Podcasts about South Sudan

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Landlocked country in east Africa

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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
South Sudan

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Best podcasts about South Sudan

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Latest podcast episodes about South Sudan

UN News
PODCAST: Developing northern Uganda - Market forces

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 13:05


Okubani Market is located in northern Uganda's Yumbe District, within the Bidibidi refugee settlement which, during the South Sudan civil war, was the largest settlement of its kind in the world. The market is a vital economic hub for refugees from South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as the host community, which suffered years of insecurity at the hands of the Lord's Resistance Army. For the last of our mini-series recorded in northern Uganda, Conor Lennon from UN News visited Okubani, to see how the support of the local government and the UN is helping those living in the region to improve their livelihoods. Music: Within the Earth, Ketsa

Lowy Institute: Live Events
EVENT: Migration nation: Australia's foreign policy from a multicultural perspective

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 64:27


Half of all Australians were born overseas or have a parent who was born overseas, and Australia is home to more than 250 ancestries and 350 languages. The new Labor government has invoked Australia's multiculturalism as a part of our national identity in its recent engagement with the region. But what is the role of Australia's multiculturalism in foreign policy? Are diversity and diasporas a source of soft power and engagement? Our panel examined how Australia's multiculturalism can inform foreign policymaking chaired by Dr Jennifer Hsu, Research Fellow in the Lowy Institute's Public Opinion and Foreign Policy Program. Panel guests include: Dr Melissa Phillips is a Lecturer in Humanitarian and Development Studies in the School of Social Sciences at Western Sydney University. She has previously worked for the United Nations and international NGOs in South Sudan, North Africa, and the Middle East, and recently co-edited Understanding Diaspora Development: Lessons from Australia and the Pacific. Jason Chai is the Director of Market Access and Government Affairs for Cochlear Asia-Pacific. He is a former Australian diplomat and has worked for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, as well as at senior government levels, including as a Chief of Staff to a Victorian Minister of Trade and Investment. Alfred Deakin Professor Fethi Mansouri holds a research chair in Migration and Intercultural Studies and the UNESCO Chair for comparative research on cultural diversity and social justice. He is the founding Director of the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation at Deakin University. He is the editor of the Journal of Intercultural Studies and since 2010 has served as an expert adviser to the United Nations on cultural diversity and intercultural relations. Recorded on 10 Aug 2022

SBS Dinka - SBS Dinka
Lul Ruai:'Those who are behind the extrajudicial executions will be held accountable.'

SBS Dinka - SBS Dinka

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 7:33


South Sudanese army has condemned the killing of four opposition officers caught as prisoners of war. The Sudanese military arrested the four men and handed them back to South Sudan. It is unclear who authorised the firing squad for the three officers and one man who was burnt alive. Gen Lul Ruai, half of the Chief of the army, condemned the act and said the investigation would belaugh into a killing. Here is the interview with Lul a few minutes ago.

Business Drive
Western Envoys Snub South Sudan Peace Roadmap Meeting

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 1:14


Western diplomats in South Sudan say they will not attend a meeting convened by President Salva Kiir to discuss a roadmap to implement the country's peace agreement. South Sudan's foreign affairs ministry sent invitations to all diplomatic missions, and regional and international non-governmental organisations accredited to South Sudan to attend the Thursday event that will be presided by the president. However, the heads of missions of the US, the UK and Norway - known as the Troika for South Sudan - wrote to President Kiir expressing regret that they would not attend. The diplomats say they had previously written to the president to express their profound concern that the consultations must include civil societies.

Best of Grandstand
Sport and Spice - GWS Giants debutant Leek Aleer can tear up the footy field and the dance floor

Best of Grandstand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 48:54


Leek Aleer of the GWS Giants shares what it means to be a role model in the South-Sudanese Australian community, his Mum's inspiring sacrifice and his recent AFL debut. Also in the mix, Kyle Chalmers calls out the media, Eddie Betts' camp revelations and we launch a new game, Wikispeedia!

Mid-South Viewpoint // Bott Radio Network
God Delivered Me from a Death Sentence // August 4, 2022

Mid-South Viewpoint // Bott Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 27:00


Born and raised in South Sudan, Dr. Michael Yemba was sentenced to death for sharing the gospel in a Middle Eastern country. He was tortured and persecuted for hosting a house church and leading Muslims to faith in Jesus Christ. Through the ministry of Jesus is Lord Ministries, Dr. Yemba along with his wife Rose are engaged in global evangelism, church planting, pastors training, as well as peace and reconciliation efforts in war torn African countries, especially the Republic of South Sudan. Dr. Yemba wil be the quest speaker for the 2022 Overcoming Abuse Gods Way Banquet, Broken for Such a Time as This at Bellevue Baptist Church in Cordova, TN Friday August 26th.

The End of the Road
Come Mud or High Water: Going the Distance to Capture Stories

The End of the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 11:15 Very Popular


Filmmaker Jeff Arnold and two other videographers trekked for miles through the mud during South Sudan's rainy season to capture stories of young evangelists who are overcoming tremendous challenges to reach others in their community—and beyond—for Christ. Long days and spotty internet made communications difficult, but we managed to connect with Jeff briefly over WhatsApp to hear his description of this remote part of South Sudan.

Business Drive
UK Delays End Of Vital Medical Funding To South Sudan

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 0:45


The British government has suspended its decision to stop providing aid to state hospitals in South Sudan. Cuts were due to come into effect but the funding has been extended for two months. South Sudan's health minister has warned that her country does not have enough money to take over the responsibilities. The head of one hospital, in Northern Bahr el Ghazal state, told the BBC he was worried the facility would collapse without British support.

Good Morning Africa
South Sudan's tax rate hike and Kenya's rising inflation rate.

