Podcasts about ngos

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Organization independent of any government, usually created to aid those in need or similar

  • 2,694PODCASTS
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  • Jul 4, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about ngos

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Latest podcast episodes about ngos

Grantseeker Coffee Talks
Shifting Traditional Power Dynamics: Flexible, Direct Grants to Local Leaders

Grantseeker Coffee Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 32:49


Move92 is a nonprofit organization that partners with and empowers local leaders to solve problems in their communities through simple yet revolutionary tactics; direct unrestricted grants. Geneva Pritchard , Executive Director | https://move92.org/ (Move92) Geneva has nearly 20 years of experience working in international development. Her varied experience includes involvement in water and sanitation programs with CARE International in Nicaragua, drug-resistant malaria among migrant communities, vocational incentive projects for people living with HIV and innovative education systems for mobile populations on the Thailand/Myanmar border, and diabetic retinopathy among marginalized populations with The Fred Hollows Foundation in Nepal and the Pacific Islands. Geneva holds a degree in International Studies from Seattle University and a Masters in Public Health from Thammasat University located in Bangkok. Geneva has a wealth of experience working for large NGOs and grassroots organizations. Relationship building has, and always will be, at the center of how Geneva operates. All of the streams of Geneva's experience have perfectly converged into her current work with Move92. As a philanthropy advisor, Geneva now gets to put relationship building at the forefront of her work, with the aim of curating relationships between openhearted philanthropists and dynamic local leaders in all corners of the world. Links: Geneva Pritchard Email: geneva@move92.org Website: move92.org  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/move.92 (@move.92) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Movethe92/ (Move92) Want to see additional resources? Visit https://resources.foundant.com/ (resources.foundant.com) Connect with other members of the philanthropic community at https://community.foundant.com/ (Community.foundant.com)

Familienleicht - LIFE & BUSINESS
#156 Mut ist nicht die Abwesenheit von Angst - Interview mit Laura Roschewitz

Familienleicht - LIFE & BUSINESS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 65:39


Corona, Krieg, Wirtschaftskrise oder Inflation - die letzten Jahre gab es einige Anlässe für Angst im sicheren Europa und für (angehende) Unternehmer:innen stellt sich auf mehreren Ebenen die Frage, wie damit umzugehen ist. Gleichzeitig gibt es damit und insgesamt viele eher latente oder unterschwellige Ängste, die oft regelrecht lähmend sind. Mit Wirtschaftspsychologin Laura Roschewitz spreche ich darüber - wie sich Angst auf uns als UnternehmerInnen auswirkt - was die Unterschiede zwischen konkreten Ängsten, Angstattacken, eher diffusen Ängsten oder auch der - „Angst vor der Angst“ - der sog. „German Angst“ ist - warum Angst kein Grund zur Scham ist und vor allem: - wie du ganz konkret damit umgehen kannst! Laura ist Wirtschaftspsychologin und begleitet Unternehmen, Teams  und NGOs zu mehr Zufriedenheit und Freude - und als Basis dafür auch zu einer besseren Kommunikation. https://lauraroschewitz.de/ https://lauraundgretel.de/two-for-you-podcast/

B5 Reportage
Eine Perspektive im Land - Handwerksausbildung im Senegal

B5 Reportage

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 22:20


Viele junge Menschen im Senegal träumen vom Auswandern nach Europa. Regierung und NGOs versuchen den Trend zu stoppen, indem Jugendlichen berufliche Perspektiven im Land eröffnet werden. Martina Zimmermann über Ausbildungsinitiativen gegen die Migration.

Macroaggressions
FLASHBACK FRIDAY | #56: Mainstream Media Vs. Humanity

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 66:32


Your nightly news is lying to you. It's true, they are not being honest with their viewers, but telling the truth has never been one of their priorities. The CIA infiltrated the corporate news six decades ago through Operation Mockingbird and they have never left. Throw in the undue influence of NGOs like the Council on Foreign Relations, the Atlantic Council, the German Marshall Fund, and the United Nations and you have the makings of a disaster. Add in the passing of the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2012 that legalized propaganda inside the United States and it becomes crystal clear that your nightly news is nothing more than a series of fairytales dreamed up by the intelligence agencies and a long list of NGOs designed to shape how you view the world so that they can continue to push a globalist agenda. Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold True Hemp Science: https://truehempscience.com/ Haelan: https://haelan951.com/pages/macro Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: HYPOCRAZY: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/macroaggressions_podcast/ Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com

Hack és Lángos
HnL233 - Hutt és Lángos

Hack és Lángos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 73:15


Mai menü:LastPass databreach alertthe VR hackAmerikai férfi kilenc év börtönbüntetésre ítélték több ezer iCloud-fiók feltörése után - IT biztonsági guruHTML adathalász mellékletek - most már anti-elemzési funkciókkal, (szerda, június 1.)Ransomware csoport debütál kereshető áldozat adataiRosszindulatú PowerShell célzó Cryptocurrency böngészőbővítmények, (szerda, június 22.)A hagyományos MSSP-felhasználók 80%-a tervezi az MDR frissítésétDFSCoerceElérhetőségeink:TelegramTwitterInstagramFacebookMail: info@hackeslangos.show

PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars
The Road to COP27 - audio podcast

PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 117:34


Over the last few years, we have seen a significant increase in awareness by the humanitarian community of the impacts of the climate crisis and humanitarian engagement in UNFCCC processes. Following on COP26 in Glasgow last year, we saw a far greater presence of humanitarian actors, engaging and raising awareness of the impacts of climate change on the most vulnerable. However, ahead of the 2022 UN Climate Change Conference or COP27, which will take place in Sharm El-Sheikh in November this year, the humanitarian community needs to further articulate its collective role in implementing solutions to the climate crisis. How does COP27 relate to the work of humanitarian actors and how can they engage in the proceedings to make sure that the discussions take into account humanitarian needs?Commitment #6 of the Climate and Environment Charter encourages humanitarian organizations to use their influence to mobilize urgent and more ambitious climate action and environmental protection. The Charter commits us to work together to foster ambitious action on climate change adaptation and mitigation and to ensure protection of those who are most vulnerable so that they are not left behind. The humanitarian sector is uniquely placed to influence legal and policy frameworks to better channel resources and attention towards vulnerable and at-risk people. We can leverage our presence, expertise, and insight to work with multilateral institutions, governments, and other organizations to ensure that greater focus on the impacts of this crisis on communities and people we serve are taken into consideration at decision-making levels. On 30 June, join us for a webinar on how we can make COP27 an opportunity for this.This webinar aims to: - Raise awareness of the UNFCC process and the importance of this year's COP27 and how it links to humanitarian action- Discuss why humanitarian organizations need to engage to bring in humanitarian perspectives on the topic of Loss and Damage in the lead-up to COP27- Highlight the modalities and strategies for humanitarian NGOs to engage in the preparatory work for COP27Read more at https://phap.org/30jun2022

Eat The Rich
Ep 121 - Dan Gertler

Eat The Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 66:11


This week, we discuss Israeli billionaire/diamond mogul Dan Gertler, his exploitation of the people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and partnership with old friends of the show Glencore, his rank corruption and appearance in the Panama Papers, and his totally legitimate reasons for hating NGOs.

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma
039 - "The Camera Didn't Make the Artist Obsolete" with John Nosta

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 64:35


On this episode of the podcast, I was joined by John Nosta of NostaLab. John and I discuss: -Pharmaceutical Innovation in the last several decades -Patient-Centricity in Pharma -Innovation vs. Implementing Existing Technologies -Genius Being a Birthright & Mediocrity Being Self imposed -Telemedicine & Digital Health -Decentralized Clinical Trials - Artificial Intelligence, Wonder and Fear John Nosta is the founder of NOSTALAB—a digital health think tank recognized globally for an inspired vision of transformation. His focus is on guiding companies, NGOs, and governments through the dynamics of exponential change and the diffusion of innovation into complex systems. He is also a member of the Google Health Advisory Board. Further, John is also a frequent and popular contributor to Fortune, Forbes, Psychology Today and Bloomberg. He has also been published in prestigious peer-reviewed journals including The American Journal of Physiology, Circulation, and The American Journal of Hematology. In 2019, he was named to the World Health Organization's Digital Health Roster of Experts.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Oranga Tamariki funding for charities in doubt

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:13


Oranga Tamariki has given notice to all its service providers that their funding contracts are not guaranteed beyond the next three to six months. Hundreds of charities and NGOs which have Oranga Tamariki funding abruptly received a letter from the agency earlier this week. It stated that Oranga Tamariki is consolidating its structure, functions and service needs, and as a result, adjustments and reductions will need to be made to the range of services that are funded. Oranga Tamariki says it expects to give more certainty to the charities by the week beginning 18 July. Nikki Hurst, the executive officer of the New Zealand Christian Social Services tells Kathryn she's deeply concerned about the implications for tamariki, rangatahi and whānau, at at time when service use is increasing at a rate not seen in a generation. 

AP Audio Stories
G-7 aims to create club of nations to boost climate action

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:08


AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports on Climate-Germany-G-7-NGOs.

CashCast: A podcast from the Cash Learning Partnership
Episode 7: How can we use cash and voucher assistance to support universal health goals?

CashCast: A podcast from the Cash Learning Partnership

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 32:11


In episode 7, we discuss how health needs, and the provision of health services, in humanitarian response works and where using Cash and Voucher Assistance (CVA) may help.  What we know already is that CVA may be used for health outcomes but giving cash via Multi-Purpose Cash Assistance (MPCA) via the Minimum Expenditure Basket (MEB) isn't enough to meet health needs.  We look at best practice on including health in the MEB, innovations in using CVA on the demand side, and exciting new hybrid approaches that are bridging demand and supply to improve access and quality.Globally, meeting health needs is known to be an inherently complex challenge.  This is because both the demand side (who needs care, what care do they need), and the supply side (hospitals, doctors, nurses, pharmacies – and their funding) of quality health care are critical factors. Within a humanitarian context, accessing quality health services when needed is generally difficult for socio-economically vulnerable people, since individual health needs are often unpredictable. At the same time, access and availability of quality health services is likely to be affected by the crisis. The results of post-distribution monitoring and other surveys show that people in receipt of cash, especially multipurpose cash, repeatedly spend a large proportion of the cash on accessing health services.  Given this context, in this episode of the CashCast, our panel of experts explore the following questions:How do health cluster members approach meeting health needs in a humanitarian crisis? Why are health needs and health services different to other needs and services? For example, food security and markets.Should we include health needs in an MEB and thus in the MPCA transfer value?  Are there recent innovations in using CVA for health outcomes? The host and guests are:Julie Lawson-McDowall (host) – Technical Advisor at the CALP Network.Andre Griekspoor – a medical doctor and public health expert with long experience in humanitarian health response. Andre is currently working in the Fragile, Conflict affected and Vulnerable settings unit of the World Health Organization' s department for Health Emergency Interventions. Among other things, he is responsible for health policy development in protracted crises, which includes approaches for health system strengthening in fragile contexts, and support to post conflict and disaster recovery planning processes. Anna Gorter – a medical doctor with a PhD in epidemiology. She has 40 years of experience working in low- and middle-income countries as a public health expert. Since 1995, she has been involved in the development of various approaches for Results Based Financing (RBF) for Health, such as health vouchers, and cash transfers. Corinne Grainger – an independent consultant working in health financing and health systems strengthening, with more than 20 years' experience providing technical assistance across a range of intervention areas including Sexual and Reproductive Health, Family planning, MNH and adolescent health. In addition to support for programme design, management and evaluation, she has provided capacity development and strategic planning support for a range of government and NGOs.  We invite you to listen to this fascinating and in-depth conversation!Further reading: there are associated resources produced by Global Health Cluster, WHO's Cash Task Team and CALP. These include 

Technology Untangled
World poverty: Is technology the great leveller?

