Podcasts about sit down

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Best podcasts about sit down

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Latest podcast episodes about sit down

Cool Dad's Basement
Sit Down Comedy

Cool Dad's Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 15:43


Today was supposed to be a Rushmore, but I don't feel good. So here's me reading some standup material that I will never, ever perform in front of a live audience. 

Stage Door, a theatre podcast hosted by two average guys
Starring Role: Ohio Northern University grads. Tyler and Maddeline Matanick sit down with Stage Door and tell us about their journey from first year theatre majors, working as theatre professionals, a

Stage Door, a theatre podcast hosted by two average guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 40:29


Starring Role: Ohio Northern University grads. Tyler and Maddeline Matanick sit down with Stage Door and tell us about their journey from first year theatre majors, working as theatre professionals, and having a career in something you love

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James
Lewis Capaldi - Sit Down Stand Up - In Full!

Radio 1 Breakfast Best Bits with Greg James

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 23:30


Lewis is back with new music and coming back to the Live Lounge next week. So Greg challenged him to a game of Sit Down Stand Up with hilarious results. Here's the full conversation with exta funny bits we didn't have time for on the show.

Nothing Personal with David Samson
Samson Sit-Down: Jason Caldwell | Chasing - A race across the Atlantic Ocean... rowing a boat!

Nothing Personal with David Samson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 50:41 Very Popular


It's a Samson Sit-Down! We've got Jason Caldwell on the show today! The man is a legend and the star of his documentary Chasing. It's about a race across the Atlantic Ocean… rowing a boat! What?!  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Purely Arsenal - Football Purists, an AFC podcast
The Sit Down: “Nice kickabout with the Bees” - Purely Arsenal Ep 93

Purely Arsenal - Football Purists, an AFC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 77:35


The Purely Arsenal podcast (@purelyarsenalFP) is brought to you by Jack Sessions (@Jack10Gooner) with guests James Johnstone (@LLcoolJames91), and Neil Shah (@Gooner_70ns). The lads discuss the comprehensive 0-3 away win at Brentford. A dominant mature display is analyzed with focus if Saliba is the best CB in the league currently, Xhaka's terrific display and ability to effect the match in the final 3rd, the return of Thomas Partey being key, Jesus leading by example, Fabio Vieira's goal scoring full PL debut, Nwaneri makes history and much more. Plus a look ahead to the massive North London Derby! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/purelyarsenal/message

10,000 Pitches
Sota Soccer Sit-Down with Northland College Men's head coach Greg Gilmore and GK Jamie Colvill

10,000 Pitches

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 18:53


Jeremy sits down with head coach Greg Gilmore and goalkeeper Jamie Colvill from Northland College! Turning around the program in just a few short years Drawing UW-Superior Moving towards a conference title Recruiting internationally More! -- Support - Get the most consistent, dedicated Minnesota soccer coverage at https://my.captivate.fm/SotaSoccer.com (SotaSoccer.com)! - Lend your support to Sota Soccer and get some great early access/bonus content in the process by becoming a Supporter or SuperSub at https://my.captivate.fm/patreon.com/sotasoccer (patreon.com/sotasoccer)

Invest In Yourself Podcast
Sit Down With Derek Galanis Associate of Cherry Hill Gambino's (El Chapo & Michael Franzese)

Invest In Yourself Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 46:49


Today's podcast features Derek Meyer Galanis; he was an associate to the Cherry Hill Gambinos. Derek was also a part of his father's crime family named the Galanis Crime Family. During Derek's time with the Gambino's he sold drugs and was connected to El Chapo. His part in the Galanis Crime Family was doing big time business scams. Derek went to prison for a good chunk of time and wrote a few books. Since he has been out of prison Derek has changed his life for the better. This is episode 108!Derek's Book links belowGalanis Crime Family - https://www.amazon.com/Greed-Fear-Galanis-Crime-Family/dp/1980343861Warrior of the Light- https://www.amazon.com/Warrior-Light-Fighters-Journey-through/dp/1074823834/ref=pd_aw_fbt_img_sccl_1/146-8555500-5216806?pd_rd_w=5rVJm&content-id=amzn1.sym.b6e57bf5-2054-445a-8980-1886178987a5&pf_rd_p=b6e57bf5-2054-445a-8980-1886178987a5&pf_rd_r=H46MVRK4PEW1EJ3KP92E&pd_rd_wg=zsobY&pd_rd_r=e2e23766-da11-486d-a9e3-b24755524a02&pd_rd_i=1074823834&psc=1 If you would like to donate to the channel here is my cash app https://cash.app/$investinyourself2020Find all of our Invest In Yourself Platforms Clothing Website- https://iiyclothing.bigcartel.com/productsYouTube- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6wGSATB9uusaUCvICpJZ_QSpotify- https://open.spotify.com/show/6d5D4lauoKHeQ1obygbOhM?si=s37hThFuQACwN1EDZKFQfg&fbclid=IwAR2WNDWcwAJe-SaFOQT6AwW2P0TcntJzOy9inskcULxIswBY9dZniUYjki0&nd=1Apple Podcasts- https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/i-i-y-podcast/id1577114137Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/invest_in_yourself_2020/fbclid=IwAR3_McZpdI3C8oy-XpAXXNfyfcoYPMtZRKab0YNSeUoA2nssgywe3Et3fnUTikTok- https://www.tiktok.com/@iiy_clothing_podcast?fbclid=IwAR1oCed6gwFX5hO1ICGMmqp_6TZ-w1feubsYHnTjed00Ddz4_4zotG1HAikFacebook- https://www.facebook.com/IIYCLOTHINGEmail- iiypodcast2021@gmail.com#mafia #mob #michaelfranzese #sonnyfranzese #galaniscrimefamily #crimefamily #gangster #truecrime #crime #prison #gambino #colombo #elchapo #cartel #mexicancartel #cherryhillgambino #johngambino #salgambino #tommygambino #johngotti

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: A Sit Down With King James Bible Defender And Author Jack McElroy

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 88:48


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, author Jack McElroy is our guest, and we are going to be blowing minds all across social media as we discuss what Bible Jesus would use if He was physically present among us today as He was in the first century. You see, the vast majority of Christian schools, colleges, universities and seminaries do not believe that God preserved His inspired word in a place where you can get your hands on it. They'll say "we believe in the verbal and plenary inspiration of the original manuscripts" which nobody has! That's what we used to refer to back in New Jersey when I was coming up as a 'con game'. Jack McElroy believes God has preserved His inspired written word, and today on the NTEB Sit Down, he's going to show you just where it is, and how you can get it. Don't miss it! I have to tell you, I am really enjoying the new NTEB Sit Down interview series, we have had some really fun to talk with and highly knowledgeable guests come into the Studio over the past few weeks. This Wednesday, we sit down with author Jack McElroy who has written some amazing and very easy to digest books on why your King James Bible is, in fact, God's inspired and preserved word.

Holly & Nira
Why Nira Is Going To Have To Wear Holly's Pants & What Date is Dinner?

Holly & Nira

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 36:11


On today's show... The latest fashion trend and what does it have to do with napping?  When does caring too much become a bad thing?  Holly is in shock! Thanks to Tik Tok there's a new party MUST HAVE  When was your last  ‘Sitdown with the Server…..' moment??  Why Nira is going to have to wear Holly's pants  Has someone ever looked through you??  Good idea or bad idea? Holly as the boss  What Date is Dinner?? 

EDRM Global Podcast Network
Illumination Zone: Deloitte's Nick Wittenberg and Sue Seeley sit down with Kaylee & Mary.

EDRM Global Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:12


Sit Down with Sniper
Sit Down With Sniper | Episode 32 ft. Spottie Wifi

Sit Down with Sniper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 67:24


We're Back!After a little break due to some issues, we've came back with an amazing guest in the Web3 space - Spottie Wifi!Listen in as we speak about his journey, Doodles, and so much more! We also want to say thank you to NRN for allowing us to join their network and you'll be seeing a lot more of SDwS soon!

Yall Heard What I Said
Exclusive Sit Down interview with Pitt Cornerback Marquis "Lock" Williams

Yall Heard What I Said

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 12:38


Wassup ock!! we're back with another exclusive sit down interview! We sit down and chop it up with NFL Prospect and starting cornerback for University of Pittsburgh Panthers, collegiate football star, number 14 Marquis "Lock" Williams. Marquis is a 4 year starter and tells us how they were able to win the ACC championship in 2021 by playing together as a team and locking in and how they look to continue to build on that success. He discusses how working out and speaking with Antonio Brown has given him the confidence to go out there and guard anybody. He has family ties from football from his uncle Tyrone Carter, who won two Super Bowls with the Pittsburgh Steelers and Jim Thorpe award for best defensive back in college. That's where his work ethic comes from and he has been working hard at it and playing cornerback since he was a kid. His uncle along with other great players from his hometown motivate him to go out there and be great. He talks about how the Reliance family always supports him by even coming up with the nickname “Lock”, coming to his games, and checking on him constantly about his family. Off the field he is a father to his daughter and reps his clothing line republic. Emphasizes his focus on football and taking care of his daughter and playing for her, while the reliance team handles everything with deals and being able to learn how to manage money. He feels he is a great NFL prospect because he can do everything on the field, is coachable, and disciplined. Tune in to their season and check out the Pitt team and Marquis Williams! Big things in store for the rest of the season. #sports #football #collegefootball #cornerback --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

F*ck it: Let's talk fights with Johnny Sig
Joe Cortez - A Sit Down with Johnny Sig

F*ck it: Let's talk fights with Johnny Sig

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 33:08


I had the honor to sit down with Hall of Fame Boxing Referee - Mr. "Fair but Firm" Joe Cortez! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thelifenetwork/support

Talking Rounds
Episode 23: Sunday Sit-Down with esteemed guest John Vu.

