Podcasts about Tooley

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Best podcasts about Tooley

Latest podcast episodes about Tooley

The John Batchelor Show
1770: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 41:00


Photo:   SER-Niños Charter School, a charter school in the Gulfton area of Houston, Texas CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU LB Max Tooley, Media Availability October 5

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 8:34


BYU Linebacker Max Tooley meets with the media on Tuesday, October 5

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
Max Tooley, Linebacker - Week 6 vs. Boise State - October 5, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:11


BYU linebacker Max Tooley addressed the media Tuesday in advance of No. 10 BYU's home game against Boise State.

Locked On Cougars
BYU football personnel notes, Max Tooley 1-on-1 & Part 1 with USU voice Scott Garrard - September 30, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:25


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Thursday, September 30, 2021 Thursday's show began with the latest from host Jake Hatch on BYU football's personnel as the No. 13 Cougars make the trip north to Logan today in advance of their showdown with the Utah State Aggies tomorrow night in Maverik Stadium (7 pm on CBS Sports Network) Attention then shifted to a one-on-one conversation that Jake had with BYU linebacker Max Tooley. The two talked about his return to the lineup after a knee injury, adapting to life without Keenan Pili on the field as well as some talk about their ability to both speak Mandarin Chinese Finally, attention shifted to the opponent sidelines as Utah State football play-by-play voice Scott Garrard joined Jake to take a deep dive on the USU offense. Scotty G explained what the future of the two-quarterback system in Logan will be as well as highlighting key personnel for the Aggies in tomorrow night's matchup Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code "LOCKEDON," or at Amazon and CVS. Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1715: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 41:00


Photo: The Browning school near Dublin, Georgia. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU LB Max Tooley Media Availability

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:31


BYU linebacker Max Tooley meets with the media on Tuesday, September 21.

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
Max Tooley, Linebacker - Week 4 vs. USF - September 21, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 8:16


BYU linebacker Max Tooley addressed the media on Tuesday ahead of No. 15/16 BYU's home game against USF.

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
BYU Football - Max Tooley Postgame - September 18, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 4:55


BYU Football - Max Tooley Postgame - September 18, 2021

BYU Football
BYU Vs Arizona St: Tooley and Rex Postgame

BYU Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 7:45


BYU Vs Arizona St: Tooley and Rex Postgame

The John Batchelor Show
1632: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 41:00


Photo: View of Timbuktu, Heinrich Barth (1858).  In its Golden Age, Timbuktu's numerous Islamic scholars and extensive trading network made possible an important book trade: together with the campuses of the Sankore Madrasah, an Islamic university, this established Timbuktu as a scholarly centre in Africa. Several notable historic writers, such as Shabeni and Leo Africanus, have described Timbuktu. [In fact, for centuries TImbuktu was a world center of scholarship.  Only recently, during the Malian civil war, have the magnificent libraries been raided and partly burned by Tuareg using radical Islam as an excuse for territorial expansion. A thrilling and literate book on this is the oddly-named, The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu : And Their Race to Save the World's Most Precious Manuscripts, by Joshua Hammer. --ed.] CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1614: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 41:00


Photo:   Eagle School, Old Eagle School Road (State Route 543) (Tredyffrin Township), Strafford, Chester County, PA CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1600: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 42:31


Photo:  Group of Girls of a Music School - Mysore, India  c1890 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Hans & Scotty G.
Hans & Scotty G - August 9, 2021 - Max Tooley, BYU LB

Hans & Scotty G.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 9:28


BYU LB Max Tooley

The John Batchelor Show
1578: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 41:00


Photo:  Early illustration— AN EDUCATOR "In learning," proudly said the birch,  "I've long l=played quite a part: Whenever little boys are dull, Why, I can can make 'em smart!" *This is the birch rod, regularly used to beat wayward children. "Only if the recipient was a small child could he or she practicably be punished over the knee of the applicant. Otherwise the child would be bent over an object such as a chair. For judicial punishments the recipient could even be tied down if likely to move about too much or attempt to escape." CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.      

90DAYCEO
76: Building your empire featuring Sam Tooley and Joe Rinaldi

90DAYCEO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 45:06


If ya don't know Sam Tooley and Joe Rinaldi, get excited.Sam's story will knock your socks off. This serial entrepreneur and creator has built a community from the ground up, and he's here to share his wisdom on doing just that.Joe's story as an entrepreneur is just three weeks old and his tips from transitioning from the corporate world to entrepreneurship are spot on.You are NOT going to want to miss this.Find them on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/coach.samtooley/ (Sam) and https://www.instagram.com/joerinaldi.dpt/ (Joe).ABOUT THIS PODCASTYou're here because you know there's something bigger.You want your income to match the impact you know you can make in this world. We only know because we were you. We're Mooch & Mel, Founders, and CEOs of MOVE and 90DAYCEO.Welcome to 90DAYCEO The Podcast, a place where possibility and business building meet. We're talking about all things business, entrepreneur lifestyle, mindset, and making your vision a reality. Having built our first 6 figure business in 5 months from a teenie idea to a fully running business, we're so excited to show you how it's possible for you, too.Happy you're here, even happier you're following your dreams.CONNECT WITH MOOCH AND MELBecome a 90DAYCEOJoin the conversation on InstagramCREDITSPodcast edited and mixed by 51 features. Connect at andrew {at} 51features {dot} com.