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 10:00


In this episode we look at South Sudan's tax rate hike and Kenya's rising inflation rate.

Life on the Line
#129 Paul Gebran

Life on the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 61:05


Alex Lloyd interviews Middle East, South Sudan and Cambodia veteran of the RAAF, Paul Gebran. Life on the Line tracks down Australian military veterans and records their stories. Paul Gebran is a veteran of the Royal Australian Air Force. He joined on April 24th 1990 and medically discharged on April 25th 2017. Paul spoke to Alex Lloyd about his deployments to Cambodia, South Sudan and the Middle East, and the volunteer work he does today with Northern Queensland Legacy. To see photos related to today's interview, visit our website - www.lifeonthelinepodcast.com - or follow us on social media: @lifeonthelinepodcast on Facebook and Instagram, @LOTLpod on Twitter and 'Thistle Productions' on LinkedIn.  

Lifesignatures Radio
1144. A Different Approach To Fun. Attention Lovers of 'Thank God It's Friday'

Lifesignatures Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 15:40


MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Cultural Competency in Healthcare

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


As we see an increasing number of culturally diverse patients in our practices, there is no doubt of the importance of cultural competency in medicine. Specific circumstances and miscommunications have been well documented. But how can we develop an eye to see where a patient’s values and worldview may differ from our own? We will review an approach to cultural competency highlighted by medical missions case studies.

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Penhold Church of Hope
Russell and Anita Wolf

Penhold Church of Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 58:15


Local farmers turned missionaries to South Sudan, Russell and Anita Wolf share with us how God is using their team in the world's newest country and how He can and does use anyone to fulfill His great commission. Find out more about Serving in Mission at sim.ca

Good Morning Africa
Meet The CEO : Akol Dok of Orus Consulting

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 11:41


On Today's episode of Meet the CEO, we bring you Akol Dok, Managing Partner at Orus Consulting.He talks about his relocation to South Sudan and also his passion for diversification and what that can do for not just South Sudan, but Africa.

Winter is Here with Garry Kasparov and Uriel Epshtein
🎧When A Six-Year Old Soldier Transforms

Winter is Here with Garry Kasparov and Uriel Epshtein

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 47:47


In 2001 a large group of refugee teenagers is rescued from the horrendous war between Sudan and the freedom seeking South Sudan. Many of them now orphaned, had started life as six year old child soldiers who had normalized burying their age mates - dead from starvation, disease and sometimes combat. Peter was keen as a young man to see a free Sudan, but besides knowing how to shoot a gun and communist political ideology indoctrination he possesses little else. The rescue brings the children to the United States where they each begin new lives. Peter Biar Ajak’s remarkable journey of  transformation is enthralling. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit renewdemocracy.substack.com

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Being Single on the Mission Field: Panel Discussion

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022


We will address the challenges and advantages of being single on the mission field.

united states women canada children australia china europe education prayer mental health france japan mexico germany russia africa research united kingdom ukraine italy ireland new zealand single spain north america south africa afghanistan brazil nutrition turkey argentina vietnam iran sweden portugal medical muslims thailand colombia chile iraq cuba singapore netherlands nigeria urban indonesia switzerland abortion greece venezuela reunions philippines kenya poland peru south america norway taiwan poverty denmark finland syria south korea costa rica belgium public health haiti diabetes austria pakistan jamaica saudi arabia north korea iceland ghana buddhist uganda guatemala ecuador malaysia counseling lebanon nepal ethiopia sri lanka qatar rural romania nursing congo panama hungary bahamas el salvador zimbabwe dentists bolivia honduras morocco psychiatry bangladesh rwanda dominican republic nicaragua tanzania cambodia uruguay hindu malta croatia monaco ebola pharmacy sudan mali belarus panel discussion bulgaria czech republic hiv aids disabilities physical therapy yemen serbia tribal chiropractic pediatrics senegal dental libya somalia estonia greenland madagascar infectious diseases fiji cyprus neurology kazakhstan barbados zambia mongolia paraguay kuwait lithuania angola economic development armenia macedonia bahrain allergy luxembourg heart disease belize namibia slovenia oman influenza slovakia sierra leone liberia united arab emirates mozambique tunisia plastic surgery internal medicine malawi cameroon botswana laos latvia oncology south pacific papua new guinea malaria emergency medicine surgical albania church planting telemedicine midwife burkina faso tonga azerbaijan togo guyana niger algeria guinea cardiology family medicine south sudan sustainable development community development moldova bhutan bioethics maldives mauritius dermatology burundi andorra dieticians uzbekistan eritrea naturopathic gambia tuberculosis benin radiology persecuted church social services grenada occupational therapy clean water cholera anesthesia dengue vanuatu gabon kyrgyzstan endocrinology san marino suriname ophthalmology gastroenterology palau health education physician assistants solomon islands refugee crisis brunei environmental health liechtenstein athletic trainers mission field turkmenistan disaster relief lesotho seychelles tajikistan swaziland djibouti optometry rheumatology mauritania timor leste hematology central african republic yellow fever nauru marshall islands disease prevention nephrology kiribati cape verde general surgery preventative medicine healthcare administration new caledonia french polynesia short term missions guinea bissau international health hep c typhoid speech pathology orthopaedic surgery tuvalu dental hygienists allied health osteopathic equatorial guinea saint lucia trinidad and tobago french guiana cardiac surgery sexually transmitted infections comoros pulmonology dental assistants bosnia and herzegovina hep b unreached people groups leishmaniasis western samoa democratic republic of the congo surgical tech lab medicine laboratory technician domestic missions epidemology
The Good Dirt
101. An Ecological Civilization for All with Andrew Schwartz of EcoCiv