Technology Untangled

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:39


Since 1990, the global rates of extreme poverty have gone from around 40% to around 10%, and ending World Poverty entirely by 2030 is one of the UN's Key Sustainable Development Goals, announced in 2015. However, progress is slowing, and 710 million people around the world still live in extreme poverty - currently earning below $1.90 per day. So how can technology help? In this episode, we'll be meeting some of the people and organisations aiming to eradicate poverty through the use of technology.The power of connectivityOne of the most important ways in which rural economies can grow and become more efficient and productive is to get access to communications technology. Isabelle Mauro is the Head of Information, Communications & Technology (ICT) Industries at the World Economic Forum. The WEF is the world body bringing together the public and private sectors, and has been pushing for greater co-operation between the public sector and telecoms providers to work on lifting developing communities out of hunger and poverty. The results speak for themselves: Research suggests a 10% improvement in mobile connectivity can add 1.5% to a country's GDP. The challenge is to provide a financial incentive for companies and Governments to reach out to poorer areas where the business case for connection might not be so obvious.Harnessing complex skills and technology for unconnected communitiesOne of the firms leading the charge to bring rural communities into the digital age is Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Brian Tippens is their Head of sustainability, and has been working closely with WEF and partners around the world to enable remote and disconnected communities to take advantage of HPE's experience in data and connectivity - particularly in encouraging skills sharing and industrial expertise among NGOs and other bodies. At the core of their philanthropic ambitions, however, is to allow and enable local communities to help provide their own solutions to their own problems, encouraging long-term, sustainable and useful programs of change to emerge.Getting educatedOne of the ways in which communities can be enabled to develop their own long-term solutions is through education and upskilling the population to take advantage of the opportunities offered by technology. Leading that charge is the Micro:bit Educational Foundation, which provides expandable, programmable micro-computers to schools around the world, alongside locally-led educational programs and learning resources. Gareth Stockdale is the organisations CEO and tells us that the democratisation of technology through enabling local participation is key to lifting people out of poverty, providing pathways to future skilled careers, and to enabling self-sufficiency among remote or impoverished communities. Whether it's educating children or upskilling adults to make the most of opportunities in their community and work in collaboration with international organisations, there's plenty being done to help end world poverty by 2030. Will it be enough? Time will tell. But the appetite seems to be real for long-lasting change.Key takeaways: Even small improvements to digital connectivity can have a lasting impact on local and national economic growth and resilience. Most people have the potential to get connected, and doing so can drastically improve lives in remote communities. The best way to lift the world out of poverty is through public-private partnerships which enable and upskill communities to create their own solutions and take long-term advantage of new technologies. Western organisations have a responsibility not to parachute in solutions, but to work on the ground with communities to enable them to make best use of the technology on offer, through collaboration and education. Links and resources:The UN Sustainable Development GoalsThe World Economic Forum's Edison AllianceTech Impact 2030 - How HPE is driving positive change through technologyThe micro:bit Educational FoundationThe impact of digital technology usage on economic growth in Africa - from the Elsevier Public Health Emergency CollectionBrian Tippens on LinkedInIsabelle Mauro on LinkedInGareth Stockdale on LinkedIn

Talking Forests
Forestry People Who Rock - Elaine Springgay FAO Officer and ForYP Founder - Episode 74

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:27


Elaine and I had a conversation about global forestry challenges. I was impressed by her experience in the sector and global knowledge. She launched ForYP the only global forestry young professionals group at the World Forest Congress in Korea this year and I asked her what that is all about and how to get involved. Elaine Springgay is FAO's Agroforestry Officer and has more than 12 years of experience working in international development on integrated natural resources management, community-based forest management and climate-smart agriculture. Prior to joining FAO in 2015, Elaine worked with NGOs or government agencies in Canada, Ghana, the Philippines and Uganda, primarily focused on community-based natural resource management, livelihoods and capacity development initiatives. She has a BSc in both Environmental Geography and History from the University of Toronto, and a Masters in Forestry from the Australian National University. She is also the Founder and Chair of the Global Network for Forestry Young Professionals, ForYP, creating a space for the forestry's younger experts and future leaders to connect, share experiences and advocate for greater career development opportunities. In her spare time, Elaine loves to travel – she has been to over 50 countries and lived in 12! She is also a foodie, loves to hike and kayaking. ForYP is a global community of young professionals in the forest sector who network, develop their professional skills, gain confidence, and feel empowered to engage and lead forestry through the 21st century. See our website: https://www.foryp.org/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/forypnetwork https://www.facebook.com/ForYPorg https://www.linkedin.com/company/foryporg/ https://www.instagram.com/foryporg/ https://twitter.com/foryporg https://youtu.be/lPZ9vtCWxjU Voice By Gordon Collier in Introduction: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Zrównoważony Biznes Podcast
#031 CZY POWINNIŚMY BAĆ SIĘ POSTWZROSTU? | JAN ZYGMUNTOWSKI, POLSKA SIEĆ EKONOMII

Zrównoważony Biznes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 49:16


W tej rozmowie dotykamy wielu wątków między innymi tego czym jest postwzrost a czym degrowth, dychotomii świata biznesu i świata administracji publicznej i NGOsów, kapitalizmu, problemu kapitału, problemów systemowych, PKB, ekonomii obwarzanka, spółdzielni, impact startupów, Bcorpów,  organizacji turkusowych, tematu kapitału społecznego oraz tego czy dotyczy nas demokracja ekonomiczna. Gość odcinka Jan Zygmuntowski Ekonomista zainteresowany problematyką … Czytaj dalej #031 CZY POWINNIŚMY BAĆ SIĘ POSTWZROSTU? | JAN ZYGMUNTOWSKI, POLSKA SIEĆ EKONOMII

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE
Bruce Gordon - EcoFlight

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 29:15


Bruce Gordon is the Founder and President of EcoFlight, an environmental service organization that operates out of Aspen, Colorado. For the past twenty-odd years, EcoFlight has been providing aerial surveys that provide environmental information for NGOs and researchers all over the United States and even beyond its borders. Listen to how Bruce and his associates work to enable their clients to collect the facts, statistics and other data they need to advocate for wilderness and wildlife.Support the show

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast
Should American Nonprofits Work In China? with Freedom House's Michael Abramowitz

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:54


For decades, American nonprofits and philanthropies worked with Chinese citizens and the Chinese Communist Party. But over the last several years especially, the space for foreign NGOs to operate in China has increasingly shrunk due to COVID restrictions, paranoia about Western influence, and an American public suspicious of Beijing. Should nonprofits and philanthropies continue to engage with a China ruled by an increasingly hostile Party? Freedom House's Michael Abramowitz and Strategy Risks' Isaac Stone Fish discuss this question and much more in this podcast.  For more, please go to carengiecouncil.org. 

Reimagining Justice
The art of the possible, the doable and the sustainable with Brian W Tang

Reimagining Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:59


In episode no. 81 my guest is Brian Tang, Founding Executive director of LITE Lab@HKU and Co-chair, Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation & Technology Association (ALITA). We discuss: Career path (which will be interesting to law students); How he became involved with innovation in the law in Hong Kong; Main justice issues in Hong Kong; What LITE stands for, and why it is intentionally a “Lab”; How the Lab works with students from 6 out of the 10 faculties at Hong Kong University;  Topics and the experiential experiences that are covered in the Lab's courses and why; How LITE Lab partners with tech start-ups, NGOs and in-house counsel to co-design research projects;  Examples of the innovative projects including workers compensation, low-income tenants, discrimination, womens' rights, human trafficking and foreign workers; Cultural foundations of ‘pro bono' and differences in approach across the world; Capacity and evolution of NGOs affecting their response to implement technology; Why Brian considers the LITE Lab a ‘marketplace' of sorts; The criticism that undergrad courses and hackathons are not effective; The potential of low code/no code, including the ability to maintain software in-house; Need for integration with existing corporate and NGO systems; Issues of funding and software sustainability of applications developed by NGOs; Impact investing, ESG requirements and social entrepreneurs' potential for the future; Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation and Technology Association's (“ALITA”) mission; Categories of ALITA awards (closing soon!); and Brian's definition of legal innovation! Proudly sponsored by Neota Logic  Links: LITE Lab My employee is pregnant Neota Logic Solution Gallery Neota Logic Churchill Trust Project Survey Andrea Perry-Petersen – LinkedIn - Twitter @winkiepp – andreaperrypetersen.com.au Twitter - @ReimaginingJ Facebook – Reimagining Justice group

Business Standard Podcast
What has been the impact of family philanthropy in India?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 6:31


Asia's richest man celebrated his birthday a bit differently this year. To mark his 60th birthday, Adani Group Chairman Gautam Adani and his family, whose net worth is estimated at $98.1 billion by Forbes, have pledged to donate Rs 60,000 crore or $7.7 billion to a series of social causes. The donation will be managed by the Adani Foundation, which is led by his wife Priti Adani.  With this Adani joins the ranks of billionaires like Mark Zuckerberg and Warren Buffett, who have committed large parts of their wealth for philanthropy. Philanthropist Azim Premji said this should set an example that entrepreneurs can try to live Mahatma Gandhi's principle of Trusteeship of Wealth at the peak of their business success. Indeed, the average age of giving in India is dipping every year and stands at 66 now. In FY21, Premji donated $1.3 billion or Rs 9,713 crore to charity. His foundation has an endowment estimated at $21 billion. The family of HCL Technologies founder Shiv Nadar was the second biggest donor according to a 2021 Hurun India report. Adani's pledge is almost half of what Bill Gates and Melinda French Gates donated to their foundation in 2021, while the former couple's total donations are valued at $74.6 billion.  Jamsetji Tata, who set up Tata Trusts, is the most generous individual of the last century, with total donations of over $102 billion at current value. Private giving in India stems from four sources -- foreign, corporate, retail and families. CSR, family philanthropy and retail giving account for approximately 84% of overall private giving, with foreign contributions making up the rest, according to the India Philanthropy Report 2022 by Dasra and Bain & Company. Family philanthropy overall forms about one-third of total private giving and is expected to grow at a robust 13% per year until FY26, driven by increasing wealth and a rise in the number of technology entrepreneurs. Family philanthropy has fewer constraints than other sources, enabling a broader impact on the social sector. These donors have a greater ability to innovate, influence public policy, build institutional capacity, and experiment with new forms of funding. They can also go far beyond grant-making as most funders come with extensive and technical knowledge in their respective fields, and have deep networks across functions and industries. But family philanthropy has its biases. Of the three major sources of private giving, CSR is the most widely distributed across sectors, while family giving is majorly concentrated in education and healthcare even as India lags in several other sectors. India also lags on gender equality indicators than on indicators related to health and education. Similarly, funding is concentrated in Tier-1 cities. Adani's donation will be utilised in the areas of healthcare, education and skill development with a special focus in rural regions.  India's ultra-rich could potentially increase their donations by 8 to 13 times if they can match the giving as a percentage of wealth of their UK, Chinese and US counterparts. Anant Bhagwati, Partner, The Bridgespan Group says, over the next 5 years, family philanthropy could grow to 40% of total private giving. Unlike CSR or retail, family giving can back causes that deliver long-term results, he says.  How the Adani family deploys its large $7.7 billion donation is also key. While a good number of family philanthropists engage with NGOs through grant-making, not all NGOs can absorb scale funding of the sort offered by these families.  Gautam Adani has said that three expert committees will be formed to formalise strategy and decide allocation of funds, with a plan to add one or two more focus areas in the coming months. Adani Foundation will have to build the right talent, enhance its institutional capabilities further, and develop strategies to drive change in the targeted areas.

NGO Soul + Strategy
041. Rest, reset, resilience: how my mind journeyed when I took a sabbatical - Chris Proulx @ Humentum

NGO Soul + Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 36:32


SummaryWhat happens when NGO leaders take a 4 months sabbatical? What happens to the mind -- what journey does it go on during a 4 month's rest from work?What happens, especially when we are talking about a leader who was already quite steeped in mindfulness and meditation before he started his sabbatical?In this podcast episode, I discuss with Chris Proulx, Global Director at  Humentum the topic of rest, reset, reflection, and personal resilience when leaders take an extensive break from work. Chris's Bio:Global Director at Humentum, the global network of NGOs that strengthens  operational excellence through community building, training, consulting services, and policy-influencing workFormer President and CEO at LINGOsFormer CEO of e-Cornell - Cornell University's e-learning platform We discuss: Resilience is not helped when we do not dare to rely on the help of others, even in the presence of a great teamWhat is the art of ‘doing nothing'? At first, anxiety about the empty space.To what extent is the notion of time an illusion?  How leaders spend their attention is precious.  Most of us spend it quite poorly.  How organizations can create more opportunities for sabbaticals, as part of a benefits package, even when you are not huge.  Quotes“My mind was not ready to rest in the first few weeks after starting my sabbatical; I was not yet able to pull back the mind”“I at first still kept scheduling, trying to stay in control mode, I was still crossing things off my to-do list”“It took a while to really be able to listen to what bubbled up in the mind” Resources:Chris's LinkedInChris's TwitterChris's WebsiteHumentum pageFive Oaks Consulting School's Online course on Virtual Team Leadership skillsYoutube video of this podcastClick here to subscribe to be alerted when new podcast episodes come out or when Tosca produces other thought leadership pieces.Or email Tosca at tosca@5oaksconsulting.org if you want to talk about your social sector organization's needs, challenges, and opportunities.You can find Tosca's content by following her on her social media channels: Twitter LinkedIn Facebook Youtube

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
G7 Summit begins in shadow of Ukraine war

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 8:10


Leaders of the world's richest economies have begun meeting in the Bavarian alps for the annual G7 summit. Greenpeace, Oxfam and other NGOs are calling on G7 leaders to take greater action against climate change and global poverty, but it's the war in Ukraine and soaring energy costs which is topping the agenda.

PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars
System-Wide Change for Greater Accountability to People Affected by Crisis

PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 90:16


Over the last decade, individual agencies, and the humanitarian sector as a whole, have made progress in becoming more accountable to people affected by crisis. However, we are still facing substantial challenges in meeting the commitments we have made to affected people. Fundamentally, we need to work with affected communities, multilateral agencies, NGOs, civil society organizations, governments, and donors, to address the asymmetry of power that currently defines the relationship between humanitarian agencies and affected people. This requires a more cohesive, collaborative system-wide approach to seeing how we connect the incentives and break down the barriers that hold us back from making this change.Join us on 24 June for a discussion on collective accountability, organized by the new IASC Task Force on Accountability to Affected People (AAP) and hosted by PHAP, where we will aim to generate ideas and understand better what is needed to drive a system-wide change for greater collective accountability for people who have been affected by crisis. The discussion will take its starting point in the vision of the AAP Task Force: “By having an accountable and enhanced leadership, supported by an inclusive system and architecture with quality resourcing available we will strengthen collective accountably to people affected by crisis and deliver the necessary system-wide change”. The session will draw on learning from a range of initiatives to capture ideas of opportunities, as well as overcoming barriers to change to help offer direction to advance the IASC Task Force plans for collective accountability to affected people.Read more about the event on https://phap.org/24jun2022

New Books in Latin American Studies
Francesca Lessa, "The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America" (Yale UP, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:57


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Studies podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Francesca Lessa about her interesting new book The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America published in 2022 by the Yale University Press. Stories of transnational terror and justice illuminate the past and present of South America's struggles for human rights. Through the voices of survivors and witnesses, human rights activists, judicial actors, journalists, and historians, Francesca Lessa unravels the secrets of transnational repression masterminded by South American dictators between 1969 and 1981. Under Operation Condor, their violent and oppressive regimes kidnapped, tortured, and murdered hundreds of exiles, or forcibly returned them to the countries from which they had fled. South America became a zone of terror for those who were targeted, and of impunity for those who perpetuated the violence. Lessa shows how networks of justice seekers gradually materialized and effectively transcended national borders to achieve justice for the victims of these horrors. Based on extensive fieldwork, archival research, trial ethnography, and over one-hundred interviews, The Condor Trials explores South America's past and present and sheds light on ongoing struggles for justice as its societies come to terms with the unparalleled atrocities of their not-so-distant pasts. Dr Francesca Lessa is a lecturer in Latin American studies and development at the University of Oxford. She is also the author of Memory and Transitional Justice in Argentina and Uruguay and is an honorary president of the Observatorio Luz Ibarburu (Uruguay), a network of human rights NGOs devoted to the fight against impunity in that country. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist and a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host of the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards, including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given out by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in History
Francesca Lessa, "The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America" (Yale UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:57


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Studies podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Francesca Lessa about her interesting new book The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America published in 2022 by the Yale University Press. Stories of transnational terror and justice illuminate the past and present of South America's struggles for human rights. Through the voices of survivors and witnesses, human rights activists, judicial actors, journalists, and historians, Francesca Lessa unravels the secrets of transnational repression masterminded by South American dictators between 1969 and 1981. Under Operation Condor, their violent and oppressive regimes kidnapped, tortured, and murdered hundreds of exiles, or forcibly returned them to the countries from which they had fled. South America became a zone of terror for those who were targeted, and of impunity for those who perpetuated the violence. Lessa shows how networks of justice seekers gradually materialized and effectively transcended national borders to achieve justice for the victims of these horrors. Based on extensive fieldwork, archival research, trial ethnography, and over one-hundred interviews, The Condor Trials explores South America's past and present and sheds light on ongoing struggles for justice as its societies come to terms with the unparalleled atrocities of their not-so-distant pasts. Dr Francesca Lessa is a lecturer in Latin American studies and development at the University of Oxford. She is also the author of Memory and Transitional Justice in Argentina and Uruguay and is an honorary president of the Observatorio Luz Ibarburu (Uruguay), a network of human rights NGOs devoted to the fight against impunity in that country. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist and a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host of the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards, including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given out by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Francesca Lessa, "The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America" (Yale UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:57


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Studies podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Francesca Lessa about her interesting new book The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America published in 2022 by the Yale University Press. Stories of transnational terror and justice illuminate the past and present of South America's struggles for human rights. Through the voices of survivors and witnesses, human rights activists, judicial actors, journalists, and historians, Francesca Lessa unravels the secrets of transnational repression masterminded by South American dictators between 1969 and 1981. Under Operation Condor, their violent and oppressive regimes kidnapped, tortured, and murdered hundreds of exiles, or forcibly returned them to the countries from which they had fled. South America became a zone of terror for those who were targeted, and of impunity for those who perpetuated the violence. Lessa shows how networks of justice seekers gradually materialized and effectively transcended national borders to achieve justice for the victims of these horrors. Based on extensive fieldwork, archival research, trial ethnography, and over one-hundred interviews, The Condor Trials explores South America's past and present and sheds light on ongoing struggles for justice as its societies come to terms with the unparalleled atrocities of their not-so-distant pasts. Dr Francesca Lessa is a lecturer in Latin American studies and development at the University of Oxford. She is also the author of Memory and Transitional Justice in Argentina and Uruguay and is an honorary president of the Observatorio Luz Ibarburu (Uruguay), a network of human rights NGOs devoted to the fight against impunity in that country. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist and a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host of the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards, including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given out by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
Francesca Lessa, "The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America" (Yale UP, 2022)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:57


In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Studies podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Francesca Lessa about her interesting new book The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America published in 2022 by the Yale University Press. Stories of transnational terror and justice illuminate the past and present of South America's struggles for human rights. Through the voices of survivors and witnesses, human rights activists, judicial actors, journalists, and historians, Francesca Lessa unravels the secrets of transnational repression masterminded by South American dictators between 1969 and 1981. Under Operation Condor, their violent and oppressive regimes kidnapped, tortured, and murdered hundreds of exiles, or forcibly returned them to the countries from which they had fled. South America became a zone of terror for those who were targeted, and of impunity for those who perpetuated the violence. Lessa shows how networks of justice seekers gradually materialized and effectively transcended national borders to achieve justice for the victims of these horrors. Based on extensive fieldwork, archival research, trial ethnography, and over one-hundred interviews, The Condor Trials explores South America's past and present and sheds light on ongoing struggles for justice as its societies come to terms with the unparalleled atrocities of their not-so-distant pasts. Dr Francesca Lessa is a lecturer in Latin American studies and development at the University of Oxford. She is also the author of Memory and Transitional Justice in Argentina and Uruguay and is an honorary president of the Observatorio Luz Ibarburu (Uruguay), a network of human rights NGOs devoted to the fight against impunity in that country. Kenneth Sanchez is a Peruvian journalist and a multi-platform content curator for the Peruvian media outlet Comité de Lectura. He is a host of the New Books in Latin American Studies podcast and the movies & entertainment podcast Segundo Plano. He holds a master's degree in Latin American Politics from University College London (UCL), is a Centre for Investigative Journalism masterclass alumni and is part of the 6th generation of Young Journalists of #LaRedLatam of Distintas Latitudes. He has won several awards, including the prestigious Amnesty Media Award given out by Amnesty International UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

USCIRF Spotlight Podcast
Preview of the IRF Summit 2022

USCIRF Spotlight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 18:41


Next week, from June 28 to June 30, the second annual International Religious Freedom (IRF) Summit will be held in Washington, DC. The IRF Summit brings together a diverse coalition of NGOs and individuals from all over the world committed to the fundamental right to freedom of religion or belief and aims to increase public awareness and political support for the international religious freedom movement. Former Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom Sam Brownback, co-chair of the IRF Summit, joins us today to preview this year's activities and the Summit's importance for promoting freedom of religion or belief.Check out the IRF Summit websiteWith Contributions from: Dwight Bashir, Director of Outreach and Policy, USCIRFKirsten Lavery, Supervisory Policy Analyst, USCIRFDylan Schexnaydre, Victims List and Outreach Specialist, USCIRF

World Business Report
Aid to Afghanistan

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:25


Organisations are facing financial challenges getting aid to Afghanistan after Wednesday's devastating earthquake. Vivienne Nunis is joined by Dr Erica Moret, a senior researcher at the Graduate Institute in Geneva and the author of a recent report on financial access for NGOs in Afghanistan. European Union leaders are today set to formally designate Ukraine a candidate for future membership. Ukraine applied to join the bloc after Russia invaded in February, and leaders are meeting in Brussels. Marc Pierini, a former career EU diplomat for nearly 40 years, explains the process of joining the EU. Online dating is big business, but some businesses are going one step further when it comes to love in the metaverse. Hannah Mullane has been investigating if putting on a virtual reality headset can help with dating. Nike's Air Force 1 went on sale today. It's a collaboration with Off White, the luxury brand formerly owned by the late fashion designer Virgil Abloh. They sold for $185 but the resale value for such sneakers can be up to 400% higher. Radio and podcast host, Kish Kash explains how he got involved in the sneaker collecting phenomenon. (Picture: Villagers along with rescue workers examine the extent of damage at a village following an earthquake in Bernal district, Paktika province, on June 23, 2022. - Desperate rescuers battled against the clock and heavy rain on June 23 to reach cut-off areas in eastern Afghanistan after a powerful earthquake killed at least 1,000 people and left thousands more homeless. Picture Credit: AHMAD SAHEL ARMAN/AFP via Getty Images).

The Aaron Katsman Show
Achieving financial success in Israel

The Aaron Katsman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 21:14


How do you make it financially in Israel? This age-old question pops up daily on internet forums and in my inbox. On today's show, we are speaking with Nadav Ellinson, founder of Money By Design, which helps English-speaking Israelis learn how to understand money to design a better life for themselves in the holy land. No matter what stage of aliyah you are in, tune in to this episode for helpful strategies and tips for making the most of your money here. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ABOUT OUR GUEST: Nadav Ellinson is a personal finance consultant and the founder of Money By Design. Nadav has an MBA from Tel Aviv Recanati School and over 10 years of finance experience as CFO/COO of a successful hi-tech company, head of finance for several NGOs, and through his private work with olim in Israel. Nadav founded moneyby.design to help English-speaking Israelis learn how to understand money to design a better life for themselves. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ CONTACT NADAV: Website: https://moneyby.design Email: nadav@moneyby.design Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/join.mbd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/moneyby.design/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SOCIAL LINKS: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AaronKatsmanLC/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AaronKatsman LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaron-katsman-6550441/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-aaron-katsman-show/id1192234142 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-aaron-katsman-show Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1lePc1pC0giBFV1nzCGsQR ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VISIT MY WEBSITE: Website: https://www.aaronkatsman.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONTACT ME: Email me: aaron@lighthousecapital.co.il ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DISCLAIMER: Aaron Katsman is a licensed financial professional both in the U.S. and Israel. Call 02-624-0995 for a consultation on how to handle U.S. brokerage accounts from Israel. This video is for education purposes only and is not intended to give investment, legal or tax advice. If such advice is needed, contact a licensed professional who can help you. Securities offered through Portfolio Resources Group Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC, MSRB, FSI. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not of Portfolio Resources Group Inc., or its affiliates. Neither PRG nor its affiliates give tax or legal advice.

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!
Ep 116 How to Grow Your Business with Gordon Van Wechel

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 37:40


Hi, I'm the Profit Answer Man Rocky Lalvani! I help small business owners simplify their financial reports so that they can make more informed business decisions with fewer hassles. We utilize the Profit First system created by Mike Michalowicz Effortless Cashflow Course: http://bit.do/effortlesscashflowcourse Schedule your free, no-obligation intro call: https://bookme.name/rockyl/lite/intro-appointment-15-minutes More about making profitability simple: http://profitcomesfirst.com/ Bio: For more than 17 years, Gordon has been helping hundreds of small to medium size businesses and professional practices develop marketing and business growth plans that have brought millions of dollars in added revenue. This has been accomplished through his agency, The Alchemy Consulting Group.   In 1995, he began partnering with several NGOs to teach microenterprise principles to people in underdeveloped nations. This work has taken him to more than 50 countries resulting in the launch of more than 1000 businesses, 27 schools and many community development programs. He continues to be active in this work today.   An enduring lesson from these experiences is the importance of business growth that is both consistent and predictable. Today's professional practice owners must be aware of market trends and be able to pivot quickly towards new opportunities in order to survive. In addition to focusing on growth, Gordon also works with owners to enhance the value of their practice. He believes that even if selling the practice isn't a goal, every professional should analyze their business as if they were a buyer.   Gordon strongly believes that small to medium sized businesses are the engine that drives the economy. By helping owners and growing their companies, we help our communities and nation     Links:   https://thealchemyconsultinggroup.com/  https://www.alchemytransitions.com   Questions: questions@profitanswerman.com Email: rocky@profitcomesfirst.com Profit Answer Man Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/profitanswerman/ My podcast about living a richer more meaningful life: http://richersoul.com/ First 2 chapters of Profit First: https://sendfox.com/rocky This episode is part of the SMB Podcast Network. Find other great interviews from around the internet just like this one at https://www.SMBPodcastNetwork.com Music provided by Junan from Junan Podcast Any financial advice is for educational purposes only and you should consult with an expert for your specific needs.

