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Country on the coast of West Africa

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Sierra Leone

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Latest podcast episodes about Sierra Leone

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1829: 3/4 Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 11:50


Photo:  @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG 3/4   Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1829: 2/4 James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 8:15


Photo:  @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG 2/4   Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1829: 1/4 James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 10:35


Photo:  @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG 1/4   Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1829: 4/4 James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 8:50


Photo:  @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG 4/4     Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Black Me Up Podcast
HOMECOMING ft. Ibraheem

Black Me Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 31:22


We invited Ibraheem to the show to discuss his upcoming project; HOMECOMING. Listen to Ibraheem explain his project, his journey back home to Sierra Leone, his experiences as a community organizer, and what is in store for the future!  HOMECOMING will be an NFT project! We invite you to explore Ibraheem's pages to see more of his work + support. If you're going to be at Art Basel and are curating an promotional event, project showing, and/or pop-up; showcase Ibraheem's project along with it.    We are grateful to have been Ibraheem's Genesis Podcast, haha! Enjoy this pop-up episode!   Follow Ibraheem today! + Show him some love!  https://www.instagram.com/ibraheemleone/ https://twitter.com/ibraheemleone   We will be posting the links to purchase and view Ibraheem's HOMECOMING collection and film right here once we receive them! Check back soon + follow the him on social media!    -- NFT MARKETPLACES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE --  https://mirror.xyz/ https://zora.co/ https://opensea.io/   Black Me Up NFT's? Don't. Tell. No. Body! -- We are going to be rolling out a limited amount of BMU NFT's that you don't want to miss, make sure that you tune into episodes as they drop.    ** Join WOC Podcasters Insiders ** Join a community of like-minded WOC, learn how to start your own podcast, enroll in classes to learn new skills, and get all of the resources that you need to be successful! Join today. https://membership.wocpodcasters.co/bundles/insiders-membership?ref=cc48fe    ** Theme Music By ** Cupla   ** Donate ** We have a podcast CashApp! $bmupod Donate with paypal. https://www.Paypal.me/bmupod  Donate to Black Me Up with Peymynt - https://peymynt.me/for/bmupod (no account needed) Support us and become a Patron for as little as $1 - https://www.patreon.com/blackmeuppodcast Sign up for Peymynt, a black-owned payment processor. Use Dae's referal code! - https://peymynt.com/?ref=daeyunique    ** Share Your Opinions ** Please email us at BlackMeUpPodcast@gmail.com Join the convo on Twitter - https://twitter.com/BlackMeUpPodcst Subscribe to our YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC49FolZE3Mb94wdlHW3aGtg LIKE us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BlackMeUpPodcast/ Find all of our links here - https://www.pod.link/BlackMeUpPodcast   ** Want To Start A Podcast ** Try PodBean. Start a podcast with PodBean and get a month of Unlimited Plan on us. Sign up today at https://www.podbean.com/bmupod   Thank you for tuning in! We appreciate your support. See you next week, byyyyeeeeee

Too Posh Podcast
#260: Michelle Jewsbury, "NO ONE IS USELESS IN THIS WORLD WHO LIGHTENS THE BURDENS OF ANOTHER"

Too Posh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:19


Over 20,000 women have been murdered due to domestic violence since 2003. Unsilenced Voices founder Michelle Jewsbury nearly became one of those women. For years, Michelle was trapped in the domestic abuse cycle. She walked on eggshells around her partner, suffered his violent blow ups, and tried to believe his apologies. Instead of being accountable, her abuser worked to keep Michelle isolated and silent. In December of 2015 she summoned the strength to break that cycle, leave her abuser, and share her story. Now, Michelle works to combat domestic and gender-based violence on a global scale as the founder and CEO of Unsilenced Voices.Unsilenced Voices is a Non Profit Organization that helps Victims of Domestic Abuse and Sexual Gender Based Violence Worldwide. They work closely with their partners to assist the many victims of domestic abuse and sexual gender based violence in Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Rwanda. They provide monthly sensitization community trainings and are pre-collaborating with their Nepal partner who assist girls forced into marriage who flee from their husbands due to physical and sexual violence against them. In Amsterdam, they are working with the Ellamo Foundation to bring programing there. In the United States, Unsilenced Voices is working to provide education to the community and resources to survivors Nationwide.Unsilenced Voices' vision is to provide legal counseling and services free of charge to survivors who are unable to afford counsel to represent them in their Domestic Violence Restraining Order actions. They also plan to provide vocational training, counseling and community outreach to victims of domestic abuse.On December 8, 2021 Unsileced Voices is holding a "A NIGHT TO REMEMBER" Gala in Las Vegas and you do not want to miss this amazing event. Please buy your tickets here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-night-to-remember-tickets-169162554755Please follow Michelle on her social media platforms and reach out to her with any questions https://www.instagram.com/michellejewsbury/?hl=enhttps://www.instagram.com/unsilencedvoices/?hl=enhttps://www.amazon.com/But-Love-Him-domestic-violence/dp/179054243X

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

What is alone time really? And isn't that really just "sitting at my desk and working" time? The Old World sees it as a potential sickness and in the West as a necessity. Come explore (alone or otherwise) what this very common thing actually is with us on WAWTAR.Like the intro music? That was Hilltop who will be joined by Brunes Charles and Georgia Heers for the First Things Foundation benefit concert being held December, 4th in Naples, FL. You can find tickets and info here: https://tinyurl.com/ys69evwrWAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Diversified Game
JEREMIAH THORONKA GIVES THE GAME ON HOW OPTIM ENERGY PROVIDES ENERGY IN SIERRA LEONE

