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Collection of scholarly papers published in the context of an academic conference

  • 766PODCASTS
  • 2,012EPISODES
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  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about proceedings

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Latest podcast episodes about proceedings

Don't Panic Geocast
Episode 310 - "Paul Bunyan's Potty"

Don't Panic Geocast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 51:54


Canyonlands National Park is a beautiful and large display of sedimentary processes, impacts, and more. Learn about the features of this park and how they got there in this week's show! ASU Virtual Field Trip (https://vft.asu.edu/VFTUpheavalDome/panos/UpheavalDome2020/UpheavalDome.html) Paul Bunyan's Potty (https://utahscanyoncountry.wordpress.com/2010/12/11/paul-bunyans-potty-tower-ruin-canyonlands-national-park/) Fun Paper Friday What if your dog could call you? Would they? Once scientist dared to ask the question. Hirskyj-Douglas, Ilyena, Roosa Piitulainen, and Andrés Lucero. "Forming the Dog Internet: Prototyping a Dog-to-Human Video Call Device." Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 5.ISS (2021): 1-20. (https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3488539) Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! (https://www.patreon.com/dontpanicgeo) www.dontpanicgeocast.com (http://www.dontpanicgeocast.com) SWUNG Slack (https://softwareunderground.org) @dontpanicgeo (https://twitter.com/dontpanicgeo) show@dontpanicgeocast.com John Leeman - www.johnrleeman.com (http://www.johnrleeman.com) - @geo_leeman (https://twitter.com/geo_leeman) Shannon Dulin - @ShannonDulin (https://twitter.com/ShannonDulin)

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Concern over guardianship rights for parents involved in criminal proceedings

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:34


Dr Carol Coulter, Director of the Child Care Law Reform Project (CCLRP), discusses the CCLRP's latest report on child-care court proceedings.

New Books in Law
Craig W. Stevens, "The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:06


Craig W. Stevens' book The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings (Academic Press, 2021) targets academic and industry pharmacologists, pharmacology graduate students, and professionals and students of affiliated disciplines, such as pharmacy and toxicology. Users will find it to be an invaluable reference for those involved in the field. In addition, pharmacists and others who increasingly serve as expert witnesses and toxicologists will find an array of very useful information. Geert Slabbekoorn works as an analyst in the field of public security. In addition he has published on different aspects of dark web drug trade in Belgium. Find him on twitter, tweeting all things drug related @GeertJS. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Medicine
Craig W. Stevens, "The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:06


Craig W. Stevens' book The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings (Academic Press, 2021) targets academic and industry pharmacologists, pharmacology graduate students, and professionals and students of affiliated disciplines, such as pharmacy and toxicology. Users will find it to be an invaluable reference for those involved in the field. In addition, pharmacists and others who increasingly serve as expert witnesses and toxicologists will find an array of very useful information. Geert Slabbekoorn works as an analyst in the field of public security. In addition he has published on different aspects of dark web drug trade in Belgium. Find him on twitter, tweeting all things drug related @GeertJS. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books Network
Craig W. Stevens, "The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:06


Craig W. Stevens' book The Drug Expert: A Practical Guide to the Impact of Drug Use in Legal Proceedings (Academic Press, 2021) targets academic and industry pharmacologists, pharmacology graduate students, and professionals and students of affiliated disciplines, such as pharmacy and toxicology. Users will find it to be an invaluable reference for those involved in the field. In addition, pharmacists and others who increasingly serve as expert witnesses and toxicologists will find an array of very useful information. Geert Slabbekoorn works as an analyst in the field of public security. In addition he has published on different aspects of dark web drug trade in Belgium. Find him on twitter, tweeting all things drug related @GeertJS. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 7: Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 50:31