Talking Rounds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 80:01


Join us for a first ever edition of the Sunday shmooze on the heels of UFC FN: Sandhagen vs Yadong. We rap the card, ineptitude, some lettuce sponsors, gruesome gashes, and endeavor to give some backdrop for Tuckers own striking coach. An exceedingly light hearted episode for a smooth Sunday special!

“Dad, Can We Talk?”
Episode 86 - A Sit Down With My Kids

“Dad, Can We Talk?”

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 71:55


I've been needing to have this sit-down with my kids for a while. It's always a good thing to sit down and get an understanding with your children. You'll find out many things about them and yourself. Plus, your kids will feel more comfortable talking with you and knowing that their voices are heard. It's not about being right or wrong, it's about getting an understanding. So that's what we did. Of course, Nana dropped out the convo early

Stonemaier Streams
Sunday Sitdown: 10 Production Secrets for Tabletop Games

Stonemaier Streams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:16


Kaw Prairie Community Church
Sermons from Spotify | Sit Down, Young Stranger

Kaw Prairie Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 33:58


Message Series: Sermons from SpotifyMusic. It's everywhere. We listen to it in the car, the store, the stadium, as well as work and home. And, whether it's at a live concert or through your Air Pods, we connect with music. It acts as a soundtrack to our lives. We all have songs that take us back, make us remember a particular moment or feeling. They move us. And we all have lyrics that have spoken to us.That got us thinking? How does God use music in our faith? Do songs — not just worship songs, but the songs we listen to on the radio or Spotify — move us closer to God? Does God speak to us those lyrics? That's what this series is about… Finding God in music.Learn more and get involved at kawprairie.info.

Stage Door, a theatre podcast hosted by two average guys
Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street: Perrysburg Musical Theatre is putting on one of Stephen Sondheim's most memorable musicals, and the guys at Stage Door sit down with the director and st

Stage Door, a theatre podcast hosted by two average guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:47


Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street: Perrysburg Musical Theatre is putting on one of Stephen Sondheim's most memorable musicals, and the guys at Stage Door sit down with the director and stars of the show. Sweeney Todd Oct. 28th-30th Tickets are on sane now https://www.perrysburgmusicaltheatre.org/tickets-events Sweeney Todd has become a bloody, worldwide success since being awarded eight Tony's, (including Best Musical), for its Broadway premiere. Stephen Sondheim's and Hugh Wheeler's (A Little Night Music, Pacific Overtures) tasty, thrilling, theatrical treat has simultaneously shocked, awed and delighted audiences across the world. An infamous tale, Sweeney Todd, an unjustly exiled barber, returns to nineteenth century London, seeking vengeance against the lecherous judge who framed him and ravaged his young wife. The road to revenge leads Todd to Mrs. Lovett, a resourceful proprietress of a failing pie shop, above which, he opens a new barber practice. Mrs. Lovett's luck sharply shifts when Todd's thirst for blood inspires the integration of an ingredient into her meat pies that has the people of London lining up... and the carnage has only just begun! Ther amazingly talented cast of Sweeney Todd! We can't wait to see you Oct. 28th-30th. Plan you calendar now, you won't want to miss. SWEENEY TODD: Christopher Bush MRS. LOVETT: Chelsie Cree ANTHONY: Kurt Elfering JOHANNA: Alexandria Hanhold LUCY/BEGGAR WOMAN: Elicia Kinder TOBIAS: Clayton Snyder U/S TOBIAS: Stephen Taylor JUDGE TURPIN: Chuck Kiskaddon PIRELLI: Wesley Grudzien BEADLE: Matthew Johnston JONAS FOGG: Joel Twitchell MALE SWING: Steven Sloan FEMALE SWING: Cassidy Dobson ENSEMBLE: Steven Sloan, Cassidy Dobson, Joel Twitchell, Dillon Sickels, Kate Taylor, Mark Taylor, Dennis Kale, Sophie Wolfinger, Sydney Wolfinger, Tristen Turkopp, Cayla Slattery, Joelle Stiles, Cyndy Brookover, Annabelle McKenzie, Elizabeth Latta, Stephen Taylor

Carrie & Tommy Catchup - Hit Network - Carrie Bickmore and Tommy Little
We do a KANGAROO SHOE workout, Carrie's SPICE GIRL interview, AND do you SIT DOWN to WEE?!

Carrie & Tommy Catchup - Hit Network - Carrie Bickmore and Tommy Little

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 45:24


Booty Drop   Carrie Break about Art   Tommy's Idle Hands   Carrie text from a friend  Andy Lee   Kangaroo Shoes  What Do You Reckon   Mel C   Same Same But Backwards   Bruno Mars Ticket Giveaway  Rapt or Raw  Subscribe on LiSTNR: https://play.listnr.com/podcasts/carrie-and-tommySee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Mother and daughter sit down for candid conversation about vaccine hesitancy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:13


At a time when misinformation is rampant, the NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs is producing a series of conversations called "Moments of Truth" that explore why people believe false information and what causes them to change their minds. This is a story about a mother who hesitated to give her child a common childhood vaccine that fights against measles, mumps and rubella. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Mother and daughter sit down for candid conversation about vaccine hesitancy

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:13


At a time when misinformation is rampant, the NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs is producing a series of conversations called "Moments of Truth" that explore why people believe false information and what causes them to change their minds. This is a story about a mother who hesitated to give her child a common childhood vaccine that fights against measles, mumps and rubella. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Extra Point with Sal Capaccio
EXP - Joe's Sit up sit down

The Extra Point with Sal Capaccio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 17:26


Hour 2: After week 1 of Fantasy Football Joe gives you his sit up and sit downs including a surprising quarterback.

Cry Me a River
The Frank Monica Episode. The boys sit down with the legend for an all-time interview. Also, is LSU back? Saints making a run, and college football/NFL recaps and previews as we get into the thick of the season.

Cry Me a River

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 110:57


The Frank Monica Episode. The boys sit down with the legend for an all-time interview. Also, is LSU back? Saints making a run, and college football/NFL recaps and previews as we get into the thick of the season.

Todd Coconato Podcast— The Remnant
From Drugs & Alcohol Abuse...to Revival Meetings…We Sit Down With Pastor D. R. Harrison

Todd Coconato Podcast— The Remnant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 45:56


Today's Guest is Evangelist/Pastor D.R. Harrison  The Mission is clear. Evangelist DR Harrison strives to take the Gospel of Jesus Christ, around the world, to this lost and dying generation. The Message is clear…THERE IS HOPE! That HOPE is found in our Lord Jesus Christ. This generation is looking for something real, something that will fill that void on the inside…only JESUS can do that! The Ministry is dedicated to accountability and transparency in everything we do. The Bible says, “Where no counsel is, the people fall: but in the multitude of counselors there is safety.” – Prov 11:14 Voice of Hope's ministry advisors are comprised of men from around America who have impeccable reputations, compassion for sinners, and share the same vision and burden as DR Harrison. D.R. Harrison's Website: https://vohministries.org/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Help us fund the operation here: www.ToddCoconato.com/give Get up-to-the-minute news here: www.Remnant.News Download our new app at www.ToddCoconato.com/app Follow Pastor Todd here: www.toddcoconato.com/findme Go to our store for special deals for Remnant Warriors here: https://remnant.news/hanews/deals-for-remnant-warriors/  

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: A Sit Down With Pastor Joel Tillis Of ‘The Soul Trap'

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 94:43


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, we are having a sit down with Pastor Joel Tillis, and discussing the beginning of sorrows now into its third year. Everywhere you look, society is collapsing at a stunning rate of speed, crime is on the rise, wars and rumours of war coming across our devices every waking minute of the day. Artificial Intelligence continues to intrude, algorithms controlling what we see and don't see, and the Metaverse threatening with its digital prison. When the apostle John was taken up to the Third Heaven from the island of Patmos, and given a vision of the end times, much of what we are seeing now is what he saw then. Today on the Prophecy News Podcast Interview, we will cover all this and take your questions for Pastor Joel live in the chat room, don't miss it! Pastor Joel Tillis is not only the pastor at Sun Coast Baptist Church, he and his team also produce ‘The Soul Trap' podcast that chronicles the rapidly-rising end times in which we find ourselves here on Day 912 of 15 Days To Flatten The Curve. Fun fact, the term ‘soul trap' was first used way back in the middle 1700's to describe fiery evangelist George Whitefield's style of preaching. He preached the gospel of Jesus Christ, and caught souls for the Lord!

Drive with Joel & Fletch
1st Hour | Stand Up or Sit Down in the brasco? (13/09/22)

Drive with Joel & Fletch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 38:32


Fletch continues his brasco discussion from yesterday posing to the listeners stander or sitter in the brasco. Thomas Burgess has also been suspended for two matches and the boys are discussing the possibility that JWH will serve his NRL suspension at the World Cup.

Mile High Flight Show - A Jets and Broncos Podcast
Turn Off the Sirens and Sit Down - Bite Show - Episode 17

Mile High Flight Show - A Jets and Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 17:08


Yes, The Broncos lost to the Seahawks. Is it as big of a deal as some are trying to make it? Absolutely not. Let's talk about why, plus some more week 1 injury updates on the newest Mile High Bite Show!