Mojo for the Modern Man
The Journeyman Life with Tony Daloisio - Act 2

Mojo for the Modern Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 32:04


Tony Daloisio begins Act 2 with a story of a recent experience he had at lunch with a good friend.  Presented with what could have easily become a confrontation, he describes facing a “moment of truth” and how slowing down, opening his heart choosing to empathize deepened the friendship.Tony leads us into a discussion highlighting his own work as well as that of Robert Kegan.  He weaves elegantly between inner and outer work, touches on the importance of self-awareness, and points us toward noticing the feedback the outside world is constantly serving up.He offers his divorce as a clear example of a wakeup call that he chose to answer.  In doing so he consciously faced the man in the mirror, “took myself on,” as he says, and got about the deep, challenging business of making real, tangible change. Tony riffs on the role ego plays in how men maintain a shell they present not only to the outside world, but also place between themselves and their own inner beings.  From there, he brings us into the “three portals: Behavioral, Psychological, and Spiritual.”We wrap Act 2 riffing on the importance of accountability and responsibility in leading a good, imperfect, Journeyman Life, and end with not only valuable gems of wisdom, but also actionable suggestions to begin to develop one's “inner guidance system.”Dr. Tony Daloisio was trained as an organizational psychologist and has practiced in that field for over thirty years, serving hundreds if not thousands of businesses, not-for-profit organizations, schools, hospitals, NGOs, and government agencies/military operations. His work with them has incorporated strategic planning and implementation, change management, team development, executive coaching, and executive education. He has been a professor in the MBA program at Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business, teaching leadership and organizational change. In the early parts of his career, which began in education, he was an inner-city high school principal where he advocated for disadvantaged youth. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in the field of Organizational Psychology and Counseling Psychology, where he received a fellowship for his research in leadership style and taught graduate courses in psychology.In the early 2000s he forged a partnership with the late Dr. Stephen R. Covey, author of the blockbuster New York Times bestseller The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, and then his son, Stephen M. R. Covey to develop the consulting practice Principle Centered Leadership and teach The 7 Habits course around the world.He founded and has been the CEO of Charter Oak Consulting group for thirty years. The company was listed as one of Inc. Magazine's fastest-growing companies and has been awarded numerous citations for best-in-class consulting projects in various industries.In 2017 he co-authored a highly acclaimed business book with Kendall Lyman entitled, Change the Way You Change.Tony lives in Washington Depot, Connecticut, and Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife, Teresa Hargrave.  He is the proud father of Tim Daloisio and Morgan Daloisio and grandfather to Ryan, Julia, Addie, and James. He is enjoying his consulting practice with schools, NGOs, business startups, and a variety of mission-driven companies. He has a love of the outdoors, hiking, biking, and his favorite, golf. With the publishing of this book, The Journeyman Life, he will be conducting training programs for men to lead groups of men interested in applying the ideas and tools from the book.www.thejourneymanlife.comwww.changethewayyouchange.comwww.cocg.com

Explore - Der National Geographic Podcast
Ägypten: Mit Aktivismus gegen Tabu und Folter

Explore - Der National Geographic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 46:38


Die Familie - in Ägypten ist sie weiter zentrale Institution und Rückgrat der Gesellschaft. Definiert wird sie meist im sehr traditionellen Sinne, Kinder dürfen da natürlich auf keinen Fall fehlen. Sie gelten als Kitt jeder Ehe, sind Teil der Altersvorsorge und tragen den Familiennamen weiter. Entsprechend fallen die Reaktionen der „Rest-Familie“ meist heftig aus, wenn ein frisch verheiratetes Paar entscheidet: Nein, wir wollen keine eigenen Kinder haben. Über die Rolle von Familie und Kindern in der ägyptischen Gesellschaft, über die Stigmatisierung kinderloser Paare und über die Partnersuche explizit ohne Kinderwunsch, unter anderem dazu mehr in dieser Folge von “Explore - der National Geographic Podcast”. Sehr „traditionell“ mögen auf viele Menschen im Westen die familiären Werte und Strukturen in Ägypten wirken, die Lage der Menschenrechte scheint hingegen mit „mittelalterlich“ nicht übertrieben schlecht beschrieben. Nationale wie internationale Menschenrechtsorganisationen und NGOs weisen immer wieder darauf hin: die ägyptische Staatsgewalt macht ihrem Namen nur allzu oft unrühmliche Ehre. Willkür, Gewalt und brutale Folter können in Ägypten demnach so gut wie jede und jeden treffen. Immerhin: Trotz allem gibt es Institutionen und mutige Menschen, die die staatliche Willkür öffentlich anprangern und den Opfern von Folter und Gewalt zur Seite stehen, obwohl sie dafür oft selbst einen hohen Preis zahlen. Unser zweites Thema in dieser Folge. Wir freuen uns immer, eure Meinung und Kommentare zu lesen: Schreibt uns gerne eine eMail an hilfe@disney.de.

Making it Count Podcast
Building Connections for Growth with Mel Williams

Making it Count Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 28:17


Today I'm chatting with the spectacular Mel Williams. Mel finds practical and creative ways for businesses and individuals to diversify, grow and maximise their potential. She is guided by a growth mindset in facilitating marketing and partnership collaborations across leading tier-1 brands, NGOs and not for profits.    In this episode, Mel is taking us through building connections for growth. She shares how her 20 years of experience building and leading sales and marketing growth initiatives has helped her develop a strong skill in identifying opportunities for growth.   With a unique ability to see through the clutter and discover hidden opportunities, Mel finds what makes the most sense (not necessarily what's the most popular) and works it through from a financial perspective to ensure that it will deliver.    There is so much power and potential from building a good collaboration. Mel takes us through her top 3 tips for growing strategic partnerships and connections.    Remember, don't overcomplicate partnerships. If Nanna can't understand it, nobody will understand it.    Mel discusses taking on a role with the grants committee for the children's charity, Variety. They support approximately 80,000 children around Australia each year who are experiencing disadvantage, disability or illness. It is one of the best things Mel has ever done and is very close to her heart.    I'm so grateful to have Mel on the show today to share her expertise, experience and inspiration. You'll take away so much value from her journey and her knowledge on building positive connections for growth and collaboration in life and business.   LINKS:   Resources mentioned:  Book: Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead: Sandberg, Sheryl   Connect with Mel Williams:  LinkedIn:https://au.linkedin.com/in/melissa-williams-06999714  Me, Myself and Pie:https://memyselfandpie.com.au/    Connect with Julie: Instagram:@juliehydeleads Website:https://juliehyde.com.au See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E43 - Elle on Threat Modeling