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Featuring perspectives from Drs Mark Levis and David Sallman, including the following topics: Introduction Challenge of New Treatment Options for AML; Role of CPX-351 — Dr Peles Hypomethylating Agents/Venetoclax: Appropriate Candidates, Tolerability and Dose Adjustments — Dr Kumar Personal Experience with Administering Azacitidine/Venetoclax — Dr Choksi Approach to Treatment-Associated Adverse Events After the First Cycle of Venetoclax/HMA in Patients with AML Chalk Talk — Dr Sallman (Part 1) Case: A woman in her late 60s with AML — Dr Gandhi Appropriate Use of Antifungal Agents for Patients Receiving Venetoclax — Dr Apuri Role of FLT3 and IDH1/2 Inhibitors for Patients Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Induction Therapy — Dr Peles Up-Front Management of AML in Older Patients with an IDH Mutation Who Are Not Eligible for Intensive Therapy Chalk Talk — Dr Sallman (Part 2) Management of Secondary AML in Younger Patients Chalk Talk — Dr Levis (Part 1) Case: A woman in her early 80s initially treated for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura — Ferdy Santiago, MD Case: A woman in her late 80s with low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes with ringed sideroblasts — Dr Apuri Luspatercept for Patients with Lower-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Chalk Talk — Dr Levis (Part 2) CME information and select publications  

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Multiple Myeloma | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 6: Multiple Myeloma

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:03


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in multiple myeloma. Featuring perspectives from Drs Noopur Raje and Saad Zafar Usmani, including the following topics: Introduction Front-Line Treatment for Transplant-Ineligible Patients; Incorporation of CAR T-Cell Therapy — Dr Choksi Up-Front Management of Multiple Myeloma in Young Patients with Adverse Cytogenetics Chalk Talk — Dr Raje Efficacy and Tolerability of Subcutaneous versus IV Daratumumab in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Chalk Talk — Dr Usmani (Part 1) Substitution of Isatuximab for Daratumumab; Role of Transplant; Role of Minimal Residual Disease — Dr Kumar Nonresearch Role of Venetoclax for Patients with R/R Multiple Myeloma and t(11;14) or Bcl-2 Overexpression Chalk Talk — Dr Usmani (Part 2) Case: A man in his mid-60s with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma with t(4:14) and del(17p) — Dr Usmani Comment on Dr Usmani's 64-Year-Old Man: High-Risk Cytogenetics — Paul G Richardson, MD and Peter Voorhees, MD Comment on Dr Usmani's 64-Year-Old Man: CAR T-Cell Therapy — Drs Richardson and Voorhees CAR T-Cell Therapy Investigational Strategies Chalk Talk — Dr Raje Investigational Bispecific Antibodies for R/R Multiple Myeloma Chalk Talk — Dr Usmani CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Lymphomas | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 5: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Lymphomas

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:55


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. Featuring perspectives from Drs Brad Kahl and Andrew Zelenetz, including the following topics: Introduction Case: A man in his early 70s with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma — Zanetta S Lamar, MD Chimeric Antigen-Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy and Use in Elderly Patients — Dr Gandhi Optimal Second-Line Treatment of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) After R-CHOP Chalk Talk — Dr Zelenetz Sequencing Tafasitamab/Lenalidomide with Other Novel Agents for Relapsed/Refractory (R/R) DLBCL Chalk Talk — Dr Kahl Case: A woman in her early 20s with mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma — Dr Peles Hodgkin Lymphoma Chalk Talk — Dr Kahl Treatment of p53-Negative versus p53-Positive Disease — Dr Kumar Selection of Front-Line BTK Inhibitors for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Chalk Talk — Dr Zelenetz Combining Venetoclax with an Anti-CD20 Antibody for Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Chalk Talk — Dr Kahl Case: A man in his early 80s with Grade I-II follicular lymphoma — Dr Shameem Treatment Options for Relapsed Follicular Lymphoma — Dr Peles Role of Tazemetostat in Therapy for Relapsed Follicular Lymphoma with and without an EZH2 Mutation Chalk Talk — Dr Zelenetz CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Genitourinary Cancers | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 4: Genitourinary Cancers