The Good Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 71:42 Very Popular


What does it mean for humans to live sustainably on the earth? Andrew Schwartz, Co-Founder and Executive Vice President of The Institute for Ecological Civilization, a non-profit promoting long-term solutions for the wellbeing of people and the planet, helps us pull apart that question. Andrew is also the Executive Director of the Center for Process Studies and Assistant Professor of Process and Comparative Theology at Claremont School of Theology. In this conversation, we're talking about fundamental shifts in many of our most basic assumptions about our relationship with each other and the environment, and the role each of us plays in the way forward towards a worldwide, life-supporting community.   Listen to the episode onhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 ( Apple Podcasts),https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo ( Spotify),https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 ( Podchaser),https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ ( Podtail), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vICp_ltnSXg&list=PLvDK7OzPMsJUXQDwqF7LN2pBTUBThKFim (Youtube), or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered: How Andrew came to his interest in ecology through religion How The Institute for Ecological Civilization came into being Explanation of The Institute for Ecological Civilization and its mission The Centrality of the Human Experience Genesis as a directive for the human role in the web of creation Deep Ecology Are we fighting for human survival or earth's survival? EcoCiv partners and programs Where are the solutions? Does change happen from within the system, outside the system or from the top down? Who is getting it right? Who do we support? Resources Mentioned:  https://share.descript.com/view/5LF2OK9aqP3 (Rose of Sharon Sacred Harp Hymn 254) https://www.blueflame.com/artist/don-shiva/ (Don Shiva) https://davidkorten.org/ (David Corton) https://www.jeremylent.com/ (Jeremy Lent) https://bookshop.org/a/4727/9780553375404 (Ishmael) by Daniel Quinn https://www.aspeninstitute.org/ (Aspen Institute) https://www.philipclayton.net/ (Philip Clayton) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_B._Cobb (John Cobb) https://bookshop.org/a/4727/9781940447414 (What is Ecological Civilization) by Andrew Schwartz and Philip Clayton https://cst.edu/for-such-a-time-as-this/?gclid=CjwKCAjwrNmWBhA4EiwAHbjEQCdUQPnlMXJ9cQsAQPOnhTug5VW9skXv8b3h3fjwkR9fUsavPL0rrBoC6RMQAvD_BwE (Claremont School of Theology) Willamette University https://www.waterforsouthsudan.org/salvas-story (Water for South Sudan) https://weall.org/ (Wellbeing Economy Alliance) Connect with Andrew and the Institute for Ecological Civilization: EcoCiv website: https://ecociv.org/ (https://ecociv.org/) On Instagram https://www.instagram.com/ecociv_/ (@ecociv_) Listen to the https://ecociv.org/the-ecociv-podcast/ (EcoCiv Podcast) About Lady Farmer: https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website) @weareladyfarmer on https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram) Join http://almanac.lady-farmer.com/ (The Lady Farmer ALMANAC) Leave us a voicemail! Call 443-459-1950 and ask a question or tell us what the good dirt means to you. Email us at thegooddirtpodcast@gmail.com Original music by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026 Statements in this podcast have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not to be considered as medical or nutritional advice. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, and should not be considered above the advice of your physician. Consult a medical professional when making dietary or lifestyle decisions that could affect your health and well being.

Miles For Change
Bonus Mile: Michael Panther, Living With Hope

Miles For Change

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 42:14


Born in South Sudan, Michael Panther Mayen lost the ability to walk when he was just a child due to a severe illness. In 2018, he started Living With Hope, an organization providing wheelchairs and other assistive devices to people in Africa who otherwise wouldn’t have access to this equipment.Visit LivingWithHope.net to find out how you can get involved. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit milesforchange.substack.com

Africa Today
Ukraine and Russia agree deal to resume grain exports

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 28:27


Ukraine and Russia have agreed a deal to resume grain exports through Ukraine's Black Sea ports. What will this mean for Africa? We hear from the head of policy at the Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (Cafod). Health workers in South Sudan have carried out the world's first mass vaccination drive to curb an outbreak of hepatitis E. And the Resident Presidents mull over the recent developments in Sri Lanka and the ousting of President Rajapaksa.