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 72:40


Episode Notes Episode summary Margaret talks with Elle an anarchist and security professional about different threat modeling approaches and analyzing different kinds of threats. They explore physical threats, digital security, communications, surveillance,and general OpSec mentalities for how to navigate the panopticon and do stuff in the world without people knowing about it...if you're in Czarist Russia of course. Guest Info Elle can be found on twitter @ellearmageddon. Host and Publisher The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Show Links Transcript Live Like the World is Dying: Elle on Threat Modeling Margaret 00:15 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret killjoy. And with me at the exact moment is my dog, who has just jumped up to try and talk into the microphone and bite my arm. And, I use 'she' and 'they' pronouns. And this week, I'm going to be talking to my friend Elle, who is a, an anarchist security professional. And we're going to be talking about threat modeling. And we're going to be talking about how to figure out what people are trying to do to you and who's trying to do it and how to deal with different people trying to do different things. Like, what is the threat model around the fact that while I'm trying to record a podcast, my dog is biting my arm? And I am currently choosing to respond by trying to play it for humor and leaving it in rather than cutting it out and re recording. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show on the network. Jingle Margaret 02:00 Okay, if you could introduce yourself, I guess, with your name and your pronouns, and then maybe what you do as relates to the stuff that we're going to be talking about today. Elle 02:10 Yeah, cool. Hi, I'm Elle. My pronouns are they/them. I am a queer, autistic, anarchist security practitioner. I do security for a living now that I've spent over the last decade, working with activist groups and NGOs, just kind of anybody who's got an interesting threat model to help them figure out what they can do to make themselves a little a little safer and a little more secure. Margaret 02:43 So that word threat model. That's actually kind of what I want to have you on today to talk about is, it's this word that we we hear a lot, and sometimes we throw into sentences when we want to sound really smart, or maybe I do that. But what does it mean, what is threat modeling? And why is it relevant? Elle 03:02 Yeah, I actually, I really love that question. Because I think that we a lot of people do use the term threat modeling without really knowing what they mean by it. And so to me, threat modeling is having an understanding of your own life in your own context, and who poses a realistic risk to you, and what you can do to keep yourself safe from them. So whether that's, you know, protecting communications that you have from, you know, state surveillance, or whether it's keeping yourself safe from an abusive ex, your threat model is going to vary based on your own life experiences and what you need to protect yourself from and who those people actually are and what they're capable of doing. Margaret 03:52 Are you trying to say there's not like one solution to all problems that we would just apply? Elle 03:58 You know, I love... Margaret 03:58 I don't understand. Elle 04:00 I know that everybody really, really loves the phrase "Use signal. Use TOR," and you know, thinks that that is the solution to all of life's problems. But it actually turns out that, no, you do have to have both an idea of what it is that you're trying to protect, whether it's yourself or something like your communications and who you're trying to protect it from, and how they can how they can actually start working towards gaining access to whatever it is that you're trying to defend. Margaret 04:31 One of the things that when I think about threat modeling that I think about is this idea of...because the levels of security that you take for something often limit your ability to accomplish different things. Like in Dungeons and Dragons, if you were plate armor, you're less able to be a dexterous rogue and stealth around. And so I think about threat modeling, maybe as like learning to balance....I'm kind of asking this, am I correct in this? Balancing what you're trying to accomplish with who's trying to stop you? Because like, you could just use TOR, for everything. And then also like use links the little like Lynx [misspoke "Tails"] USB keychain and never use a regular computer and never communicate with anyone and then never accomplish anything. But, it seems like that might not work. Elle 05:17 Yeah, I mean, the idea, the idea is to prevent whoever your adversaries are from keeping you from doing whatever you're trying to accomplish. Right? So if the security precautions that you're taking to prevent your adversaries from preventing you from doing a thing are also preventing you from doing the thing, then it doesn't matter, because your adversaries have just won, right? So there, there definitely is a need, you know, to be aware of risks that you're taking and decide which ones make sense, which ones don't make sense. And kind of look at it from from a dynamic of "Okay, is this something that is in my, you know, acceptable risk model? Is this a risk I'm willing to take? Are there things that I can do to, you know, do harm reduction and minimize the risk? Or at least like, make it less? Where are those trade offs? What, what is the maximum amount of safety or security that I can do for myself, while still achieving whatever it is that I'm trying to achieve?" Margaret 06:26 Do you actually ever like, chart it out on like, an X,Y axis where you get like, this is the point where you start getting diminishing returns? I'm just imagining it. I've never done that. Elle 06:37 In, in the abstract, yes, because that's part of how autism brain works for me. But in a, like actually taking pen to paper context, not really. But that's, you know, at least partially, because of that's something that autism brain just does for me. So I think it could actually be a super reasonable thing to do, for people whose brains don't auto filter that for them. But but I'm, I guess, lucky enough to be neurodivergent, and have like, you know, like, we always we joke in tech, "It's not a bug, it's a feature." And I feel like, you know, autism is kind of both sometimes. In some cases, it's totally a bug and and others, it's absolutely a feature. And this is one of the areas where it happens to be a feature, at least for me. Margaret 07:35 That makes sense. I, I kind of view my ADHD as a feature, in that, it allows me to hyper focus on topics and then move on and then not come back to them. Or also, which is what I do now for work with podcasting, and a lot of my writing. It makes it hard to write long books, I gotta admit, Elle 07:56 Yeah, I work with a bunch of people with varying neuro types. And it's really interesting, like, at least at least in my own team, I think that you know, the, the folks who are more towards the autism spectrum disorder side of of the house are more focused on things like application security, and kind of things that require sort of sustained hyper focus. And then folks with ADHD make just absolutely amazing, like incident responders and do really, really well in interrupt driven are interrupts heavy contexts, Margaret 08:38 Or sprinters. Elle 08:40 It's wild to me, because I'm just like, yes, this makes perfect sense. And obviously, like, these different tasks are better suited to different neuro types. But I've also never worked with a manager who actually thought about things in that way before. Margaret 08:53 Right. Elle 08:54 And so it's actually kind of cool to be to be in a position where I can be like, "Hey, like, Does this sound interesting to you? Would you rather focus on this kind of work?" And kind of get that that with people. Margaret 09:06 That makes sense that's.... i I'm glad that you're able to do that. I'm glad that people that you work with are able to have that you know, experience because it is it's hard to it's hard to work within....obviously the topic of today is...to working in the workplace is a neurodivergent person, but it I mean it affects so many of us you know, like almost whatever you do for work the the different ways your brain work are always struggling against it. So. Elle 09:32 Yeah, I don't know. It just it makes sense to me to like do your best to structure your life in a way that is more conducive to your neurotype. Margaret 09:44 Yeah. Elle 09:45 You know, if you can. Margaret 09:49 I don't even realize exactly how age ADHD I was until I tried to work within a normal workforce. I built my entire life around, not needing to live in one place or do one thing for sustained periods of time. But okay, but back to the threat modeling. Margaret 10:07 The first time I heard of, I don't know if it's the first time I heard a threat modeling or not, I don't actually know when I first started hearing that word. But the first time I heard about you, in the context of it was a couple years back, you had some kind of maybe it was tweets or something about how people were assuming that they should use, for example, the more activist focused email service Rise Up, versus whether they should just use Gmail. And I believe that you were making the case that for a lot of things, Gmail would actually be safer, because even though they don't care about you, they have a lot more resources to throw at the problem of keeping governments from reading their emails. That might be a terrible paraphrasing of what you said. But this, this is how I was introduced to this concept of threat modeling. If you wanted to talk about that example, and tell me how I got it all wrong. Elle 10:07 Yeah. Elle 10:58 Yeah. Um, so you didn't actually get it all wrong. And I think that the thing that I would add to that is that if you are engaging in some form of hypersensitive communication, email is not the mechanism that you want to do that. And so when I say things like, "Oh, you know, it probably actually makes sense to use Gmail instead of Rise Up," I mean, you know, contexts where you're maybe communicating with a lawyer and your communications are privileged, right?it's a lot harder to crack Gmail security than it is to crack something like Rise Up security, just by virtue of the volume of resources available to each of those organizations. And so where you specifically have this case where, you know, there's, there's some degree of legal protection for whatever that means, making sure that you're not leveraging something where your communications can be accessed without your knowledge or consent by a third party, and then used in a way that is conducive to parallel construction. Margaret 12:19 So what is parallel construction? Elle 12:20 Parallel construction is a legal term where you obtain information in a way that is not admissible in court, and then use that information to reconstruct a timeline or reconstruct a mechanism of access to get to that information in an admissible way. Margaret 12:39 So like every cop show Elle 12:41 Right, so like, with parallel construction around emails, for example, if you're emailing back and forth with your lawyer, and your lawyer is like, "Alright, like, be straight with me. Because I need to know if you've actually done this crime so that I can understand how best to defend you." And you're like, "Yeah, dude, I totally did that crime," which you should never admit to in writing anyway, because, again, email is not the format that you want to have this conversation in. But like, if you're gonna admit to having done crimes in email, for some reason, how easy it is for someone else to access that admission is important. Because if somebody can access this email admission of you having done the crimes where you're, you know, describing in detail, what crimes you did, when with who, then it starts, like, it gets a lot easier to be like, "Oh, well, obviously, we need to subpoena this person's phone records. And we should see, you know, we should use geolocation tracking of their device to figure out who they were in proximity to and who else was involved in this," and it can, it can be really easy to like, establish a timeline and get kind of the roadmap to all of the evidence that they would need to, to put you in jail. So it's, it's probably worth kind of thinking about how easy it is to access that that information. And again, don't don't admit to doing crimes in email, email is not the format that you want to use for admitting to having done crimes. But if you're going to, it's probably worth making sure that, you know, the the email providers that you are choosing are equipped with both robust security controls, and probably also like a really good legal team. Right? So if...like Rise Up isn't going to comply with the subpoena to the like, to the best of their ability, they're not going to do that, but it's a lot easier to sue Rise Up than it is to sue Google. Margaret 14:51 Right. Elle 14:51 And it's a lot easier to to break Rise Up's security mechanisms than it is to break Google's, just by virtue of how much time and effort each of those entities is able to commit to securing email. Please don't commit to doing crimes in email, just please just don't. Don't do it in writing. Don't do it. Margaret 15:15 Okay, let me change my evening plans. Hold on let me finish sending this email.. Elle 15:23 No! Margaret 15:25 Well, I mean, I guess like the one of the reasons that I thought so much about that example, and why it kind of stuck with me years later was just thinking about what people decide they're safe, because they did some basic security stuff. And I don't know if that counts under threat modeling. But it's like something I think about a lot is about people being like, "I don't understand, we left our cell phones at home and went on a walk in the woods," which is one of the safest ways anyone could possibly have a conversation. "How could anyone possibly have known this thing?" And I'm like, wait, you, you told someone you know, or like, like, not to make people more paranoid, but like... Elle 16:06 Or maybe, maybe you left your cell phone at home, but kept your smartwatch on you, because you wanted to close, you know, you wanted to get your steps for the day while you were having this conversation, right? Margaret 16:19 Because otherwise, does it even count if I'm not wearing my [smartwatch]. Elle 16:21 Right, exactly. And like, we joke, and we laugh, but like, it is actually something that people don't think about. And like, maybe you left your phones at home, and you went for a walk in the woods, but you took public transit together to get there and were captured on a bunch of surveillance cameras. Like there's, there's a lot of, especially if you've actually been targeted for surveillance, which is very rare, because it's very resource intensive. But you know, there there are alternate ways to track people. And it does depend on things like whether or not you've got additional tech on you, whether or not you were captured on cameras. And you know, whether whether or not your voices were picked up by ShotSpotter, as you were walking to wherever the woods were like, there's just there's we live in a panopticon. I don't say that so that people are paranoid about it, I say it because it's a lot easier to think about, where, when and how you want to phrase things. Margaret 17:27 Yeah. Elle 17:28 In a way that you know, still facilitates communications still facilitates achieving whatever it is that you're trying to accomplish, but sets you sets you up to be as safe as possible in doing it. And I think that especially in anarchist circles, just... and honestly also in security circles, there's a lot of of like, dogmatic adherence to security ritual, that may or may not actually make sense based on both, you, who your actual adversaries are, and what their realistic capabilities are. Margaret 18:06 And what they're trying to actually accomplish I feel like is...Okay, one of the threat models that I like...I encourage people sometimes to carry firearms, right in very specific contexts. And it feels like a security... Oh, you had a good word for it that you just used...ritual of security theater, I don't remember...a firearm often feels like that, Elle 18:30 Right. Margaret 18:31 In a way where you're like," Oh, I'm safe now, right, because I'm carrying a firearm." And, for example, I didn't carry a firearm for a very long time. Because for a long time, my threat model, the people who messed with me, were cops. And if a cop is going to mess with me, I do not want to have a firearm on me, because it will potentially escalate a situation in a very bad way. Whereas when I came out and started, you know, when I started getting harassed more for being a scary transwoman, and less for being an anarchist, or a hitchhiker, or whatever, you know, now my threat model is transphobes, who wants to do me harm. And in a civilian-civilian context, I prefer I feel safer. And I believe I am safer in most situations armed in that case. But every time I leave the house, I have to think about "What is my threat model?" And then in a similar way, sorry, it's just me thinking about the threat model of firearms, but it's the main example that I think of, is that often people's threat model in terms of firearms and safety as themselves, right? And so you just actually need to do the soul searching where you're like,"What's more likely to happen to me today? Am I likely to get really sad, or am I likely to get attacked by fascists?" Elle 19:57 Yeah. And I think that there is there's an additional question, especially when you're talking about arming yourself, whether it's firearms, or carrying a knife, or whatever, because like, I don't own any firearms, but I do carry a knife a lot of the time. And so like some questions, some additional questions that you have to ask yourself are, "How confident am I in my own ability to use this to harm another person?" Because if you're going to hesitate, you're gonna get fucked up. Margaret 20:28 Yeah. Elle 20:28 Like, if you are carrying a weapon, and you pull it out and hesitate in using it, it's gonna get taken away from you, and it's going to be used against you. So that's actually one of the biggest questions that I would say people should be asking themselves when developing a threat model around arming themselves is, "Will I actually use this? How confident am I?" if you're not confident, then it's okay to leave it at home. It's okay to practice more. It's okay to like develop that familiarity before you start using it as an EDC. Sorry an Every Day Carry. And then the you know, the other question is, "How likely am I to get arrested here?" I carry, I carry a knife that I absolutely do know how to use most of the time when I leave the house. But when I'm going to go to a demonstration, because the way that I usually engage in protests or in demonstrations is in an emergency medical response capacity, I carry a medic kit instead. And my medic kit is a clean bag that does not have any sharp objects in it. It doesn't have anything that you know could be construed as a weapon it doesn't have...it doesn't...I don't even have weed gummies which are totally like recreationally legal here, right? I won't even put weed in the medic kit. It's it is very much a... Margaret 21:52 Well, if you got a federally arrested you'd be in trouble with that maybe. Elle 21:55 Yeah, sure, I guess. But, like the medic bag is very...nothing goes in this kit ever that I wouldn't want to get arrested carrying. And so there's like EMT shears in there. Margaret 22:12 Right. Elle 22:13 But that's that's it in terms of like... Margaret 22:16 Those are scary you know...the blunted tips. Elle 22:21 I know, the blunted tips and the like safety, whatever on them. It's just...it's it is something to think about is "Where am I going...What...Who am I likely to encounter? And like what are the trade offs here?" Margaret 22:37 I remember once going to a demonstration a very long time ago where our like, big plan was to get in through all of the crazy militarized downtown in this one city and, and the big plan is we're gonna set up a Food Not Bombs inside the security line of the police, you know. And so we picked one person, I think I was the sacrificial person, who had to carry a knife, because we had to get the folding tables that we're gonna put the food on off of the top of the minivan. And we had to do it very quickly, and they were tied on. And so I think I brought the knife and then left it in the car and the car sped off. And then we fed people and they had spent ten million dollars protecting the city from 30 people feeding people Food Not Bombs. Elle 23:20 Amazing. Margaret 23:22 But, but yeah, I mean, whereas every other day in my life, especially back then when I was a hitchhiker, I absolutely carried a knife. Elle 23:30 Yeah. Margaret 23:31 You know, for multiple purposes. Yeah, okay, so then it feels like...I like rooting it in the self defense stuff because I think about that a lot and for me it maybe then makes sense to sort of build up and out from there as to say like...you know, if someone's threat model is my ex-partner's new partner is trying to hack me or my abusive ex is trying to hack me or something, that's just such a different threat model than... Elle 24:04 Yeah, it is. Margaret 24:05 Than the local police are trying