost loss, I should say. So that's you to covering you and your loss, your first-party expenses, third party liability. Each one of those has specific parameters. So sub-limit retention and others. First-party losses are usually including the loss of revenue due to business interruption. First party expenses would include all of the services and resources that you needed to use to recover from attack like forensic or system rebuilding services. These third-party liabilities. May cover expenses and legal fees related to potential damage caused by the incident to third parties like partners, customers, or employees whose sensitive information may have been compromised. So read them carefully. Be very careful. There are next-generation, cyber insurance policies are going even further and make these types of services. Prior to any incident to reduce exposures and prevent incidents in the first place. Now we don't provide insurance. We are not an insurance company, but that's basically what we're trying to do here. Not become an insurance company, but to make sure. The businesses have the right services so that the likelihood of anything happening or is extremely low. And then following up after the fact it's different obviously than insurers in and insurance, the guardians, Jessica Crispin had a great article about a couple of weeks ago that I've been hanging on. And it's talking about this tattle where that's been incorporated into the computers we're using at home. Now we're specifically talking about employers that are putting this. The software on computers, they belong to the companies. A lot of businesses are worried. If workers are at home or where we can't see them, how do we know that they're actually working, not watching Netflix or something else on. They have, of course, come up with software that can reassure your boss. It does things like take snapshots of what you're doing. Record your keystrokes grabs photos from. Picture from your camera. There's a new program called sneak, which makes your webcam take a photo of you about once a minute and makes available to the supervisor to prove you're not away from your desk. There's no warning in advance. It just takes that photograph catches your doom. Pretty much anything can be absolutely anything. Then, it's the type of thing you'd expect the national security agency to do. So there are some good reasons for this lack of trust because sometimes employees have not been doi

The Common Man Progrum
PROGRUM PASSWORD - Pucks vs Pigskins FULL GAME

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 35:54


Kevin Falness and Kevin Gorg vs Ron Johnson and Mark Rosen in Progrum Password!

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #21184: MacVoices Live! - Repeat Password Usage and Security (1)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:47


Why are people still using the same passwords for difference services for web sites? The MacVoice Live! panel of David Ginsburg, Jeff Gamet, Warren Sklar, Andrew Orr, Kelly Guimont, and Jim Rea attempt to answer that question, examining password managers and authentication apps along the way. (Part 1) This edition of MacVoices is sponsored by Smile, the makers of TextExpander for Mac, iPad, and iPhone. Find out more at TextExpander.com/podcast. Show Notes: Guests: Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. He is also President of the Suburban Chicago Apple Users Group. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Andrew Orr is a freelance writer and amateur photographer. He loves Apple products and enjoys writing and sharing all things tech. When he's not writing about Apple, you can often find him snapping photos with his iPhone. Read what he writes at The Mac Observer, and follow him on Twitter. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Brittany Smith is a cognitive neuroscientist who provides a variety of consulting services through her business, Devise and Conquer that includes ADD/ADHD coaching, technology coaching, productivity consulting, and more. She is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”, and holds a M.S. degree in Cognitive Neuroscience. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator. Check out her latest project, a YouTube channel of tech tips. Links: 70% of People use the Same Password for Multiple Websites by Andrew Orr on The Mac Observer Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Video HD
MacVoices #21184: MacVoices Live! - Repeat Password Usage and Security (1)

MacVoices Video HD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:47


Why are people still using the same passwords for difference services for web sites? The MacVoice Live! panel of David Ginsburg, Jeff Gamet, Warren Sklar, Andrew Orr, Kelly Guimont, and Jim Rea attempt to answer that question, examining password managers and authentication apps along the way. (Part 1) This edition of MacVoices is sponsored by Smile, the makers of TextExpander for Mac, iPad, and iPhone. Find out more at TextExpander.com/podcast. Show Notes: Guests: Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. He is also President of the Suburban Chicago Apple Users Group. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Andrew Orr is a freelance writer and amateur photographer. He loves Apple products and enjoys writing and sharing all things tech. When he's not writing about Apple, you can often find him snapping photos with his iPhone. Read what he writes at The Mac Observer, and follow him on Twitter. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Brittany Smith is a cognitive neuroscientist who provides a variety of consulting services through her business, Devise and Conquer that includes ADD/ADHD coaching, technology coaching, productivity consulting, and more. She is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”, and holds a M.S. degree in Cognitive Neuroscience. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator. Check out her latest project, a YouTube channel of tech tips. Links: 70% of People use the Same Password for Multiple Websites by Andrew Orr on The Mac Observer Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
ENCORE - Elizabeth Rush Author Interview and Reading for RARI 2021