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Uganda

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 111:32


Creepy Uganda   So Logan and I saw that we were rising through the ranks of Uganda's listeners for the show and thought: “Hey!  We should show our love and support to these wonderful people”. So, in order to do it right,  we are going on a trip! To Creepy Uganda.    Aside from rituals, ancient vengeful deities, and some rather haunted locations found throughout the wonderful country, there's actually quite a few beautiful areas that, as a tourist, would be something to see! Beautiful Lakes, Mountains and rich cultures are just some of the many things that are strewn about Uganda. So without further adieu, Let's Get Creepy.   The East African nation of Uganda, formally the Republic of Uganda, is a landlocked nation. Kenya borders the nation on the east, South Sudan on the north, the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the west, Rwanda on the south-west, and Tanzania on the south. A sizable piece of Lake Victoria, which Tanzania, Kenya, and the rest of the country share, is located in the southern region of the nation. The African Great Lakes area includes Uganda. The climate in Uganda, which is also part of the Nile basin, is variable but usually modified equatorial(Characteristics of Modified Equatorial Climate have a range of 4 to 27 degrees celsius). There are about 42 million people living there, 8.5 million of them reside in Kampala, the country's capital and largest metropolis.   Uganda was given its name after the kingdom of Buganda, which ruled over a sizable area of the country's southern region, including the capital city of Kampala, and whose language, Luganda, is extensively spoken today.   The United Kingdom began to govern the region as a protectorate in 1894, establishing administrative law throughout the realm. (A Protectorate is state that is governed and guarded by another independent state is known as a protectorate. It is a dependent region with local autonomy over the majority of internal matters that yet recognizes the authority (much like our relationship between the US and Puerto Rico) of a more powerful sovereign state without being that state's actual possession.) On October 9, 1962, Uganda declared its independence from the UK. Since then, there have been other bloody wars, including an eight-year military dictatorship under Idi Amin.   Their Constitution stipulates that "any other language may be used as a medium of instruction in schools or other educational institutions or for legislative, administrative, or judicial functions as may be authorized by law," despite the fact that English and Swahili are the official languages. Many more languages, including Ateso, Lango, Acholi, Runyoro, Runyankole, Rukiga, Luo, Rutooro, Samia, Jopadhola, and Lusoga, are also spoken in the Central and South Eastern portions of the nation.   Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, the president of Uganda at the moment, came to power in January 1986 following a lengthy six-year guerrilla conflict. He was able to run and win the presidency of Uganda in the general elections of 2011, 2016, and 2021 as a result of constitutional revisions that eliminated the president's term restrictions.   Uganda's varied terrain includes volcanic hills, mountains, and lakes. The average elevation of the nation is 900 meters above sea level. Mountains line Uganda's eastern and western borders. The Ruwenzori mountain range is home to Alexandra, the highest peak in Uganda, which rises to a height of 5,094 meters.   One of the largest lakes in the world, Lake Victoria, which has several islands, has a significant effect on most of the country's southern region. The most significant cities, including Kampala, the capital, and Entebbe, a neighboring city, are found in the south, close to this lake. The country's largest lake, Lake Kyoga, located in the middle of a vast marshy landscape. Uganda is a landlocked country, although it has a lot of big lakes. Lake Albert, Lake Edward, and the smaller Lake George are additional lakes to Lakes Victoria and Kyoga. The Nile basin encompasses practically the whole country of Uganda. On the border with Congo, the Victoria Nile flows from Lake Victoria via Lake Kyoga and into Lake Albert. South Sudan is reached by continuing northward. The Suam River, which is a component of Lake Turkana's internal drainage basin, drains a region in eastern Uganda. The Lotikipi Basin, which is mostly in Kenya, receives water from the far north-eastern region of Uganda.   There are 60 protected areas in Uganda, including ten national parks. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park and Rwenzori Mountains National Park are both UNESCO World Heritage Sites. What in the hell is UNESCO? It stands for Unidentified Neural Electron Sexual Conspiracy Organization and of course that's incorrect and stupid. It ACTUALLY stands for The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. A specialised agency of the United Nations aimed at promoting world peace and security through international cooperation in education, arts, sciences and culture.The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is home to a group of mountain gorillas, the Mgahinga Gorilla National Park is home to gorillas and golden monkeys, and the Murchison Falls National Park is home to those evil fucking hippos.   The military in Uganda is known as the Uganda People's Defense Force. There are about 45,000 soldiers on active service in Uganda's military. Only the United States Armed Forces are deployed to more nations, according to analysts, than the Ugandan army, which is actively engaged in a number of combat and peacekeeping missions in the area. Uganda has troops stationed in the Central African Republic, Somalia, South Sudan, and the northern and eastern regions of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.   The landscape and wildlife of Uganda are the main attractions for tourists. In 2012–13, it contributed 4.9 trillion Ugandan shillings (US$1.88 billion or €1.4 billion as of August 2013) to Uganda's GDP, making it a significant source of employment, investment, and foreign money. Photo safaris across the National parks and wildlife reserves are the primary draws. Other highlights are the mountain gorillas, which may be found in Uganda's aforementioned Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP) and Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP), which are two of the continent of Africa's oldest cultural kingdoms. With more than 1073 species of birds reported, Uganda is an ornithologist's paradise, ranking fourth among bird species in Africa and sixteenth worldwide. The Great Rift Valley and the white-capped Rwenzori mountains are only two of Uganda's many landscapes.   Unfortunately like everywhere else, Uganda has a plethora of things that have happened there that aren't exactly what some may consider “pleasant”. For lack of a better term and because we're adults, let's just say some Pretty fucked up shit had happened, actually. Genocide being a fairly big thing. But we want to dive into the lesser known side of Uganda.   Like maybe some cryptozoology? Hmmmmmm?   A large cryptid bird named Bagge's Black Bird was once sighted in Uganda's Lake Bujuku, which is located south of Mount Speke in the Ruwenozori Mountains. They were purportedly observed in large numbers in 1898 at a height of 9,000 feet, according to Stephen Salisbury Bagge, a guide for the government. Bagge described them as black birds the size of sheep with an alarm call resembling that of a bull. Not much else to go on here since this was the only sighting allegedly of the creature. But who knows! Maybe it was a pterodactyl, or better yet, a rather large black bird that was living rather well and just so happened to be bigger than the rest.   