to get me versus the federal police are trying to get me versus a foreign country is trying to get me you know, and I and it feels like sometimes those things are like contradictory to each other about what isn't isn't the best maybe. Elle 24:19 They are, because each of those each of those entities is going to have different mechanisms for getting to you and so you know, an abusive partner or abusive ex is more likely to have physical access to you, and your devices, than you know, a foreign entity is, right? Because there's there's proximity to think about, and so you know, you might want to have....Actually the....Okay, so the abusive ex versus the cops, right. A lot of us now have have phones where the mechanism for accessing them is either a password, or some kind of biometric identifier. So like a fingerprint, or you know, face ID or whatever. And there's this very dogmatic adherence to "Oh, well, passwords are better." But passwords might actually not be better. Because if somebody has regular proximity to you, they may be able to watch you enter your password and get enough information to guess it. And if you're, if you're not using a biometric identifier, in those use cases, then what can happen is they can guess your password, or watch, you type it in enough time so that they get a good feeling for what it is. And they can then access your phone without your knowledge while you're sleeping. Right? Margaret 25:46 Right. Elle 25:47 And sometimes just knowing whether or not your your adversary has access to your phone is actually a really useful thing. Because you know how much information they do or don't have. Margaret 26:01 Yeah. No that's... Elle 26:03 And so it really is just about about trade offs and harm reduction. Margaret 26:08 That never would have occurred to me before. I mean, it would occur to me if someone's trying to break into my devices, but I have also fallen into the all Biometrics is bad, right? Because it's the password, you can't change because the police can compel you to open things with biometrics, but they can't necessarily compel you...is more complicated to be compelled to enter a password. Elle 26:31 I mean, like, it's only as complicated as a baton. Margaret 26:34 Yeah, there's that XKCD comic about this. Have you seen it? Elle 26:37 Yes. Yes, I have. And it is it is an accurate....We like in security, we call it you know, the Rubber Hose method, right? It we.... Margaret 26:46 The implication here for anyone hasn't read it is that they can beat you up and get you to give them their [password]. Elle 26:50 Right people, people will usually if they're hit enough times give up their password. So you know, I would say yeah, you should disable biometric locks, if you're going to go out to a demonstration, right? Which is something that I do. I actually do disable face ID if I'm taking my phone to a demo. But it...you may want to use it as your everyday mechanism, especially if you're living in a situation where knowing whether or not your abuser has access to your device is likely to make a difference in whether you have enough time to escape. Margaret 27:30 Right. These axioms or these these beliefs we all have about this as the way to do security,the you know...I mean, it's funny, because you brought up earlier like use Signal use Tor, I am a big advocate of like, I just use Signal for all my communication, but I also don't talk about crime pretty much it in general anyway. You know. So it's more like just like bonus that it can't be read. I don't know. Elle 27:57 Yeah. I mean, again, it depends, right? Because Signal...Signal has gotten way more usable. I've been, I've been using Signal for a decade, you know, since it was still Redphone and TextSecure. And in the early days, I used to joke that it was so secure, sometimes your intended recipients don't even get the messages. Margaret 28:21 That's how I feel about GPG or PGP or whatever the fuck. Elle 28:24 Oh, those those.... Margaret 28:27 Sorry, didn't mean to derail you. Elle 28:27 Let's not even get started there. But so like Signal again, has gotten much better, and is way more reliable in terms of delivery than it used to be. But I used to, I used to say like, "Hey, if it's if it's really, really critical that your message reach your recipient, Signal actually might not be the way to do it." Because if you need if you if you're trying to send a time sensitive message with you know guarantee that it actually gets received, because Signal used to be, you know, kind of sketchy on or unreliable on on delivery, it might not have been the best choice at the time. One of the other things that I think that people, you know, think...don't think about necessarily is that Signal is still widely viewed as a specific security tool. And that's, that's good in a lot of cases. But if you live somewhere, for example, like Belarus, where it's not generally considered legal to encrypt things, then the presence of Signal on your device is enough in and of itself to get you thrown in prison. Margaret 29:53 Right. Elle 29:53 And so sometimes having a mechanism like, you know, Facebook secret messages might seem like a really, really sketchy thing to do. But if your threat model is you can't have security tools on your phone, but you still want to be able to send encrypted messages or ephemeral messages, then that actually might be the best way to kind of fly under the radar. So yeah, it again just really comes down to thinking about what it is that you're trying to protect? From who? And under what circumstances? Margaret 30:32 Yeah, I know, I like this. I mean, obviously, of course, you've thought about this thing that you think about. I'm like, I'm just like, kind of like, blown away thinking about these things. Although, okay, one of these, like security things that I kind of want to push back on, and actually, this is a little bit sketchy to push back on, the knife thing. To go back to a knife. I am. I have talked to a lot of people who have gotten themselves out of very bad situations by drawing a weapon without then using it, which is illegal. It is totally illegal. Elle 31:03 Yes Margaret 31:03 I would never advocate that anyone threaten anyone with a weapon. But, I know people who have committed this crime in order to...even I mean, sometimes it's in situations where it'd be legal to stab somebody,like... Elle 31:16 Sure. Margaret 31:16 One of the strangest laws in the United States is that, theoretically, if I fear for my life, I can draw a gun.... And not if I fear for my life, if I am, if my life is literally being threatened, physically, if I'm being attacked, I can I can legally draw a firearm and shoot someone, I can legally pull a knife and stab someone to defend myself. I cannot pull a gun and say "Back the fuck off." And not only is it illegal, but it also is a security axiom, I guess that you would never want to do that. Because as you pointed out, if you hesitate now the person has the advantage, they have more information than they used to. But I still know a lot of hitchhikers who have gotten out of really bad situations by saying, "Let me the fuck out of the car." Elle 32:05 Sure. Margaret 32:06 Ya know?. Elle 32:06 Absolutely. It's not....Sometimes escalating tactically can be a de-escalation. Right? Margaret 32:17 Right. Elle 32:18 Sometimes pulling out a weapon or revealing that you have one is enough to make you no longer worth attacking. But you never know how someone's going to respond when you do that, right? Margaret 32:33 Totally Elle 32:33 So you never know whether it's going to cause them to go "Oh shit, I don't want to get stabbed or I don't want to get shot," and stop or whether it's going to trigger you know a more aggressive response. So it doesn't mean that you know, you, if you pull a weapon you have to use it. Margaret 32:52 Right. Elle 32:53 But if you're going to carry one then you do need to be confident that you will use it. Margaret 32:58 No, that that I do agree with that. Absolutely. Elle 33:00 And I think that is an important distinction, and I you know I also think that...not 'I think', using a gun and using a knife are two very different things. For a lot of people, pulling the trigger on a gun is going to be easier than stabbing someone. Margaret 33:20 Yeah that's true. Elle 33:21 Because of the proximity to the person and because of how deeply personal stabbing someone actually is versus how detached you can be and still pull the trigger. Margaret 33:35 Yeah. Elle 33:36 Like I would...it sounds...it feels weird to say but I would actually advocate most people carry a gun instead of a knife for that reason, and also because if you're, if you're worried about being physically attacked, you know you have more range of distance where you can use something like a gun than you do with a knife. You have to be, you have to be in close quarters to to effectively use a knife unless you're like really good at throwing them for some reason and even I wouldn't, cause if you miss...now your adversary has a knife. Margaret 34:14 I know yeah. Unless you miss by a lot. I mean actually I guess if you hit they have a knife now too. Elle 34:22 True. Margaret 34:23 I have never really considered whether or not throwing knives are effective self-defense weapons and I don't want to opine too hard on this show. Elle 34:31 I advise against it. Margaret 34:32 Yeah. Okay, so to go back to threat modeling about more operational security type stuff. You're clearly not saying these are best practices, but you're instead it seems like you're advocating of "This as the means by which you might determine your best practices." Elle 34:49 Yes. Margaret 34:49 Do you have a...do you have a a tool or do you have like a like, "Hey, here's some steps you can take." I mean, we all know you've said like, "Think about your enemy," and such like that, but Is there a more...Can you can you walk me through that? Elle 35:04 I mean, like, gosh, it really depends on who your adversary is, right? Elle 35:10 Like, if you're if you're thinking about an abusive partner, that's obviously going to vary based on things like, you know, is your abusive partner, someone who has access to weapons? Are they someone who is really tech savvy? Or are they not. At...The things that you have to think about are going to just depend on the skills and tools that they have access to? Is your abusive partner or your abusive ex a cop? Because that changes some things. Margaret 35:10 Yeah, fair enough. Margaret 35:20 Yeah. Elle 35:27 So like, most people, if they actually have a real and present kind of persistent threat in their life, also have a pretty good idea of what that threat is capable of, or what that threat actor or is capable of. And so it, it's it, I think, it winds up being fairly easy to start thinking about things in terms of like, "Okay, how is this person going to come after me? How, what, what tools do they have? What skills do they have? What ability do they have to kind of attack me or harm me?" But I think that, you know, as we start getting away from that really, really, personal threat model of like the intimate partner violence threat model, for example, and start thinking about more abstract threat models, like "I'm an anarchist living in a state," because no state is particularly fond of us. Margaret 36:50 Whaaaat?! Elle 36:51 I know it's wild, because like, you know, we just want to abolish the State and States, like want to not be abolished, and I just don't understand how, how they would dislike us for any reason.. Margaret 37:03 Yeah, it's like when I meet someone new, and I'm like, "Hey, have you ever thought about being abolished?" They're usually like, "Yeah, totally have a beer." Elle 37:10 Right. No, it's... Margaret 37:11 Yes. Elle 37:11 For sure. Um, but when it comes to when it comes to thinking about, you know, the anarchist threat model, I think that a lot of us have this idea of like, "Oh, the FBI is spying on me personally." And the likelihood of the FBI specifically spying on 'you' personally is like, actually pretty slim. But... Margaret 37:34 Me? Elle 37:35 Well... Margaret 37:37 No, no, I want to go back to thinking about it's slim, it's totally slim. Elle 37:41 Look...But like, there's there is a lot like, we know that, you know, State surveillance dragnet exists, right, we know that, you know, plaintext text messages, for example, are likely to be caught both by, you know, Cell Site Simulators, which are in really, really popular use by law enforcement agencies. Margaret 38:08 Which is something that sets up and pretends to be a cell tower. So it takes all the data that is transmitted over it. And it's sometimes used set up at demonstrations. Elle 38:16 Yes. So they, they both kind of convinced your phone into thinking that they are the nearest cell tower, and then actually pass your communications on to the next, like the nearest cell tower. So your communications do go through, they're just being logged by this entity in the middle. That's, you know, not great. But using something... Margaret 38:38 Unless you're the Feds. Elle 38:39 I mean, even if you... Margaret 38:41 You just have to think about it from their point of. Hahah. Elle 38:42 Even if you are the Feds, that's actually too much data for you to do anything useful with, you know? Margaret 38:50 Okay, I'll stop interuppting you. Haha. Elle 38:51 Like, it's just...but if you're if you are a person who is a person of interest who's in this group, where a cell site simulator has been deployed or whatever, then then that you know, is something that you do have to be concerned about and you know, even if you're not a person of interest if you're like texting your friend about like, "All right, we do crime in 15 minutes," like I don't know, it's maybe not a great idea. Don't write it down if you're doing crime. Don't do crime. But more importantly don't don't create evidence that you're planning to do crime, because now you've done two crimes which is the crime itself and conspiracy to commit a crime Margaret 39:31 Be straight. Follow the law. That's the motto here. Elle 39:35 Yes. Oh, sorry. I just like I don't know, autism brain involuntarily pictured, like an alternate universe in which in where which I am straight, and law abiding. And I'm just I'm very... Margaret 39:52 Sounds terrible. I'm sorry. Elle 39:53 Right. Sounds like a very boring.... Margaret 39:55 Sorry to put that image in your head. Elle 39:56 I mean, I would never break laws. Margaret 39:58 No. Elle 39:59 Ever Never ever. I have not broken any laws I will not break any laws. No, I think that... Margaret 40:08 The new "In Minecraft" is "In Czarist Russia." Instead of saying "In Minecraft," because it's totally blown. It's only okay to commit crimes "In Czarist Russia." Elle 40:19 Interesting. Margaret 40:23 All right. We don't have to go with that. I don't know why i got really goofy. Elle 40:27 I might be to Eastern European Jewish for that one. Margaret 40:31 Oh God. Oh, my God, now I just feel terrible. Elle 40:34 It's It's fine. It's fine. Margaret 40:36 Well, that was barely a crime by east... Elle 40:40 I mean it wasn't necessarily a crime, but like my family actually emigrated to the US during the first set of pogroms. Margaret 40:51 Yeah. Elle 40:52 So like, pre Bolshevik Revolution. Margaret 40:57 Yeah. Elle 40:59 But yeah, anyway. Margaret 41:02 Okay, well, I meant taking crimes like, I basically think that, you know, attacking the authorities in Czarist Russia is a more acceptable action is what I'm trying to say, I really don't have to try and sell you on this plan. Elle 41:16 I'm willing to trust your judgment here. Margaret 41:19 That's a terrible plan, but I appreciate you, okay. Either way, we shouldn't text people about the crimes that we're doing. Elle 41:26 We should not text people about the crimes that we're planning on doing. But, if you are going to try to coordinate timelines, you might want to do that using some form of encrypted messenger so that whatever is logged by a cell site simulator, if it is in existence is not possible by the people who are then retrieving those logs. And you know, and another reason to use encrypted messengers, where you can is that you don't necessarily want your cell provider to have that unencrypted message block. And so if you're sending SMS, then your cell, your cell provider, as the processor of that data has access to an unencrypted or plain text version of whatever text message you're sending, where if you're using something like Signal or WhatsApp, or Wicker, or Wire or any of the other, like, multitude of encrypted messengers that you could theoretically be using, then it's it's also not going directly through your your provider, which I think is an interesting distinction. Because, you know, we we know, from, I mean, we kind of sort of already knew, but we know for a fact, from the Snowden Papers, that cell providers will absolutely turn over your data to the government if they're asked for it. And so minimizing the amount of data that they have about you to turn over to the government is generally a good practice. Especially if you can do it in a way that isn't going to be a bunch of red flags. Margaret 43:05 Right, like being in Belarus and using Signal. Elle 43:08 Right. Exactly. Margaret 43:10 Okay. Also, there's the Russian General who used an unencrypted phone where he then got geo located and blowed up. Elle 43:23 Yeah. Margaret 43:24 Also bad threat modeling on that that guy's part, it seems like Elle 43:28 I it, it certainly seems to...that person certainly seems to have made several poor life choices, not the least of which was being a General in the Russian army. Margaret 43:41 Yeah, yeah. That, that tracks. So one of the things that we talked about, while we were talking about having this conversation, our pre-conversation conversation was about...I think you brought up this idea that something that feels secret, doesn't mean it is, and Elle 43:59 Yeah! Margaret 44:00 I'm wondering if you had more thoughts about that concept? It's not a very good prompt. Elle 44:05 So like, it's it's a totally reasonable prompt, we say a lot that, you know, security and safety are a feeling. And I think that that actually is true for a lot of us. But there's this idea that, Oh, if you use coded language, for example, then like, you can't get caught. I don't actually think that's true, because we tend to use coded language that's like, pretty easily understandable by other people. Because the purpose of communicating is to communicate. Margaret 44:42 Yeah. Elle 44:43 And so usually, if you're like, code language is easy enough to be understood by whoever it is you're trying to communicate with, like, someone else can probably figure it the fuck out too. Especially if you're like, "Hey, man, did you bring the cupcakes," and your friend is like, "Yeah!" And then an explosion goes off shortly thereafter, right? It's like, "Oh, by cupcakes, they meant dynamite." So I, you know, I think that rather than then kind of like relying on this, you know, idea of how spies work or how, how anarchists communicated secretly, you know, pre WTO it's, it's worth thinking about how the surveillance landscape has adapted over time, and thinking a little bit more about what it means to engage in, in the modern panopticon, or the contemporary panopticon, because those capabilities have changed over time. And things like burner phones are a completely different prospect now than they used to be. Actually... Margaret 45:47 In that they're easier or wose? Elle 45:49 Oh, there's so much harder to obtain now. Margaret 45:51 Yeah, okay. Elle 45:52 It's it is so much easier to correlate devices that have been used in proximity to each other than it used to be. And it's so much easier to, you know, capture people on surveillance cameras than it used to be. I actually wrote a piece for Crimethinc about this some years ago, that that I think kind of still holds up in terms of how difficult it really, really is to procure a burner phone. And in order to do to do that safely, you would have to pay cash somewhere that couldn't capture you on camera doing it, and then make sure that it was never turned on in proximity with your own phone anywhere. And you would have to make sure that it only communicated with other burner phones, because the second it communicates with a phone that's associated to another person, there's a connection between your like theoretical burner phone and that person. And so you can be kind of triangulated back to, especially if you've communicated with multiple people. It just it is so hard to actually obtain a device that is not in any way affiliated with your identity or the identity of any of your comrades. But, we have to start thinking about alternative mechanisms for synchronous communication. Margaret 47:18 Okay. Elle 47:18 And, realistically speaking, taking a walk in the woods is still going to be the best way to do it. Another reasonable way to go about having a conversation that needs to remain private is actually to go somewhere that is too loud and too crowded to...for anyone to reasonably overhear or to have your communication recorded. So using using the kind of like, signal to noise ratio in your favor. Margaret 47:51 Yeah. Elle 47:52 To help drown out your own signal can be really, really useful. And I think that that's also true of things like using Gmail, right? The signal to noise ratio, if you're not using a tool that's specifically for activists can be very helpful, because there is just so much more traffic