SHMS Shenanigans!
Strawberry Letter - Get Somewhere And Sit Down

SHMS Shenanigans!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:12


Strawberry Letter
Get Somewhere And Sit Down

Strawberry Letter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:25


  Dear Steve and Shirley, I'm a 60 year old single mother. My son is 32 and he has been a single father since his first wife passed away 4 years ago. My granddaughter is 14 years old and she's with me during the week and she goes back to her dad's house on the weekend. My son has started back dating and he wants to be married again. He says he doesn't function well as a single man..............................See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WFYM Talk Radio
45 - Sit Down Air Tree (PREVIEW)

WFYM Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 4:22


We talked about our most demonic prank calls and imagined a janitor-based reality show where every contestant is a clone of The Illuminator. Plus the queen thing but not too much   For full episode go to: https://www.patreon.com/chapofym

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 153: “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Heroes and Villains” by the Beach Boys, and the collapse of the Smile album. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a sixteen-minute bonus episode available, on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" by the Electric Prunes. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode. As well as the books I referred to in all the Beach Boys episodes, listed below, I used Domenic Priore's book Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece and Richard Henderson's 33 1/3 book on Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson by Peter Ames Carlin is the best biography of Wilson. I have also referred to Brian Wilson's autobiography, I Am Brian Wilson, and to Mike Love's, Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music in general, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it, including the single version of “Heroes and Villains”. The box set The Smile Sessions  contains an attempt to create a finished album from the unfinished sessions, plus several CDs of outtakes and session material. Transcript [Opening -- "intro to the album" studio chatter into "Our Prayer"] Before I start, I'd just like to note that this episode contains some discussion of mental illness, including historical negative attitudes towards it, so you may want to check the transcript or skip this one if that might be upsetting. In November and December 1966, the filmmaker David Oppenheim and the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein collaborated on a TV film called "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution".  The film was an early attempt at some of the kinds of things this podcast is doing, looking at how music and social events interact and evolve, though it was dealing with its present rather than the past. The film tried to cast as wide a net as possible in its fifty-one minutes. It looked at two bands from Manchester -- the Hollies and Herman's Hermits -- and how the people identified as their leaders, "Herman" (or Peter Noone) and Graham Nash, differed on the issue of preventing war: [Excerpt: Inside Pop, the Rock Revolution] And it made a star of East Coast teenage singer-songwriter Janis Ian with her song about interracial relationships, "Society's Child": [Excerpt: Janis Ian, "Society's Child"] And Bernstein spends a significant time, as one would expect, analysing the music of the Beatles and to a lesser extent the Stones, though they don't appear in the show. Bernstein does a lot to legitimise the music just by taking it seriously as a subject for analysis, at a time when most wouldn't: [Excerpt: Leonard Bernstein talking about "She Said She Said"] You can't see it, obviously, but in the clip that's from, as the Beatles recording is playing, Bernstein is conducting along with the music, as he would a symphony orchestra, showing where the beats are falling. But of course, given that this was filmed in the last two months of 1966, the vast majority of the episode is taken up with musicians from the centre of the music world at that time, LA. The film starts with Bernstein interviewing Tandyn Almer,  a jazz-influenced songwriter who had recently written the big hit "Along Comes Mary" for The Association: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] It featured interviews with Roger McGuinn, and with the protestors at the Sunset Strip riots which were happening contemporaneously with the filming: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] Along with Frank Zappa's rather acerbic assessment of the potential of the youth revolutionaries: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] And ended (other than a brief post-commercial performance over the credits by the Hollies) with a performance by Tim Buckley, whose debut album, as we heard in the last episode, had featured Van Dyke Parks and future members of the Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] But for many people the highlight of the film was the performance that came right before Buckley's, film of Brian Wilson playing a new song from the album he was working on. One thing I should note -- many sources say that the voiceover here is Bernstein. My understanding is that Bernstein wrote and narrated the parts of the film he was himself in, and Oppenheim did all the other voiceover writing and narration, but that Oppenheim's voice is similar enough to Bernstein's that people got confused about this: [Excerpt: Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution] That particular piece of footage was filmed in December 1966, but it wasn't broadcast until April the twenty-fifth, 1967, an eternity in mid-sixties popular music. When it was broadcast, that album still hadn't come out. Precisely one week later, the Beach Boys' publicist Derek Taylor announced that it never would: [Excerpt: Brian Wilson, "Surf's Up"] One name who has showed up in a handful of episodes recently, but who we've not talked that much about, is Van Dyke Parks. And in a story with many, many, remarkable figures, Van Dyke Parks may be one of the most remarkable of all. Long before he did anything that impinges on the story of rock music, Parks had lived the kind of life that would be considered unbelievable were it to be told as fiction. Parks came from a family that mixed musical skill, political progressiveness, and achievement. His mother was a scholar of Hebrew, while his father was a neurologist, the first doctor to admit Black patients to a white Southern hospital, and had paid his way through college leading a dance band. Parks' father was also, according to the 33 1/3 book on Song Cycle, a member of "John Philip Sousa's Sixty Silver Trumpets", but literally every reference I can find to Sousa leading a band of that name goes back to that book, so I've no idea what he was actually a member of, but we can presume he was a reasonable musician. Young Van Dyke started playing the clarinet at four, and was also a singer from a very early age, as well as playing several other instruments. He went to the American Boychoir School in Princeton, to study singing, and while there he sang with Toscaninni, Thomas Beecham, and other immensely important conductors of the era. He also had a very special accompanist for one Christmas carolling session. The choir school was based in Princeton, and one of the doors he knocked on while carolling was that of Princeton's most famous resident, Albert Einstein, who heard the young boy singing "Silent Night", and came out with his violin and played along. Young Van Dyke was only interested in music, but he was also paying the bills for his music tuition himself -- he had a job. He was a TV star. From the age of ten, he started getting roles in TV shows -- he played the youngest son in the 1953 sitcom Bonino, about an opera singer, which flopped because it aired opposite the extremely popular Jackie Gleason Show. He would later also appear in that show, as one of several child actors who played the character of Little Tommy Manicotti, and he made a number of other TV appearances, as well as having a small role in Grace Kelly's last film, The Swan, with Alec Guinness and Louis Jourdain. But he never liked acting, and just did it to pay for his education. He gave it up when he moved on to the Carnegie Institute, where he majored in composition and performance. But then in his second year, his big brother Carson asked him to drop out and move to California. Carson Parks had been part of the folk scene in California for a few years at this point. He and a friend had formed a duo called the Steeltown Two, but then both of them had joined the folk group the Easy Riders, a group led by Terry Gilkyson. Before Carson Parks joined, the Easy Riders had had a big hit with their version of "Marianne", a calypso originally by the great calypsonian Roaring Lion: [Excerpt: The Easy Riders, "Marianne"] They hadn't had many other hits, but their songs became hits for other people -- Gilkyson wrote several big hits for Frankie Laine, and the Easy Riders were the backing vocalists on Dean Martin's recording of a song they wrote, "Memories are Made of This": [Excerpt: Dean Martin and the Easy Riders, "Memories are Made of This"] Carson Parks hadn't been in the group at that point -- he only joined after they'd stopped having success -- and eventually the group had split up. He wanted to revive his old duo, the Steeltown Two, and persuaded his family to let his little brother Van Dyke drop out of university and move to California to be the other half of the duo. He wanted Van Dyke to play guitar, while he played banjo. Van Dyke had never actually played guitar before, but as Carson Parks later said "in 90 days, he knew more than most folks know after many years!" Van Dyke moved into an apartment adjoining his brother's, owned by Norm Botnick, who had until recently been the principal viola player in a film studio orchestra, before the film studios all simultaneously dumped their in-house orchestras in the late fifties, so was a more understanding landlord than most when it came to the lifestyles of musicians. Botnick's sons, Doug and Bruce, later went into sound engineering -- we've already encountered Bruce Botnick in the episode on the Doors, and he will be coming up again in the future. The new Steeltown Two didn't make any records, but they developed a bit of a following in the coffeehouses, and they also got a fair bit of session work, mostly through Terry Gilkyson, who was by that point writing songs for Disney and would hire them to play on sessions for his songs. And it was Gilkyson who both brought Van Dyke Parks the worst news of his life to that point, and in doing so also had him make his first major mark on music. Gilkyson was the one who informed Van Dyke that another of his brothers, Benjamin Riley Parks, had died in what was apparently a car accident. I say it was apparently an accident because Benjamin Riley Parks was at the time working for the US State Department, and there is apparently also some evidence that he was assassinated in a Cold War plot. Gilkyson also knew that neither Van Dyke nor Carson Parks had much money, so in order to help them afford black suits and plane tickets to and from the funeral, Gilkyson hired Van Dyke to write the arrangement for a song he had written for an upcoming Disney film: [Excerpt: Jungle Book soundtrack, "The Bare Necessities"] The Steeltown Two continued performing, and soon became known as the Steeltown Three, with the addition of a singer named Pat Peyton. The Steeltown Three recorded two singles, "Rock Mountain", under that group name: [Excerpt: The Steeltown Three, "Rock Mountain"] And a version of "San Francisco Bay" under the name The South Coasters, which I've been unable to track down. Then the three of them, with the help of Terry Gilkyson, formed a larger group in the style of the New Christy Minstrels -- the Greenwood County Singers. Indeed, Carson Parks would later claim that  Gilkyson had had the idea first -- that he'd mentioned that he'd wanted to put together a group like that to Randy Sparks, and Sparks had taken the idea and done it first. The Greenwood County Singers had two minor hot one hundred hits, only one of them while Van Dyke was in the band -- "The New 'Frankie and Johnny' Song", a rewrite by Bob Gibson and Shel Silverstein of the old traditional song "Frankie and Johnny": [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "The New Frankie and Johnny Song"] They also recorded several albums together, which gave Van Dyke the opportunity to practice his arrangement skills, as on this version of  "Vera Cruz" which he arranged: [Excerpt: The Greenwood County Singers, "Vera Cruz"] Some time before their last album, in 1965, Van Dyke left the Greenwood County Singers, and was replaced by Rick Jarrard, who we'll also be hearing more about in future episodes. After that album, the group split up, but Carson Parks would go on to write two big hits in the next few