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:55


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in genitourinary cancers. Featuring perspectives from Drs Neeraj Agarwal and Daniel Petrylak, including the following topics: Introduction Case: A woman in her early 50s with metastatic renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features — Dr Kumar Comparing First-Line Treatment Options for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Chalk Talk — Dr Petrylak Second-Line Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma After Progression on Checkpoint Inhibitor-Based Therapy Chalk Talk — Dr Agarwal Case: A healthy man in his late 80s with locally recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) — Dr Guancial Case: A man in his mid-80s with metastatic CRPC and a somatic BRCA2 mutation — Dr Zafar 177Lu-PSMA-617 in Metastatic CRPC Chalk Talk — Dr Agarwal Case: A man in his early 60s with metastatic CRPC and an ATM mutation — Dr Shameem Genomic Testing and PARP Inhibition for Metastatic Prostate Cancers with a BRCA Mutation Chalk Talk — Dr Petrylak Case: A woman in her late 70s with non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer — Dr Gandhi Case: A man in his late 60s with localized urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) — Dr Choksi Case: A woman in her early 70s with high-TMB muscle-invasive UBC and high-PD-L1 expression — Dr Guancial Genomic Testing and PARP Inhibition for Metastatic Prostate Cancers with a BRCA Mutation Chalk Talk — Dr Petrylak Sequencing Enfortumab Vedotin and Other Targeted Therapies for Metastatic UBC Chalk Talk — Dr Agarwal CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Gastrointestinal Cancers | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 3: Gastrointestinal Cancers

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:25


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in gastrointestinal cancers. Featuring perspectives from Drs Tanios Bekaii-Saab and Kristen Ciombor, including the following topics: Introduction Case: A woman in her early 70s with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) — Dr Peles Treatment Options for Child-Pugh B HCC — Dr Choksi First-Line Treatment for Advanced HCC with Child-Pugh B or C Cirrhosis — Dr Bekaii-Saab Second-Line Systemic Treatment for Advanced HCC After Atezolizumab/Bevacizumab — Dr Ciombor Case: A woman in her early 60s with microsatellite instability-high Stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) and a BRAF V600E mutation — Ina J Patel, DO Case: A woman in her late 50s with microsatellite stable metastatic CRC and a KRAS G12C mutation — Dr Apuri First-Line Immunotherapy for MSI-High dMMR Metastatic CRC Chalk Talk — Dr Ciombor ctDNA in Early and Metastatic CRC Chalk Talk — Dr Bekaii-Saab Gastric, Gastroesophageal and Esophageal Cancers Chalk Talk — Dr Ciombor Case: A woman in her late 60s with metastatic pancreatic cancer — Lowell L Hart, MD Case: A woman in her early 90s with metastatic cholangiocarcinoma — Dr Choksi CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Lung Cancer | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 2: Lung Cancer

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:29


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in lung cancer. Featuring perspectives from Drs Lecia Sequist and David Spigel, including the following topics: Introduction Case: A woman in her early 70s with microsatellite stable metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung and a HER2 mutation, PD-L1 TPS 0% — Dr Zafar Case: A man in his mid-80s with localized adenocarcinoma of the lung and an EGFR exon 19 deletion — Dr Gandhi Case: A woman in her late 70s with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung, somatic BRCA2 and KRAS G12C mutations and high tumor mutation burden (TMB) — Kapisthalam (KS) Kumar, MD Targeted Therapy for Lung Cancer Chalk Talk — Dr Spigel Case: A man in his mid-60s with Stage IIIA (8-cm, node-negative) adenocarcinoma of the lung — Shachar Peles, MD Case: A man in his mid-50s with Stage IIIA adenocarcinoma of the lung — Dr Choksi Case: A woman in her mid-60s with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung, PD-L1 56% — Dr Gandhi First-Line Treatment of PD-L1-Negative Metastatic NSCLC without a Targetable Mutation Chalk Talk — Dr Sequist Selecting Patients with Localized NSCLC for Adjuvant Immunotherapy Chalk Talk — Dr Spigel Case: A man in his early 50s with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) — Dr Apuri Case: A man in his mid-60s with extensive-stage SCLC and concurrent prostate cancer — Dr Gandhi CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Breast Cancer | Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists – Part 1: Breast Cancer