Real Science Radio
RSR's One-Way Speed of Light Experiment Proposal

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021


* RSR's Light Speed Experiment Proposal: A 2019 article posted here at Real Science Radio (at rsr.org/stretch) proposed an experiment, Einstein, Lisle, and Hartnett notwithstanding, that just might enable the measurement of the one-way speed of light. Let's think through the following.* Billions of Frames Per Second Cameras: The field of physics almost with one voice has maintained for over a century that the one-way speed of light cannot be measured and therefore that it cannot be shown to be equal to its roundtrip speed. Do high speed cameras require a reassessment of that long-standing claim? Transmission of light filmed at CIT at 100 billion FPS.* A Fast Camera Proposal for a One-Way Measurement: RSR's asks whether 10-trillion FPS cameras (and Caltech's planned faster versions) might be used in a round-trip configuration to challenge the conventionality thesis and measure the one-way speed of light. Here's the concept for neutralizing that pesky 2-way speed of light problem... * Light Speed in a Vacuum: To state the problem more fully, it's the one-way speed of light in a vacuum that can't be measured. Scientists at Cambridge and Harvard have slowed light down to 38 mph by shooting a laser through extremely cold sodium atoms, so it's relatively easy to measure that one-way speed. But this RSR experiment, especially its second iteration, through water vapor, will measure a speed so very close to the speed through a vacuum that the difference cannot falsify the primary results, that is, that it is possible to measure light's one-way speed! After all, there is no known perfect vacuum, not at CERN and not even in space. So if anyone wants to quibble they might as well argue that physicists have never measured even the roundtrip speed of light. For interestingly, even interstellar space is estimated to contain anywhere from a million molecules per cubic centimeter down to a thousand atoms per cubic meter. If you'd like to help RSR, please consider Donating,Subscribing, or See our Research Wish List!* Vacuum Rabbit Trail: The European Organization for Nuclear Research has bragging rights for their massive super-rarified ultra high vacuum that they compare to the vacuum in space as far away from Earth as the moon. One RSR caveat on that though. It just so happens that the Earth's atmosphere extends beyond the Moon. So that environment isn't as void of particles as many may expect. And that atmospher extension is another young-earth argument because it is one of scores of transient conditions and events in the solar system that could not long persist. And while we're on this rabbit trail, the more than 100 annual meteor showers caused by Earth flying through known streams of cosmic debris is evidence, directly observed by millions of people, that Earth orbits in a dusty region of space, whereas evidence only known to those who study the solar system tells us that as the asteroid belt is approached the estimated number of micrometeroites per cubic kilometer decreases significantly. So something, recently, dirtied up Earth's environment.)* Light Speed in Milk and Stuff: RSR's proposed light speed experiment is performed first with the bottle filled with water and a splash of milk. The milk sufficiently increases the refractivity of the medium so that the laser's progress can be captured on video. The experiment is then repeated with the bottle empty except for some water vapor. The speed of light in a vacuum is: - 50% faster than in glass - 25% faster than in water, but only negligibly faster - three hundredths of 1% than in air. Of course the introduction of milk in the water, and even the water vapor alone, will reduce the speed of light through these mediums. But that reduction should be quantifiable and sufficiently minimal as to not prevent the one-way measurement of the speed of light (unless, as pointed out above, it is argued that the 2-way speed can never be measured). Grand Prize!* Photons Bouncing Off Photons: A laser pulse in a pure vacuum would only be detectable, it is believed, by a camera situated directly in the path of the beam. A camera aimed at the beam from off to its side would not detect the laser directly because there would be no matter to scatter the laser's photons such that some could be detected by that camera. If photons normally interacted with one another, a second beam of light could be emitted from a camera and bounce off the target beam to be videotaped, with the camera then recording the returning light signal. If that were possible, RSR argues that its light speed experiment configuration could still resolve the one-way speed question because the round trip of that second much shorter beam would be a negligible factor compared to the lengthier main axis of the laser beam's path. However, visible light photons rarely collide. There are known ways to cause them to collide and high energy photon-photon collisions do occur. Regardless of these particulars though, if this proposal gets to the attention of the scientists at CIT or CERN, perhaps they could arrange for this experiment to be conducted in an optimal configuration. * No Sneakin' Around: The experiment above, first proposed on Sept. 3, 2019, avoids the kind of systematic error that evolutionists make when they "sneak" intelligence into their "natural selection" computer simulations. For example, we would discredit the results if we snuck the round-trip speed of light into the synchronization of the cameras themselves and used that very synchronization in the experiment. To avoid this, the experiment design does not rely on the cameras being synchronized. (And in any configuration, other than perhaps in a photon-to-photon collision mode, the results do not depend upon roundtrip optics to and from any individual camera.) Instead, we position the three cameras close enough to the laser beam so that any roundtrip optics in any configuration is insignificant compared to the lengthier transit of the laser through the bottle. That is, evaluate the results through a range of values for the speed of light to the camera as though it were half c up to infinite. If none of those values changes the overall result of the experiment, we did not sneak in c (as Röemer reportedly did in 1676 when he first measured lightspeed). As a beam transits the bottle, it will produce photographable scatter from the refraction off of the various materials filling the bottle. If the beam's transit to the bottom of the bottle is instantaneous, and it's return trip is at half of today's assumed speed of light, then the cameras' registering of the scatter will show a different number of frames between the outgoing and returning beam as they would if the outgoing and returning beams travel at the same speed on both legs of their round trip. The differences are quantified below. However, if the beam's transit to the bottom of the bottle is not instantaneous (and of course the cameras' frame rates are fast enough to capture this), it seems that the leading edge of the beam (or pulse) would come into view of each camera from the right boundary of its field of vision and, frame-by-frame, pass to left boundary (with perhaps ten frames showing its progress across a single camera's field of view). If this happens, a single camera could accomplish the goal of the experiment, as it alone could demonstrate that the light did not travel instantaneously on its outgoing journey. In this case, we could calculate light's one-way speed based on the width of the single camera's field of vision, the cameras frame rate, and the number of frames it takes to record the beam's journey across that field. The three-camera configuration enables a different kind of measurement. The two additional cameras (above, numbered 2 and 3) along with a reflector at the bottom of the bottle might enable separate video recordings of both the outgoing and the return trips of the same beam. (If the single camera configuration provided any one-way speed measurement, this could also corroborate that result.) Regardless of whether the beam's one-way speeds are identical, camera #3 will be the first camera to record the beam's return trip. That last camera would then record fewer frames between the beam leaving its field of view and when it again reentered its field of view on its return trip. If sufficient frame rates enable this experiment to work, then the first camera, #1, will register the most frames separating it's initial recording and it's final recording of the laser's scatter. For example, consider if the camera operated at quadrillions of frames per second. Next, consider what could be learned if each camera captured on ten frames the refraction produced by the passing laser. Only to simplify this explanation of the experiment, assume that the cameras were positioned next to each other such that the beams entire journey would be captured on one or another camera. So when Camera 1 first registers the beam, we count 10 frames until the beam disappears. If the one-way speed of light is the same as its roundtrip speed, the camera will then have 40 empty frames until it begins to register the beam on it's return trip, and the data from that camera will end with its frames 51 to 60 showing the end of the laser's journey. In this circumstance, Camera #2 will not show 40 empty frames between its first and last registering of the scatter, but only 20 empty frames. Camera #3 will show no empty frames and the reflector, in this simplified explanation, would be positioned at the edge of that camera's field of view. If the one-way speed of light is not the same as its roundtrip speed, and its speed on its initial leg is instantaneous, it is presumed that all three cameras would still register the scatter produced, although they would all be registering that refraction at the same time. (This would be an indirect way to synchronize the cameras, after the fact in the analysis of the data they record. A difference this would make as compared to the above discussion is that the light scatter registered by each camera's field of view would not show it moving from right to left, but that scatter would appear instantaneously horizontally across the camera's display and disappear instantaneously, and not from right to left.) Also in this case of an instantaneous outgoing one-way trip, the number of frames results from Camera #3 will be identical to what it would be if the one-way speed of light were the same as its roundtrip speed. Camera 3 will show ten frames of the outgoing leg immediately followed by ten frames of the return leg (although, there very well may be a difference in how the instantaneous leg registers the refraction as compared to the non-instantaneous leg, as just described). So Camera #3 in this experiment would not be able to distinguish, based on numbers of frames, between varying one-way and roundtrip speeds of light. Consider though Camera #2. Camera #2 would have only ten empty frames between its registering the beam on its outgoing and return trips. That is because Camera #2 would register the laser instantaneously with Camera #1, and would only have to "wait" the equivalent of the ten frames it takes for the light reflected to cross Camera #3's field of view. So the data from Camera #2 will end with its frames 21 to 30 showing the end of the laser's journey from its perspective. Consider then Camera #1. In this circumstance, Camera 1 will show 20 empty frames between its first and last registering of the scatter. So compare the differences in the empty frames between registering the light's outgoing and return trips. If the outgoing trip is instantaneous, Camera #2 will have 10 empty frames and Camera #3 will have 20 empty frames. If the one-way speed of light is the same as its roundtrip speed, Camera #1 will have 40 empty frames and camera #2 will have 20 empty frames. The ratios in this configuration are the same. But by using differing configurations and by determing the actual number of frames it takes for the laser to traverse a single camera's field of view, the results could become definitive. While a seemingly wild idea, quantum physicists can believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast. So, many would not be shocked if light behaved in the extraordinary way that Dr. Jason Lisle and Dr. John Hartnett propose. Regardless though, RSR makes the following prediction (which is merely what most physicists would expect). If the beam leaves a record of its travels on each of the camers, then considering the time that would pass between the beam leaving and then reentering each camera's field of view. RSR predicts that we could calculate the increasing number of camera frames (time) that pass, as we move from the last, to the middle, to the first camera, between the leading edge of the beam leaving the field of the camera's view (as it heads toward the bottom of the bottle) and reappearing on its return trip. And of course, if the camera frame rates are not fast enough to distinguish between the outgoing and return trips of the beam, then just get a faster camera or a much taller bottle. Please send any comments to Bob@rsr.org. Thanks! * On the One-Way Speed of Light Claim from Einstein and Creationist PhDs Jason Lisle & John Hartnett: The world of physics insists that the speed of light is known only from round-trip measurements. The context of this observation speaks generally of light in a theoretical vacuum or in space (which is a near vacuum). Hundreds of laser beam flashes aimed at the Moon demonstrate one example of this kind of measurement. These lasers strike the Apollo 15 retro-reflector base plate and then bounce back as researchers measure the time of the round trip, about 2.51 seconds. (These experiments, by the way, indicate that the moon is recessing from the Earth at more than one inch per year.) Long before these actual experiments, in Einstein's 1905 paper on special relativity he presented a thought experiment in space. "Let a ray of light depart from A... let it be reflected at B... and reach A again..." A page earlier he had described not the measurement of light's one-way speed but about, "establishing by definition that the 'time' needed for the light to travel from A to B is equal to the 'time' it needs to travel from B to A." Establishing this by definition instead of by measurement is referred to as doing this by convention. Regarding this Einstein continued, "We assume that this definition of synchrony is free from contradiction..." And we "assume the quantity... c to be a universal constant--the velocity of light in empty space." This Einstein synchronisation is sometimes abbreviated as ESC for the Einstein Synchrony Convention. * Starlight & Time, the Conventionality Thesis, and Anisotropic Synchrony Convention: Agreeing with Einstein, the consensus view in physics is that no one has ever measured the one-way c but presents that speed as a convention, that is, an assumption, or, as Einstein wrote, even just a definition, also called the conventional unidrectional speed. By this widespread reckoning, it would not violate any actual measurement to propose that the one-way speed of light toward an observer (say, on Earth) can be infinite as long as the light reflected back travels at half c for the other leg of its roundtrip, producing an average speed of 186,000 miles per second. Creationist astrophysicist Dr. Jason Lisle, as supported by RSR friend and cosmologist Dr. John Hartnett, has used this to address the starlight and time challenge by claiming that light instantly arrives at Earth after being emitted from even the most distant galaxies. If so, of course that great distance would thereby be irrelevant to light's travel time to Earth and also to the age of the creation. Photons are both relativistic and elementary quantum particles. Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum mechanics both make so many counterintuitive observations that many who study these fields, we submit, would not be shocked if light behaved in this way. Drs. Lisle and Hartnett, with many others, argue that such anisotropy cannot be experimentally disproved, that is, that light cannot be shown to not have this different property when measured in different directions. Effectively agreeing with this, Grünbaum in his second enlarged edition of Philosophical Problems of Space and Time points out that "a choice... which renders the transit times (velocities) of light in opposite directions unequal cannot possibly conflict with... our descriptive conventions" (p. 366, emphasis in the original). With this Karlov agrees, regarding "the constancy of the speed of light... but other choices... are physically just as permissible" (Australian Journal of Physics, 1970 Vol. 23, p. 244, emphasis added). Various philosophers of physics though, and others, have proposed theoretical ways to test the one-way speed of light. Routinely then, the physics community responds by claiming these proposals include faulty assumptions that "sneak in" the roundtrip speed of light (in much the same way that computational evolution simulators "sneak" intelligence into their algorithms). For example, reasoning can be shown to be circular if an experiment assumes the constancy of the speed of light which is the very thing that it is designed to demonstrate. So this conventional unidirectional speed means that the 300,000 kilometers per second claimed universal speed limit has never actually been experimentally verified and is only an industry-wide assumption made to simplify the math (and to please our sensibilities). Some creation physicists have begun to argue therefore that, as believed by mankind's early scientists (from Aristotle to Descartes and beyond), and compatible with Einstein's theory of special relativity, and arguably, with all measurements made to date, the one-way speed of light from even the furthest galaxies to the Earth could be infinite. Light at 100 billion FPSIf so, human beings would be seeing astronomical events unfold as they happen in a "real-time" universe and Adam would have seen the light from the stars made only two days before He was created, without any other supernatural or natural explanation needed. In 2010 Dr. Lisle proposed this Anisotropic Synchrony Convention (ASC) to answer the young-earth creationist's starlight and time question. This argument includes the claim, as boldly stated by Dr. Hartnett in 2019, that "there can be no experiment that can refute the conventionality thesis", such that no one can even theoretically devise a way to demonstrate that the one-way speed of light equals the roundtrip speed. What follows are four proposed methods to demonstrate that the one-way speed of light approximately equals the roundtrip speed, the first three having already been performed, which we use to address the Einstein's Synchrony Convention. And the fourth experiment, not yet performed but here proposed, which addresses Lisle's ASC. * Did this 2019 Laboratory Video Measure the One-Way Speed of Light? Through water, light travels 25% slower than through a vacuum, at 225,000 kilometers per second rather than 300,000. At rsr.org/asc#camera (and just below) see a 2019 video made at CIT using a 100 billion frames per second (FPS) camera. At 4:33 (see the screenshots, just above) a laser beam is shot through a bottle of water with a bit of milk in it. The milk increases the amount of photon scatter produced by refraction to make the beam's progress easier to capture on video. (The milk of course would also further slow down the light.) Amazingly Caltech's two cameras, the fastest in the world, one with a maximum rate of 10 trillion frames per second, are able to capture light in progress in its one-way transit. The clip referenced was filmed using the slower of the two cameras and yet it captures the laser beam's one-way journey through the bottle! One of the philosophy of science books by award-winning physicist Max Jammer, who was personally acquainted with Einstein at Princeton, is directly on our topic, Concepts of Simultaneity: From antiquity to Einstein and beyond. Written thirteen years before the fast-camera light-in-the-bottle recording, Jammer concluded that the conventionality thesis remains an open question, and thus, whether the one-way speed of light can be measured may seem theoretically impossible, but it might just be that we haven't figured out how to do it. Chaotic CavityThus according to this Berlin-born Israeli physicist who became close to Einstein, as of 2006, no experiment had falsified a potentially infinite one-way speed of light. But Jammer, who passed away in 2010, never saw this 2019 Caltech bottle video. The astounding technical achievement of the CIT researchers has been popularized by YouTube's The Slo Mo Guys. (We've previously utilized two of their videos in our answer to creationist Michael Oard to explain why there is a linear crack, called the mid-oceanic ridge, that circles the Earth like the seam on a baseball.) The March 17, 2019 Slo Mo Guys' video is called Filming the Speed of Light at 10 Trillion FPS. The slower of CIT's two fastest cameras used to "film" the "bottle" segment of their video was operating at 100 billion FBS, that is, each frame equaled 10 picoseconds (ten trillionths of a second) and it took about 2,000 picoseconds (two billionths of a second) for the light to travel through the length of the bottle. On our Real Science Radio program my co-host Fred Williams and I briefly discussed this and argued that this video may have measured the one-way speed of light.  10 trillion FPSA second measurement appears at 5:40 into the same video. At the same 100 billion frames per second, the CIT technician recorded light bouncing around inside of a water-vapor filled mirrored device they call a chaotic cavity. (See image, left.) Light propagates in a vacuum only three hundredths of 1% faster than it travels through "air". (On average, about two percent of the molecules in Earth's atmosphere are water vapor, and "for applications with less than five digits of accuracy, the index of refraction of air is the same as that of vacuum...") So the light beam in this cavity traveling through nothing but air and water vapor must be traveling at very close to the speed of light in a vacuum. The videotaped light pulse bouncing around within this chamber demonstrates that it travels at no discernable difference in its speed in any direction, including when it bounces back and forth essentially in a "roundtrip" pattern. It certainly never appears to have moved at infinite speed by disappearing and instantly popping up across the chamber. Prof. emeritus Michael Tooley from the University of Colorado, argued in his 2000 Time, Tense, and Causation that the many attempts to measure the one-way speed of light had all failed. And of course that too was concluded before Caltech researchers made possible this 2019 Filming the Speed of Light video. (We would be remiss in not warning the public, and the professor himself regarding the horrific consequences in this life, and eternally, about his vile arguments in defense not only of killing unborn children but also in Tooley's denial even that newborn babies have a right to life.)  The third measurement appears at 10:50 into the video using Caltech's fastest camera. A researcher records at ten trillion frames per second a pulse of light traveling about ten millimeters through a milky vile. (See image, right.) See that segment of the video also at rsr.org/asc#camera (or just click play here): 