Diversified Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 47:01


CONNECT WITH JEREMIAH: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremiah-thoronka-914b5b128/ This is the Diversified Game Podcast with Kellen "Kash" Coleman a podcast giving entrepreneurial advice from a diverse and inclusive perspective. Submit to Be Our Guest: Send your bio, epk, one sheet, and decks to diversifiedgame@gmail.com Book Consulting Time with Kellen www.cprfirm.com Buy Our Swag/Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 https://diversifiedgame.bigcartel.com/ Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gamediversified Follow the Diversified Game Experience: http://diversifiedgame.com https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 http://instagram.diversifiedgame.com http://facebook.diversifiedgame.com http://twitter.diversifiedgame.com http://youtube.diversifiedgame.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/support

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens
Do I Have a Purpose?

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 3:42


Is God calling you to be a missionary?” Our pastor asked the question while he introduced the visiting missionaries from Sierra Leone. I sat in the hard pew and watched the couple walk on stage to share what God was doing in their mission work. I tuned out and blankly watched the slideshow of places and people that meant nothing to me. I was pretty sure God was not calling me to be a missionary or a pastor. Those thoughts had never entered my mind. Where did that leave me? And, if you're like me, where does that leave you? It has taken me forty years to learn what I wish I knew as a teenager: God has a purpose for every life He has created. As a teen, I thought God only had a purpose for people He called to do something big. Like live in a foreign land and speak in a foreign language to tell others about Jesus. The rest of us were relegated to attend church, be good, get a job, and live an ordinary life. I was mistaken. It has taken heartache, wrong choices, and a renewed relationship with God for me to realize He has a divine purpose for each of us in His kingdom. He has equipped everyone with a unique combination of talents, strengths, and desires. No one is insignificant in God's eyes. We don't have to be foreign missionaries to spread the good news about Jesus and His death and resurrection, or to share God's love with the world. What's in your future? What career(s) will you have? Electrician? Doctor? Store clerk? Designer? Farmer? Scientist? Parent? Where will you live? Who will you be in relationship with? The possibilities for your life's influence are endless because our amazing God is limitless. You are a useful, worthwhile, one-of-a-kind kingdom citizen. God has a purpose for your life tailored specifically for you. As you seek Him and follow Him, He will lead you along the paths He desires for your life. • Erin Nestico • What are some of the talents, strengths, and desires God has given you? How might He be inviting you to contribute to His kingdom today? What about in the future? • As you continue to discover what God has put in you, who are trusted Christians in your life who can pray with you and help you notice what God is doing in and through you? For we are God's masterpiece. He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the good things he planned for us long ago. Ephesians 2:10 (NLT)

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
Love Based Success?

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:12


 What does success look like? Well the NoVo Foundation seems to think that we can measure it using love as a metric. But how does that work? And as some have noted, can love really be quantified so easily? John tackles this and counters with an old world concept called the nous - which offers a possible meeting ground for these concepts. Links:Quartz article by Suzanne Guillette - https://tinyurl.com/xc7npbc8Orthodox Psychotherapy by Metropolitan Vlachos - https://tinyurl.com/277c6hdaLife of Moses by St. Gregory of Nyssa - https://tinyurl.com/h5pvs4ajWAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Diversified Game
AMBASSADOR SIDIQUE ABOU-BAKARR WAI GIVES THE GAME ON SIERRA LEONE

Diversified Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 44:47


Connect with The Ambassador & Sierra Leone:  https://embassyofsierraleone.net/about-embassy/ambassadors-bio This is the Diversified Game Podcast with Kellen "Kash" Coleman a podcast giving entrepreneurial advice from a diverse and inclusive perspective.  Submit to Be Our Guest: Send your bio, epk, one sheet, and decks to diversifiedgame@gmail.com Book Consulting Time with Kellen www.cprfirm.com Buy Our Swag/Merchandise:  https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187  https://diversifiedgame.bigcartel.com/  Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gamediversified   Follow the Diversified Game Experience: http://diversifiedgame.com  https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 http://instagram.diversifiedgame.com http://facebook.diversifiedgame.com  http://twitter.diversifiedgame.com  http://youtube.diversifiedgame.com Episode analytics --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/support

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
A Cup of Tea with the Taliban Neighbours

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 26:56


The news from Afghanistan is ever more dire. Twenty three million people are at risk of starvation, according to the World Food Programme, a fate which gets ever nearer as winter approaches. For international donors and aid agencies, this presents an acute dilemma: whether or not to work with the Afghan authorities to try to solve this crisis. To do so might require handing over food and other supplies to the Taliban government, a regime which no country even recognises. That is because nobody is quite sure just what kind of rulers the Taliban will be. Since they took over in August, there have been reports of brutality, which in some cases meant the cold-blooded murder of people who were seen as Taliban opponents. Yet there have not been the kind of mass atrocities which many feared. Visiting Kabul, Andrew North has found a variety of attitudes among the Taliban members he's come across, and they include his next door neighbours. They held a mass funeral in Sierra Leone, after a hundred and fifteen people were killed in a fuel tanker explosion. It happened in the West African country's capital, Freetown, some of the victims dying because they had rushed towards the site of the accident, hoping to gather up some of the petrol which had spilled out. This latest disaster comes just months after a fire destroyed thousands of homes in one of the city's slums. And many of this week's victims were buried in the same cemetery as those who died in a mudslide; that disaster killed around a thousand people. But then Sierra Leone is a country which in recent times has also experienced an Ebola outbreak, and before that, civil war. Walking round Freetown this week, Lucinda Rouse found people shocked and upset, but also sometimes resigned to the misfortune so frequently visited upon them. We were hoping to bring you a report from Nicaragua, where they have been holding an election. However, our Correspondent, Will Grant was not allowed into the country, turned back at the border. But that in itself tells you plenty about the way politics works in Nicaragua these days he says. It is a country where journalists and other commentators are routinely locked up for what they write, and where people protesting against the government have been shot in the streets. Still, Will Grant did at least try to get in, knowing the chances were slim. People often have a love-hate relationship with tourists. They may well bring plenty of money into an economy, and jobs for those who need them. And yet the disruption caused by a mass of visitors is not always welcome. Of course, many tourist spots have had a terrible time under Covid, with lockdown preventing anyone from coming to visit. Some resorts have been positively praying for a return to the days when they could play host to hordes of holiday-makers. Others though have been surprised to find a surge in new arrivals, like residents on the Greek island of Tinos, where Antonia Quirke was among those paying a visit.