Denman's bird was another cryptid bird that Canadian mountaineer Earl Denman purportedly claimed to have seen diving "swiftly and nearly vertically in the high mountain air" in Uganda's Ruwenzori Mountains. Ben S. Roesch speculated that they could have been Verreaux's eagles, which are common in the region and frequently observed diving to grab hyraces (rock rabbits) and hares (the thing that doesn't grow on my head) when hunting in pairs.   The irizima, also known as "the thing that may not be spoken of," was a cryptid that was seen in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo near Lake Edward. One of the least well-supported of the African neodinosaurs, it has been compared to both the mokele-mbembe and the emela-ntouka.   Neodinosaurian cryptids like the mokele-mbembe or li'kela-bembe have been seen mostly in the Republic of the Congo and Cameroon, where it is thought to live in marshy or swampy wetlands, lakes, and rivers. Several other bodies of water have also reported seeing it, but the Likouala region and Lake Tele are particularly linked to it. Many cryptozoologists have long assumed that the mokele-mbembe is a big amphibious animal with a bulky body, a long neck and tail, and a small head. However, a wide range of different reptilian and mammalian identities have also been proposed.   A neodinosaurian cryptid known from the rainforest swamps and rivers of the Republic of the Congo and the southwest Central African Republic, the emela-ntouka (Bomitaba or Lingala: "killer of elephants" or "eater of the tops of trees") is described as a horned animal and has been likened to rhinoceroses and ceratopsian dinosaurs. It is often used as a synonym for the older but now less well-known chipekwe water rhinoceros from Zambia, as well as the ngoubous from Cameroon, the ntambue ya mai from the southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and certain accounts of forest rhinoceroses. The morphology of the emela-ntouka has been described as well-defined but puzzling. It is described as an amphibian with an elephantine, rhinoceros-like appearance, a big horn on its nose, and a bulky tail resembling a crocodile. The emela-identity ntouka's has historically been the subject of two extremely divergent conflicting theories: either it was a big semi-aquatic rhinoceros or, primarily due to its bulky tail, a living ceratopsian dinosaur. Many cryptozoologists no longer subscribe to the latter notion, as the emela-ntouka is now thought of as a mammal. One ethnic group, the Aka, refers to the emela-ntouka as mokele-mbembe, a practice that has generated considerable misunderstanding.   Now that we understand those two similar cryptids we go back to the irizima. It was initially brought up by Captain William Hichens, who said that there were two conflicting accounts of the creature, including a "gigantic hippopotamus with the horns of a rhinoceros" and an animal with hippo-like legs, an elephant-like trunk, a lizard's head, and an aardvark's tail. Hichens said that such a creature had been spotted by an unknown big game hunter, who then told Herbert Francis Fenn about it, inspiring him to look for neodinosaurs in the Congo. A Brontosaurus, described by Hichens as "a massive marsh animal, ten times as big as the biggest elephant," was discovered in a Congo swamp by a "madcap man" who had been searching for the monster, according to Hichens. Hichens, according to Bernard Heuvelmans, mistook information about the Great Brontosaurus Hoax and Captain Leicester Stevens' excursion for information about Lake Edward. Also, it sounds like they found the funny mushrooms.   The brontosaurus hoax was pretty interesting as well. Allegedly, the news paper in the area of the Democratic Republic of the Congo wanted Captain Stevens to find this cryptid found in the marshes of Lake Edward. The twist is that the original reports were of a ceratopsian dinosaur not a brontosaurus that was written in the news.   Hunter Roger Courtney later made reference to the Lake Edward monster, describing it as a huge, black beast that spews tremendous waves and spouts. When the hunter persuaded his companions to aid him onto the water, the monster had already dove, according to Courtney, who claimed that a Dutch hunter had spotted the animal from the shore of Lake Edward. In addition, Courtney had heard rumors about "dinosaurs" from the adjacent Ituri Forest, which he took to be true.   According to E. A. Temple-Perkins, who studied the irizima in Lake Edward, the monster—especially as it was described by Courtney—may have originated as a local legend intended to explain why waterspouts naturally occur. Given the lack of reliable material from Lake Edward, Bernard Heuvelmans believed that Captain Hichens had accidentally introduced the Lepage-Gapelle fake monster there, leaving Roger Courtney's brief report as the only description of the Lake Edward monster. Karl Shuker, however, asserts that these two contradictory descriptions demonstrate that the term "irizima" is likely used to describe both of the two primary African neodinosaur types found in Lake Edward, the long-necked mokele-mbembe type and the horned emela-ntouka type. Shuker hypothesizes that the irizima, which Hichens described as having numerous horns, may be the same animal as the emela-ntouka and the ngoubou, which resemble Arsinoitherium (a large two horned mammal that went extinct and resemble rhino but the horns being on its brow instead of its snout).   A group of semiaquatic cryptids known as water lions, water leopards, or jungle walruses have been found in rivers and occasionally wetlands throughout tropical Africa, particularly in the Central African Republic. The majority of the time referred to as huge cats , they can be identified by their protruding fangs or tusks and their penchant for hippopotamus slaughter, so they're not all bad. A number of competing theories exist, and some water lions have also been identified or confused with neodinosaurs, water rhinoceroses, and pseudodeinotheria. Ingo Krumbiegel and Bernard Heuvelmans theorized that water lions represent a surviving species of sabre-toothed cat adapted to an amphibious lifestyle and that sounds terrifying. The majority of water lion sighting reports were gathered in the 20th century, however reports of the n'gooli or “water panther”, continue to come from Cameroon.   The Nandi bear, also known as the chemosit (Kalenjin: "devil"), is a cryptid that has been seen in western Kenyan highlands as well as Uganda. It is described as a deadly creature with a matted mane that resembles a bear. Cryptozoologists have determined that the Nandi bear is a fusion of several different cryptids, including maybe two real unknown animals: a huge hyena and a giant baboon, however identities of a living chalicothere (the weird horse/gorilla looking thing) and an unknown bear have also been proposed. Since the 20th century, there have been few or no sightings, and it has been hypothesized that the Nandi bear, if it ever existed, is now extinct. Maybe another version of the sasquatch?    Hope the Cryptids were a little more easy going because now we dive into some… shit.   Sir Edward Frederick William David Walugembe Mutebi Luwangula Mutesa, often known as Kabaka Mutesa II, led a fascinating life. He ruled as Buganda's 36th kabaka (king) from 1939 until his passing on November 21, 1969. In addition, he served as Uganda's first president from 1963 until 1966, when he was ousted and taken into exile by Prime Minister Milton Obote.   Following the passing of his father, King Daudi Cwa II, he succeeded to the throne of Buganda in 1939. He was overthrown twice: once by the colonial governor-general Sir Andrew Cohen in 1953 so that he could be replaced by his half-brother, whom Cohen believed he could better control; and once more in 1966 when Prime Minister Obote forced him to leave for Britain, where he died in exile. Following his first exile of two years, Mutesa II was permitted to reclaim the throne as part of a negotiated agreement that established him as a constitutional monarch and granted the Baganda the opportunity to choose delegates for the kingdom's parliament, the Lukiiko. He had thirteen wives and eleven children by marriage and six through other means.   