Bob Enyart Live
RSR's One-Way Speed of Light Experiment Proposal

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021


* RSR's Light Speed Experiment Proposal: A 2019 article posted here at Real Science Radio (at rsr.org/stretch) proposed an experiment, Einstein, Lisle, and Hartnett notwithstanding, that just might enable the measurement of the one-way speed of light. Let's think through the following.* Billions of Frames Per Second Cameras: The field of physics almost with one voice has maintained for over a century that the one-way speed of light cannot be measured and therefore that it cannot be shown to be equal to its roundtrip speed. Do high speed cameras require a reassessment of that long-standing claim? Transmission of light filmed at CIT at 100 billion FPS.* A Fast Camera Proposal for a One-Way Measurement: RSR's asks whether 10-trillion FPS cameras (and Caltech's planned faster versions) might be used in a round-trip configuration to challenge the conventionality thesis and measure the one-way speed of light. Here's the concept for neutralizing that pesky 2-way speed of light problem... * Light Speed in a Vacuum: To state the problem more fully, it's the one-way speed of light in a vacuum that can't be measured. Scientists at Cambridge and Harvard have slowed light down to 38 mph by shooting a laser through extremely cold sodium atoms, so it's relatively easy to measure that one-way speed. But this RSR experiment, especially its second iteration, through water vapor, will measure a speed so very close to the speed through a vacuum that the difference cannot falsify the primary results, that is, that it is possible to measure light's one-way speed! After all, there is no known perfect vacuum, not at CERN and not even in space. So if anyone wants to quibble they might as well argue that physicists have never measured even the roundtrip speed of light. For interestingly, even interstellar space is estimated to contain anywhere from a million molecules per cubic centimeter down to a thousand atoms per cubic meter. If you'd like to help RSR, please consider Donating,Subscribing, or See our Research Wish List!* Vacuum Rabbit Trail: The European Organization for Nuclear Research has bragging rights for their massive super-rarified ultra high vacuum that they compare to the vacuum in space as far away from Earth as the moon. One RSR caveat on that though. It just so happens that the Earth's atmosphere extends beyond the Moon. So that environment isn't as void of particles as many may expect. And that atmospher extension is another young-earth argument because it is one of scores of transient conditions and events in the solar system that could not long persist. And while we're on this rabbit trail, the more than 100 annual meteor showers caused by Earth flying through known streams of cosmic debris is evidence, directly observed by millions of people, that Earth orbits in a dusty region of space, whereas evidence only known to those who study the solar system tells us that as the asteroid belt is approached the estimated number of micrometeroites per cubic kilometer decreases significantly. So something, recently, dirtied up Earth's environment.)* Light Speed in Milk and Stuff: RSR's proposed light speed experiment is performed first with the bottle filled with water and a splash of milk. The milk sufficiently increases the refractivity of the medium so that the laser's progress can be captured on video. The experiment is then repeated with the bottle empty except for some water vapor. The speed of light in a vacuum is: - 50% faster than in glass - 25% faster than in water, but only negligibly faster - three hundredths of 1% than in air. Of course the introduction of milk in the water, and even the water vapor alone, will reduce the speed of light through these mediums. But that reduction should be quantifiable and sufficiently minimal as to not prevent the one-way measurement of the speed of light (unless, as pointed out above, it is argued that the 2-way speed can never be measured). Grand Prize!* Photons Bouncing Off Photons: A laser pulse in a pure vacuum would only be detectable, it is believed, by a camera situated directly in the path of the beam. A camera aimed at the beam from off to its side would not detect the laser directly because there would be no matter to scatter the laser's photons such that some could be detected by that camera. If photons normally interacted with one another, a second beam of light could be emitted from a camera and bounce off the target beam to be videotaped, with the camera then recording the returning light signal. If that were possible, RSR argues that its light speed experiment configuration could still resolve the one-way speed question because the round trip of that second much shorter beam would be a negligible factor compared to the lengthier main axis of the laser beam's path. However, visible light photons rarely collide. There are known ways to cause them to collide and high energy photon-photon collisions do occur. Regardless of these particulars though, if this proposal gets to the attention of the scientists at CIT or CERN, perhaps they could arrange for this experiment to be conducted in an optimal configuration. * No Sneakin' Around: The experiment above, first proposed on Sept. 3, 2019, avoids the kind of systematic error that evolutionists make when they "sneak" intelligence into their "natural selection" computer simulations. For example, we would discredit the results if we snuck the round-trip speed of light into the synchronization of the cameras themselves and used that very synchronization in the experiment. To avoid this, the experiment design does not rely on the cameras being synchronized. (And in any configuration, other than perhaps in a photon-to-photon collision mode, the results do not depend upon roundtrip optics to and from any individual camera.) Instead, we position the three cameras close enough to the laser beam so that any roundtrip optics in any configuration is insignificant compared to the lengthier transit of the laser through the bottle. That is, evaluate the results through a range of values for the speed of light to the camera as though it were half c up to infinite. If none of those values changes the overall result of the experiment, we did not sneak in c (as Röemer reportedly did in 1676 when he first measured lightspeed). As a beam transits the bottle, it will produce photographable scatter from the refraction off of the various materials filling the bottle. If the beam's transit to the bottom of the bottle is instantaneous, and it's return trip is at half of today's assumed speed of light, then the cameras' registering of the scatter will show a different number of frames between the outgoing and returning beam as they would if the outgoing and returning beams travel at the same speed on both legs of their round trip. The differences are quantified below. However, if the beam's transit to the bottom of the bottle is not instantaneous (and of course the cameras' frame rates are fast enough to capture this), it seems that the leading edge of the beam (or pulse) would come into view of each camera from the right boundary of its field of vision and, frame-by-frame, pass to left boundary (with perhaps ten frames showing its progress across a single camera's field of view). If this happens, a single camera could accomplish the goal of the experiment, as it alone could demonstrate that the light did not travel instantaneously on its outgoing journey. In this case, we could calculate light's one-way speed based on the width of the single camera's field of vision, the cameras frame rate, and the number of frames it takes to record the beam's journey across that field. The three-camera configuration enables a different kind of measurement. The two additional cameras (above, numbered 2 and 3) along with a reflector at the bottom of the bottle might enable separate video recordings of both the outgoing and the return trips of the same beam. (If the single camera configuration provided any one-way speed measurement, this could also corroborate that result.) Regardless of whether the beam's one-way speeds are identical, camera #3 will be the first camera to record the beam's return trip. That last camera would then record fewer frames between the beam leaving its field of view and when it again reentered its field of view on its return trip. If sufficient frame rates enable this experiment to work, then the first camera, #1, will register the most frames separating it's initial recording and it's final recording of the laser's scatter. For example, consider if the camera operated at quadrillions of frames per second. Next, consider what could be learned if each camera captured on ten frames the refraction produced by the passing laser. Only to simplify this explanation of the experiment, assume that the cameras were positioned next to each other such that the beams entire journey would be captured on one or another camera. So when Camera 1 first registers the beam, we count 10 frames until the beam disappears. If the one-way speed of light is the same as its roundtrip speed, the camera will then have 40 empty frames until it begins to register the beam on it's return trip, and the data from that camera will end with its frames 51 to 60 showing the end of the laser's journey. In this circumstance, Camera #2 will not show 40 empty frames between its first and last registering of the scatter, but only 20 empty frames. Camera #3 will show no empty frames and the reflector, in this simplified explanation, would be positioned at the edge of that camera's field of view. If the one-way speed of light is not the same as its roundtrip speed, and its speed on its initial leg is instantaneous, it is presumed that all three cameras would still register the scatter produced, although they would all be registering that refraction at the same time. (This would be an indirect way to synchronize the cameras, after the fact in the analysis of the data they record. A difference this would make as compared to the above discussion is that the light scatter registered by each camera's field of view would not show it moving from right to left, but that scatter would appear instantaneously horizontally across the camera's display and disappear instantaneously, and not from right to left.) Also in this case of an instantaneous outgoing one-way trip, the number of frames results from Camera #3 will be identical to what it would be if the one-way speed of light were the same as its roundtrip speed. Camera 3 will show ten frames of the outgoing leg immediately followed by ten frames of the return leg (although, there very well may be a difference in how the instantaneous leg registers the refraction as compared to the non-instantaneous leg, as just described). So Camera #3 in this experiment would not be able to distinguish, based on numbers of frames, between varying one-way and roundtrip speeds of light. Consider though Camera #2. Camera #2 would have only ten empty frames between its registering the beam on its outgoing and return trips. That is because Camera #2 would register the laser instantaneously with Camera #1, and would only have to "wait" the equivalent of the ten frames it takes for the light reflected to cross Camera #3's field of view. So the data from Camera #2 will end with its frames 21 to 30 showing the end of the laser's journey from its perspective. Consider then Camera #1. In this circumstance, Camera 1 will show 20 empty frames between its first and last registering of the scatter. So compare the differences in the empty frames between registering the light's outgoing and return trips. If the outgoing trip is instantaneous, Camera #2 will have 10 empty frames and Camera #3 will have 20 empty frames. If the one-way speed of light is the same as its roundtrip speed, Camera #1 will have 40 empty frames and camera #2 will have 20 empty frames. The ratios in this configuration are the same. But by using differing configurations and by determing the actual number of frames it takes for the laser to traverse a single camera's field of view, the results could become definitive. While a seemingly wild idea, quantum physicists can believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast. So, many would not be shocked if light behaved in the extraordinary way that Dr. Jason Lisle and Dr. John Hartnett propose. Regardless though, RSR makes the following prediction (which is merely what most physicists would expect). If the beam leaves a record of its travels on each of the camers, then considering the time that would pass between the beam leaving and then reentering each camera's field of view. RSR predicts that we could calculate the increasing number of camera frames (time) that pass, as we move from the last, to the middle, to the first camera, between the leading edge of the beam leaving the field of the camera's view (as it heads toward the bottom of the bottle) and reappearing on its return trip. And of course, if the camera frame rates are not fast enough to distinguish between the outgoing and return trips of the beam, then just get a faster camera or a much taller bottle. Please send any comments to Bob@rsr.org. Thanks! * On the One-Way Speed of Light Claim from Einstein and Creationist PhDs Jason Lisle & John Hartnett: The world of physics insists that the speed of light is known only from round-trip measurements. The context of this observation speaks generally of light in a theoretical vacuum or in space (which is a near vacuum). Hundreds of laser beam flashes aimed at the Moon demonstrate one example of this kind of measurement. These lasers strike the Apollo 15 retro-reflector base plate and then bounce back as researchers measure the time of the round trip, about 2.51 seconds. (These experiments, by the way, indicate that the moon is recessing from the Earth at more than one inch per year.) Long before these actual experiments, in Einstein's 1905 paper on special relativity he presented a thought experiment in space. "Let a ray of light depart from A... let it be reflected at B... and reach A again..." A page earlier he had described not the measurement of light's one-way speed but about, "establishing by definition that the 'time' needed for the light to travel from A to B is equal to the 'time' it needs to travel from B to A." Establishing this by definition instead of by measurement is referred to as doing this by convention. Regarding this Einstein continued, "We assume that this definition of synchrony is free from contradiction..." And we "assume the quantity... c to be a universal constant--the velocity of light in empty space." This Einstein synchronisation is sometimes abbreviated as ESC for the Einstein Synchrony Convention. * Starlight & Time, the Conventionality Thesis, and Anisotropic Synchrony Convention: Agreeing with Einstein, the consensus view in physics is that no one has ever measured the one-way c but presents that speed as a convention, that is, an assumption, or, as Einstein wrote, even just a definition, also called the conventional unidrectional speed. By this widespread reckoning, it would not violate any actual measurement to propose that the one-way speed of light toward an observer (say, on Earth) can be infinite as long as the light reflected back travels at half c for the other leg of its roundtrip, producing an average speed of 186,000 miles per second. Creationist astrophysicist Dr. Jason Lisle, as supported by RSR friend and cosmologist Dr. John Hartnett, has used this to address the starlight and time challenge by claiming that light instantly arrives at Earth after being emitted from even the most distant galaxies. If so, of course that great distance would thereby be irrelevant to light's travel time to Earth and also to the age of the creation. Photons are both relativistic and elementary quantum particles. Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum mechanics both make so many counterintuitive observations that many who study these fields, we submit, would not be shocked if light behaved in this way. Drs. Lisle and Hartnett, with many others, argue that such anisotropy cannot be experimentally disproved, that is, that light cannot be shown to not have this different property when measured in different directions. Effectively agreeing with this, Grünbaum in his second enlarged edition of Philosophical Problems of Space and Time points out that "a choice... which renders the transit times (velocities) of light in opposite directions unequal cannot possibly conflict with... our descriptive conventions" (p. 366, emphasis in the original). With this Karlov agrees, regarding "the constancy of the speed of light... but other choices... are physically just as permissible" (Australian Journal of Physics, 1970 Vol. 23, p. 244, emphasis added). Various philosophers of physics though, and others, have proposed theoretical ways to test the one-way speed of light. Routinely then, the physics community responds by claiming these proposals include faulty assumptions that "sneak in" the roundtrip speed of light (in much the same way that computational evolution simulators "sneak" intelligence into their algorithms). For example, reasoning can be shown to be circular if an experiment assumes the constancy of the speed of light which is the very thing that it is designed to demonstrate. So this conventional unidirectional speed means that the 300,000 kilometers per second claimed universal speed limit has never actually been experimentally verified and is only an industry-wide assumption made to simplify the math (and to please our sensibilities). Some creation physicists have begun to argue therefore that, as believed by mankind's early scientists (from Aristotle to Descartes and beyond), and compatible with Einstein's theory of special relativity, and arguably, with all measurements made to date, the one-way speed of light from even the furthest galaxies to the Earth could be infinite. Light at 100 billion FPSIf so, human beings would be seeing astronomical events unfold as they happen in a "real-time" universe and Adam would have seen the light from the stars made only two days before He was created, without any other supernatural or natural explanation needed. In 2010 Dr. Lisle proposed this Anisotropic Synchrony Convention (ASC) to answer the young-earth creationist's starlight and time question. This argument includes the claim, as boldly stated by Dr. Hartnett in 2019, that "there can be no experiment that can refute the conventionality thesis", such that no one can even theoretically devise a way to demonstrate that the one-way speed of light equals the roundtrip speed. What follows are four proposed methods to demonstrate that the one-way speed of light approximately equals the roundtrip speed, the first three having already been performed, which we use to address the Einstein's Synchrony Convention. And the fourth experiment, not yet performed but here proposed, which addresses Lisle's ASC. * Did this 2019 Laboratory Video Measure the One-Way Speed of Light? Through water, light travels 25% slower than through a vacuum, at 225,000 kilometers per second rather than 300,000. At rsr.org/asc#camera (and just below) see a 2019 video made at CIT using a 100 billion frames per second (FPS) camera. At 4:33 (see the screenshots, just above) a laser beam is shot through a bottle of water with a bit of milk in it. The milk increases the amount of photon scatter produced by refraction to make the beam's progress easier to capture on video. (The milk of course would also further slow down the light.) Amazingly Caltech's two cameras, the fastest in the world, one with a maximum rate of 10 trillion frames per second, are able to capture light in progress in its one-way transit. The clip referenced was filmed using the slower of the two cameras and yet it captures the laser beam's one-way journey through the bottle! One of the philosophy of science books by award-winning physicist Max Jammer, who was personally acquainted with Einstein at Princeton, is directly on our topic, Concepts of Simultaneity: From antiquity to Einstein and beyond. Written thirteen years before the fast-camera light-in-the-bottle recording, Jammer concluded that the conventionality thesis remains an open question, and thus, whether the one-way speed of light can be measured may seem theoretically impossible, but it might just be that we haven't figured out how to do it. Chaotic CavityThus according to this Berlin-born Israeli physicist who became close to Einstein, as of 2006, no experiment had falsified a potentially infinite one-way speed of light. But Jammer, who passed away in 2010, never saw this 2019 Caltech bottle video. The astounding technical achievement of the CIT researchers has been popularized by YouTube's The Slo Mo Guys. (We've previously utilized two of their videos in our answer to creationist Michael Oard to explain why there is a linear crack, called the mid-oceanic ridge, that circles the Earth like the seam on a baseball.) The March 17, 2019 Slo Mo Guys' video is called Filming the Speed of Light at 10 Trillion FPS. The slower of CIT's two fastest cameras used to "film" the "bottle" segment of their video was operating at 100 billion FBS, that is, each frame equaled 10 picoseconds (ten trillionths of a second) and it took about 2,000 picoseconds (two billionths of a second) for the light to travel through the length of the bottle. On our Real Science Radio program my co-host Fred Williams and I briefly discussed this and argued that this video may have measured the one-way speed of light.  10 trillion FPSA second measurement appears at 5:40 into the same video. At the same 100 billion frames per second, the CIT technician recorded light bouncing around inside of a water-vapor filled mirrored device they call a chaotic cavity. (See image, left.) Light propagates in a vacuum only three hundredths of 1% faster than it travels through "air". (On average, about two percent of the molecules in Earth's atmosphere are water vapor, and "for applications with less than five digits of accuracy, the index of refraction of air is the same as that of vacuum...") So the light beam in this cavity traveling through nothing but air and water vapor must be traveling at very close to the speed of light in a vacuum. The videotaped light pulse bouncing around within this chamber demonstrates that it travels at no discernable difference in its speed in any direction, including when it bounces back and forth essentially in a "roundtrip" pattern. It certainly never appears to have moved at infinite speed by disappearing and instantly popping up across the chamber. Prof. emeritus Michael Tooley from the University of Colorado, argued in his 2000 Time, Tense, and Causation that the many attempts to measure the one-way speed of light had all failed. And of course that too was concluded before Caltech researchers made possible this 2019 Filming the Speed of Light video. (We would be remiss in not warning the public, and the professor himself regarding the horrific consequences in this life, and eternally, about his vile arguments in defense not only of killing unborn children but also in Tooley's denial even that newborn babies have a right to life.)  The third measurement appears at 10:50 into the video using Caltech's fastest camera. A researcher records at ten trillion frames per second a pulse of light traveling about ten millimeters through a milky vile. (See image, right.) See that segment of the video also at rsr.org/asc#camera (or just click play here): 