Medicine, We're Still Practicing
34 - Dr. Suzanne Donovan - Ebola Outbreak Discussion Revisited

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:01


In this episode, we revisit our conversation with Dr Suzanne Donovan and her harrowing work on the Ebola outbreak. As Dr. Donovan breaks down her first time fighting overseas against this truly terrible disease, one can't help but draw the similarities and foreshadowing between her work in a nation in desperation, and the COVID pandemic that was just around the corner.  Episode Timestamps: 1:40 How is Ebola spread? Why is the outbreak so bad in West Africa? 4:20 Why were so many doctors dying from Ebola? 6:20 Evacuating doctors back to the US? 7:30 What is the treatment for Ebola in Africa? 10:00 Transmission timeline for Ebola 14:30 What was the scene like on Dr. Donovan's first day in the African hospital? 17:48 Contact tracing and testing for Ebola 19:50 Healthcare worker safety in West Africa 22:23 Dealing with dead bodies? 23:36 Dr Donovan compares how governments in third world countries handle health crisis differently than the US 25:36 The progress in HIV/AIDS treatment over the years ----------------- Learn More: Medicine, We're Still Practicing Follow Us: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram Hosted by: Dr. Steven Taback & Bill Curtis Produced and Edited by: AJ Moseley Theme Music by: Celleste and Eric Dick A CurtCo Media Production See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
What's Happening with Foreign Aid?

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:29


Foreign aid...what's it really? Did George Washington have a foreign aid policy? And is it only about sending aid overseas, or is there an element of receiving as well? Or is it all about making lots of money? Heer's takes a quick look at what aid is and how it's delivered.WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Africa Today
Niger school fire kills at least 20 children

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 21:06


An entire city in mourning in Niger, following the death of at least twenty children in a blaze that engulfed a school made of thatch and wood. Five thousand people from DRC cross in Uganda to flee militia infight near their homes. The aftermath of a fuel tank explosion is still felt three days later in Sierra Leone, as people are still crowding the local hospitals looking for their loved ones. And climate change affects us all for sure, but many of its effects impact women more than men; we find out why.

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #408 - 11.08.2021  ASTRO MOUNT PORTAL: Travis Scott Symbols, Big Bird Biden, Shatner Saw Hades in Space - CCNT 408 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO Methodeia Transhuman Coin officially launches Breakdown of Economist Cover 2022   FLIPPY Why business owners are turning to ‘gratitude robots' to show appreciation for employees (Insider)   IT WILL KILL Note: Man bursts into flames after being tased, hand sanitizer (mLive) Note: Sierra Leone capital, 99 killed in tanker explosion (Reuters) Travis Scott concert, 9 killed, Astroworld mass casualty, Travis Scott (Houston Chron.)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE Clip: Bayer pharmaceuticals CEO says shot is gene therapy at World Health Summit Tweet: Big Bird got the shot, Biden responds US federals appeals court freezes Biden's shot rule for companies (Reuters) Study shows dramatic decline in effective of all three shots (Yahoo News/LA Times) Note: How Fauci Fooled America (Newsweek Opinion)   Party Pitch BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   POLYTICK $1 Trillion, House Passes Infrastructure bill (NY Times) Clip: Newsom MIA since booster (ABC)   NEW WORLD ORDER/COP26 First Patient Diagnosed with “Climate Change” (Independent) Clip: Obama COP26 speech, puppet master Clip: John Kerry says progress being made, real money being spent

Let's Keep It Real
Overcoming Fear When You Have Something Worthy to Say

Let's Keep It Real

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 52:26


Sinéad Andrews has spent over 25 years working in international emergencies and development work. At the age of 22, she was working in a refugee camp set up on the Rwandan-Tanzanian border after the genocide that took place in Rwanda killing 800,000 people. Her next overseas position was in Calcutta working with street children for an Irish NGO funding local Indian NGO's. Since then, Sinéad has worked with the United Nations, mostly UNICEF, jumping from HQ and field positions in Dublin, New York, Lebanon, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Papua New Guinea with short missions in Sierra Leone, Kosovo and Nigeria.    She previously interned for Senator Ted Kennedy in DC during the Clinton/Gore campaign election in 1992.