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 81:25


This encore episode features our interview with the 2020 Reading Across Rhode Island author Elizabeth Rush of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore as well as a reading of the opening chapter titled The Password. Book Recommendations from Elizabeth Rush: Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains by Kerri Arsenault Getting Involved with Climate Activism: Surging Seas mapping tools Anthropocene Alliance & Higher Ground flood survivor network Nationalize Grid Sunrise Movement This episode was originally planned as a live in-person event on March 12, 2020. It was canceled due to COVID-19. You can learn about the original partner organizations that were working with the library to bring Elizabeth Rush to Barrington. Barrington Land Conservation Trust Change for the Better Friends of Barrington Public Library Ink Fish Books Reading Across Rhode Island & Center for the Book Podcasting in Seven Easy Steps: A Video Series This podcast is a project of the Office of Library & Information Services and is made possible by a grant from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

The Mad Chatters Podcast | Walt Disney World and Around the Disney Universe

Sixteen players... Six Disney games... Immeasurable fun... Our fifth GAME NIGHT episode is here! Grab a snack, put on your thinking hat, and play along as Jeremy, Derek, and a ton of special guests compete in Disney-themed games like Password, Match Game, "Which Disney Character Said It?", Before & After, and more! Our "Game Night" episodes would not be possible without our INCREDIBLE guests. Here is where you can find each of them online. Go check out the awesome projects they are part of and let them know you enjoyed hearing them on the show! Jonathan Harvill: Twitter: @jonathanharvill | Letterboxd: @jonathanharvill David Alpert: Podcast: E-Ticket to Broadway | Twitter: @directfromdavid Courtney Guth: Podcast: Book of the Mouse Club | Twitter: @Courtney_Guth | Instagram: @greatguthsby Emily McDermott: Podcast: Book of the Mouse Club | Instagram: @emily_mickde | Twitter: @emily_mickde J.T. Landry: Podcast: The Disney Buzz | Instagram: @jtishere  Melanie McBurney: Podcast: The Disney Buzz | Instagram: @mrs.melanie23 | @disbuzz Aaron Wallace: Website: aaronwallaceonline.com | Latest Book: The Thinking Fan's Guide to Walt Disney World: Magic Kingdom 2020 | Twitter: @aaronwallace | Instagram: @aaronhwallace Reuben Gutierrez: LEGO Instagram: @wibblywobblylegowego | Amorette's Patisserie chef Blake Taylor: Disney Podcast: Park People | Disney Instagram: @parkpeoplepod | Twitter: @blake_242 Teri Deel: Twitter: @terideel Jeff DePaoli: Podcast: Dizney Coast to Coast | Online Podcasting Course: YouCanPodcastNow.net | Twitter: @JeffDePaoli (personal) @DizneyCTC (podcast) | Instagram: @disneyctc Marshal Knight: Instagram: @marshalknight | Twitter: @Marshal_Knight | Podcast/Blog: Um, Sure? Guy Selga: Book: Unofficial Guide to Disneyland | Twitter: @guyselga If you want to interact with us online, we'd love for you to connect with us on Facebook (/madchatterspodcast), Instagram (@madchatters), and Twitter (@MadChatters). Or, send your emails to comments@madchatters.net. Thanks for listening!