The Practical Filmmaker
#39 Directorial Debut | Part 1 with Sydney Tooley

The Practical Filmmaker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 34:43


Sydney Tooley is making her first feature length film for Sony's Affirm Films. She is the writer and director for Sun Moon coming out in 2022, and she's currently in the middle of production. Follow her journey into how she got this film funded and the challenges she's faced along the way. In this episode, she shares how she pitched the film, assembled a crew overseas, and how she spent her budget. Listen to Sydney share her experience as a first time director. Key Points:1:00 - How her latest project started3:50 - Securing funding for project8:28 - What helped in the pitch meetings10:23 - Crew in Thailand 15:29 - Plans for festival run18:05 - Biggest budgetary items18:58 - Working with a co-writer20:47 - Spending money on the right things26:04 - Best spent money27:47 - Spending money on talent32:55 - First female director in faith based spaceLinks:Sun Moon Film Instagram Sydney Tooley Instagramhttps://www.syd2ly.comConnect with the Practical FilmmakerFollow The Practical Filmmaker on InstagramWatch more episodes on YouTubeSupport the showFind more filmmaking resources

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast
The deep history of apples

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 44:04


Gordon Tooley and his wife Margaret Yancey started Tooley's Trees in Truchas, New Mexico, in the early 1990s. They grow and sell rare and heirloom trees that are well adapted to the semi-arid climate of the region. But just as important as the business is the history of these fruit trees and the genetic preservation of varieties that have very specific characteristics and uses--and the way of life that cultivates a deep relationship with the wildlife, soil, water, and even air in their particular place. We talk about what it means to choose a slower pace of life that favors close observation and low-tech tools over instant gratification. This interview is part the Good Earth series, a project supported by the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Healthy Soils Initiative and led by photographer Esha Chiocchio. It features a set of eight videos on soil stewards in New Mexico. Please check out the short videos here.

The John Batchelor Show
1536: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast
“Dreams Come True” With Tara Tooley