The John Batchelor Show
1795: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 41:00


Photo: CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Simple English News Daily
Monday 8th November 2021. World News. Today: UK COP 26. Germany stabbing. Italy Mafia trial. Sierra Leone tanker explosion. Ethiopia Tigray

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 8:15


World News in 7 minutes. Monday 8th November 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: UK COP 26. Germany stabbing. Italy Mafia trial. Sierra Leone tanker explosion. Ethiopia Tigrayan advance. US festival disaster. Nicaragua elections. India fire. Iraq assassination attempt. And Musk's billion dollar vote.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Global News Podcast
Scores dead in Sierra Leone tanker explosion

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 27:23


The accident happened after a fuel tanker collided with another vehicle in the capital, Freetown. Also: Texas police open criminal investigation into deaths at festival, and a dig in Pompeii yields rare window on daily life of Roman slaves.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 6, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The episode features a PANW report with dispatches on the current threat to national sovereignty in Ethiopia amid the escalating conflict initiated by western-backed rebel groupings; Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa has attended the COP26 climate conference held in Glasgow, Scotland; reports says that 98 people have been killed in an oil tanker exploision in the West African state of Sierra Leone; and the Sudanese mass organizations have rejected a settlement offered by the military leaders that seized power on Oct. 25. In the second hour we look at the contributions of Ghana musician Nana Kwame Ampadu who recently joined the ancestors. In addition, we examine in detail the conflict in the Horn of Africa state of Ethiopia. Finally, we look into other issues impacting Africa and international community. 

World News with BK
Podcast#273: Sierra Leone fuel explosion, US election results, UK serial necrophiliac

World News with BK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 153:13


Back in the saddle... started with that fuel truck explosion in Sierra Leone which killed at least a hundred people, and then went on the Sudan coup. Plus eight people dead at a Travis Scott concert, US election results and aftermath, Japan death row prisoners sue, Biden's ridiculous settlement offer to illegal immigrants, and an electrician in the UK apparently had sex with hundreds of corpses. Music: Diorona Beat/"Положение"

Newshour
At least 99 dead in Freetown tanker explosion

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 47:24


A huge fuel tanker explosion in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, has killed at least 99 people. We hear from the mayor of Freetown. Also in the programme: several dead in Texas concert crush; and Polish pro-abortion march. (Picture: Burnt collided trucks are pictured after a fuel tanker explosion in Freetown. Credit: Reuters)

Diversified Game
ANTONIA HOWARD GIVES THE GAME ON BEING A BROADCAST JOURNALIST IN SIERRA LEONE

Diversified Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 24:31


VISIT: https://antoniahoward.com This is the Diversified Game Podcast with Kellen "Kash" Coleman a podcast giving entrepreneurial advice from a diverse and inclusive perspective. Submit to Be Our Guest: Send your bio, epk, one sheet, and decks to diversifiedgame@gmail.com Book Consulting Time with Kellen www.cprfirm.com Buy Our Swag/Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 https://diversifiedgame.bigcartel.com/ Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gamediversified Follow the Diversified Game Experience: http://diversifiedgame.com https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 http://instagram.diversifiedgame.com http://facebook.diversifiedgame.com http://twitter.diversifiedgame.com http://youtube.diversifiedgame.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/support

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Welcome! Welcome! Today John dives into the dowry (not to be confused with bride price - don't worry we clear that up). What was it, what is it, and how has it transformed in the modern world? Also, yes, there are people who kidnap their brides and we talk about that too.WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

The Daily Good
Episode 401: A startlingly positive discovery about tap water, more wisdom from Mark Twain, advances in Sierra Leone’s power supply, the beauty of Dublin, the genius of Kurt Elling, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 19:06


Good News: New research shows that tap water (NOT pure water!) has a way of reacting with plastics to keep them from breaking down into harmful micro plastics, Link HERE. The Good Word: A classic quote from Mark Twain! Good To Know: A genuinely surprising bit of trivia about President Rutherford B. Hayes… Good News: […]

Archives d'Afrique
Archives d'Afrique - Liberia: la descente aux enfers de Charles Taylor (7&8)

Archives d'Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:00


La situation se complique pour le président du Liberia, Charles Taylor. Le Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU lui impose un embargo sur les armes, après avoir constaté qu'il s'adonne à un trafic d'armes et de diamants avec les rebelles de Sierra Leone.

The John Batchelor Show
1803: Hezbollah in Africa. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 11:55


Photo:  Hezbollah does fundraising among Shi'a in Africa, including from innocents who don't know where the funds will go; and it also makes significant income from blood diamonds, incl from SIerra Leone. Here: the famous Star of Sierra Leone Hezbollah in Africa. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 https://eeradicalization.com/hezbollah-and-irans-radicalization-efforts-in-africa/

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation
125: HOT BENCH Judge Michael Corriero and his eye-popping insight