years. The first and biggest was a song he originally wrote for a side project. His future wife Gaile Foote was also a Greenwood County Singer, and the two of them thought they might become folk's answer to Sonny and Cher or Nino Tempo and April Stevens: [Excerpt: Carson and Gaile, "Somethin' Stupid"] That obviously became a standard after it was covered by Frank and Nancy Sinatra. Carson Parks also wrote "Cab Driver", which in 1968 became the last top thirty hit for the Mills Brothers, the 1930s vocal group we talked about way way back in episode six: [Excerpt: The Mills Brothers, "Cab Driver"] Meanwhile Van Dyke Parks was becoming part of the Sunset Strip rock and roll world. Now, until we get to 1967, Parks has something of a tangled timeline. He worked with almost every band around LA in a short period, often working with multiple people simultaneously, and nobody was very interested in keeping detailed notes. So I'm going to tell this as a linear story, but be aware it's very much not -- things I say in five minutes might happen after, or in the same week as, things I say in half an hour. At some point in either 1965 or 1966 he joined the Mothers of Invention for a brief while. Nobody is entirely sure when this was, and whether it was before or after their first album. Some say it was in late 1965, others in August 1966, and even the kind of fans who put together detailed timelines are none the wiser, because no recordings have so far surfaced of Parks with the band. Either is plausible, and the Mothers went through a variety of keyboard players at this time -- Zappa had turned to his jazz friend Don Preston, but found Preston was too much of a jazzer and told him to come back when he could play "Louie Louie" convincingly, asked Mac Rebennack to be in the band but sacked him pretty much straight away for drug use, and eventually turned to Preston again once Preston had learned to rock and roll. Some time in that period, Van Dyke Parks was a Mother, playing electric harpsichord. He may even have had more than one stint in the group -- Zappa said "Van Dyke Parks played electric harpsichord in and out." It seems likely, though, that it was in summer of 1966, because in an interview published in Teen Beat Magazine in December 66, but presumably conducted a few months prior, Zappa was asked to describe the band members in one word each and replied: "Ray—Mahogany Roy—Asbestos Jim—Mucilage Del—Acetate Van Dyke—Pinocchio Billy—Boom I don't know about the rest of the group—I don't even know about these guys." Sources differ as to why Parks didn't remain in the band -- Parks has said that he quit after a short time because he didn't like being shouted at, while Zappa said "Van Dyke was not a reliable player. He didn't make it to rehearsal on time and things like that." Both may be true of course, though I've not heard anyone else ever criticise Parks for his reliability. But then also Zappa had much more disciplinarian standards than most rock band leaders. It's possibly either through Zappa that he met Tom Wilson, or through Tom Wilson that he met Frank Zappa, but either way Parks, like the Mothers of Invention, was signed to MGM records in 1966, where he released two solo singles co-produced by Wilson and an otherwise obscure figure named Tim Alvorado. The first was "Number Nine", which we heard last week, backed with "Do What You Wanta": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Do What You Wanta"] At least one source I've read says that the lyrics to "Do What You Wanta" were written not by Parks but by his friend Danny Hutton, but it's credited as a Parks solo composition on the label. It was after that that the Van Dyke Parks band -- or as they were sometimes billed, just The Van Dyke Parks formed, as we discussed last episode, based around Parks, Steve Stills, and Steve Young, and they performed a handful of shows with bass player Bobby Rae and drummer Walt Sparman, playing a mix of original material, primarily Parks' songs, and covers of things like "Dancing in the Street". The one contemporaneous review of a live show I've seen talks about  the girls in the audience screaming and how "When rhythm guitarist Steve Stillman imitated the Barry McGuire emotional scene, they almost went wiggy". But The Van Dyke Parks soon split up, and Parks the individual recorded his second single, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] Around the time he left the Greenwood County Singers, Van Dyke Parks also met Brian Wilson for the first time, when David Crosby took him up to Wilson's house to hear an acetate of the as-yet-unreleased track "Sloop John B". Parks was impressed by Wilson's arrangement techniques, and in particular the way he was orchestrating instrumental combinations that you couldn't do with a standard live room setup, that required overdubbing and close-micing. He said later "The first stuff I heard indicated this kind of curiosity for the recording experience, and when I went up to see him in '65 I don't even think he had the voices on yet, but I heard that long rotational breathing, that long flute ostinato at the beginning... I knew this man was a great musician." [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B (instrumental)"] In most of 1966, though, Parks was making his living as a session keyboard player and arranger, and much of the work he was getting was through Lenny Waronker. Waronker was a second-generation music industry professional. His father, Si Waronker, had been a violinist in the Twentieth Century Fox studio orchestra before founding Liberty Records (the label which indirectly led to him becoming immortalised in children's entertainment, when Liberty Records star David Seville named his Chipmunk characters after three Liberty executives, with Simon being Si Waronker's full forename). The first release on Liberty Records had been a version of "The Girl Upstairs", an instrumental piece from the Fox film The Seven-Year Itch. The original recording of that track, for the film, had been done by the Twentieth Century Fox Orchestra, written and conducted by Alfred Newman, the musical director for Fox: [Excerpt: Alfred Newman, "The Girl Upstairs"] Liberty's soundalike version was conducted by Newman's brother Lionel, a pianist at the studio who later became Fox's musical director for TV, just as his brother was for film, but who also wrote many film scores himself. Another Newman brother, Emil, was also a film composer, but the fourth brother, Irving, had gone into medicine instead. However, Irving's son Randy wanted to follow in the family business, and he and Lenny Waronker, who was similarly following his own father by working for Liberty Records' publishing subsidiary Metric Music, had been very close friends ever since High School. Waronker got Newman signed to Metric Music, where he wrote "They Tell Me It's Summer" for the Fleetwoods: [Excerpt: The Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me It's Summer"] Newman also wrote and recorded a single of his own in 1962, co-produced by Pat Boone: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "Golden Gridiron Boy"] Before deciding he wasn't going to make it as a singer and had better just be a professional songwriter. But by 1966 Waronker had moved on from Metric to Warner Brothers, and become a junior A&R man. And he was put in charge of developing the artists that Warners had acquired when they had bought up a small label, Autumn Records. Autumn Records was a San Francisco-based label whose main producer, Sly Stone, had now moved on to other things after producing the hit record "Laugh Laugh" for the Beau Brummels: [Excerpt: The Beau Brummels, "Laugh Laugh"] The Beau Brummels  had had another hit after that and were the main reason that Warners had bought the label, but their star was fading a little. Stone had also been mentoring several other groups, including the Tikis and the Mojo Men, who all had potential. Waronker gathered around himself a sort of brains trust of musicians who he trusted as songwriters, arrangers, and pianists -- Randy Newman, the session pianist Leon Russell, and Van Dyke Parks. Their job was to revitalise the career of the Beau Brummels, and to make both the Tikis and the Mojo Men into successes. The tactic they chose was, in Waronker's words, “Go in with a good song and weird it out.” The first good song they tried weirding out was in late 1966, when Leon Russell came up with a clarinet-led arrangement of Paul Simon's "59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)" for the Tikis, who performed it but who thought that their existing fanbase wouldn't accept something so different, so it was put out under another name, suggested by Parks, Harpers Bizarre: [Excerpt: Harpers Bizarre, "Feeling Groovy"] Waronker said of Parks and Newman “They weren't old school guys. They were modern characters but they had old school values regarding certain records that needed to be made, certain artists who needed to be heard regardless. So there was still that going on. The fact that ‘Feeling Groovy' was a number 10 hit nationwide and ‘Sit Down, I Think I Love You'  made the Top 30 on Western regional radio, that gave us credibility within the company. One hit will do wonders, two allows you to take chances.” We heard "Sit Down, I Think I Love You" last episode -- that's the song by Parks' old friend Stephen Stills that Parks arranged for the Mojo Men: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down, I Think I Love You"] During 1966 Parks also played on Tim Buckley's first album, as we also heard last episode: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And he also bumped into Brian Wilson on occasion, as they were working a lot in the same studios and had mutual friends like Loren Daro and Danny Hutton, and he suggested the cello part on "Good Vibrations". Parks also played keyboards on "5D" by the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "5D (Fifth Dimension)"] And on the Spirit of '67 album for Paul Revere and the Raiders, produced by the Byrds' old producer Terry Melcher. Parks played keyboards on much of the album, including the top five hit "Good Thing": [Excerpt: Paul Revere and the Raiders, "Good Thing"] But while all this was going on, Parks was also working on what would become the work for which he was best known. As I've said, he'd met Brian Wilson on a few occasions, but it wasn't until summer 1966 that the two were formally introduced by Terry Melcher, who knew that Wilson needed a new songwriting collaborator, now Tony Asher's sabbatical from his advertising job was coming to an end, and that Wilson wanted someone who could do work that was a bit more abstract than the emotional material that he had been writing with Asher. Melcher invited both of them to a party at his house on Cielo Drive -- a house which would a few years later become notorious -- which was also attended by many of the young Hollywood set of the time. Nobody can remember exactly who was at the party, but Parks thinks it was people like Jack Nicholson and Peter and Jane Fonda. Parks and Wilson hit it off, with Wilson saying later "He seemed like a really articulate guy, like he could write some good lyrics". Parks on the other hand was delighted to find that Wilson "liked Les Paul, Spike Jones, all of these sounds that I liked, and he was doing it in a proactive way." Brian suggested Parks write the finished lyrics for "Good Vibrations", which was still being recorded at this time, and still only had Tony Asher's dummy lyrics,  but Parks was uninterested. He said that it would be best if he and Brian collaborate together on something new from scratch, and Brian agreed. The first time Parks came to visit Brian at Brian's home, other than the visit accompanying Crosby the year before, he was riding a motorbike -- he couldn't afford a car -- and forgot to bring his driver's license with him. He was stopped by a police officer who thought he looked too poor to be in the area, but Parks persuaded the police officer that if he came to the door, Brian Wilson would vouch for him. Brian got Van Dyke out of any trouble because the cop's sister was a Beach Boys fan, so he autographed an album for her. Brian and Van Dyke talked for a while. Brian asked if Van Dyke needed anything to help his work go smoothly, and Van Dyke said he needed a car. Brian asked what kind. Van Dyke said that Volvos were supposed to be pretty safe. Brian asked how much they cost. Van Dyke said he thought they were about five thousand dollars. Brian called up his office and told them to get a cheque delivered to Van Dyke for five thousand dollars the next day, instantly earning Van Dyke's loyalty. After that, they got on with work. To start with, Brian played Van Dyke a melody he'd been working on, a melody based on a descending scale starting on the fourth: [Plays "Heroes and Villains" melody] Parks told Wilson that the melody reminded him vaguely of Marty Robbins' country hit "El Paso" from 1959, a song about a gunfighter, a cantina, and a dancing woman: [Excerpt: Marty Robbins, "El Paso"] Wilson said that he had been thinking along the same lines, a sort