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 54:27


Matt and Garrett welcome special guest, Tara Tooley, to the show today. Tara has been a Ninja in Fort Collins, Colorado, for over six years, and she has an incredible ability to take every system we work with and completely own it to create a unique and highly successful experience for her clients. She breaks down her process for Matt and Garrett step-by-step, and tells them about integrating a “Ninja Filter” in everything she does. She begins with the “Magic Wand” conversation, then begins the funnel process by opening a broad search for her clients to make sure they don't miss any important options. Tara's only motivation is to help her clients find a home and make their dreams come true. She explains that she doesn't stop until she sees the “happy dance” from her clients, and this no-pressure approach instantly builds trust and shows clients that you're on their team. Tara chats about setting clients up to be the “smartest buyer out there,” the importance of guiding them to a trusted, local lender versus impersonal online options, and how a solid pre-qualification empowers clients with the coolest idea ever - a “shopping license.” She goes into the recasting loan, a huge secret weapon, in great detail, as well as her “magic” tip to help clients recalibrate if they haven't found a house that makes them do the happy dance yet. You'll hear about Tara's approach to step back and let buyers find their own potential home, her “dance with the other broker” and building relationships before even visiting a house, using the online feedback form to give her buyers a competitive edge in the sellers' eyes, and how investing in clarity of process shortens her timeline significantly.  Tara offers these, and so many other great takeaways as we begin to take a closer look at how actual Ninjas are using the 10-Step Process and applying it in practice. We can learn so much from Tara's “Super-Size-It” attitude and proven track record, and her fascinating insights highlight the many ways you can make the Ninja process work for you in a way that feels fun and authentic, so you can help bring your clients' dreams into reality as well. Send us your request for future episodes by joining the growing Ninja Selling Podcast group on Facebook at www.facebook.com/groups/theninjasellingpodcast. There you can also ask questions, give advice, and connect with other Ninjas. If you have not been accepted to the group yet, please check your messages for a follow-up from Matt. You can also leave a voicemail with your direct feedback at 208 MY-NINJA. And visit NinjaSelling.com/events for more information about upcoming open installations.   Episode Highlights:  Tara Tooley has been a Ninja for about six years She works at the group in Fort Collins, Colorado The advice based on her marketplace can work in any area She has an incredible ability to put her own unique spin on the 10-Step Buyer Process, and has used it to create an extraordinary buyer process for her clients She puts everything she does through a “Ninja Filter” When people first reach out to her, they have already thought about this decision for a long time and they're ready to make their move She asks them a series of questions and has the “Magic Wand” conversation She begins with a very broad search so that her clients don't miss any options (one of the biggest buyer fears), then narrows the focus from there This is the funnel process She includes homes in a higher price range as many sellers begin too aggressively and may lower their prices later She sets her clients up to become “the smartest person in the market” as they watch for these prices to drop Her mindset is laser-focused on helping her clients find a house Her only goal is to help make people's dreams come true and see their “happy dance” Setting her clients up with a trusted local lender versus online lenders who typically don't care and will not go to bat for them Being pre-qualified with a solid lender empowers clients with a “shopping license” Tara is not afraid to tell people she can't move forward with them, if she feels they are not a good fit Bridge loans and recasting When clients have not yet found the home that makes them do the happy dance, she gives them an actual magical wand to help them recalibrate and shift their mindset Most of the time, her clients find the home themselves - she is there to help them get that house once they've found it Her “dance with the other broker” and creating a relationship with them before they even view the house The importance of broker-to-broker relationships The buyer who drags you around to house after house does not know what they want, but maintaining a positive relationship with them can still lead to referrals Success is taking care of the client The 10-Step Buyer Process often happens in the house There is no such thing as the perfect house - the goal is to be happy with 85% Tara is a huge believer in expert coaching and learning from the professionals She's very transparent about her process with clients Garrett's name for Tara is “Super-Size-It Tara” because she takes every idea to a new level and isn't afraid to make this business fun and authentic   Quotes: “Tara is an agent that takes every system I've ever worked with her on, and she goes, I'm going to make this mine. And she owns it.” “I consider myself a Ninja 1,000%. I put everything I do through what I call a Ninja Filter.” “We have that quick little conversation. I'm like, Well, What are you thinking? Tell me, if you wave the magic wand, what might happen? What kind of - how big of a house? Why are you moving? And I go through some of the questions. How many bedrooms? What price range are you thinking? What town are you thinking?” “I always take notes. I never talk without a pen in my hand.” “You're going to become, what I call, the smartest person in the market. You're going to watch those prices - that overpriced person come down maybe into your price range if they sit on the market, because not everything sells if it's overpriced.” “I had a buyer call me on a Friday.... She said, Well, we're going to be buying somewhere between now, three months, six months, nine months. We're not really in a hurry. And...we're under contract six days later. Their first offer.” “My mindset is - my only goal is to help these people's dreams come true. That's it. That's where it ends.” “If there's no happy dance, I'm like, Hey, I think we need to keep looking.” “When you put people into a position where they really want to buy, yes, you are a great salesperson. Because you didn't have to sell them on anything. You just put all the pieces together, and all of a sudden they're buying. As far as I'm concerned, that's about as Ninja as you can be.” “I'm like, This house, I don't see it. And then I'm like, Aren't I a great salesperson? They just laugh. And then all of a sudden, that trust level just goes out the roof, because they're like, Oh, she's on our team. She's not trying to sell us anything. She's trying to help our dreams come true.” “Your lender is going to be your most valuable player, maybe even more important sometimes than I am in this process. If we don't have a lender that can go to bat for you, literally seven days a week, that's trusted in our local market, I'm not sure I can get you a house and be competitive on your offers. Because what's been happening is these online lenders, they just don't care.” “I had a 45-minute conversation with an older guy that was qualified with his big national bank. And I'm like, Dude, I can't win a house for you in this market with that as your lender… He finally succumbed. And sure enough, three days later, we got the deal because of that lender.” “What we really need is a really good shopping license. If you don't have a good shopping license, it doesn't make a lot of sense to even go look at houses, because we don't really even know what you can buy. And so your lender will give you a pre-qualification, which I consider your shopping license.” “The shopping license is the most powerful if you don't have to sell your house before you buy.” “There's a product out there called recasting loans, a recasting product, and that's how I get most of my people from A to B without a contingent offer.” “If you talk to your lender, and they don't know what recasting is, you need to go dial the phone and find a lender that does, because that is a huge secret weapon in this market.” “I find it very interesting when you hand those magic wands out, sometimes the game completely changes, and they buy something that feels to me, as a realtor, 100% different than what they told me.” “I don't look at houses online. I don't think I've ever, maybe one or two times actually, been the one that found the house. The buyer finds the house. And they're like, Let's go look at it.” “I feel like the buyers are the smartest people in the entire market. Realtors think they're all smart and everything. It's not their money that's buying the house.” “I'm starting what I call, the dance with the other broker, because that's one of the most important dances of the whole deal in a competitive market. So I start the dance before I ever get to the house.” “That feedback was so powerful and so emotional, that literally the sellers fell in love with the hope that these buyers would buy the house.” “It's really important to me that I follow the leader of success. And Ninja is the most successful life a realtor could ever ask for, and being able to serve the world with our expertise as realtors.” “I believe wholeheartedly, if you're going to be successful at whatever you want to be successful at, you need a coach… And I tell people, Go find the very best coach you can find. And I didn't say the very best coach you can afford, I say the very best coach you can find.”   Links: www.TaraTooley.com www.TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Email us at    TSW@TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Leave a voicemail at (208) MY-NINJA   Ninja Selling www.NinjaSelling.com @ninjasellingofficial Ninja Coaching: www.NinjaCoaching.com @ninja.coaching Ninja Events www.NinjaSelling.com/Events  Garrett garrett@ninjacoaching.com @ninjaredding Matt matt@ninjacoaching.com @matthewjbonelli   The Ninja Selling Podcast Facebook Group

The John Batchelor Show
1515: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 41:00


Photo:.Burning of the 'Tin School' January 5, 1945 This photo in the Bolton Family album shows the fire on January 5th, 1945.. This school came to a sad end when it burned to the ground on Jan. 5 1945. The fire was caused by a torch used to thaw frozen water pipes. Within three days classes commenced in the community hall across the road.'. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way

The John Batchelor Show
1498: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. GXX.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 42:31


Photo: After moving to Worcester, MA, the Kelleys sent their daughters to the best private girls' schools in Worcester, where Abby proved to be a top student. No high school for girls was available in the city, so Abby attended the New England Friends Boarding School, now called the Moses Brown School, in Providence, RI. This co-educational school was the highest form of education available for middle class girls. However, classrooms and the playground were segregated by gender. While boys learned to become merchants, doctors, and professors, the girls were taught to become teachers at less prestigious schools.. CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow GX James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. GXX. Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1480: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 41:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way

Locked On Cougars
Max Tooley one-on-one & 100 Seasons of BYU Football Countdown: 1974 & the Fiesta Bowl - June 29, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 29:10


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Tuesday, June 29, 2021 The Tuesday edition of the podcast began with the 100 Seasons of BYU Football Countdown with a stroll down memory lane to look back at 1974 and the first bowl berth in program history as they played in the Fiesta Bowl after a fine run to the WAC title in LaVell Edwards' third season in charge Jake Hatch then played a one-on-one interview with BYU linebacker Max Tooley in the "B block" as they talked about what Tooley has done to refine his skills this offseason as he looks to build upon a breakout campaign in 2020 and retain his starting job at linebacker Finally, the podcast wrapped up with the other BYU news Cougar fans need to know, including good news from George Udo on his injury recovery and the latest on the BYU men's basketball program continuing to comb through the NCAA Transfer Portal to fill their final open scholarship Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1468: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 41:00


Photo: Boston Latin School. Permissions: see below CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way ..  ..  ..  Permissins: Boston Latin School - Exterior View 4, Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA. School building photographs circa 1920-1960 (Collection # 0403.002), City of Boston Archives.   25 April 2011 Source | https://www.flickr.com/photos/cityofbostonarchives/5653244453/ Author | Boston Latin School

The John Batchelor Show
1456: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 41:02


Photo: No known restrictions on publication.CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@BatchelorshowJames Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddlingwith rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way

The John Batchelor Show
1449: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education — Hardcover. April 12, 2021., by James Tooley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 41:00


Photo: Eastern High School, Washington, D.C.: Good Fellows club .CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@BatchelorshowJames Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education —  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way...

The John Batchelor Show
1439: James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 41:00


Photo: Berea College students present quilt, 6/3/26.CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@BatchelorshowJames Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021.  Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education -  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley (Author) “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

RealTuners Radio
RealTuners Radio – Episode 155 – Brian Tooley / Brian Tooley Racing

RealTuners Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 115:59


AWESOME show you've been waiting for, Brian Tooley knocks 'em out of the park for 2 straight hours!!   We can't wait to have him back.  LS and domestic v8 guys give this a listen!

Inside the Match
Tips from an Ophthalmology Associate Program Director & Program Director: Drs. Barkmeier and Tooley

Inside the Match

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 22:30


Everything you always wanted to know, but were afraid to ask about the residency application process from an Ophthalmology Program Director and Associate Program Director (Drs. Andrew Barkmeier and Andrea Tooley). Completing Residency Applications and doing interviews can be full of unexpected twists and turns. Short and helpful tips while you're taking a study break. Acid Trumpet Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

The John Batchelor Show
1413: 4/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education. Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 10:30


Photo: The teaching Confucius. Portrait by Wu Daozi, 685-758, Tang Dynasty..CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow4/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education.  Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley https://www.amazon.com/Really-Good-Schools-High-Caliber-Education/dp/1598133381/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1621647673&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Tooley&s=books&sr=1-1A distinguished scholar of education and the world’s foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world’s most impoverished communities located in some of the world’s most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1413: 3/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education. Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 13:10


Photo: Boys's school inSfax, Tunisia.CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow3/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education.  Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley https://www.amazon.com/Really-Good-Schools-High-Caliber-Education/dp/1598133381/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1621647673&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Tooley&s=books&sr=1-1A distinguished scholar of education and the world’s foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world’s most impoverished communities located in some of the world’s most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1413: 2/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education. Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 9:45


Photo: Certificate.CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow2/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education.  Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley https://www.amazon.com/Really-Good-Schools-High-Caliber-Education/dp/1598133381/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1621647673&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Tooley&s=books&sr=1-1A distinguished scholar of education and the world’s foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world’s most impoverished communities located in some of the world’s most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
1413: 1/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education. Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 12:05


Photo: Education.   Claude Gillot (French, Langres 1673–1722 Paris)CBS Eye on the World with John BatchelorCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow1/4: Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education.  Hardcover – April 12, 2021 by James Tooley   https://www.amazon.com/Really-Good-Schools-High-Caliber-Education/dp/1598133381/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1621647673&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Tooley&s=books&sr=1-1A distinguished scholar of education and the world’s foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world’s most impoverished communities located in some of the world’s most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Tungsten Originals
73: Why Not Both? w/ Production Designer Jenna Rae Tooley

Tungsten Originals

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 53:04


Production designer and painter Jenna Rae Tooley joins us to discuss how her experience as a fine artist influences her work on productions, the two feature films she’s working on as a production designer, and how she’s pursuing a career across multiple disciplines. Links below:Check out the video version on our YouTube channel!Jenna:PortfolioInstagramTungsten:PatreonYouTubeInstagramTwitterWebsiteFacebookWest:Instagram

Karis Church Sermons
The Curse Removed | Galatians 3:10:14 | 05.16.2021 | Michael Tooley

Karis Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 22:19


The Education Exchange
Ep. 186 - April 5, 2021 - Low-Cost Private Schools Serving the Global Poor

The Education Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 42:37


A professor at the University of Buckingham, James Tooley, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss Tooley's new book, Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education, and the success of some low-cost, effective private schools in the developing world. Peterson reviewed Really Good Schools for Education Next, in "To Critics of The Beautiful Tree, a Pearl of a Reply." https://www.educationnext.org/to-critics-of-the-beautiful-tree-pearl-of-reply-review-really-good-schools-tooley/ Tooley profiled low-cost private schools in the Fall 2005 issue of Education Next, in "Private Schools for the Poor." https://www.educationnext.org/privateschoolsforthepoor/

Karis Church Sermons
Celebrate the King and His Limitless Kingdom | Psalm 96 | 03.28.2021 | Michael Tooley

Karis Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 26:15


Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU LB Max Tooley post-practice interview, Mar. 26.