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 22:37


Judge Michael Corriero (Ret.) serves as one of three judges on CBS Media Ventures' Emmy-nominated syndicated court program HOT BENCH, created by Judge Judy Sheindlin. The show returned for its eighth season on September 13, 2021. During the 2020-21 season, HOT BENCH was once again the #2 court program in daytime television in household ratings and all major demographics. It has been # 2 across-the-board in all those categories since 2015. Prior to joining HOT BENCH, Judge Corriero served as a prosecutor in the office of Manhattan District Attorney Frank Hogan, a criminal defense attorney and a judge for 28 years in the criminal courts of New York State. For 16 years, he presided over Manhattan's Youth Part, a special court he created in the Supreme Court of New York State designed to focus attention and scarce resources on young offenders prosecuted as adults pursuant to New York State's Juvenile Offender Law. Under Judge Corriero's innovative leadership, the Youth Part became a model for mobilization and coordination of treatment and social services for children prosecuted in adult courts. He retired from the bench in 2008 to become the Executive Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City. In 2010, he left Big Brothers Big Sisters to establish the New York Center for Juvenile Justice. The Center promoted a comprehensive model of justice for minors that treats children as children and responds to their misconduct with strategies designed to improve their chances of becoming constructive members of society. An important element of the Center's advocacy was recognized in the enactment of New York State's 2017 Raise The Age Legislation which incorporated and institutionalized the Youth Part Model. In 2012, Judge Corriero founded, along with the New York Foundling, one of New York's oldest and respected social service agencies run by the Sisters of Charity, the Families Rising Project - an alternative-to-incarceration program that works not only with a young offender but with his/her entire family. Judge Corriero is an alumnus of St. John's University School of Law and St. John's University. He was a member of the Law Review and served as an associate editor. He graduated from St. John's University College with a Bachelor of Arts degree majoring in social science. He is the author of a book titled, “Judging Children as Children: A Proposal for a Juvenile Justice System,” which is a blueprint for juvenile justice reform. He is regarded nationally and internationally as an expert in juvenile justice. He has traveled extensively, lecturing and advising legal institutions in numerous countries, including Israel, South Africa, Sierra Leone, Kazakhstan and Peru. Judge Corriero is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including: The New York Foundling's Lifetime Achievement Award (2015); Advocate of the Decade (2014) presented by Families on the Move of New York City, Inc.; The Eleanor Roosevelt Award (2011), presented by Citizens Committee for Children; Asian Pacific American Advocates (OCA – New York) Community Service Award (2011); Excellence in Juvenile Justice, Juvenile Detention Association of New York State (2007); Frank S. Hogan Associates Recognition Award (2007); Excellence in Children's Advocacy, presented by 100 Women Against Child Abuse (2006); The Citizens' Committee for Children's Annual Founders' Award (2004); The Howard A. Levine Award for Outstanding Work in the area of children and the law (New York State Bar Association 1999); The Livingston Hall Juvenile Justice Award (American Bar Association 1997); Outstanding Service on Behalf of Youth Award (ELEM 1996, 2007); The Conrad B. Mattox, Jr. Commonwealth Debate Winner (University of Richmond 1996); The Charles A. Rapallo Award (Colombian Lawyers Association 1994); and he participated as a Polsky Judicial Fellow at the Aspen Institute's Justice and Society Seminar (2003). Judge Corriero served at the request of the former Chief Judge of New York State, Judith Kaye, on the New York State Permanent Commission on Justice for Children. He also served on Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Committee on the Judiciary. He has previously served on the New York State Probation Commission Task Force and former New York Governor David Patterson's Task Force on Transforming Juvenile Justice. Judge Corriero also served as Chairperson of the Committee on Juvenile Justice of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. He was Co-chair of the American Bar Association's Juvenile Justice Committee. He is a member of the New York State Bar Association's Committee on Children and the Law. He served as a trustee of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City; a member of the Advisory Committee of Citizens' Committee for Children; a member of the Professional Committee of ELEM (Youth at Risk in Israel); and a board member of Transfiguration Grammar School Education Association. HOT BENCH is created by Judge Judy Sheindlin and executive produced by David Theodosopoulos. Belinda Jackson and James Glover are co-executive producers. Patricia DiMango, Tanya Acker and Michael Corriero comprise the three-judge panel. HOT BENCH is produced by Big Ticket Pictures and Queen Bee Productions. It is distributed by CBS Media Ventures. JONES.SHOW is a weekly podcast featuring host Randall Kenneth Jones (author, speaker & creative communications consultant) and Susan C. Bennett (the original voice of Siri). JONES.SHOW is produced and edited by Kevin Randall Jones. HOT BENCH Online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/HotBenchTV Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HotBench Web: www.hotbench.tv JONES.SHOW Online: Join us in the Jones.Show Lounge on Facebook. Twitter (Randy): https://twitter.com/randallkjones Instagram (Randy): https://www.instagram.com/randallkennethjones/ Facebook (Randy): https://www.facebook.com/mindzoo/ Web: RandallKennethJones.com Follow Randy on Clubhouse Twitter (Susan): https://twitter.com/SiriouslySusan Instagram (Susan): https://www.instagram.com/siriouslysusan/ Facebook (Susan): https://www.facebook.com/siriouslysusan/ Web: SusanCBennett.com Follow Susan on Clubhouse Web: KevinRandallJones.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-randall-jones/ www.Jones.Show SFX: "big clap" by kellieskitchen on freesound.org licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported. SFX link: https://freesound.org/people/kellieskitchen/sounds/209991/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
From the Field Series: Isabella Copeland

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:48


The From the Field Series is a conversation between First Things Foundation Field Workers and John as they explore the lesser talked about aspects of life. This is not a series devoted to what FTF does per se, but rather, a meaningful look at how experiences and decisions shape our lives.This week Isabella Copeland joins us from our Appalachian site to talk about her experience as a hospital chaplain and her intimate and life changing experience with death and those coming to terms with it.WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Glocal Citizens
Episode 97: In Pursuit of Humanity United with Kehinde Togun