Initially joining forces to demand self-rule, Sir Edward Mutesa II, KBE and Prime Minister Milton Obote went on to win the 1962 election. Mutesa II was named non-executive president, primarily serving in a ceremonial capacity, but after independence, their relationship started to sour. Obote allegedly instructed Idi Amin-led soldiers to raid his stronghold in 1966. Mutesa II had to escape to the UK once more. Obote declared himself president and assumed total control while he was overseas.   The largest of Uganda's several ethnic groups, the Baganda, were led by Mutesa II as monarch. Despite taking advantage of it, Obote used his position of power to get rid of both the traditional kingships and the independence of the province administrations because Buganda had only agreed to join the state if it had a high degree of autonomy. In 1993, Mutesa's son was elected as the 37th kabaka under a revised constitution. Within Uganda, Buganda is currently a constitutional monarchy. In Uganda, Mutesa II attended King's College, Budo. As a student at Magdalene College in Cambridge, England, he enlisted in an officer training corps and received a captain's commission in the Grenadier Guards. Buganda was then a part of Uganda's British rule. Many of the traditional leaders or kings served as the British's representatives in Uganda. The late fourteenth century is when the Buganda kingly line began. Oddly enough, Obote was deposed in a coup in 1971 by none other than Amin, the head of his own army and closest supporter.   At the age of 45, Mutesa II passed away from alcohol poisoning at his London apartment in 1969. The British authorities determined that he committed suicide, despite his followers' claims that Obote regime assassins were responsible. In 2009, four decades after Mutesa II's passing, a family friend and fellow Ugandan exile living in London told the BBC, "We got warning, people used to write and say somebody has been sent, be aware, take care."   According to JM Kavuma-Kaggwa, an elder from Kyaggwe, Mukono District: “There were rumours that Obote was spending Shs 250,000 per week (a lot of money then) to track down the Kabaka. Their mission had completely failed until luck struck when the late Oscar Kambona of Tanzania who fell out with President Nyerere and fled into exile in London, organised a birthday party in November 1969 in Sir Edward Mutesa's honour.”   “Also in attendance was a beautiful Muganda girl who had reportedly been recruited by the GSU to go to London, befriend Sir Edward, be close to him and poison him. She came close to the Kabaka during the party. It was reported that the Kabaka invited the girl to this birthday party and that was the time she managed to poison him because she was the one in charge of the Kabaka's drinks that evening.”   After Obote was overthrown in 1971, Mutesa II's remains were brought back to Uganda and given a formal funeral by the new president, Idi Amin, who had led the attack on Mutesa's palace in 1966 as the army commander. Definitely an interesting story to say the least. This next event is a little more… unsettling.   On the last night of her life, Rose Nakimuli shut down her little hair salon in rural Uganda at around nine o'clock. The 27-year-old made her way back down to the neighborhood bar for a late-night beverage after walking home to change and turning on her porch light for the evening. Later, while she was strolling along a country road next to a two-lane highway on her way home, a friend leaned out of his small bar to greet her. The following morning, a neighbor discovered her dead; slouched behind banana trees in front of her house. Nakimuli was stripped and forced to kneel on her knees. Her vagina had been penetrated with a cassava stick. Her spouse recognized her by the maroon sweater that was hanging from a tree close by. Considering the porch light was still on suggests that she never actually made it home.   Nakimuli is one of 23 women who have died mysteriously and horribly on the outskirts of Kampala, the expanding metropolis of quickly urbanizing Uganda, from May to November of 2017. The murders have caused fear in the neighborhood, sparked doubts about the nation's dedication to protecting women, and increased scrutiny of the police force, a potent institution criticized for acting with impunity and serving as an extension of the government's ruling political party, the National Resistance Movement.   All of the victims were female, ranging in age from 19 to 38. Four of the individuals have been recognized as sex workers, along with a number of traders and a high school student. Many of the victims had no nearby family and lived alone. Three of the women, at least, are yet unidentified. Many of the murders, according to the police, were committed by witchcraft practitioners who sought financial gain through human sacrifice. Others, according to them, are the result of spousal abuse, drug use among unemployed youth, land disputes, and lone women who fail to take the necessary safeguards.    Twelve or more suspects have been taken into custody. Some have apparently been tortured into confessing. However, not much evidence connecting the suspects to the crimes has been made public.   Locals and activist organizations charge the police with being overburdened and conflicted over the murders of over twenty women.   “What makes me to feel that there is an element of injustice is that it took Rose to die in order for somebody to move,” said Nakimuli's husband, Anatoli Ndyabagyera.   Community watch groups have been established, a curfew has been implemented to prevent women from travelling alone at night, and the local informal economy has collapsed in the interim. Some of the safety measures have not been applied since Idi Amin's regime and the civil conflict that ensued after his overthrow in 1979.   Interior Minister Jeje Odongo blamed a couple of businesspeople at the head of a vast criminal network connected to "the Illuminati" in September 2017 for most of the killings. According to Odongo, the guys, Ivan Katongole and Phillip Tumuhimbise, performed rituals using the victims' blood and body parts in order to increase their wealth.   In Uganda, magic and mysticism still have great power. The rituals that these beliefs usually take the form of can occasionally become more evil. In the past, killings for ceremonial purposes have often involved children in particular.   Jordan Anderson, a researcher who has studied magic in East and Central Africa, claims that the latest killings of women, however, have little in common with conventional ritual homicides. One reason is that it's unusual to preserve a sacrificial body.   “You are killing the person because, in the first sense, you want to use that body part in the ‘medicine' or the potion that you are going to put together,” he said. “It's the particular part of the person you want, not the death per se."   Black magic can also be useful cover for a murderer trying to hide their tracks or an easy scapegoat for incompetent security forces.   “If you have this motif in the media, people can pick it up and copycat it,” Anderson said. “If there's insecurity in this area, if there are murders taking place, this is a great excuse for the politicians, the police and, above all, the people doing the murders.”   In an interview at one of the clubs where she was last seen alive, her husband noted that Nakimuli was regarded as being "extremely sweet." She was unable to stand by as a child sobbed. He couldn't bring himself to clean up her house for two months following her passing.   In small communities like the one where Nakimuli passed away, rumors are easily disseminated, and Ndyabagyera is still dubious of the police's version of what happened to his wife. He thinks Nakimuli's cousin may have set her up as part of a long-standing vendetta.   