happening, that it's easier to blend in. Margaret 48:18 I mean, that's one reason why I mean, years ago, people were saying that's why non activists should use GPG, the encrypted email service that is terrible, was so attempt to try and be like, if you only ever use it, for the stuff you don't want to be known, then it like flags it as "This stuff you don't want to be known." And so that was like, kind of an argument for my early adoption Signal, because I don't break laws was, you know, just be like," Oh, here's more people using Signal," it's more regularized, and, you know, my my family talks on Signal and like, it helps that like, you know, there's a lot of different very normal legal professions that someone might have that are require encrypted communication. Yeah, no book, like accountants, lawyers. But go ahead. Elle 49:06 No, no, I was gonna say that, like, it's, it's very common in my field of work for people to prefer to use Signal to communicate, especially if there is, you know, a diversity of phone operating systems in the mix. Margaret 49:21 Oh, yeah, totally. I mean, it's actually now it's more convenient. You know, when I when I'm on my like, family's SMS loop, it's like, I constantly get messages to say, like, "Brother liked such and such comment," and then it's like, three texts of that comment and...anyway, but okay, one of the things that you're talking about, "Security as a feeling," right? That actually gets to something that's like, there is a value in like, like, part of the reason to carry a knife is to feel better. Like, and so part of like, like anti-anxiety, like anxiety is my biggest threat most most days, personally. Right? Elle 50:00 Have you ever considered a career in the security field, because I, my, my, my former manager, like the person who hired me into the role that I'm in right now was like, "What made you get into security?" when I was interviewing, and I was just like, "Well, I had all this anxiety lying around. And I figured, you know, since nobody will give me a job that I can afford to sustain myself on without a degree, in any other field, I may as well take all this anxiety and like, sell it as a service." Margaret 50:33 Yeah, I started a prepper podcast. It's what you're listening to right now. Everyone who's listening. Yeah, exactly. Well, there's a value in that. But then, but you're talking about the Panopticon stuff, and the like, maybe being in too crowded of an environment. And it's, and this gets into something where everyone is really going to have to answer it differently. There's a couple of layers to this, but like, the reason that I just like, my profile picture on twitter is my face. I use my name, right? Elle 51:03 Same. Margaret 51:04 And, yeah, and I, and I just don't sweat it, because I'm like, "Look, I've been at this long enough that they know who I am. And it's just fine. It's just is." One day, it won't be fine. And then we have other problems. Right? Elle 51:18 Right. Margaret 51:19 And, and, and I'm not saying that everyone as they get better security practice will suddenly start being public like it... You know, it, it really depends on what you're trying to accomplish. Like, a lot of the reasons to not be public on social media is just because it's a fucking pain in the ass. Like, socially, you know? Elle 51:36 Yeah. Margaret 51:36 But I don't know, I just wonder if you have any thoughts about just like, the degree to which sometimes it's like, "Oh, well, I just, I carry a phone to an action because I know, I'm not up to anything." But then you get into this, like, then you're non-normalizing... don't know, it gets complicated. And I'm curious about your thoughts on that kind of stuff. Elle 51:56 So like, for me, for me personally, I am very public about who I am. What I'm about, like, what my politics are. I'm extremely open about it. Partially, because I don't think that, like I think that there is value in de-stigmatizing anarchism. Margaret 52:20 Yes. Elle 52:20 I think there is value in being someone who is just a normal fucking human being. And also anarchist. Margaret 52:29 Yeah. Elle 52:30 And I think that, you know, I...not even I think. I know, I know that, through being exactly myself and being open about who I am, and not being super worried about the labels that other people apply to themselves. And instead, kind of talking about, talking about anarchism, both from a place of how it overlaps with Judaism, because it does in a lot of really interesting ways, but also just how it informs my decision making processes. I've been able to expose people who would not necessarily have had any, like, concept of anarchism, or the power dynamics that we're interested in equalizing to people who just wouldn't have wouldn't have even thought about it, or would have thought that anarchists are like this big, scary, whatever. And, like, there, there are obviously a multitude of tendencies within anarchism, and no anarchist speaks for anybody but themselves, because that's how it works. But, it's one of the things that's been really interesting to me is that in the security field, one of the new buzzwords is Zero Trust. And the idea is that you don't want to give any piece of technology kind of the sole ability to to be the linchpin in your security, right? So you want to build redundancy, you want to make sure that no single thing is charged with being the gatekeeper for all of your security. And I think that that concept actually also applies to power. And so I...when I'm trying to talk about anarchism in a context where it makes sense to security people, I sometimes talk about it as like a Zero Trust mechanism for organizing a society. Margaret 54:21 Yeah. Elle 54:21 Where you just you...No person is trustworthy enough to hold power over another person. And, so like, I'm really open about it, but the flip side of that is that, you know, I also am a fucking anarchist, and I go to demonstrations, and sometimes I get arrested or whatever. And so I'm not super worried about the government knowing who I am because they know exactly who I am. But I don't share things like my place of work on the internet because I've gotten death threats from white nationalists. And I don't super want white nationalists like sending death threats into my place of work because It's really annoying to deal with. Margaret 55:02 Yeah. Elle 55:03 And so you know, there's...it really comes down to how you think about compartmentalizing information. And which pieces of yourself you want public and private and and how, how you kind of maintain consistency in those things. Margaret 55:21 Yeah. Elle 55:22 Like people will use the same...people will like be out and anarchists on Twitter, but use the same Twitter handle as their LinkedIn URL where they're talking about their job and have their legal name. And it's just like, "Buddy, what are you doing?" Margaret 55:37 Yeah. Elle 55:38 So you do have to think about how pieces of data can be correlated and tied back to you. And what story it is that you're you're presenting, and it is hard and you are going to fuck it up. Like people people are going to fuck it up. Compartmentalization is super hard. Maintaining operational security is extremely hard. But it is so worth thinking about. And even if you do fuck it up, you know, that doesn't mean that it's the end of the world, it might mean that you have to take some extra steps to mitigate that risk elsewhere. Margaret 56:11 The reason I like this whole framework that you're building is that I tend to operate under this conception that clandestinity is a trap. I don't want to I don't want to speak this....I say it as if it's a true statement across all and it's not it. I'm sure there's absolute reasons in different places at different times. But in general, when I look at like social movements, they, once they move to "Now we're just clandestine." That's when everyone dies. And, again, not universally, Elle 56:40 Yeah, but I mean, okay, so this is where I'm gonna get like really off the wall. Right? Margaret 56:46 All right. We're an hour in. It's the perfect time. Elle 56:50 I know, right? People may or may not know who Allen Dulles is. But Allen Margaret 56:54 Not unless they named an airport after him. Elle 56:56 They Did. Margaret 56:57 Oh, then i do who he is. Elle 56:59 Allen Dulles is one of the people who founded the CIA. And he released this pamphlet called "73 Points On Spycraft." And it's a really short read. It's really interesting, I guess. But the primary point is that if you are actually trying to be clandestine, and be successful about it, you want to be as mundane as possible. Margaret 57:22 Yep. Elle 57:23 And in our modern world with the Panopticon being what it is, the easiest way to be clandestine, is actually to be super open. So that if you are trying to hide something, if there is something that you do want to keep secret, there's enough information out there about you, that you're not super worth digging into. Margaret 57:46 Oh, yeah. Cuz they think they already know you. Elle 57:48 Exactly. So if, if that is what your threat model is, then the best way to go about keeping a secret is to flood as many other things out there as possible. So that it's just it's hard to find anything, but whatever it is that you're flooding. Margaret 58:04 Oh, it's like I used to, to get people off my back about my dead name, I would like tell one person in a scene, a fake dead name, and be like, "But you can't tell anyone." Elle 58:15 Right. Margaret 58:16 And then everyone would stop asking about my dead name, because they all thought they knew it, because that person immediately told everyone, Elle 58:22 Right. Margaret 58:23 Yeah. Elle 58:24 It's, it's going back to that same using the noise to hide your signal concept, that it...the same, the same kind of concepts and themes kind of play out over and over and over again. And all security really is is finding ways to do harm reduction for yourself, finding ways to minimize the risk that you're undertaking just enough that that you can operate in whatever it is that you're trying to do. Margaret 58:53 No, I sometimes I like, ask questions. And then I am like, Okay, well don't have an immediate follow up, because I just need to like, think about it. Instead of being like, "I know immediately what to say about that." But okay, so, but with clandestinity in general in this this concept...I also think that this is true on a kind of movement level in a way that I I worry about sometimes not necessarily....Hmm, what am I trying to say? Because I also really hate telling people what to do. It's like kind of my thing I don't like telling people what to do. But there's a certain level... Elle 59:25 Really? Margaret 59:25 Yeah, you'd be shocked to know, Elle 59:27 You? Don't like telling people what to do? Margaret 59:31 Besides telling people not to tell me what to do. That's one of my favorite things to tell people. But, there's a certain amount of. Margaret 59:38 Oh, that's true, like different conceptions of freedom. Elle 59:38 But that's not telling people what to do, that's telling people what not to do. Elle 59:44 It's actually setting a boundary as opposed to dictating a behavior. Margaret 59:48 But I've been in enough relationships where I've learned that setting boundaries is the same as telling people to do. This is a funny joke. Elle 59:55 Ohh co-dependency. Margaret 59:58 But all right, there's a quote from a guy whose name I totally space who was an old revolutionist, who wasn't very good at his job. And his quote was, "Those who make half a revolution dig their own graves." And I think he like, I think it proved true for him. If I remember correctly, I think he died in jail after kind of making half a revolution with some friends. I think he got like arrested for pamphleteering or something, Elle 1:00:20 Jesus. Margaret 1:00:21 It was a couple hundred years ago. And but there's this but then if you look forward in history that like revolutionists, who survive are the ones who win. Sometimes, sometimes the revolutionists win, and then their comrades turn on them and murder them. But, I think overall, the survival rate of a revolution is better when you win is my theory. And and so there's this this concept where there's a tension, and I don't have an answer to it. And I want people to actually think about it instead of assuming, where the difference between videotaping a cop car on fire and not is more complicated than people want you to know. Because, if you want there to be more cop cars on fire, which I do not unless we're in Czarist Russia, in which case, you're in an autocracy, and it's okay to set the cop cars on fire, but I'm clearly not talking about that, or the modern world. But, you're gonna have to film it on your cell phone in order for people to fucking know that it's happening. Sure. And and that works absolutely against your best interest. Like, on an individual level, and even a your friends' level. Elle 1:01:25 So like, here's the thing, being in proximity to a burning cop car is not in and of itself a crime. Margaret 1:01:33 Right. Elle 1:01:34 So there's, there's nothing wrong with filming a cop car on fire. Margaret 1:01:41 But there's that video... Margaret 1:01:41 Right. Elle 1:01:41 There is something wrong with filming someone setting a cop car on fire. And there's something extremely wrong with taking a selfie while setting a cop car on fire. And don't do that, because you shouldn't do crime. Obviously, right? Elle 1:01:42 But there's Layers there...No, go ahead. Margaret 1:02:03 Okay, well, there's the video that came out of Russia recently, where someone filmed themselves throwing Molotovs at a recruitment center. And one of the first comments I see is like, "Wow, this person has terrible OpSec." And that's true, right? Like this person is not looking at how to maximize their lack of chance of going to jail, which is probably the way to maximize that in non Czarist Russia... re-Czarist Russia, is to not throw anything burning at buildings. That's the way to not go to jail. Elle 1:02:35 Right. Margaret 1:02:35 And then if you want to throw the thing at the... and if all you care about is setting this object on fire, then don't film yourself. Elle 1:02:41 Right. Margaret 1:02:41 But if you want more people to know that this is a thing that some people believe is a worthwhile thing to do, you might need to film yourself doing it now that person well didn't speak. Elle 1:02:53 Well no. Margaret 1:02:56 Okay. Elle 1:02:56 You may not need to film yourself doing it. Right? Because what what you can do is if, for example, for some reason, you are going to set something on fire. Margaret 1:03:09 Right, in Russia. Elle 1:03:09 Perhaps what you might want to do is first get the thing to be in a state where it is on fire, and then begin filming the thing once it is in a burning state. Margaret 1:03:25 Conflaguration. Yeah. Elle 1:03:25 Right? And that can that can do a few things, including A) you're not inherently self incriminating. And, you know, if if there are enough people around to provide some form of cover, like for example, if there are 1000s of other people's cell phones also in proximity, it might even create some degree of plausible deniability for you because what fucking dipshit films themself doing crimes. So it's, you know, there's, there's, there's some timing things, right. And the idea is to get it...if you are a person who believes that cop cars look best on fire... Margaret 1:04:10 Buy a cop car, and then you set it on fire. And then you film it. Elle 1:04:15 I mean, you know, you know, you just you opportunistically film whenever a cop car happens to be on fire in your proximity. Margaret 1:04:23 Oh, yeah. Which might have been set on fire by the person who owned it. There's no reason to know one way or not. Elle 1:04:27 Maybe the police set the cop car on fire you know? You never know. There's no way to there....You don't have to you don't have to speculate about how the cop car came to be on fire. You can just film a burning cop car. And so the you know, I think that the line to walk there is just making sure there's no humans in your footage of things that you consider to be art. Margaret 1:04:29 Yeah. No, it it makes sense. And I guess it's like because people very, very validly have been very critical about the ways that media or people who are independently media or whatever, like people filming shit like this, right? But But I think then to say that like, therefore no, no cop cars that are on fire should ever be filmed versus the position you're presenting, which is only cop cars that are already on fire might deserve to be filmed, which is the kind of the long standing like film the broken window, not the window breaker and things like that. But... Elle 1:05:29 I think and I think also there's, you know, there's a distinction to be made between filming yourself setting a cop car on fire, and filming someone else setting a cop car on fire, because there's a consent elemenet, right? Margaret 1:05:34 Totally. Totally. Elle 1:05:47 You shouldn't like...Don't do crime. Nobody should do crime. But if you are going to do crime, do it on purpose. Right? Margaret 1:05:55 Fair enough. Elle 1:05:55 Like that's, that's what civil disobedience is. Civil disobedience is doing crime for the purpose of getting caught to make a point. That's what it is. And if you if you really feel that strongly about doing a crime to make a point, and you want everyone to know that you're doing a crime to make a point, then that's, that's a risk calculation that you yourself need to make for yourself. But you can't make that calculation for anybody else. Margaret 1:06:25 I think that's a great way to sum it up. Elle 1:06:27 So unless your friend is like, "Yo, I'm gonna set this cop car on fire. Like, get the camera ready, hold my beer." You probably shouldn't be filming them. Margaret 1:06:38 See you in 30 years. Elle 1:06:39 Right? You probably shouldn't be filming them setting the cop car on fire either. Margaret 1:06:43 No. No Elle 1:06:44 And also, that's a shitty friend because they've just implicated you in conspiracy, right? Margaret 1:06:49 Yeah. Elle 1:06:50 Friends don't implicate friends. Margaret 1:06:53 It's a good, it's a good rule. Yeah, yeah. All right. Well, I that's not entirely where I immediately expected to go with Threat Modeling. But I feel like we've covered an awful lot. Is there something? Is there something...Do you have any, like final thoughts about Threat Modeling, and as relates to the stuff that we've been talking about? Elle 1:07:18 I think that you know, the thing that I do really want to drive home. And that honestly does come back to your point about clandestinity being a trap is that, again, the purpose of threat modeling is to first understand, you know, what risks you're trying to protect against, and then figure out how to do what you're accomplishing in a way that minimizes risk. But the important piece is still doing whatever it is that you're trying to accomplish, whether that's movement building, or something else. And so there there is, there is a calculation that needs to be made in terms of what level of risk is acceptable to you. But if if, ultimately, your risk threshold is preventing you from accomplishing whatever you're trying to accomplish, then it's time to take a step back, recalculate and figure out whether or not you actually want to accomplish the thing, and what level of risk is worth taking. Because I think that, you know, again, if if you're, if your security mechanisms are preventing you from doing the thing that you're you set out to try to do, then your adversaries are already winning, and something probably needs to shift. Margaret 1:08:39 I really like that line. And so I feel like that's a decent spot, place to end on. Do. Do you have anything that you'd like to shout out? People can follow you on the internet? Or they shouldn't follow you on the internet? What? What do you what do you want to advocate for here? Elle 1:08:53 If you follow me on the internet, I'm so sorry. That's really all I can say. I'm, I am on the internet. I am a tire fire. I'm probably fairly easy to find based on my name, my pronouns and the things that I've said here today, and I can't recommend following my Twitter. Margaret 1:09:17 I won't put in the show notes then. Elle 1:09:19 I mean, you're welcome to but I can't advocate in good conscience for anyone to pay attention to anything that I have to say. Margaret 1:09:27 Okay, so go back and don't listen to the last hour everyone. Elle 1:09:31 I mean, I'm not going to tell you what to do. Margaret 1:09:34 I am that's my favorite thing to do. Elle 1:09:36 I mean, you know, this is just like my opinion, you know? There are no leaders. We're all the leaders. I don't know. Do do do what you think is right. Margaret 1:09:55 Agreed. All right. Well, thank you so much. Elle 1:09:59 Thank you. I really appreciate it. Margaret 1:10:07 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, you should tell people about it by whatever means occurs to you to tell people about it, which might be the internet, it might even be in person, it might be by taking a walk, leaving your cell phones behind, and then getting in deep into the woods and saying," I like the following podcast." And then the other person will be like, "Really, I thought we were gonna make out or maybe do some crimes." But, instead you have told them about the podcast. And I'm recording this at the same time as I record the intro, and now the