Glocal Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 51:06


Greetings Glocal Citizens! Around this time last year, the world--Africa particular witnessed the rise of a new and notable class of activists in the #EndSARS protests which was punctuated by a brutal conflict between police forces and activists in the Lekki Toll Gate Shooting on 20th October 2020. In this week's episode, I had to opportunity discuss the changing face of activism as well as the necessary changes in the ways that policy is taught, designed, communicated about and implemented with a consummate policy professional, Kehinde Togun. As former colleagues at www.ndi.org, he was introduced to me by my guest in Episode 93 [https://glocalcitizens.fireside.fm/93], Sefakor Ashiagbor and I am grateful, as always, for the introduction. Kehinde is currently the Senior Director for Policy and Government Relations at Humanity United where he leads the team responsible for engaging governments, multilateral institutions, and civil society in pursuit of policy change and regulatory action that cultivate the conditions for enduring peace and freedom. He has led global democracy and governance programs for 15 years which has included complex research advising on overseas investments; leading diverse development initiatives, including training senior staff of the Tanzanian government to improve service delivery to citizens; supporting members of the Iraqi and Kurdistan Parliaments to increase outreach to constituents; working with citizens in Nigeria and Kenya to improve electoral integrity; and enhancing the ability of NGOs in Iraq, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Turkey to demand greater accountability from their governments. He also serves on multiple boards including the Center for Racial Justice in Education [https://centerracialjustice.org/], an organization that trains and empowers educators to dismantle racism in the US education system. Born and partially raised in Nigeria, Kehinde started his glocal citizenship journey at the age of 11 when his family migrated to the US in search of healthcare solutions. Listen in, there's so much more to this talented diasporan. Where to find Kehinde? On LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/kehindetogun/) On Twitter (https://twitter.com/KehindeTogun?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) What's Kehinde listening to? Up First on NPR (https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510318/up-first) The Daily Punch (https://www.audacy.com/podcasts/the-daily-punch-47458) Hacks on Tap (https://www.hacksontap.com/about) Code Switch on NPR (https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510312/codeswitch) Snap Judgement (https://snapjudgment.org/) Other topics of interest: About Teach for America (https://www.teachforamerica.org/) The Case Against Education (https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B07T3QRNLC&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_Z1YF5PBHA52SW8TY393M&tag=glocalcitiz0e-20) by Bryan Caplan Truman National Security Project (https://www.trumanproject.org/) Council on Foreign Relations (https://www.cfr.org/) *When you click and purchase books using the link(s) above, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for your support! Special Guest: Kehinde Togun.

Archives d'Afrique
Archives d'Afrique - Charles Taylor et la guerre en Sierra Leone (5&6)

Archives d'Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:00


4 août 1997. Charles Taylor prend en main pour 6 ans les destinées du Liberia. Les Libériens ballotés, malmenés, ont finalement voté en faveur de celui qui avait pour slogan « Il a tué ma mère, il a tué mon père, mais je vote pour lui ». Alors qu'au Liberia, la guerre est loin d'être terminée, cette victoire de Charles Taylor n'a pas non plus mis fin à une autre guerre civile en Sierra Leone, dont il est l'un des principaux acteurs. Charles Taylor qui lorgne sur l'immense richesse en or et en diamants de l'État voisin.

Found Down
Working with Ebola Patients in Sierra Leone – An Interview with Emily Scott, Labor and Delivery Nurse

Found Down

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 55:33


Today I interview Emily Scott, labor and delivery nurse and one half of the Two Dusty Travelers about her time working with ebola patients in Sierra Leone, West Africa. Emily describes how she decided to heed the call to work up close and personal with such a deadly disease and what she experienced when she got there. Emily is an adventurous and brave individual who shares this inspiring tale. Not everything went as expected - as often in this case, so you will definitely want to tune in to this episode! Thank you again for being on the show! Stay Safe and Stay Sane, Nicole Support this podcast

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond
681: Lisa Buckley - "No Strings Attached"

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:14


Lisa Buckley began her career puppeteering on a LIVE morning show back in 1980 and continues to work as a professional puppeteer. Her talent as a performer has brought her literally around the world, performing in Cambodia, Philippines, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Madagascar, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, Haiti and Bangladesh. She has worked on countless stage productions, movies and television shows including Alf, Men In Black, Lazytown, Johnny and the Sprites and dozens of Muppet productions. Lisa spent ten seasons on Sesame Street where she puppeteered everything from a penguin to a hotdog. Lisa designs, builds and performs all types of puppets.  Her greatest love and achievement to date is her work with No Strings International, an NGO that delivers lifesaving workshops and films to children in crisis around the world. Listen to her amazing story and how she, with no strings attached, is connecting to the world. *** CONNECT TO LOU DIAMOND & THRIVE LOUD

Get F***ing Real
#86: From The Dumbest Decision to Global Cultural Change Agent | Zarinah El-Amin

Get F***ing Real

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:09


Zarinah El-Amin is an award-winning anthropologist, author and TEDx speaker whose company, Book Power Publishing, revolves around helping clients create cultural change through books and global experiences.  What is the dumbest decision you've ever made in your life? Zarinah opens up about the “dumbest decision” she ever made, and the transformational lesson she learned when she repressed her true nature to make her marriage work. Being raised a Muslim, Zarinah was surrounded by family friends from many cultures, but as a student in Detroit and later at Howard University, she wasn't exposed to a lot of different people. Find out what “clicked” that made her know she was a “person of the world.” And how that led to eye-opening experiences like living in Egypt and dating someone in a different caste, and revitalizing orphan programs in Sierra Leone. You'll also hear the lessons she learned in her 40th year—a spiritual year of revelations for many Muslims—which came in a series of GFR moments including losing her mom, divorcing her husband of 14 years, and moving in with her father after his stage 4 cancer diagnosis. Plus, you'll hear how she's using it all to serve her purpose today. ResourcesGrab Zarinah's gift here: http://www.bookpowerpublishing.com/checklist (The Complete Self-Publishing Checklist ) The 12 GFR Commandments - https://gfr.life/12c (download your own copy now) https://gfr.life/squad (Join the GFR Squad) - get started for just 20 Bucks! Plus get access to the Squad exclusive video “How to start writing your book” with Zarinah El-Amin  Did you enjoy the podcast?If you liked this episode let me know! Reviews for the podcast on iTunes are much appreciated! This helps us reach entrepreneurs just like you to be unapologetically themselves. If you received value from this episode, it would mean the world if you could take a moment and leave your 5-star rating and positive review. You can do that by https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/get-f-ing-real/id1464530109 (visiting right here)https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/get-f-ing-real/id1464530109 (.)