of old west story, and thought maybe it should be called "Heroes and Villains". Parks started writing, matching syllables to Wilson's pre-conceived melody -- "I've been in this town so long that back in the city I've been taken for lost and gone and unknown for a long, long time" [Excerpt: Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, "Heroes and Villains demo"] As Parks put it "The engine had started. It was very much ad hoc. Seat of the pants. Extemporaneous values were enforced. Not too much precommitment to ideas. Or, if so, equally pursuing propinquity." Slowly, over the next several months, while the five other Beach Boys were touring, Brian and Van Dyke refined their ideas about what the album they were writing, initially called Dumb Angel but soon retitled Smile, should be. For Van Dyke Parks it was an attempt to make music about America and American mythology. He was disgusted, as a patriot, with the Anglophilia that had swept the music industry since the arrival of the Beatles in America two and a half years earlier, particularly since that had happened so soon after the deaths both of President Kennedy and of Parks' own brother who was working for the government at the time he died. So for him, the album was about America, about Plymouth Rock, the Old West, California, and Hawaii. It would be a generally positive version of the country's myth, though it would of course also acknowledge the bloodshed on which the country had been built: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider" section] As he put it later "I was dead set on centering my life on the patriotic ideal. I was a son of the American revolution, and there was blood on the tracks. Recent blood, and it was still drying. The whole record seemed like a real effort toward figuring out what Manifest Destiny was all about. We'd come as far as we could, as far as Horace Greeley told us to go. And so we looked back and tried to make sense of that great odyssey." Brian had some other ideas -- he had been studying the I Ching, and Subud, and he wanted to do something about the four classical elements, and something religious -- his ideas were generally rather unfocused at the time, and he had far more ideas than he knew what to usefully do with. But he was also happy with the idea of a piece about America, which fit in with his own interest in "Rhapsody in Blue", a piece that was about America in much the same way. "Rhapsody in Blue" was an inspiration for Brian primarily in how it weaved together variations on themes. And there are two themes that between them Brian was finding endless variations on. The first theme was a shuffling between two chords a fourth away from each other. [demonstrates G to C on guitar] Where these chords are both major, that's the sequence for "Fire": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow/Fire"] For the "Who ran the Iron Horse?" section of "Cabin Essence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] For "Vegetables": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Vegetables"] And more. Sometimes this would be the minor supertonic and dominant seventh of the key, so in C that would be Dm to G7: [Plays Dm to G7 fingerpicked] That's the "bicycle rider" chorus we heard earlier, which was part of a song known as "Roll Plymouth Rock" or "Do You Like Worms": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Bicycle Rider"] But which later became a chorus for "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] But that same sequence is also the beginning of "Wind Chimes": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] The "wahalla loo lay" section of "Roll Plymouth Rock": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Roll Plymouth Rock"] And others, but most interestingly, the minor-key rearrangement of "You Are My Sunshine" as "You Were My Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "You Were My Sunshine"] I say that's most interesting, because that provides a link to another of the major themes which Brian was wringing every drop out of, a phrase known as "How Dry I Am", because of its use under those words in an Irving Berlin song, which was a popular barbershop quartet song but is now best known as a signifier of drunkenness in Looney Tunes cartoons: [Excerpt: Daffy Duck singing "How Dry I Am" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap4MMn7LpzA ] The phrase is a common one in early twentieth century music, especially folk and country, as it's made up of notes in the pentatonic scale -- it's the fifth, first, second, and third of the scale, in that order: [demonstrates "How Dry I Am"] And so it's in the melody to "This Land is Your Land", for example, a song which is very much in the same spirit of progressive Americana in which Van Dyke Parks was thinking: [Excerpt: Woody Guthrie, "This Land is Your Land"] It's also the start of the original melody of "You Are My Sunshine": [Excerpt: Jimmie Davis, "You Are My Sunshine" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvgNEU4Am8] Brian rearranged that melody when he stuck it into a minor key, so it's no longer "How Dry I Am" in the Beach Boys version, but if you play the "How Dry I Am" notes in a different rhythm, you get this: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody] Which is the start of the melody to "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] Play those notes backwards, you get: [Plays "He Gives Speeches" melody backwards] Do that and add onto the end a passing sixth and then the tonic, and then you get: [Plays that] Which is the vocal *countermelody* in "He Gives Speeches": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "He Gives Speeches"] And also turns up in some versions of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains (alternate version)"] And so on. Smile was an intricate web of themes and variations, and it incorporated motifs from many sources, both the great American songbook and the R&B of Brian's youth spent listening to Johnny Otis' radio show. There were bits of "Gee" by the Crows, of "Twelfth Street Rag", and of course, given that this was Brian Wilson, bits of Phil Spector. The backing track to the verse of "Heroes and Villains": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Owed more than a little to a version of "Save the Last Dance For Me" that Spector had produced for Ike and Tina Turner: [Excerpt: Ike and Tina Turner, "Save the Last Dance For Me"] While one version of the song “Wonderful” contained a rather out-of-place homage to Etta James and “The Wallflower”: [Excerpt: “Wonderful (Rock With Me Henry)”] As the recording continued, it became more and more obvious that the combination of these themes and variations was becoming a little too much for Brian.  Many of the songs he was working on were made up of individual modules that he was planning to splice together the way he had with "Good Vibrations", and some modules were getting moved between tracks, as he tried to structure the songs in the edit. He'd managed it with "Good Vibrations", but this was an entire album, not just a single, and it was becoming more and more difficult. David Anderle, who was heading up the record label the group were looking at starting, would talk about Brian playing him acetates with sections edited together one way, and thinking it was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together, the only possible way, and then hearing the same sections edited together in a different way, and thinking *that* was perfect, and obviously the correct way to put them together. But while a lot of the album was modular, there were also several complete songs with beginnings, middles, ends, and structures, even if they were in several movements. And those songs showed that if Brian could just get the other stuff right, the album could be very, very, special. There was "Heroes and Villains" itself, of course, which kept changing its structure but was still based around the same basic melody and story that Brian and Van Dyke had come up with on their first day working together. There was also "Wonderful", a beautiful, allusive, song about innocence lost and regained: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] And there was CabinEssence, a song which referenced yet another classic song, this time "Home on the Range", to tell a story of idyllic rural life and of the industrialisation which came with westward expansion: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "CabinEssence"] The arrangement for that song inspired Van Dyke Parks to make a very astute assessment of Brian Wilson. He said later "He knew that he had to adhere to the counter-culture, and I knew that I had to. I think that he was about as estranged from it as I was.... At the same time, he didn't want to lose that kind of gauche sensibility that he had. He was doing stuff that nobody would dream of doing. You would never, for example, use one string on a banjo when you had five; it just wasn't done. But when I asked him to bring a banjo in, that's what he did. This old-style plectrum thing. One string. That's gauche." Both Parks and Wilson were both drawn to and alienated from the counterculture, but in very different ways, and their different ways of relating to the counterculture created the creative tension that makes the Smile project so interesting. Parks is fundamentally a New Deal Liberal, and was excited by the progresssive nature of the counterculture, but also rather worried about its tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and to ignore the old in pursuit of the new. He was an erudite, cultured, sophisticated man who thought that there was value to be found in the works and attitudes of the past, even as one must look to the future. He was influenced by the beat poets and the avant garde art of the time, but also said of his folk music period "A harpist would bring his harp with him and he would play and recite a story which had been passed down the generations. This particular legacy continued through Arthurian legend, and then through the Middle Ages, and even into the nineteenth century. With all these songs, half of the story was the lyrics, and the folk songs were very interesting. They were tremendously thought-driven songs; there was nothing confusing about that. Even when the Kingston Trio came out -- and Brian has already admitted his debt to the Kingston Trio -- 'Tom Dooley', the story of a murder most foul 'MTA' an urban nightmare -- all of this thought-driven music was perfectly acceptable.  It was more than a teenage romantic crisis." Brian Wilson, on the other hand, was anything *but* sophisticated. He is a simple man in the best sense of the term -- he likes what he likes, doesn't like what he doesn't like, and has no pretensions whatsoever about it. He is, at heart, a middle-class middle-American brought up in suburbia, with a taste for steaks and hamburgers, broad physical comedy, baseball, and easy listening music. Where Van Dyke Parks was talking about "thought-driven music", Wilson's music, while thoughtful, has always been driven by feelings first and foremost. Where Parks is influenced by Romantic composers like Gottschalk but is fundamentally a craftsman, a traditionalist, a mason adding his work to a cathedral whose construction started before his birth and will continue after his death, Wilson's music has none of the stylistic hallmarks of Romantic music, but in its inspiration it is absolutely Romantic -- it is the immediate emotional expression of the individual, completely unfiltered. When writing his own lyrics in later years Wilson would come up with everything from almost haiku-like lyrics like "I'm a leaf on a windy day/pretty soon I'll be blown away/How long with the wind blow?