The small village of Katabi, where Nakimuli and 11 other women were murdered, is located along the main road from Kampala to Entebbe, which is home to the president of Uganda's palace and the country's primary airport on Lake Victoria. Museveni frequently travels this route on his way from his residence to the capital. He didn't go to the town, however, to pay his respects to the deceased until late September.   Museveni interviewed the victims' friends and neighbors during the unexpected visit while keeping a clipboard in his hand and taking careful notes.   The majority of the twelve slain women in the Katabi area were brutalized in ways akin to Nakimuli. Many had been assaulted with cassava sticks, stripped naked, and strangled.   On the opposite side of Kampala, 20 miles north, the bodies of an additional 11 women were found during the same time frame. There, victims were allegedly sexually assaulted and strangled, yet there were no sticks in their genitalia.   An individual named Ibrahim Kaweesa, a chicken dealer who had previously served ten years in prison for robbery, has been connected to those killings. Which seems like a huge escalation. The interior minister claimed that Tumuhimbise, a teenage shopkeeper, employed Kaweesa to murder a dozen women "for ritual performance to protect or improve his wealth."   As part of a loose network supporting law enforcement, 40-year-old Charles Waswa assisted in the arrest of Kaweesa and claimed, "They removed the blood."   Kaweesa resided two-thirds of the way down a short row of apartments, surrounded by women cooking outside and shrieking children. He was labeled by his neighbors as an arrogant and dangerous womanizer.   Kaweesa's neighbor Annette Namkose, 29, stepped in to prevent them from dating. She alleged through a translator that in response, he threatened to kill her, saying, "I'll kill you like I did the ones in Entebbe."   She declared, "He's not a neighbor you want to be with.   Police said that after being detained, Kaweesa swiftly confessed to the crimes. He allegedly led detectives around a number of the crime scenes without being asked.   “I don't believe we have arrested each and every person who knew about this matter,” said Kasingye, the police spokesman.   “I cannot say 100% there isn't going to be any (more) crime because it has never happened anywhere in the world. But at least it (the arrests) shows us we can stop criminals. We can arrest them, we can prosecute them and we can do this throughout the whole country.”   Unfortunately cases like these happen too much in many places around the world. Uganda seems to be trying to get ahead of the curve with the installment of the Anti-Human Sacrifice and Trafficking Task Force following the Anti-Trafficking Act in 2009.    Although reports have shown that the task force has been severely underfunded for a while, we do hope that things start to turn around.   Speaking of human sacrifices, this is a report from only a few weeks ago:   Human sacrifices continue unabated in the remote and rural areas of the landlocked East African country of Uganda despite authorities enacting tough laws and threatening death sentences.   According to officials, 132 incidents of human sacrifices have been recorded in the last three years. The numbers have spiked from 22 sacrifices in 2019, 45 in 2020 and 65 in 2021.   Most victims of such “ritual sacrifices” are children, apparently because they are easier to abduct and seen as “pure” and so of "higher ritual value".   Anadolu Agency quoted authorities as saying on Sunday that the sacrifices are being carried out by witch doctors or local traditional healers, dotting rural areas.   Admitting that human sacrifice is a big problem, Lucas Oweyesigire, the police spokesman for the Kampala region, said most such practices take place in rural areas.   The so-called leader of traditional healing and witch doctors, Mama Fina, has also condemned human sacrifice and described those recommending the sacrifice of human beings as “fake”.   Taking advice from witch doctors   Police spokesman Fred Enanga said only last month they "arrested a man identified as Musilimu Mbwire on suspicion of killing his two sons in human sacrifice.”   According to preliminary investigations, a rich man had paid Mbwire money and convinced him to sacrifice his two sons at the instructions of a witch doctor.   Superstitions lead people in rural areas to seek help from witch doctors, who in turn offer weird prescriptions, including human sacrifices to turn around their luck.   A more worrisome part of the superstition is to undertake human sacrifice to put the body at the foundation of a building to bring good luck.   Timothy Mukasa, a local leader in Kampala's suburb of Kireka, said many multi-storey buildings in the town have been built on a human body.   “The witch doctors tell owners to put a human body at the foundation of the construction of the buildings,” he said.   In 2014, authorities apprehended and later sentenced a tycoon Kato Kajubi for sacrificing a child and then putting his body in the foundation of a building that he was about to construct.   David Musenze, a journalist who studied psychology, said there are not many qualified counsellors to attend to psychological and mental issues of people, which makes them take advice from witch doctors.   "People go to witch doctors to help them get jobs, be promoted at jobs, or kill their enemies, along with many other problems," he said.   So, what about hauntings, you might be thinking to yourself. Well, we found a story from someone living in Uganda from the “your ghost stories” website. I had always thought this sort of nightmare was happening to me alone until I have come across this site. I always took my suffering silently especially the unexplained sickness which always followed devil attacks.   It all started on 28th November 2004 one hour to midnight. Whilst walking home after branching off from the main road. I heard footsteps of someone walking behind me and whoever it was seemed to have been in a hurry, I glanced back and stepped aside to see who it was and let him/her pass as I was in a narrow path.   I saw a hazy form I can't clearly explain here, my hair stood on my head like when you encounter something fearful. A cold shiver enveloped me and a gust of chilly wind wrapped my entire body, like I was putting on a cloak. I let out a silent incoherent scream and ran towards home which was just nearby. That occurrence signalled the beginning of my suffering to date.   Since then, whenever I sleep I am woken up by something touching my foot or a feeling of a being lying beside me, in the morning I find scratches on my body and at first I thought it was me scratching myself during asleep so I used to trim my nails, but the scratches continued.   During the attacks, I fall in a sort of hypotonizing stance. I neither can move nor make any sound except my feet which I use to struggle and try to shrug of the being.   In the past two years the demon has turned sexual, it would turn in a woman form, hugging me in bed trying to initiate sexual intimacy, when I wake up my reproductive organ feels so cold and shrunk. There's pain also in the pelvic area for most of the day.   I have tried all sorts of remedies e.g. Blessed water, salt, prayers etc. But none seems to work, Any suggestions on how to get rid of this demon is welcome.   And lastly, the Haunted Palace of Kabaka Kabak's Palace, also known as Idi Amin's Torture Chambers or Haunted Mansion or Lubiri Palace is located in Lubiri area of Kampala on Mengo Hill Road. It was the home of the Bugandan kings but these days it largely remains unoccupied due to the horrific events that took place under the rule of Idi Amin and President Milton Obote. President Idi Amin built his torture chamber here where hundreds of people were reportedly tortured to death. Their spirits are believed to have haunted the palace which is closed to the public these days for repair and clearing it from the so-called spirits.   MOVIES-Top movies set in africa 30 Must Watch Movies Set in Africa - IMDb