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
What is a Company?

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 24:19


Big companies have become the movers and shakers of the modern world. But was it always that way? How were merchants understood in the "old world?" And do big, global companies have a problem that most of us aren't discussing? WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Tech This Out News
Wakanda Forever (Ghana: Black To The Future)

Tech This Out News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:30


“Wakanda” marks a fascinating cultural moment globally. The name serves as symbolism to an unapologetic Afro Futurist society. Wakanda also represents the powerful promise of black liberation dreamed by generations of Black People global. “We have for centuries sought to either find or create a promised land where we would be untroubled by the criminal horrors of our American existence,” “From the original pioneer of Black to Africa, Paul Cuffe's attempts in 1811 to repatriate blacks to Sierra Leone and Marcus Garvey's back-to-Africa Black Star shipping line to the Afrocentric movements of the '60s and '70s, black people have populated the Africa of our imagination with our most yearning attempts at self-realization. Osei Kweku sits with Dr. George C. Fraser for one epic conversation, education session on the Wakanda Project. This is one podcast you save, share and be inspired! #classic #epic

The John Batchelor Show
1770: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 41:00


Photo:   SER-Niños Charter School, a charter school in the Gulfton area of Houston, Texas CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Digital Dependence in the Global South

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:11


Rev. David Federwitz — Regional Director for Liberia, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Nigeria, and Cameroon for Lutheran Bible Translators (LBT), joins Andy and Sarah to talk about the daily life for the people groups served by LBT, the role of technology and digital communications in these cultures, and how the recent social media outage affected these cultures in a very different way than for residents of the United States. Learn more about the work of Lutheran Bible Translators at lbt.org, and listen to the Bible at lbt.org/livingwater. Read more about this in an article from The Atlantic at theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2021/10/whatsapp-outage-hit-global-south-hardest/620312.

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle
Lives at stake: Baka people in Cameroon, lithium mining in Nevada and industrial fishing in Sierra Leone

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 29:59


Around the world, local people fight to maintain their way of life and habitats. In Cameroon, the Baka people are being driven out of their forests by logging and mining. In the US, a new lithium mine threatens to infringe on Indigenous sacred sites. And in Sierra Leone, an expensive, internationally-funded industrial fishing habor could ruin residents' livelihoods and the local ecosystem.

World Football
Welcoming back Mr. Ranieri

World Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:17


Watford defender William Troost-Ekong discusses Claudio Ranieri's Premier League return. We also hear from the Sierra Leone national team coach John Keister as the country looks ahead to competing in its first Africa Cup of Nations since 1996. Picture on website: William Troost-Ekong of Watford celebrates following a match against Millwall (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images).

The Forum
A dirty history of diamonds

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:40


We seem to have an almost insatiable appetite for the glitter and sparkle of diamonds. Yet transforming these stones into jewels fit for princesses and film stars involves a long chain of production and distribution. And the diamond industry has long been bound up with a much darker side: the exploitation of workers, environmental damage, all-powerful monopolies and violent mafias, not to mention the so-called Blood Diamonds used to finance armed conflict. So how is the industry trying to clean up its image and regulate the trade? Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the history of the diamond trade are: Dr. Lansana Gberie, former coordinator for the UN Security Council Panel of Experts on Liberia. He is the author of A Dirty War in West Africa: The RUF and the Destruction of Sierra Leone. He's also Sierra Leone's current Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva and the Sierra Leonean Ambassador to Switzerland - though his contributions to this programme are in a personal capacity. Ian Smillie, founder of the Diamond Development Initiative, now DDI at Resolve, an organisation which works to improve conditions for small-scale miners. He is the author of several books, including Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond Trade. He is based in Canada. Dr. Tijl Vanneste, researcher at the Portuguese Institute of International Relations at Nova University in Lisbon. He is the author of Blood, Sweat and Earth: The Struggle for Control over the World's Diamonds Throughout History. [Image: Examining a gem diamond in Antwerp, Belgium; Credit: Paul O'Driscoll/Getty Images]

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
N.S. art installation features letters to Black loyalists who emigrated to Sierra Leone

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:58


In 1792, nearly 1,200 Black loyalists left Nova Scotia and set sail for Sierra Leone. The British failed to keep their promises to the loyalists so they were given the opportunity to leave. A new art installation at the Canadian Museum of Immigration pays tribute to those who left by featuring letters written to them by present-day Nova Scotians. Kathrin Winkle is the coordinator of the community project and Karen Hudson wrote one of the letters.

The Compass
Trust: What is the best way to communicate public health messages?

The Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:39


Anti-vaxxers, flat Earthers, 5G arsonists and climate change deniers – why have so many people given up on science and where are governments, scientists and the media going wrong? As Covid-19 continues to affect us all, what is the best way to communicate public health messages, when the bottom line is saving lives? Umaru Fofana reports from Sierra Leone on the Ebola prevention and vaccine campaigns and former BBC science correspondent, Sue Nelson, speaks to public health experts and fact checkers about efforts to combat misinformation. (Photo: Pupils look at an Ebola prevention poster during a sensibilisation campaign provided by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in Abidjan. Credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

In the "Old World" you see a lot of interesting things. A truck lodged in the roof of a Guatemalan hut for instance. You also see, especially in Africa, men holding hands. What is that all about? You might be surprised to find out that the underlying reasons are more important culturally than is first apparent.WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

The Take
The mental health toll of survivors in Sierra Leone

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:34


After dealing with an 11-year war and the Ebola epidemic, Sierra Leoneans are now - like the rest of us - facing the COVID-19 pandemic. But for many, this can be particularly triggering. So what happens to people faced with generations of untreated collective trauma, and what can be done to help Sierra Leoneans heal? In this episode:  Rawya Rageh (@RawyaRageh), Senior Crisis Adviser for Amnesty International Yusuf Kabba, President of the Sierra Leone Association of Ebola Survivors Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)  

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
Searching for Empathy with Uncle Seth

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:57


John and Uncle Seth back for more as they bite into what exactly happened to individuality and community in the last year. Was there a chance to unite under a common cause and repair social rifts? Or is taking horse de-wormer really the issue at stake here? WAWTAR!Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

The John Batchelor Show
1715: James Tooley #Unbound: Really good schools. The complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 41:00


Photo: The Browning school near Dublin, Georgia. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  James Tooley #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview. May 14, 2021. LXX. GLXXG Really Good Schools: Global Lessons for High-Caliber, Low-Cost Education –  Hardcover – April 12, 2021.by James Tooley  “James Tooley has taken his argument about the transformative power of low-cost private education to a new and revelatory level in Really Good Schools. This is a bold and inspiring manifesto for a global revolution in education.” —Niall C. Ferguson, Milbank Family Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Almost overnight a virus has brought into question America's nearly 200-year-old government-run K-12 school-system—and prompted an urgent search for alternatives. But where should we turn to find them?  Enter James Tooley's Really Good Schools. A distinguished scholar of education and the world's foremost expert on private, low-cost innovative education, Tooley takes readers to some of the world's most impoverished communities located in some of the world's most dangerous places—including such war-torn countries as Sierra Leone, Liberia, and South Sudan.  And there, in places where education “experts” fear to tread, Tooley finds thriving private schools that government, multinational NGOs, and even international charity officials deny exist.  Why?  Because the very existence of low-cost, high-quality private schools shatters the prevailing myth in the U.S., U.K., and western Europe that, absent government, affordable, high-quality schools for the poor could not exist. But they do. And they are ubiquitous and in high demand. Founded by unheralded, local educational entrepreneurs, these schools are proving that self-organized education is not just possible but flourishing—often enrolling far more students than “free” government schools do at prices within reach of even the most impoverished families. In the course of his analysis Tooley asks the key questions: ■ What proportion of poor children is served? ■ How good are the private schools?  ■ What are the business models for these schools?  ■ And can they be replicated and improved?  The evidence is in. In poor urban and rural areas around the world, children in low-cost private schools outperform those in government schools. And the schools do so for a fraction of the per-pupil cost. Thanks to the pandemic, parents in America and Europe are discovering that the education of their children is indeed possible—and likely far better—without government meddling with rigid seat-time mandates, outdated school calendars, absurd age-driven grade levels, and worse testing regimes. And having experienced the first fruits of educational freedom, parents will be increasingly open to the possibilities of ever greater educational entrepreneurship and innovation.  Thankfully, they have Really Good Schools to show the way.

Reveal
A Racial Reckoning at Doctors Without Borders

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 50:47


For decades, Doctors Without Borders has been admired for bringing desperately needed medical care to crises around the globe and pioneering modern-day humanitarian aid. It's an organization with radical roots, promising to do whatever it takes to deliver life-saving care to people in need. But now, it's struggling to address institutional racism. The organization, also known by its French acronym MSF, has about 63,000 people working in 88 countries. While foreign doctors parachuting into crisis zones get most of the attention, 90 percent of the work is being done by local health workers.  In the summer of 2020, more than 1,000 current and former staffers wrote a letter calling out institutional racism at MSF. They say that MSF operates a two-tiered tiered system that favors foreign doctors, or expat doctors, over local health workers.  On the eve of MSF's 50th anniversary, reporters Mara Kardas-Nelson, Ngozi Cole and Sean Campbell talked to about 100 current and former MSF workers to investigate how deep these issues run. We meet Dr. Indira Govender, a South African doctor who in 2011 accepted what she thought was her dream job with MSF in South Africa, only to get a front-row seat to the organization's institutional racism. Even though she's officially the second-in-command of her project, she says it feels like a select group of European expats and White South Africans are running the show.   Then, Kardas-Nelson and Cole take us inside the inequities MSF staffers experienced during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone. While expat doctors had their meals together and socialized, local health workers were left out. But inequities ran deeper. If expat doctors got sick, they would be evacuated out of the country, while local workers didn't get that care – they were treated at the same center where they worked. Kardas-Nelson and Cole reported the story from Sierra Leone in the Spring of 2021 and spoke to former National MSF clinicians. Finally, we talk about what can change in humanitarian aid. Govender is part of a group of current and former MSF workers called Decolonize MSF. While she and others are pushing the organization to commit to changes that address racial inequities, some are skeptical about what will actually change.  This week's episode was created in partnership with the global news site Insider.