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 6:31


BYU LB Max Tooley post-practice interview, Mar. 26.

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
2021 Spring Ball - Max Tooley, Linebacker - March 26, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 7:08


BYU linebacker Max Tooley addressed the media Friday evening after the final spring practice for the Cougars.

That's What We Said
Episode 55 - Celebrating the Life of Michelle Tooley

That's What We Said

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2021 38:27


Continuing our series of interviews with Kentucky women, we welcome our amazing friends Grace McKenzie and Heather Dent to share their upcoming children’s book about one of our Kentucky heroes, Michelle Tooley. Michelle was a peace and social justice activist and professor here in Berea. Grace and Heather talk us through the process of bringing the book from a short presentation at a local summer camp to a hardbound story to be shared with children and adults in our community and beyond. On one of the first mornings in spring, we celebrate the life and legacy of Michelle Tooley, who brought so much bright and cleansing light to the world.  Recorded via Zoom in Berea, KY | Edited by Kelly Smith | Music composed and performed by Elly Green | Artwork by Jessica Holly

ON THE BOOKS with Lianna Rana & Rachael Lippincott
4 - ADRIENNE TOOLEY: Lady Bakers, Micro-dosing on Serotonin, & The Sapphic-Sphere

ON THE BOOKS with Lianna Rana & Rachael Lippincott

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 33:30


This week we had an absolute blast chatting with Adrienne Tooley about Pittsburgh, lady bakers, and sapphic books. We also fangirled a bit, because Adrienne is ALSO a singer/songwriter with 3 indie-folk EPs, her song "All My Demons" becoming a play-on-repeat favorite of Rachael's.Adrienne's wonderful debut novel, SWEET & BITTER MAGIC, released just yesterday. You can find her on Instagram and Twitter @adriennetooley, or at her website, adriennetooley.com.

100% BS with Bella Solanot
#19 - Drew Tooley: Clubhouse, Fake Famous & Authenticity

100% BS with Bella Solanot

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 80:44


100% BS is joined by the talented Drew Tooley -- a Filmmaker, Photographer, and YouTuber based out of Denver, CO. We dive into all sorts of goodness: the pros and cons of Clubhouse, how Clubhouse is a win for free speech, the documentary Fake Famous and what its implications are, authenticity on and off-line, why investing in yourself monetarily is important, how Drew films his work in the mountains, and the impact of lockdowns on the youth. ENJOY!!Check out Drew's website, YouTube, and Instagram.Watch this episode on YouTube.Thank you so much for tuning in! If you enjoyed the show, please consider giving it a review on Apple Podcasts and subscribing to the YouTube channel -- thank you!!Support the show (https://pod.fan/100-bs-podcast)

Coaches Council
Bonus Episode: Sam Tooley - The Power of Self Reflection and Mentorship

Coaches Council

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 37:00


In this episode, Justin and Purdeep welcome Sam Tooley the endurance and mindset coach. Through many hardships and struggles, Sam somehow figured out how to take control of his own life and build habits and beliefs that help him empower others to do the same. -------------------------------------------------------1:01 Sam Tooley’s Background9:27 Power of Mentorship13:22 Belonging and Purpose21:09 Who’s your harshest critic25:13 Habits for things that go awry30:10 Power of self Reflection and Pausing33:00 Where to find Sam Tooley--------------------------------------------------------Sam’s Information: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coach.samtooley/Podcast: Pursuit Podcast: https://thepursuitwithsamandjoe.libsyn.com/ ----------------------------------------Follow Us on Instagram!Justin @justinroeth - https://bit.ly/3hLUgqFPurdeep @purdeepsangha - https://bit.ly/2AMcTdD----------------------------------------Reach us through our website - https://coaches-council.com/And be sure to follow Coaches Council's Instagram @coaches_council - https://bit.ly/2Nh1163Podcast Produced by Perfect My PodcastLearn more about Perfect My Podcast here: www.perfectmypodcast.com