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:02


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in breast cancer. Featuring perspectives from Drs Ann Partridge and Mark Pegram, including the following topics: Introduction Case: A woman in her late 40s with ER/PR-negative, HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (mBC) — Syed F Zafar, MD Clinical Implications of the DESTINY-Breast03 Trial — Elizabeth Guancial, MD Case: A woman in her mid-70s with ER-positive, PR-negative, HER2-positive mBC with bone and brain metastases — Sunil Gandhi, MD DESTINY-Breast03 Trial Chalk Talk — Dr Pegram Postneoadjuvant/Adjuvant Neratinib for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Chalk Talk — Dr Partridge Case: A woman in her early 50s with ER/PR-positive, HER2-negative mBC — Susmitha Apuri, MD Case: A premenopausal woman in her early 50s with ER/PR-positive, node-positive x 1 breast cancer — Raji Shameem, MD Case: A woman in her early 60s with ER/PR-positive breast cancer — Dr Apuri Genomic Assays in ER-Positive Breast Cancer Chalk Talk — Dr Pegram Selecting a First-Line CDK4/6 Inhibitor for ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Chalk Talk — Dr Partridge Case: A woman in her early 60s with asynchronous second primary triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) — Mamta Choksi, MD KEYNOTE-522 Trial Chalk Talk — Dr Pegram OlympiA Trial Chalk Talk — Dr Partridge CME information and select publications

Breast Cancer Update
Recent Advances and Future Directions in Oncology

Breast Cancer Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 364:12


Proceedings from a daylong symposium hosted in partnership with Florida Cancer Specialists, featuring key clinical presentations and papers in acute myeloid leukemia, breast cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas, gastrointestinal cancers, genitourinary cancers, lung cancer and multiple myeloma. Featuring perspectives from Drs Neeraj Agarwal, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, Kristen Ciombor, Brad Kahl, Mark Levis, Ann Partridge, Mark Pegram, Daniel Petrylak, Noopur Raje, David Sallman, Lecia Sequist, David Spigel, Saad Zafar Usmani and Andrew Zelenetz.

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 246 - SEAL Talks Moral Reasoning in 7 Questions

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 49:34


CAPT Roger Herbert, USN, retired SEAL, discusses how the moral world is complex, but a framework for deliberation can reduce the likelihood of missing essential moral considerations. For more: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/may/moral-reasoning-seven-questions

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 295 — Russia's Caspian Flotilla with MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


By Jared Samuelson MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans joins the program to discuss his research and Proceedings article covering the history and development of the Russian Navy’s flotilla in the Caspian Sea. Downloaded Sea Control 295 – Russia’s Caspian Flotilla with MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans Links 1. “The Caspian Flotilla: Russia's Offensive Reinvention,” by MIDN 1/C … Continue reading Sea Control 295 — Russia’s Caspian Flotilla with MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans →

Sea Control
Sea Control 295 - Russia's Caspian Flotilla with MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 14:14


Links1. "The Caspian Flotilla: Russia's Offensive Reinvention," by MIDN 1/C Benoit Gorgemans, Proceedings, August 2021. 

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 245 - Sub War in the Falklands

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:41


Second Lieutenant Grant Willis, USAF, talks about the impact the ARA San Luis had on the British Royal Navy. More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval-history-magazine/2021/october/enemy-below-ara-san-luis-war-patrol-during-1982

Science Friday
Mammoth Pool Fire, Fun Squirrel Facts, Soil Importance. Nov 12 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 52:39