Why Me Project
Tabitha Biel Luak

Why Me Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 37:21


This week's episode was a real eye opener. Guest Tabitha Biel Luak shares with Hollie and Johnny about life in South Sudan, moving to Canada, and how Christian radio played a huge role in her life. She's excited to share her story and her new book this week on the Why Me Project! Tabitha talks about: South Sudan Faith What A Godly Privilege To Be Born A Man Marriage Why Me? Episode Links Why Me Project: @whymeprojectpodcast Know someone with an incredible story? Have a question, comment, or concern? Ask us anything! Email whymeproject@faithstrongtoday.com!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ukraine Daily Brief
July 18, 2022: Ukraine, Sri Lanka, Marburg in Ghana, and Climate Change in Europe

Ukraine Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 9:42 Very Popular


The ninety-ninth episode of the DSR Daily Brief.   Stories Cited in the Episode Zelensky fires prosecutor general Venediktova, security service chief Bakanov Zelensky urges to appoint heads of SAPO, NABU UK Ministry of Defense Update 7.18 Russia's Medvedev: Attack on Crimea will ignite 'Judgement Day' response Sri Lanka puts emergency in place ahead of parliament's vote for new president Ghana confirms first cases of deadly Marburg virus ‘Just hell.' 5 countries suffering in Europe's heat wave Mexico detains drug lord wanted by US as 14 killed in Black Hawk helicopter crash Explosion of violence in South Sudan threatens peace pact Lawsuit says Bass Pro won't honor lifetime warranty on socks

Centre Circle LIVE!
Beyond the Pitch: William Akio

Centre Circle LIVE!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 24:40


In the latest edition of Beyond The Pitch, CanPL.ca's Kristian Jack chats with William Akio as he makes his move to Europe after being sold by Valour FC to Scottish Premiership side Ross County FC. The two delve into the move and Akio's past, including how he came to join Valour FC, his experience with the South Sudan national team, and the story behind his trademark celebration.

Daybreak Africa  - Voice of America
South Sudan Disappointed Over U.S. Axed Support [02:13] - July 18, 2022

Daybreak Africa - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 2:13


South Sudan has expressed disappointment in the recent withdrawal by the United States in its support for the peace process quoting lack of sustained progress by leaders of the Central African nation. VOA's James Butty spoke with Presidential spokesperson Ateny Wek Ateny.

Thrive Culture: Success Engineering
S6E3 Health: Craig Weller Applying An Elite Special Force Mindset to Life...

Thrive Culture: Success Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 50:05


Craig Weller served in Naval Special Operations as a Special Warfare combat crewman or SWCC, and then spent nearly two years on the High Threat Protection Team for the US Ambassador to Baghdad in Iraq. Craig has held instructional and diplomatic security roles around the world including in Kenya, the Philippines, Central America and South Sudan. Since then, Craig spent the past decade studying and teaching peak performance. His program and book Building the elite has achieved a  90% success ratein passing the selection tests for Special Operations. The mindset tools in this conversation are incredible! You can apply them to any area of your life from pushing a little bit harder in your workouts, to parenting and staying balanced emotionally!Website:Building the EliteIG: Buildingtheelite12 Week Entrepreneur Mastermind Presale Application- For entrepreneurs who want to truly and deeply feel enough, know they are not alone, and overcome the limiting beliefs that keep us stuck...

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Seven Principles for Empowering on Short Term Trips

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


Oftentimes short term mission trips sideline the indigenous church. The local church is the key to transformation and must be empowered to participate in the Great Commission. The members of the local, indigenous church are the best people to reach their community with the Gospel. They speak the same language, look the same, and understand the culture. By giving the local church the responsibility, allowing them to be in the driver's seat, we will be able to empower them with skills that will meet the biggest needs in their own community. Missions is designed to be a relay race. We will discuss seven principles to assist us in our short term mission trips to have sustained, long term impact without creating dependency.