/Until I die" to "He sits behind his microphone/Johnny Carson/He speaks in such a manly tone/Johnny Carson", depending on whether at the time his prime concern was existential meaninglessness or what was on the TV. Wilson found the new counterculture exciting, but was also very aware he didn't fit in. He was developing a new group of friends, the hippest of the hip in LA counterculture circles -- the singer Danny Hutton, Mark Volman of the Turtles, the writers Michael Vosse and Jules Siegel, scenester and record executive David Anderle -- but there was always the underlying implication that at least some of these people regarded him as, to use an ableist term but one which they would probably have used, an idiot savant. That they thought of him, as his former collaborator Tony Asher would later uncharitably put it, as "a genius musician but an amateur human being". So for example when Siegel brought the great postmodern novelist Thomas Pynchon to visit Brian, both men largely sat in silence, unable to speak to each other; Pynchon because he tended to be a reactive person in conversation and would wait for the other person to initiate topics of discussion, Brian because he was so intimidated by Pynchon's reputation as a great East Coast intellectual that he was largely silent for fear of making a fool of himself. It was this gaucheness, as Parks eventually put it, and Parks' understanding that this was actually a quality to be cherished and the key to Wilson's art, that eventually gave the title to the most ambitious of the complete songs the duo were working on. They had most of the song -- a song about the power of music, the concept of enlightenment, and the rise and fall of civilisations: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] But Parks hadn't yet quite finished the lyric. The Beach Boys had been off on tour for much of Brian and Van Dyke's collaboration, and had just got back from their first real tour of the UK, where Pet Sounds had been a smash hit, rather than the middling success it had been in the US, and "Good Vibrations" had just become their first number one single. Brian and Van Dyke played the song for Brian's brother Dennis, the Beach Boys' drummer, and the band member most in tune with Brian's musical ambitions at this time. Dennis started crying, and started talking about how the British audiences had loved their music, but had laughed at their on-stage striped-shirt uniforms. Parks couldn't tell if he was crying because of the beauty of the unfinished song, the humiliation he had suffered in Britain, or both. Dennis then asked what the name of the song was, and as Parks later put it "Although it was the most gauche factor, and although maybe Brian thought it was the most dispensable thing, I thought it was very important to continue to use the name and keep the elephant in the room -- to keep the surfing image but to sensitise it to new opportunities. One of these would be an eco-consciousness; it would be speaking about the greening of the Earth, aboriginal people, how we had treated the Indians, taking on those things and putting them into the thoughts that come with the music. That was a solution to the relevance of the group, and I wanted the group to be relevant." Van Dyke had decided on a title: "Surf's Up": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surf's Up"] As the group were now back from their tour, the focus for recording shifted from the instrumental sessions to vocal ones. Parks had often attended the instrumental sessions, as he was an accomplished musician and arranger himself, and would play on the sessions, but also wanted to learn from what Brian was doing -- he's stated later that some of his use of tuned percussion in the decades since, for example, has come from watching Brian's work. But while he was also a good singer, he was not a singer in the same style as the Beach Boys, and they certainly didn't need his presence at those sessions, so he continued to work on his lyrics, and to do his arrangement and session work for other artists, while they worked in the studio. He was also, though, starting to distance himself from Brian for other reasons. At the start of the summer, Brian's eccentricity and whimsy had seemed harmless -- indeed, the kind of thing he was doing, such as putting his piano in a sandbox so he could feel the sand with his feet while he wrote, seems very much on a par with Maureen Cleave's descriptions of John Lennon in the same period. They were two newly-rich, easily bored, young men with low attention spans and high intelligence who could become deeply depressed when understimulated and so would get new ideas into their heads, spend money on their new fads, and then quickly discard them. But as the summer wore on into autumn and winter, Brian's behaviour became more bizarre, and to Parks' eyes more distasteful. We now know that Brian was suffering a period of increasing mental ill-health, something that was probably not helped by the copious intake of cannabis and amphetamines he was using to spur his creativity, but at the time most people around him didn't realise this, and general knowledge of mental illness was even less than it is today. Brian was starting to do things like insist on holding business meetings in his swimming pool, partly because people wouldn't be able to spy on him, and partly because he thought people would be more honest if they were in the water. There were also events like the recording session where Wilson paid for several session musicians, not to play their instruments, but to be recorded while they sat in a pitch-black room and played the party game Lifeboat with Jules Siegel and several of Wilson's friends, most of whom were stoned and not really understanding what they were doing, while they got angrier and more frustrated. Alan Jardine -- who unlike the Wilson brothers, and even Mike Love to an extent, never indulged in illegal drugs -- has talked about not understanding why, in some vocal sessions, Brian would make the group crawl on their hands and knees while making noises like animals: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains Part 3 (Animals)"] As Parks delicately put it "I sensed all that was destructive, so I withdrew from those related social encounters." What this meant though was that he was unaware that not all the Beach Boys took the same attitude of complete support for the work he and Brian had been doing that Dennis Wilson -- the only other group member he'd met at this point -- took. In particular, Mike Love was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. As he said later "I called it acid alliteration. The [lyrics are] far out. But do they relate like 'Surfin' USA,' like 'Fun Fun Fun,' like 'California Girls,' like 'I Get Around'? Perhaps not! So that's the distinction. See, I'm into success. These words equal successful hit records; those words don't" Now, Love has taken a lot of heat for this over the years, and on an artistic level that's completely understandable. Parks' lyrics were, to my mind at least, the best the Beach Boys ever had -- thoughtful, intelligent, moving, at times profound, often funny, often beautiful. But, while I profoundly disagree with Love, I have a certain amount of sympathy for his position. From Love's perspective, first and foremost, this is his source of income. He was the only one of the Beach Boys to ever have had a day job -- he'd worked at his father's sheet metal company -- and didn't particularly relish the idea of going back to manual labour if the rock star gig dried up. It wasn't that he was *opposed* to art, of course -- he'd written the lyrics to "Good Vibrations", possibly the most arty rock single released to that point, hadn't he? -- but that had been *commercial* art. It had sold. Was this stuff going to sell? Was he still going to be able to feed his wife and kids? Also, up until a few months earlier he had been Brian's principal songwriting collaborator. He was *still* the most commercially successful collaborator Brian had had. From his perspective, this was a partnership, and it was being turned into a dictatorship without him having been consulted. Before, it had been "Mike, can you write some lyrics for this song about cars?", now it was "Mike, you're going to sing these lyrics about a crow uncovering a cornfield". And not only that, but Mike had not met Brian's new collaborator, but knew he was hanging round with Brian's new druggie friends. And Brian was behaving increasingly weirdly, which Mike put down to the influence of the drugs and these new friends. It can't have helped that at the same time the group's publicist, Derek Taylor, was heavily pushing the line "Brian Wilson is a genius". This was causing Brian some distress -- he didn't think of himself as a genius, and he saw the label as a burden, something it was impossible to live up to -- but was also causing friction in the group, as it seemed that their contributions were being dismissed. Again, I don't agree with Mike's position on any of this, but it is understandable. It's also the case that Mike Love is, by nature, a very assertive and gregarious person, while Brian Wilson, for all that he took control in the studio, is incredibly conflict-avoidant and sensitive. From what I know of the two men's personalities, and from things they've said, and from the session recordings that have leaked over the years, it seems entirely likely that Love will have seen himself as having reasonable criticisms, and putting them to Brian clearly with a bit of teasing to take the sting out of them; while Brian will have seen Love as mercilessly attacking and ridiculing the work that meant so much to him in a cruel and hurtful manner, and that neither will have understood at the time that that was how the other was seeing things. Love's criticisms intensified. Not of everything -- he's several times expressed admiration for "Heroes and Villains" and "Wonderful" -- but in general he was not a fan of Parks' lyrics. And his criticisms seemed to start to affect Brian. It's difficult to say what Brian thinks about Parks' lyrics, because he has a habit in interviews of saying what he thinks the interviewer wants to hear, and the whole subject of Smile became a touchy one for him for a long time, so in some interviews he has talked about how dazzlingly brilliant they are, while at other times he's seemed to agree with Love, saying they were "Van Dyke Parks lyrics", not "Beach Boys lyrics". He may well sincerely think both at the same time, or have thought both at different times. This came to a head with a session for the tag of "Cabinessence": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Cabinessence"] Love insisted on having the line "over and over the crow flies uncover the cornfield" explained to him, and Brian eventually decided to call Van Dyke Parks and have him come to the studio. Up to this point, Parks had no idea that there was anything controversial, so when Brian phoned him up and very casually said that Mike had a few questions about the lyrics, could he come down to the studio? He went without a second thought. He later said "The only person I had had any interchange with before that was Dennis, who had responded very favorably to 'Heroes and Villains' and 'Surf's Up'. Based on that, I gathered that the work would be approved. But then, with no warning whatsoever, I got that phone call from Brian. And that's when the whole house of cards came tumbling down." Parks got to the studio, where he was confronted by an angry Mike Love, insisting he explain the lyrics. Now, as will be, I hope, clear from everything I've said, Parks and Love are very, very, *very* different people. Having met both men -- albeit only in formal fan-meeting situations where they're presenting their public face -- I actually find both men very likeable, but in very different ways. Love is gregarious, a charmer, the kind of man who would make a good salesman and who people use terms like "alpha male" about. He's tall, and has a casual confidence that can easily read as arrogance, and a straightforward sense of humour that can sometimes veer into the cruel. Parks, on the other hand, is small, meticulously well-mannered and well-spoken, has a high, precise, speaking voice which probably reads as effeminate to the kind of people who use terms like "alpha male", and the kind of devastating intelligence and Southern US attention to propriety which means that if he *wanted* to say something cruel about someone, the victim would believe themselves to have been complimented until a horrific realisation two days after the event. In every way, from their politics to their attitudes to art versus commerce to their mannerisms to their appearance, Mike Love and Van Dyke Parks are utterly different people, and were never going to mix well. And Brian Wilson, who was supposed to be the collaborator for both of them, was not mediating between them, not even expressing an opinion -- his own mental problems had reached the stage where he simply couldn't deal with the conflict. Parks felt ambushed and hurt, Love felt angry, especially when Parks could not explain the literal meaning of his lyrics. Eventually Parks just said "I have no excuse, sir", and left. Parks later said "That's when I lost interest. Because basically I was taught not to be where I wasn't wanted, and I could feel I wasn't wanted. It was like I had someone else's job, which was abhorrent to me, because I don't even want my own job. It was sad, so I decided to get away quick." Parks continued collaborating with Wilson, and continued attending instrumental sessions, but it was all wheelspinning -- no significant progress was made on any songs after that point, in early December. It was becoming clear that the album wasn't going to be ready for its planned Christmas release, and it was pushed back to January, but Brian's mental health was becoming worse and worse. One example that's often cited as giving an insight into Brian's mental state at the time is his reaction to going to the cinema to see John Frankenheimer's classic science fiction horror film Seconds. Brian came in late, and the way the story is always told, when he was sat down the screen was black and a voice said from the darkness, "Hello Mr. Wilson". That moment does not seem to correspond with anything in the actual film, but he probably came in around the twenty-four minute mark, where the main character walks down a corridor, filmed in a distorted, hallucinatory manner, to be