Theme Park Pulse
The (Racist) Jungle Cruise

Theme Park Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 32:38


  Parker, from Adventures With Parker finds out if he is 'the map,' and former Walt Disney World cast member Jen Diaz tells us why she thinks Jungle Cruise is racist! - To support our work, and hear Patreon exclusive series like "The Doomscroll" and "Assemble: A Marvel Podcast" - click here. - AUTO TRANSCRIPTION (contains errors) Kory: [00:00:00] Four years ago on February 25th, 2017, my friends and I launched the no midnight podcast that would become no midnight media, a production company, producing theme park pulse, the game Adam's theme park time, machine unpacked, assemble the doom scroll and more over the last four years we've grown and you've grown with us. We owe our growth to you. Thank you very much for telling your friends how much you love the show and for your iTunes reviews and your emails and your tweets. Most importantly, just thanks for listening. I'm Christopher Biel. You might know me as Corey, the host and producer of theme park, post the game. And I just want to say thank you.  Kory: [00:00:52] We're presenting this week's Theme Park Pulse: The Game. Ad-free welcome to theme park pulse, the game, the game show for theme park fans. I'm your host Corey in San Francisco, and I'll introduce you to the rest of the panel and just a second. Theme park, post the game as a completely fan supported podcast. And if you would consider supporting our work for as little as a dollar a month, you'll get cool series like the doom scroll every Thursday morning. It's a Patrion exclusive more info at the link in the show notes. Thanks in advance this week. Parker from adventures by Parker on YouTube finds out if he is in fact, the map and former Walt Disney world cast member gin Diaz. Tells us why she thinks the jungle cruise is racist. That's all in the next half hour on theme park pulse, the game up first, it's the Park's pop culture pop quiz. If you'd like to play theme park, post the game, call (213) 935-0513 and leave a message. Let's welcome. Our first contestant on theme park, post the game this week from Orlando, Florida. It's Jen Diaz. Hey Corey. I'm so excited to be here. Thanks for joining us this week 10 in just a minute, I'm going to test your parks knowledge with the Park's pop culture pop quiz. But first I want to introduce you to are mentally and physically scattered. Panel. You'll see what I mean in a minute, first in Sacramento, California, he is the co-host of assemble a Marvel podcast on our Patrion. He is a one-time so far Mandalorian cast member, Tik TOK Liberty, and the person on this cast most victimized by Mercury's current road trip through retrograde. It's our scorekeeper Alby.  Sean: [00:02:48] Oh, I  Josh: [00:02:48] just can't  with her. Can I just pull a Mariah? I don't know  Josh: [00:02:51] her.  Kory: [00:02:51] Sure. Cool. Also in Sacramento, practically, within shouting distance of Alby. Which is in fact why we had to separate them in the first place. It's our pal, Adam.  Adam: [00:03:02] Come over and pick up that thing you left, or  Josh: [00:03:05] you can keep it. I don't want it. How  Adam: [00:03:08] come Alby gets all these accomplishments and I'm just the guy who lives close to Alby  Josh: [00:03:14] as I'm the  Kory: [00:03:15] famous one. Sorry. There's only room for Al B's eco on this show. Adam, fresh off of his family's fourth mandatory vacation this quarter so far. Somewhere in some place. Maybe it's Jack. Hey Jack. Hey, mom runs a  tight ship and just be happy. I'm here to mess everything up cause I don't have a segment. So that's what I'm here to do. Hello?  Kory: [00:03:37] How accurate that is on our flight East. Now we'll have an inexplicable three hour layover in Denver where we can visit the host of the modern mouse and assemble podcasts at some local coffee shop, giving the people in line at the Starbucks across the street. The stinkiest of looks it's Josh Taylor. I only  Josh: [00:03:55] give stanky, looks to hosts there on this podcast that refuse to give up their Starbucks. Even though they have horrible experiences at them on a consistent basis. When I've told them almost weekly, they should go somewhere else.  Adam: [00:04:13] But you're not going to name names or anything. I mean,  Josh: [00:04:16] No, I would never say Corey's name out  Kory: [00:04:18] loud. He hasn't had a conversation with anyone, but his wife off of zoom. And about two years, one was the pandemic. The rest is just a general dislike of the human race. Of course, via zoom in Greenville, South Carolina. It's Sean. Hey Sean.  Sean: [00:04:32] I feel like I legally have to point out that I am not just mentally scattered, but I'm scattered smothered covered and chunked. Yes. As is the waffle  Kory: [00:04:40] house way. Hungry now spoken  Adam: [00:04:42] like a true southerner.  Kory: [00:04:43] And finally she co-hosts mornings on WVA Q in Morgantown, West Virginia, which means that if you can't hear her, it's not the microphone. It's not your headphones. It's regional blackouts. It's Nicki Drake. Hi, Nikki. Hi, I'm  Jen: [00:04:57] here today. I'm glad to be here. Welcome  Kory: [00:04:59] Corey. I hope we get a poem out of you at some point during the show. No pressure. I  can, I can get some  Jen: [00:05:05] haiku's written while  Kory: [00:05:06] we sit here. Jack's family's yacht. It  Nikki: [00:05:10] can be  Jen: [00:05:11] about Jack. It can be about Al B's, ego it's whatever.  Kory: [00:05:15] Just let the muse. Speak, Jen. Thanks again for joining us on theme park, post the game. You're a former Walt Disney world cast member at what roles do  Jen: [00:05:22] I was attractions in the star Wars launch Bay and a character attendant or a blueberry. And that was at any park on any  Kory: [00:05:30] given day from Walt Disney world in 2020 during the pandemic. It's important to us at the Merkel's the game to talk to the actual cast members. What have these layoffs and losing your dream job, how has that affected your life in the time center? I  Jen: [00:05:44] think, at least for me, it was something that was on the horizon. It was something that you saw the boat getting bigger and bigger. So I'm glad that Disney kept us on for as long as they could and took care of us for as long as they could. Before these layoffs inevitably came, I survived most of 2020 with Disney helping me out. I've wanted to work at Disney world since I. Could remember, and I had two really great years with them and the story's not over yet. So I don't know if I could come back in some other role in some other capacity. It was just bittersweet, but I was glad that, like I had that chapter of my story. Do you  Kory: [00:06:22] have a favorite memory from your time as a cast member, Jesse?  Jen: [00:06:25] People's faces light up, seeing these characters in real life and holding a lightsaber and like using the forest, it was just like, I've seen people cry, any range of emotions. Like I've experienced them at  Nikki: [00:06:37] Disney world. I'm crying right now. Kory: [00:06:43] emails with you. You revealed to us a couple of hot takes that I wanted to go through one that the jungle cruise is racist and too. But the trace Caballeros ride is cringy. Yeah. Has that opinion changed now that it also has no animatronics?  Nikki: [00:07:03] It's just  Jen: [00:07:03] outdated. We feel your sister, like, you know, a theme park isn't supposed to be a, a time capsule. Walt really intended it to keep changing, to keep growing. First couple of times I wrote jungle cruise. I was just like, Oh, that, you know the jokes they're, they're cool. And. And everything and they're cheesy and like, yeah, I get it. But it just felt very like through the lens of like colonization and you know, it just, it just felt weird and icky to me, especially like, I dunno, the shrunken head jokes, the getting back to civilization jokes is like, Oh, well the natives ooga booga it just felt very like, Uh, like this, but I get it. People love the jingle cruise. So  Kory: [00:07:47] it's what happens when you wrap some tensile around right. Brian, Jen, we're going to play the parks, pop culture, pop quiz. I'm going to ask you three questions about some recent news and parks, pop culture. If you get too correct, you're going to win a glow in the dark theme park pulse wristband. Are you ready to play? Okay, I'm ready. You sound nervous. That's her secret? The orange County register reports that a new bill proposed by California state assembly members would speed the reopening of Disneyland and universal studios, Hollywood and override the governor's guidelines that have left the state's theme, parks and amusement parks closed for more than 10 months. Who is the governor of California?  Nikki: [00:08:29] She lives in Florida. What are you doing to  Jen: [00:08:32] her?  Kory: [00:08:35] Yeah, that's right. Depending on the day of the pandemic, you're in, he's either the next president. Or is going to be immediately recalled an exile to the fair lawns by raft. But these businesses that run the parks and the assembly members that represent them, say it's time for a framework for reopening safely reached for a comment. A Disney rep says, quote, M I C K E Y, where a freaking mess. He did not in fact say that they should have though. Question to Disney on ice is for many of us, a little glimpse of Disney. When you can't get to the parks, it rolls through town. And once you get over being the only inebriated solo adult in the arena, your blurred vision from the booze or your age makes it almost sort of feel like you're at Disney. You know, well, Disney on ice was in Kansas city. Recently when the health department shut down their production of dream, big due to repeated violations of what.  Nikki: [00:09:32] Not  Jen: [00:09:32] wearing their masks.  Kory: [00:09:35] We're going to take it. It's more severe though. It's repeated violations of COVID-19 restrictions, including. A COVID-19 outbreak among the staff that Disney on ice is parent company Feld entertainment failed to report. This is why we can't have semi nice, almost passable, magical wish thing. That's generous as a big, all right. Theme park fans across the internet are expressing disappointment that the new ride dedicated to Mario kart is not what.  Nikki: [00:10:10] Fast, Kory: [00:10:14] Mario kart. You would think it's a no brainer, but the attraction is actually a slow moving dark ride. Here we go with an AR headset that gives you all of, kind of like the magic, but the reality is Roger rabbit's cartoon. Spin is faster than this X Sox personally. I think it looks cooler without the glasses and banana peels myself. That's just just 50 CC. I'll be how to Jen do on the Park's top culture pop quiz. It's like she  Josh: [00:10:39] read our minds. She got them. All right. Kory: [00:10:46] You can catch Jen at Jen performs on Instagram. Wanted to make sure I plugged that. Jen, will you stick around and play some more games later in the show?  Nikki: [00:10:53] I sure will. Kory: [00:11:06] come back to theme park pulse, the game. Let's welcome. Our next contestant. He is the host of adventures with Parker on YouTube and Ontario, Canada. It's Parker, van Bellingham. Welcome to the show.  Josh: [00:11:16] Hello,  Parker: [00:11:16] or as we say in Canada,  Josh: [00:11:18] sometimes buzzword,  Kory: [00:11:21] well done. We're  Adam: [00:11:22] international  Kory: [00:11:23] now Parker, first question. What happens if we subscribe to adventures by Parker on YouTube? Well,  Parker: [00:11:29] um, a lot of good things. I do a lot of videos about theme parks, but also the outdoors travel local places around my city and just whatever other Synetic against, I happened to  Kory: [00:11:42] get up to. Well, and speaking of your city, you live in Ontario, Canada. How is the whole pandemic thing going there? Are you guys all still masked up and hiding there? Look, we are here. Oh yeah. Like  Parker: [00:11:51] I'm still in lockdown right now. I haven't been outside in a long time, but then again, even if it wasn't a pandemic, would I really go  Sean: [00:11:58] outside  Kory: [00:11:58] all that much? Is it cold  Parker: [00:12:01] right now? Yes. Oh my goodness. It is negative 13 today with Fahrenheit. I believe translates to around 10 it's in the five to 10 range. That  Kory: [00:12:12] is completely  Sean: [00:12:12] unpleasant. It just sounds like you could walk around with a test tube of the Pfizer vaccine. It'd be perfectly fine because it's just so far.  Kory: [00:12:20] Yeah. They probably don't have the problem of expiring vaccines in that climate. It just seems to leave them in the street. I'm on the doorstep. Find  Jen: [00:12:26] the same Bernard, throw them in a barrel around the neck and go door to door with the vaccine.  Kory: [00:12:31] You grew up going to a park called Canada's Wonderland. Can you describe that for the non Canadians and our audience? Because I am visualizing snow and mooses,  Parker: [00:12:41] I mean, it's not too far off. So the park, instead of a castle in its center has a giant mountain called wonder mountain. And it has a few different themed lands. One of which is of course, frontier Canada, which is all about like lumberjacks and Yukon and all that great Canadian stuff. But there's also a little area called medieval fair. There's an area called action zone. It's owned by the same company that owns Cedar point. So it's a, it's a pretty big park actually.  Sean: [00:13:11] I feel like my beard would make me a deity there  Josh: [00:13:17] kinda does that.  Parker: [00:13:18] Definitely the lumberjack  Sean: [00:13:19] aesthetic  Kory: [00:13:21] get a flannel shirt. In addition to your YouTube channel, you're a college student at Western university. What are you studying? I  Parker: [00:13:28] am studying integrated science with environmental  Kory: [00:13:31] science. And what drew  Parker: [00:13:32] you to that? I don't know. I mean, originally my plan was to go through, to be a doctor, but then about halfway through my degree, I decided I really liked the, um, environmental stuff and I liked. You know that whole end of biology, as well as the social sciences and my program kind of offers a bit of everything. So yeah, I decided to jump ships and I'm on a completely different career trajectory, but I'm loving it.  Kory: [00:13:56] Well, good luck with your studies and your YouTube channel. And thank you for joining us this week. We've invited you here to play a game that Adam invented a game in which you must tell truth from fiction. It's called. Show me the lot, Adam,  Adam: [00:14:10] the game where the cast always tells me what a good liar I am. And I don't know how to that's true. When a company is as successful as Disney, it's bound to have its fair share of imitators and knockoffs. Everything from Marty moose at Wally world and national Lampoon's vacation to Sherry bobbins on the Simpsons. Everyone wants to get a slice of Walt's product while staying just. It's different enough to ensure that uncle Bob doesn't take you to court. Sometimes though, these Disney knockoffs are just plain bad, so bad. In fact, they've spawned a whole new genre of movie, the mock Buster. I never even knew that term existed until this week. And I plan it to work it into regular conversation from here on, out for this game, I'm going to read off plot summaries for three movies. Two of them are real mock busters. One of them I completely made up. Listen to these three Synopsys. And tell me if you can show me the light you're ready.  Josh: [00:15:11] I guess I'm going to have to be,  Adam: [00:15:13] that's usually the reaction I get for this game  Kory: [00:15:15] that you are not running. All  Adam: [00:15:18] right. Moving number one, prepare to be transported to the dark bleak, depressing wasteland of new iron city. The city was deserted hundreds of years ago when a corporation run by a greedy evil robot led earth to the brink of annihilation. The world is hopeless, but all is not lost. Meet our cute scrappy robot hero tranq who has been working for generations to clean up the city. It's a boring monotonous life, but the only one he's ever known tranq is about to go on a voyage of discovery. And self-awareness, he is about to learn that he is a very special robot, possibly the only robot in the universe who's got what it takes to save civilization. Don't miss the feel-good smash, hit tiny robots. Kory: [00:16:09] I would see this.  You've already seen it. It's called. Wall-E  Josh: [00:16:15] talking about.  Adam: [00:16:17] I can neither confirm nor deny a moving number two, welcome come to a world where animals live in harmony and work together for a functioning society. For as long as she can remember. Trudy, the ferret has had only one dream to be a firefighter. She graduated from fire Academy with top ranks in her class, but because we all know ferrets can't do anything she's assigned to handicap. Fractions to kids who were playing with firecrackers. All that's about to change though, because Trudy has got the assignment of a lifetime with the help of a con artist Wiley coyote, whose name is definitely not wildly coyote because that's another legal, gray area she's out to prove that ferrets can change the world just as well as any bear bull or horse, you could hope to meet fun for the whole family and a great lesson to boot. Don't miss. Jungle Opolis  Nikki: [00:17:10] Oh my God. I want to be Trudy's best  friend.  Nikki: [00:17:13] She  Josh: [00:17:13] sounds fun.  Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh. Oh. Do some thing, right?  Nikki: [00:17:21] It was horrible.  Kory: [00:17:22] Settle down, Shakira. All right.  Adam: [00:17:24] Third. Final blockbuster. Join Dr. Crumb and Dr. Zoucks and that magical fantastical adventure across many worlds, urban and rural to AME and wild. The doctors have discovered a magical rock that can hypnotize humans. And installed thousands of balloons that will transport a house across land and seed doctors. Crummins Zoucks soon encounter an Intrepid French Explorer named John Pierre, who claims to have discovered a host of wild and exotic animals in the rainforest. So they get in the flying house. Set sail for the Amazon. Soon, it becomes clear that John Pierre doesn't have the best of intentions and the dastardly Frenchman lures the doctor into a cave in order to steal their magic rock in the struggle for the magic rock. The trio accidentally opens a portal into which three beasts escape and are transported to Paris. For some reason, for good measure, there are some kids thrown into the mix. So that the creators of this mock Buster can call it a children's movie with some justification. They don't seem to serve any purpose to the overall narrative, but regardless, anyone who hopes to join the adventures club absolutely must see what's up balloon to the rescue  Kory: [00:18:34] Parker. Two of those are real movies. One of those is a total fabrication made up by Adam. Can you show me the lie?  Josh: [00:18:43] Well, I mean,  Parker: [00:18:44] they all sound great. I'd love to see any of those movies, but I'm going to have to say that the light is the second one. Adam: [00:18:57] little too on the notes. I think, I  Josh: [00:19:00] think that was the one.  Parker: [00:19:01] I want it to be real the most. So,  Nikki: [00:19:04] so of course it has to be fake.  Kory: [00:19:05] Yeah. Maybe  Adam: [00:19:06] I'm losing my edge or maybe Parker's just good at spotting liars, quick note, Wally world and Marty news feature in the most recent episode of the part-time machine, which is in your feed right now. Nice plug Adam. I'm so  Kory: [00:19:19] proud of you. Very nice. Congratulations Parker. Will you hang out and play some more games later in the show? I would love to. back to theme park, post the game. If you'd like to be a contestant call (213) 935-0513 and leave a message. Let's welcome back to the show. Our contestants, Jen and Parker. Welcome back. Good to still be here. Well, we'll see how you feel at the end of the game, because you're here to play with Josh Taylor, Josh, what is it? Find out you are the worst, just  Adam: [00:20:00] like that.  Josh: [00:20:01] I am the worst. Uh, this game is called. I am the map. Typically you would walk into anything park, grab a paper map. And it would guide you to attractions, shops, restaurants, character locations, et cetera. However, a select few of us have all been on a trip with a passholder or a cast member of the Lake who refused to let us grab a map because in their mind, They are the map. So I'm going to give you an increasingly difficult task of deciphering my instructions. And you have to tell me the place in which you should hopefully end up since I have both of you, Jen and Parker, I'm going to give you each three different locations. The person that has the most guest is at the end wins. Hopefully you're both ready. Yeah, I am. The map will Parker. You are a first.  Nikki: [00:20:58] Oh, okay.  Jeez,  Josh: [00:21:01] I'm just  Kory: [00:21:01] scared. Now,  Josh: [00:21:03] Parker, if you're heading down main street USA, you'd take a right turn under the tomorrow land sign, follow the path all the way straight back. Don't take the walkway up to the people mover, but instead, slightly turned to your right and walk toward what round building. Carousel  Parker: [00:21:22] of  Josh: [00:21:22] progress. It is correct, Jen. Yes. John veer to your right. Take the walkway past Canada. Cross the bridge over the waterway and past France. It's actually the next country beyond France. Go in there. You should be able to meet characters from what nineties Disney movie  Nikki: [00:21:47] you said beyond  Josh: [00:21:47] France. Beyond  Kory: [00:21:49] France. Would you like a hint of the government of this country? No longer runs its pavilion Disney does. Is it Morocco?  Jen: [00:21:57] Uh, Jasmine,  Josh: [00:21:59] you can meet Jasmine or Aladdin or genie in Morocco. That is correct Parker. Once you've gone to discovery Island, you'll make a left turn, take the first left pass that travel that path into the land. You'll see some amazing rock formations turn right and walk to the open air building that looks like an old hangar with that roofing, then grab a seat and enjoy what restaurant Tooley canteen correct Nikki: [00:22:36] is the map. Wow. It's the  Parker: [00:22:41] Canadian superpowers,  Josh: [00:22:43] Jen. Once you've gotten to discovery Island veer, right? Take that path to its very end. You'll cross a bridge over the river from there. You'll have to choose to go right or left turn. Right. And then head into the back of the land. That's immediately there on your left. There will be a ride, but don't get on it. Just keep walking straight back. That's where your journey will begin for. What.  Nikki: [00:23:13] Expedition  Josh: [00:23:13] Everest. You, you would be incorrect.  Nikki: [00:23:16] Yeah, I figured close  Josh: [00:23:18] though. It is the Maharajah jungle Trek Parker headed down Hollywood Boulevard. Do not turn onto sunset. Keep going before you get to the Chinese theater. It's on your right-hand side, just behind a little guard. It's a nice little pricey restaurant called what?  Nikki: [00:23:37] This is so unfair.  Parker: [00:23:39] Hollywood and vine.  Josh: [00:23:42] It is not. Oh, it is the Brown Derby. Jen's looking for revenge.  Nikki: [00:23:54] Dare Josh. Give me Adam.  Josh: [00:23:58] Sorry, Jen. I know it's weird, but you cannot actually walk through the castle. But if you veer into Liberty square, there's a little path on your right-hand side. That'll take you back behind the castle when you're on that path. It's the first shop immediately on your right. What shop is that?  Nikki: [00:24:20] Is it the Phil horror  Josh: [00:24:23] magic shop? It is not Kory: [00:24:32] who won this version of IMT. Apparently  Josh: [00:24:36] Parker  Sean: [00:24:36] is the map  Josh: [00:24:38] he got to.  Kory: [00:24:41] Thank you. Yeah, it's okay, Jen, you're going to have a chance to get you revenge. We're playing the eighth dwarf next on theme park pulse, the game. wrap up the show this week, we're going to play another round of the eighth dwarf, which you can play on social media. Using the hashtag eighth dwarf. The whole panel is going to play. Gin is here. Parker is here and Sean who is wearing his, I am the eighth dwarf. T-shirt take it away.  Sean: [00:25:15] All right. Today, I'd like to turn our attention to the online. Disney  Josh: [00:25:20] fandom. No,  Kory: [00:25:23] same, same.  Sean: [00:25:24] Now, as we all know, the seven dwarfs they're designed to represent specific behaviors or personality traits. And at some point, any of us are likely to read or write tweets that are happy dopey, or maybe even a little grumpy, but every now and then there are those people that we just can't categorize as one of the seven doors in their behavior, or in this case, tweets are so outrageous that we fit them into their own category. Called the eighth dwarf. Now I want to begin with a disclaimer. Twitter is awful. And if Twitter is hell, then fittingly does Twitter is the eighth layer of hell. Look it up. I'm not wrong. The dwarves, there are just the worst note that I have changed. The Twitter handles to protect all of you from doom scrolling. These twits. You're welcome. Going in order of amusing to atrocious, let's start with does glow up 2010. This account was so bizarre. I honestly wasn't sure whether they were legit or satire and mixed in with selfies of herself and her girls spelled G U R L Z, because I don't know why. These are kind of cuckoo posts. For example, I have a cousin who works for the government and they told me that Disneyland is opening on February 30th. Hashtag can't wait. I don't think that they have a calendar and then there's this one. I talked to a cast member who told me that Disney is working on rolling tube tunnels for all future parades to enforce appropriate social distancing, hashtag fat. Like I said, I honestly can't tell if what I'm reading is serious parody or just a bot run a muck. Corey, what is your name for does glow up  Kory: [00:27:17] 2010  Adam: [00:27:20] Georgia representative Marjorie Taylor green. Nikki: [00:27:26] perfect. I don't mean  to reduce it. We're using recycled, but I feel like this is definitely Tom coreless his Twitter. I was going to say  Nikki: [00:27:33] thirsty for some  Josh: [00:27:35] attention. Q1 on E. Oh, that's a good one. Horn to Viking. Insurrectionist Jacob chancellor needs  Nikki: [00:27:51] to  Parker: [00:27:52] check their sources, ear. Kory: [00:27:57] I  Adam: [00:27:57] E the entire internet. Yeah.  Jen: [00:28:01] Q  Nikki: [00:28:01] conspiracy Z.  Sean: [00:28:05] It's got good ring to it. Yeah, it does. It does. I think for that one, we're going to go with Jed with cute.  Josh: [00:28:12] All  Sean: [00:28:12] right. So if you haven't looked yet, the eighth layer of hell is actually known to be the home of liars flatterers and false prophets. It is fan went 80, seems to have read that description from Dante and just replied with, hold my beer to wit. In 2019, the country bear Jabber Rebo would be replaced with Bob Hagar's children doing an eight hour remixed version of Oklahoma called OCA hump guns. I'll eat my shoe if I'm wrong in case you're curious. Cut. Your bears is still there. The show hasn't been changed, although I could probably use a touch up here and there. When asked about this fact, his fan went 80 quickly. Yelled squirrel attempted to distract from their myriad mistakes. See the trick with does Twitter. You're never wrong. If you only count the hits and ignore all the misses. But as we say down here in the South, even a stop clock is right. Twice a day is fan one 80. How would you like your shoe cooked also? Do you prefer ketchup or mayonnaise? Corey, what do we call it? Does fan  Kory: [00:29:20] one 80. Rongey right.  Adam: [00:29:25] Deflecting.  Josh: [00:29:26] Ooh.  I like the idea of him just being squirrel. Like he just said his name when he was trying to distract  Josh: [00:29:34] people. So  Nikki: [00:29:35] scrolling,  Jen: [00:29:36] no friends and very bored. He.  Josh: [00:29:39] Oh, must run out of a lot of shoes. He, uh, this is clearly a Texas Senator, Ted Cruz.  Parker: [00:29:50] Gosh. Kids don't do drugs. Nikki: [00:29:57] Good old boy. Sean: [00:30:02] Oh, I think we have to stick with the advice. Kids don't do drugs. They can partner. That's our winner. Thank you, bud.  Kory: [00:30:09] Parker. And Jen, thank you so much for joining us something park. Thanks for having us post the game created, written and produced by me and the panelists you heard on the show today. I'm talking about Shawn Reed, Adam bargain, Jack Milliken, Nicki Drake, Alby magical. And Josh Taylor. I'd like to thank again, our amazing contestants, Jen and Parker. If you'd like to be a guest on the show yourself, call (213) 935-0513 and leave a message or email Nikki. And I K K i@nomidnightmedia.com an all new episode of the doom. Scroll drops tomorrow on our Patrion. That show is weekly and it all tiers check out the link in the description and support our work for as little as a dollar or a month. And you'll get that in other cool bonuses. There is a link in the show notes. You enjoyed this episode of theme park, post the game, the best way to help us. Share it with a friend. All right. Panel. If you're in a relationship, you might have like a celebrity hall pass. Let's get weird for a second because your Disney feature animation call Pat. Sean.  Sean: [00:31:12] Wait, does that count Pixar? Because it would definitely be missing credible.  Nikki: [00:31:15] Oh,  Adam: [00:31:17] Sean, 100% stole mine. You bastard Josh: [00:31:24] Jack.  Well, I think my 12 year old self needs to go with Roxanne from a  Josh: [00:31:29] goofy movie,  Kory: [00:31:30] Nicki  Jen: [00:31:31] personally, I was going to say Aladdin, but then I started thinking about it and Jeannie can turn into whoever you want.  Nikki: [00:31:38] Right.  Kory: [00:31:40] Spicy Alby. Oh Jesus.  Josh: [00:31:44] Um,  Sean: [00:31:45] he wasn't in a Disney movie,  Josh: [00:31:48] the Eldorado buddy, uh, Flynn. Oh, Lynn Reiner. It's a smolder. Josh Taylor. You could really go with Baymax and he would take care of you after  Kory: [00:32:05] great cuddler.  Josh: [00:32:07] Good hugs. That's gross.  Kory: [00:32:09] No one that knows me is going to be surprised by my answer. I'm going with a Latin, but like vest already half undressed, a Latin from our family to yours. Please be safe. Wear a mask, get a vaccine if you're eligible and join us next time for another all new theme park.  Josh: [00:32:27] Sure. It was Nikki: [00:32:32] a good one too.  Kory: [00:32:34] Oh yeah, that would have been great.