Watt Matters: The FORESIGHT energy transition podcast

With the current trio of crises facing many consumers around the world—high energy prices, the fallout of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and climate change—energy efficiency is on everyone's lips. But to actually make these changes necessary, a greater level of dialogue is required to strengthen the narrative around energy efficiency. Recorded at the IEA's conference on energy efficiency in Sønderborg, Denmark, our guests this week are Paula Glover, president of the Alliance to Save Energy, Melanie Slade, senior programme manager for energy efficiency in emerging economies at the International Energy Agency, and Andrea Voigt, head of global public affairs at Danfoss. The panellists agree the key to upgrading energy efficiency with consumers is selecting the correct narrative with the arguments—and policies—that work each region. Listen and subscribe to Watt Matters wherever you get podcasts. Follow us on Twitter at @WattMattersPod or email us at show@wattmatterspodcast.com. You can also find FORESIGHT Climate & Energy on LinkedIn. Show notes: - MEPs vote down EU climate laws in dramatic upset: https://euobserver.com/green-economy/155162#:~:text=In%20a%20high%2Dstakes%20political,least%2055%20percent%20by%202030 - Efficient cooling for global development: https://www.iea-events.org/energy-efficiency/eventagenda - Ærø's electric ferry Ellen: https://www.visitaeroe.com/ellen - Enel Group post on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/enelgroup_wattachange-repowereu-fitfor55-activity-6937757171749158912-JxFz/?utm_source=linkedin_share&utm_medium=ios_app TRY FULL ACCESS TO FORESIGHT CLIMATE & ENERGY FOR €1 A DAY Join over 100,000 policymakers, energy experts in business, finance, and academia, city leaders, and leading NGOs in having access to FORESIGHT Climate & Energy GET YOUR 30 DAY TRIAL: www.foresightdk.com/subscribe/.

CounterSpin
Nicaragua a ‘Dictatorship’ When It Follows US Lead on NGOs

CounterSpin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


Modest legal steps that would go unnoticed in most countries are—in Nicaragua's case—clear evidence that it is “inching toward dictatorship.” The post Nicaragua a ‘Dictatorship' When It Follows US Lead on NGOs appeared first on FAIR.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
The impact of youth organizing and political legacy

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 12:01


Guest: Kealeboga Mase Ramaru, a feminist activist and advocate that I have admired for a long time. She has worked within movements and NGOs. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Moxie Podcast
Episode 119 / Jeanette Tapley - Building Communities and Thriving Together.

Moxie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 28:53


In today's episode Jeanette and Jenny talk about building relationships that enables one to thrive in them. Stepping out of our ‘bubble' is one of the steps to make meaningful relationships. What else? Find out more in today's Episode.   MENTIONS Keep Social Media SocialTM    Lulu is an artist and designer. She owns and serves as creative director of Lulu Kitololo Studio, providing illustration and graphic design services. Their style is vibrant, eclectic and largely African inspired. Lulu has been working in the creative industry for over 10 years with various types of clients including international NGOs, museums,  film festivals, fashion brands, musicians, theatres, writers and more.   In 2014, she started concentrating on more self-directed projects which has led to a line of paper and fabric goods which include greeting cards, art prints and more.   Click on the link to be a part of  this Afri-love community and carry the African vibrance with you.   Lulu Kitololo

Building the Future: Freedom, Prosperity, and Foreign Policy with Dan Runde
The Fight Against Forced Labor in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan with the Cotton Campaign

Building the Future: Freedom, Prosperity, and Foreign Policy with Dan Runde

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 24:27


In this episode of Building the Future, Dan Runde is joined by Bennett Freeman and Allison Gill from the Cotton Campaign, a coalition of human rights NGOs, independent trade unions, brand associations, responsible investors, and academics, united to end forced labor in cotton production. Bennett and Allison share key elements to the Cotton Campaigns' success, and the critical steps necessary to fight against forced and child labor in countries such as Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. 

Macroaggressions
#238: Hate Incorporated

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 79:15


There is a whole lot of money in the “Hate Industry”, and some very unscrupulous people are running point on this operation to destroy the language and the culture of America by relabeling everything that contradicts their agenda as a form of hate speech. It should come as no surprise that George Soros has his tentacles all over many of the NGOs that purport to be fighting for the rights of the marginalized, and his cash has helped to keep these actual hate factories operational for well over a decade. Don't fall for the sales pitches or the slogans, these groups have a very dark agenda and use the powerless as a shield to deflect from the very real criticism of what these organizations are plotting to achieve. Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold True Hemp Science: https://truehempscience.com/ Haelan: https://haelan951.com/pages/macro Free 10 Day Trial @ Ickonic: https://www.ickonic.com/affiliate/charlie-robinson Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: HYPOCRAZY: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/macroaggressions_podcast/ Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com

Mojo for the Modern Man
The Journeyman Life with Tony Daloisio - Act 1

Mojo for the Modern Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 27:48


Tony Daloisio opens Act 1 with his story of life with “Mother Mary”, his brilliant and extraordinarily troubled mother.  Tony's mother was an “obsessive, compulsive, neurotic” parent who “ruled with an iron fist,” who did everything in her power to control her environment, including her children.  Tony goes on to describe the energy of his extended family as “dangerous.” As a relatively young teen, Tony realized that he was actually his own person.  Often forced by his mother to sit for hours at a time during which she wrote and would later take swats at him, he began to fight back by putting his hands up to block his mother's physical blows.  “I never hit back,” says Tony, but he sent a clear message that he was no longer going to allow the physical abuse. Citing Viktor Frankl's “Man's Search for Meaning,” Tony points to the importance of choice and the recognition that a big part of creating his own path came down to the choices he had the power to make.Tony shares the lessons learned through his own traumas, and we touch on how trauma lives in the body.  We wrap our first Act riffing on stimulus, response, and the importance of self-observation, self-awareness, finally bringing it home with wisdom about the values-driven choices that become available when one develops conscious, self-reflective practices.Dr. Tony Daloisio was trained as an organizational psychologist and has practiced in that field for over thirty years, serving hundreds if not thousands of businesses, not-for-profit organizations, schools, hospitals, NGOs, and government agencies/military operations. His work with them has incorporated strategic planning and implementation, change management, team development, executive coaching, and executive education. He has been a professor in the MBA program at Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business, teaching leadership and organizational change. In the early parts of his career, which began in education, he was an inner-city high school principal where he advocated for disadvantaged youth. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in the field of Organizational Psychology and Counseling Psychology, where he received a fellowship for his research in leadership style and taught graduate courses in psychology.In the early 2000s he forged a partnership with the late Dr. Stephen R. Covey, author of the blockbuster New York Times bestseller The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, and then his son, Stephen M. R. Covey to develop the consulting practice Principle Centered Leadership and teach The 7 Habits course around the world.He founded and has been the CEO of Charter Oak Consulting group for thirty years. The company was listed as one of Inc. Magazine's fastest-growing companies and has been awarded numerous citations for best-in-class consulting projects in various industries.In 2017 he co-authored a highly acclaimed business book with Kendall Lyman entitled, Change the Way You Change.Tony lives in Washington Depot, Connecticut, and Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife, Teresa Hargrave.  He is the proud father of Tim Daloisio and Morgan Daloisio and grandfather to Ryan, Julia, Addie, and James. He is enjoying his consulting practice with schools, NGOs, business startups, and a variety of mission-driven companies. He has a love of the outdoors, hiking, biking, and his favorite, golf. With the publishing of this book, The Journeyman Life, he will be conducting training programs for men to lead groups of men interested in applying the ideas and tools from the book.www.thejourneymanlife.comwww.changethewayyouchange.comwww.cocg.com

Future of Fitness
Brian Chappon & Mohammed Iqbal - Centred Wellness & The Future of Travel

Future of Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 52:16


Brian Chappon is the definition of a scrappy social entrepreneur and global citizen. A competitive athlete and seasoned expert in capital markets around the world, he takes an international perspective to building economic ecosystems and promoting health & wellness. Brian founded his career as a volunteer and intern with NGOs providing disaster relief. Seeing the economic impact of those environmental events led to a new focus on the need for sustainable entrepreneurship and investment ecosystems in developing countries. As a consultant and head of capital markets, he raised funds and created models to analyze high-return projects and de-risk public-private partnership investments. He built networks of insurance companies, PE/Financial service providers, governments, NGOs, and innovative projects to build wealth, jobs, and opportunities in new markets in in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. The mix of extended international travel, stress, and commitment to marathon training took a toll on his health. After the recession of 2008 he hit max burnout and went from what felt like being on top of the world to becoming homeless and living in a 24hour Starbucks in New York City. After shaking off the pain of failure Brian took a sabbatical to teach spinning in a high-end studio. During his time of reflecting he heard of the mental and physical health issues that fellow road warriors faced while traveling, and the idea to create a health studio in an airport was formed. He is now combining his passion for fitness, experience in entrepreneurship, and vision for global health to launch CENTRED-Wellness.com, the first travel health and wellness platform changing the way the world will travel during and after the global Covid-19 crises.   Mohammed Iqbal strives to enhance the lives of people. He believes the key to leading a healthier life is having access to fitness knowledge and acting on it. He founded SweatWorks, the leading digital agency in fitness design and technology to create meaningful wellness journeys for everyone. As founder and CEO, Mohammed has established SweatWorks as a wellness technology brand unlike any other. The agency pursues innovation to make fitness engaging, beautiful and accessible to all. Mohammed also contributes to the wellness industry via speaking engagements at leading events and fitness conferences around the world. His personal commitment to his fitness journey is an inspiration to all those he comes in contact with. Daily, he immerses himself in strategic and creative thinking, fitness, and innovation. For ten years, Mohammed has worked at exploring the intersection of fitness and technology paving way towards a more tangible wellness and healthcare future. SweatWorks collaborates with top-tier fitness brands to provide design, technology and marketplace expertise to produce first-to-market fitness and wellness products. It has made the Inc 5000 list as one of the fastest growing private companies multiple times.   Pocketsuite: https://pocketsuite.io/register/future   https://centred-wellness.com/app     https://www.futureoffitness.co/

NGO Soul + Strategy
040. Can NGOs Stay Human-Centered while Embracing Smart Tech? Beth Kanter and Allison Fine