greeted: [Excerpt: Seconds, 24:00] But as Brian watched the film, primed by this, he became distressed by a number of apparent similarities to his life. The main character was going through death and rebirth, just as he felt he was. Right after the moment I just excerpted, Mr. Wilson is shown a film, and of course Brian was himself watching a film. The character goes to the beach in California, just like Brian. The character has a breakdown on a plane, just like Brian, and has to take pills to cope, and the breakdown happens right after this: [Excerpt: Seconds, from about 44:22] A studio in California? Just like where Brian spent his working days? That kind of weird coincidence can be affecting enough in a work of art when one is relatively mentally stable, but Brian was not at all stable. By this point he was profoundly paranoid -- and he may have had good reason to be. Some of Brian's friends from this time period have insisted that Brian's semi-estranged abusive father and former manager, Murry, was having private detectives watch him and his brothers to find evidence that they were using drugs. If you're in the early stages of a severe mental illness *and* you're self-medicating with illegal drugs, *and* people are actually spying on you, then that kind of coincidence becomes a lot more distressing. Brian became convinced that the film was the work of mind gangsters, probably in the pay of Phil Spector, who were trying to drive him mad and were using telepathy to spy on him. He started to bar people who had until recently been his friends from coming to sessions -- he decided that Jules Siegel's girlfriend was a witch and so Siegel was no longer welcome -- and what had been a creative process in the studio degenerated into noodling and second-guessing himself. He also, with January having come and the album still not delivered, started doing side projects,  some of which, like his production of tracks for photographer Jasper Daily, seem evidence either of his bizarre sense of humour, or of his detachment from reality, or both: [Excerpt: Jasper Daily, "Teeter Totter Love"] As 1967 drew on, things got worse and worse. Brian was by this point concentrating on just one or two tracks, but endlessly reworking elements of them. He became convinced that the track "Fire" had caused some actual fires to break out in LA, and needed to be scrapped. The January deadline came and went with no sign of the album. To add to that, the group discovered that they were owed vast amounts of unpaid royalties by Capitol records, and legal action started which meant that even were the record to be finished it might become a pawn in the legal wrangling. Parks eventually became exasperated by Brian -- he said later "I was victimised by Brian Wilson's buffoonery" -- and he quit the project altogether in February after a row with Brian. He returned a couple of weeks later out of a sense of loyalty, but quit again in April. By April, he'd been working enough with Lenny Waronker that Waronker offered him a contract with Warner Brothers as a solo artist -- partly because Warners wanted some insight into Brian Wilson's techniques as a hit-making producer. To start with, Parks released a single, to dip a toe in the water, under the pseudonym "George Washington Brown". It was a largely-instrumental cover version of Donovan's song "Colours", which Parks chose because after seeing the film Don't Look Back, a documentary of Bob Dylan's 1965 British tour, he felt saddened at the way Dylan had treated Donovan: [Excerpt: George Washington Brown, "Donovan's Colours"] That was not a hit, but it got enough positive coverage, including an ecstatic review from Richard Goldstein in the Village Voice, that Parks was given carte blanche to create the album he wanted to create, with one of the largest budgets of any album released to that date. The result was a masterpiece, and very similar to the vision of Smile that Parks had had -- an album of clever, thoroughly American music which had more to do with Charles Ives than the British Invasion: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "The All Golden"] But Parks realised the album, titled Song Cycle, was doomed to failure when at a playback session, the head of Warner Brothers records said "Song Cycle? So where are the songs?" According to Parks, the album was only released because Jac Holzman of Elektra Records was also there, and took out his chequebook and said he'd release the album if Warners wouldn't, but it had little push, apart from some rather experimental magazine adverts which were, if anything, counterproductive. But Waronker recognised Parks' talent, and had even written into Parks' contract that Parks would be employed as a session player at scale on every session Waronker produced -- something that didn't actually happen, because Parks didn't insist on it, but which did mean Parks had a certain amount of job security. Over the next couple of years Parks and Waronker co-produced the first albums by two of their colleagues from Waronker's brains trust, with Parks arranging -- Randy Newman: [Excerpt: Randy Newman, "I Think It's Going to Rain Today"] And Ry Cooder: [Excerpt: Ry Cooder, "One Meat Ball"] Waronker would refer to himself, Parks, Cooder, and Newman as "the arts and crafts division" of Warners, and while these initial records weren't very successful, all of them would go on to bigger things. Parks would be a pioneer of music video, heading up Warners' music video department in the early seventies, and would also have a staggeringly varied career over the years, doing everything from teaming up again with the Beach Boys to play accordion on "Kokomo" to doing the string arrangements on Joanna Newsom's album Ys, collaborating with everyone from U2 to Skrillex,  discovering Rufus Wainwright, and even acting again, appearing in Twin Peaks. He also continued to make massively inventive solo albums, releasing roughly one every decade, each unique and yet all bearing the hallmarks of his idiosyncratic style. As you can imagine, he is very likely to come up again in future episodes, though we're leaving him for now. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys were floundering, and still had no album -- and now Parks was no longer working with Brian, the whole idea of Smile was scrapped. The priority was now to get a single done, and so work started on a new, finished, version of "Heroes and Villains", structured in a fairly conventional manner using elements of the Smile recordings. The group were suffering from numerous interlocking problems at this point, and everyone was stressed -- they were suing their record label, Dennis' wife had filed for divorce, Brian was having mental health problems, and Carl had been arrested for draft dodging -- though he was later able to mount a successful defence that he was a conscientious objector. Also, at some point around this time, Bruce Johnston seems to have temporarily quit the group, though this was never announced -- he doesn't seem to have been at any sessions from late May or early June through mid-September, and didn't attend the two shows they performed in that time. They were meant to have performed three shows, but even though Brian was on the board of the Monterey Pop Festival, they pulled out at the last minute, saying that they needed to deal with getting the new single finished and with Carl's draft problems. Some or all of these other issues almost certainly fed into that, but the end result was that the Beach Boys were seen to have admitted defeat, to have handed the crown of relevance off to the San Francisco groups. And even if Smile had been released, there were other releases stealing its thunder. If it had come out in December it would have been massively ahead of its time, but after the Beatles released Sgt Pepper it would have seemed like it was a cheap copy -- though Parks has always said he believes the Beatles heard some of the Smile tapes and copied elements of the recordings, though I don't hear much similarity myself. But I do hear a strong similarity in "My World Fell Down" by Sagittarius, which came out in June, and which was largely made by erstwhile collaborators of Brian -- Gary Usher produced, Glen Campbell sang lead, and Bruce Johnston sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Sagittarius, "My World Fell Down"] Brian was very concerned after hearing that that someone *had* heard the Smile tapes, and one can understand why. When "Heroes and Villains" finally came out, it was a great single, but only made number twelve in the charts. It was fantastic, but out of step with the times, and nothing could have lived up to the hype that had built up around it: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Heroes and Villains"] Instead of Smile, the group released an album called Smiley Smile, recorded in a couple of months in Brian's home studio, with no studio musicians and no involvement from Bruce, other than the previously released singles, and with the production credited to "the Beach Boys" rather than Brian. Smiley Smile has been unfairly dismissed over the years, but it's actually an album that was ahead of its time. It's a collection of stripped down versions of Smile songs and new fragments using some of the same motifs, recorded with minimal instrumentation. Some of it is on a par with the Smile material it's based on: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wonderful"] Some is, to my ears, far more beautiful than the Smile versions: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Wind Chimes"] And some has a fun goofiness which relates back to one of Brian's discarded ideas for Smile, that it be a humour album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She's Going Bald"] The album was a commercial flop, by far the least successful thing the group had released to that point in the US, not even making the top forty when it came out in September, though it made the top ten in the UK, but interestingly it *wasn't* a critical flop, at least at first. While the scrapping of Smile had been mentioned, it still wasn't widely known, and so for example Richard Goldstein, the journalist whose glowing review of "Donovan's Colours" in the Village Voice had secured Van Dyke Parks the opportunity to make Song Cycle, gave it a review in the New York Times which is written as if Goldstein at least believes it *is* the album that had been promised all along, and he speaks of it very perceptively -- and here I'm going to quote quite extensively, because the narrative about this album has always been that it was panned from the start and made the group a laughing stock: "Smiley Smile hardly reads like a rock cantata. But there are moments in songs such as 'With Me Tonight' and 'Wonderful' that soar like sacred music. Even the songs that seem irrelevant to a rock-hymn are infused with stained-glass melodies. Wilson is a sound sculptor and his songs are all harmonious litanies to the gentle holiness of love — post-Christian, perhaps but still believing. 'Wind Chimes', the most important piece on the album, is a fine example of Brian Wilson's organic pop structure. It contains three movements. First, Wilson sets a lyric and melodic mood ("In the late afternoon, you're hung up on wind chimes"). Then he introduces a totally different scene, utilizing passages of pure, wordless harmony. His two-and-a-half minute hymn ends with a third movement in which the voices join together in an exquisite round, singing the words, "Whisperin' winds set my wind chimes a-tinklin'." The voices fade out slowly, like the bittersweet afternoon in question. The technique of montage is an important aspect of Wilson's rock cantata, since the entire album tends to flow as a single composition. Songs like 'Heroes and Villains', are fragmented by speeding up or slowing down their verses and refrains. The effect is like viewing the song through a spinning prism. Sometimes, as in 'Fall Breaks and Back to Winter' (subtitled "W. Woodpecker Symphony"), the music is tiered into contrapuntal variations on a sliver of melody. The listener is thrown into a vast musical machine of countless working gears, each spinning in its own orbit." That's a discussion of the album that I hear when I listen to Smiley Smile, and the group seem to have been artistically happy with it, at least at first. They travelled to Hawaii to record a live album (with Brian, as Bruce was still out of the picture), taking the Baldwin organ that Brian used all over Smiley Smile with them, and performed rearranged versions of their old hits in the Smiley Smile style. When the recordings proved unusable, they recreated them in the studio, with Bruce returning to the group, where he would remain, with the intention of overdubbing audience noise and releasing a faked live album: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "California Girls [Lei'd studio version]"] The idea of the live album, to be called Lei'd in Hawaii, was scrapped, but that's not the kind of radical reimagining of your sound that you do if you think you've made an artistic failure. Indeed, the group's next albu