The Art of Bombing
Episode 183: Dennis "Pops" Tooley (Gutty's Comedy Club)

The Art of Bombing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 62:18


Episode 183: Clean comedy! In the last episode 2020, I'm joined by comedian & comedy club owner, Dennis "Pops" Tooley (Gutty's Comedy Club). Dennis shares a story about bombing for the troops and what happens when you make the mistake of giving up the mic to an audience member. We talked about the World Series of Comedy, being clean, running a comedy club during the pandemic, and corporate comedy. Plus more! Please rate, review, and subscribe! 

Ever Forward Radio
EFR 409: How to Channel Bad Experiences, Gain Perspective, and Never Stop the Pursuit of a Meaningful Life with Sam Tooley

Ever Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2020 78:17


Facing problems in life is part of being a human. Finding purpose out of these problems requires much more perspective and attitude. Overcoming obstacles is not always easy but is doable, but what could we possibly think when these obstacles never seem to be over? In this episode, Sam Tooley shares some special and honest stories of his past and how he was able to channel bad experiences into action and transformation. Losing someone we love, dealing with depression or anxiety, not knowing what path to follow… These are all barriers that life throws at us. When something similar happens, we have a choice: we could give up, surrender, and go down the rabbit hole. Or we could accept it, believe that this event happened for a reason, and in the end, rise stronger and more resilient.    Follow Sam @coach.samtooley Follow Chase @chase_chewning   Episode Resources Free shipping on LMNT products! The Pursuit Podcast on Spotify The Pursuit Podcast on Apple Podcasts   Key Timestamps [6:15] – What Sam does to recharge and reconnect with himself. [8:52] – Sam’s background and origins. [21:57] – Gaining perspective with problems. [24:38] – Too much freedom can be an issue sometimes. [35:55] – Helping others is helping yourself. [45:15] – Having support and taking the right step. [52:31] – How Sam became a Mindset and Endurance Coach. [59:08] – Dealing with losses and grief. [01:10:24] – Responsibility in life. [01:13:46] – Sam also lives a life Ever Forward. [01:16:12] – Connect with Sam!