The Shared Security Show
No Password Microsoft Accounts, Facebook Smart Glasses, Security.txt Internet Standard

The Shared Security Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 30:47


Microsoft will now allow you to login to your accounts without a password, Facebook releases its Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses, and a conversation about the security.txt “Internet standard” and if this will help or hinder a organization's vulnerability disclosure process. ** Links mentioned on the show ** You Can Now Sign-in to Your Microsoft Accounts […] The post No Password Microsoft Accounts, Facebook Smart Glasses, Security.txt Internet Standard appeared first on The Shared Security Show.

The Common Man Progrum
Password Part 2! Common Man Progrum HOUR 3

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 46:40


Common Man Progrum HOUR 3 --Progrum Password Part 3 --Mark Rosen --Our Patrick

The Common Man Progrum
Password Part 1! Common Man Progrum HOUR 2

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 46:02


Common Man Progrum HOUR 2 --Lil' B --Progrum Password Part 1

Phone Pranks with Jubal Fresh
Jimmy Petrie stole your password in this Phone Prank!

Phone Pranks with Jubal Fresh

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:09


Jimmy Petrie aka Jubal Fresh stole your password in this Phone Prank! Let us know what you think on social!Follow us at: @thejubalshow @jubalfresh @thatdreas @evanontheradio

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Cyber Safety. Anatomy Of A Password. Scott Schober, Author & CEO, Berkeley Varitronics.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 6:03


In this episode of Cyber Safety, Scott Schober, CEO of Berkeley Varitronics, joins host Steve Morgan to share how to create a strong password, including the basic best practices, and more. To learn more about ransomware and more about cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com/

Hacking Humans
They won't ask for sensitive information over the phone.

Hacking Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 39:02


Guest Alex Hinchliffe, Threat Intelligence Analyst from Unit 42 at Palo Alto Networks joins Dave to talk about some of his team's ransomware research, Joe's story is about a new jury duty scam that is out there (hint, they will not call you on the phone), Dave's got a story about Microsoft rolling out passwordless login options, our Catch of the Day comes from a listener named Lucio who shared several social engineering ploys with us. Links to stories: Brand New Jury Duty Scam You Can Now Ditch the Password on Your Microsoft Account Have a Catch of the Day you'd like to share? Email it to us at hackinghumans@thecyberwire.com or hit us up on Twitter.

Tell Me About Your Kids
What's The Password For My Kid?

Tell Me About Your Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 42:39


Breaking the code into those hard conversations with your kids can be tricky when shut down and lock out is the norm. Kids don't want to hear what you want when it means they don't get what they want. Kim must plan carefully how she talks to her 13 yr. old son about maintaining some control over his (actually her) phone. Planning the right time, the right words and the right tone can take time but make all the difference. Bonnie Harris, MS.Ed., director of Connective Parenting, 30+ years of coaching, teaching, and writing for parents. Website: bonnieharris.com Email: bh@bonnieharris.comBooks: When Your Kids Push Your Buttons (workbook available)            Confident Parents, Remarkable Kids:             8 Principles for Raising Kids You'll Love to Live With Audio BooksThe Buttons Audio Course Counseling/CoachingAll books and audiobooks can be purchased here: https://bonnieharris.com/shop/Produced, mixed, and scored by Echo Finch www.echofinch.com

All Things Tibette
BONUS: Phone Can You Tell Me My Password | Gen Q Season 2 Episode 7 Recap

All Things Tibette

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 63:12


Welcome back to All Things Tibette Podcast This week we are reviewing The L Word Gen Q S2 E7 titled "Light" Don't forget to follow us on twitter @alltibettepod and on IG @allthingstibettepod --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/allthingstibette/support

The Common Man Progrum
Progrum Password Part 2: Common Man Progrum HOUR 3

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 43:20


Common Man Progrum HOUR 3: --Progrum Password Part 2 (Amy James/Rachel Ramsey) --Progrum Trivia --Warren, Larry Mondello Guy calls in

The Common Man Progrum
Progrum Password Part 1: Common Man Progrum HOUR 2

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 46:52


Common Man Progrum HOUR 2: --Five Questions --Progrum Password Part 1 (Amy James/Rachel Ramsey)