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Riverbend Church's Podcast
Sit Down Anyway | Come To The Table (Week 4)

Riverbend Church's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 37:16


Lead Pastor Joe Payton wraps up the sermon series "Come To The Table".

Fareed Zakaria GPS
A monarchy in transition and a sit down with President Zelensky in Kyiv

Fareed Zakaria GPS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 38:28 Very Popular


Fareed is joined by celebrated historians Simon Schama and Kate Williams in front of Buckingham Palace to discuss the life and legacy of the late Queen Elizabeth II and the challenges King Charles III will face. Then, an exclusive interview with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine in the Mariinsky Palace in Kyiv, where Fareed has a wide-ranging conversation with him about the new counteroffensive, his Russian enemy, Ukraine's message to America, and more.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Stonemaier Streams
Sunday Sitdown: 12 Questions & Answers About Game Design

Stonemaier Streams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 21:52


EDRM Global Podcast Network
Illumination Zone: Ankura's Chris Marks & Han Lai sit down with Kaylee & Mary.

EDRM Global Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 29:02


Sit Down with Sky & Preston
Tactics of Evil and BYU Pamphlet Controversy

Sit Down with Sky & Preston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 48:36


On today's episode, what are common tactics of the adversary? And what can we learn about them from the BYU pamphlet controversy? Preston shares some insider info from a friend in the New Student Orientation BYU department.All that and more on today's episode of Sit Down with Sky and Preston. If you enjoyed this episode, please leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or whatever platform you use.  Buy Preston's book:https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0B59HFQLJSubscribe to your YouTube Channel!https://youtube.com/channel/UCQLkj5TX9vqhibqdj8yi0RgFollow us on Instagramhttps://instagram.com/sitdownwithsky?utm_medium=copy_linkFollow us on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/sitdownwithsky?s=21All of our links:https://linktr.ee/Sitdownwithsky

F*ck it: Let's talk fights with Johnny Sig
Shawn Porter - A Sit Down with Johnny Sig

F*ck it: Let's talk fights with Johnny Sig

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 30:57


I had the honor to be joined with 2-time Welterweight Champion, amazing commentator and straight up great guy: Mr. Shawn "Showtime" Porter! We cover so much in this great conversation, enjoy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thelifenetwork/support

The Big Vito Brand
Big Vito's Sitdown- All out War

The Big Vito Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 30:40


Big Vito and the Mafia sitdow to discuss the fall out from AEW All out! CM Punk stripped of the title EVPs and other Suspended Where do they go from here!?! Plus all the other wrestling news on the Sitdown! We podcast Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday on Twitch 6:30 pm Eastern Twitch.tv/thebigvitobrand Listen HERE Anchor : Anchor.FM/thebigvitobrand IHeart : https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-the-big-vito-brand-31159185/ iTunes : https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-big-vito-brand Stitcher : https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-big-vito-brand Podbean : https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detail/j26b3-76d3a/The-Big-Vito-Brand-Podcast On your Alexa Devices under Flash Briefings https://www.amazon.com/The-Big-Vito-Brand/dp/B07N62Z7J4 Get Social HERE Instagram and Twitter: @thebigvitobrand Instagram and Twitter @MagicTSpiller Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebigvitobrand TikTok @thebigvitobrand Official websites : BigVito.com TheBigVitoBrand.com Virtue on twitter @NoDQ_Virtue @NotJargo PWR team on twitter @pwhustleprof @TheeTommyWonder @TheP1JB @BigRayHernandez --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thebigvitobrand/message

Where We Live
A sit down with incumbent Governor Ned Lamont

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 49:00


The gubernatorial race in Connecticut is heating up. Today, Governor Ned Lamont joins us to discuss his reelection campaign and what he wants to accomplish if elected to a second term. Lamont has led the state through 2.5 years of a pandemic; what are his plans to help residents in the current economy, bogged down by inflation and in a state where employers are still struggling to hire workers? We discuss evolving COVID-19 protocols, creating more affordable housing in our state, as well as parental rights and influence in education. Governor Lamont also answers listener calls and questions posted to Where We Live's Facebook and Twitter accounts. Ned Lamont - Incumbent Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Dr. Jonathan Wharton - Associate Professor of Political Science at Southern Connecticut State University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

One Nation Under Whisky
Season 6 Ep 15 - Jess Lomas has a sit-down with Richard Mckneand of Mackmyra

One Nation Under Whisky

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 127:05


Well, it's taken a little while but our very own Jess has her first industry interview on wax for the One Nation Under Whisky Padcost!   Joining Jess is Richard Mckneand, Area Sales Manager (UK South) for Sweden's Mackmyra Distillery. Mackmyra is perhaps the world's first distillery to create a completely vertical/gravity fed malt whisky distillery. We get to learn about that distillery as well as their maturation practices, how they smoke their malt, and so much more... ...as usual, have a seat, have a pour, and listen in. Unless you're driving. If you're driving, be smart and stay sober but be sure to listen into the conversation! Special thanks to: - Weigh Down for allowing us to use their song "Wooden Monsters" as our theme song - Moana McAuliffe for designing our Podcast Logo - RØDE for making *really* great microphones - Focusrite for making awesome USB receivers - Olympus and Tascam for making fine mobile recording devices - Joshua Hatton for producing and editing

Blue Chip Academy - Presented by L.I.G. Sports Group
The 2/10ths secret, a sit down with DeWayne Brown on specialized training and early identification process in recruiting.

Blue Chip Academy - Presented by L.I.G. Sports Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 38:04


To get an edge in your prep career, you need to learn about the 2/10ths speed and agility and the man behind it, DeWayne Brown. In this interview, I deep dive into what makes his training approach so innovative and what's the secret to his track record for success. If you want to understand the nuances of the early identification process, specialized training and the competitive environment are needed.This episode is for you."You get what you Earn."Just a few Pros that have gone through his program. Aaron Donald, Los Angeles Rams Jaquan Brisker, Chicago Bears Miles Sanders, Philadelphia EaglesSky Moore, Kansas City Chiefs Does your son dream of playing college football at the highest level?www.ligbluechip.comConnect with Justin and the Blue Chip Academy on Social Media:https://linktr.ee/JKingLIG

Chicago Dog Walk
Monday 9/5/22 - (Best of The Dog Walk) Sit-Down Chain Restaurant Draft (ft. Jeff D. Lowe) Replay

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 82:12 Very Popular


Best of The Dog Walk: Jeff D Lowe enters the draft room once again to draft sit-down chain restaurants. We get into White Sox Dave loving busty women, if Eddie's third round pick is trash, if Carl's fifth round pick is a weird spot for a date, and more.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 30:55


Part 5 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:07


Part 3 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:01


Part 4 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

The Brendan Fraser Podcast
A Sit-Down with Author and Journalist Zach Schonfeld

The Brendan Fraser Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 47:03


Spend some time with writer Zach Schonfeld, author of multiple Brendan Fraser related articles including "The Oral History of Encino Man, Brendan Fraser's Caveman Cult Classic" and "Blast From the Past is Now the Most Accidentally Prophetic 90s Movie".  Learn more about the making of Encino Man, how the pandemic relates to Blast and discover which film Fraser didn't really want to star in.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 6 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:57


Part 6 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Seeds of Hope: Homilies by Fr. Mike Muhr
First, Sit Down and Decide

Seeds of Hope: Homilies by Fr. Mike Muhr

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 10:50


Jesus says, “first sit down and calculate…” and a few moments later repeats “first sit down and decide…” In today's gospel reading Jesus turns around and addresses the great crowd traveling with him. He's proclaiming the kingdom of God, but they're not getting it. He  thus describes three conditions for being his disciple. This is a moment of choice for each person in the crowd, and for you and me.Readings https://bible.usccb.org/bible/readings/090422.cfm

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:06


Part 2 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 31:12


Part 1 -- HEARTBREAKING: Dan Golvach's son was murdered by Illegal alien out of prison for the fifth time. Dan joins Paine in emotional sit down to detail the aftermath and how the U.S. federal government cost Spencer Golvach his young life. MUST LISTEN