As Wildfire Intensity Rises, So Does The Human Toll Of Blazes It was Labor Day 2020, and Mammoth Pool Reservoir, in California's Sierra Nevada, was buzzing with campers. Karla Carcamo and her parents, siblings, cousins, and countless others, mostly from the Los Angeles area, have been coming here every Labor Day for 17 years. “Most of it is my family, and family that's invited family, and those family friends have invited friends of theirs,” she says. “I'm telling you, we have over 200 people.” Alex Tettamanti and her husband Raul Reyes are also Labor Day regulars. Every year, they drive in from Las Vegas to meet up with an off-roading club made up of a few dozen families from across the West. They fill their weekend with jet-skiing, ATVing and hiking. “It's beautiful,” says Tettamanti. “The smell of all the pine trees and stuff, and the trees are so big, it's really cool. The campground and reservoir are nestled at an elevation of about 3,000 feet in the Central California foothills a few hours northeast of Fresno. The attraction is unfiltered Sierra Nevada: Sparkling blue water surrounded by a thick forest of stately ponderosa pines and black oaks. Plus, it's isolated. There's only one road in and out, which dead ends at the lake. “Being there, let me tell you, it's like a little piece of paradise,” says Carcamo. That Friday passed like any other. Groups split up to go hiking, swimming and grilling, and Carcamo's family prepared for their annual pupusa night later in the weekend. By Saturday morning, however, the atmosphere had changed. “When I woke up, I did notice it was kind of cloudy,” says Reyes. “The sky was orange and there was ash, like big pieces of ash falling,” says Reyes' friend Vicky Castro. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Squirrel-Nut Economics And Other Agility Tricks In many parts of the country, the lead-up to winter is a busy time for squirrels, furiously collecting and hiding acorns and nuts for the cold months ahead. But how can squirrels recall where it has stashed all its stores? And what can studying squirrels tell researchers about memory, learning, and economic decision-making in other species? Ira talks with Lucia Jacobs, a professor in the department of psychology and the Institute of Neuroscience at UC Berkeley, about her studies of the campus squirrels—from learning about their cognition, learning, and memory to recording the acrobatic movements of a squirrel on the ground and in the treetops. Jacobs co-leads a "squirrel school," observing rescued and orphaned juvenile squirrels as they learn normal squirrel behavior, and is contributing to a project seeking to develop robots using agility tricks learned from the rodents.   What Will We Reap Without Topsoil? You may have missed the research when it came out this February: a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science reporting on satellite studies of farmland topsoil in the nation's corn belt, states like Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois. And the news was not good. The team estimated that more than one-third of the topsoil in this region is gone, eroded mostly from hilltops and ridgelines, thanks to the plowing and tilling processes used to perform industrial agriculture. That topsoil, some of the richest in the world, is carbon-rich and crucial to our food supply. And yet it's continuing to wash away, a hundred years after scientists like Aldo Leopold first called out the threat of erosion. This erosion, as well as other degradation of soil's complex structure and microbiome, continues at a fast clip around the globe, hurting food production and ecosystems health. In addition, soil could be helping us contain more than 100 billion additional tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere—if we let it. But the good news, according to University of Wisconsin soil scientist Jo Handelsman, is that the solutions like cover crops and no-till farming are simple, well-understood, and easy to implement—as long as we give farmers incentives to make the leap. She talks to Ira about her forthcoming book, A World Without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet.

Sea Control
Sea Control 292 — Closing the Gender Gap with Dr. Jeannette Haynie and Brian Kerg

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:58


Links1. "Close the Door on Gender Barriers," by Brian Kerg, Proceedings, United States Naval Institute, August 2021.2. USNI Blog posts by Jeannette Haynie.3. Athena Leadership Project.4. USMC Women's Initiative Team Facebook page.5. Actionable Change – the FB page is closed to all but female Marines, but there is s also an Allies page.6. "The Perils of Mixing Masculinity and Missiles," by Carol Cohn, The New York Times, January 5, 2018

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
How Remote Court Proceedings Affect Equal Access with Douglas Keith [Ep. 257]

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 18:53


When the pandemic started, courts that were slower in adopting technology had to undergo a two-week revolution to move their operations to a remote setting. Under normal circumstances, that would have taken them twenty years to achieve.  Existing research shows that while remote technologies can be helpful in court proceedings, they can also harm individuals if not used carefully. Several issues have been coming up around the effects that remote court proceedings have had on our communities. Today's guest is Douglas Keith, counsel in the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, where he works primarily on promoting fair, diverse, and impartial courts. He will walk us through the various concerns. Douglas Keith was the George A. Katz Fellow at the Brennan Center, where he worked on issues around money in politics, voting rights, and redistricting. His work has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Atlantic, Guardian, New York Daily News, and Huffington Post. Before that, Keith worked as a Ford Foundation public interest law fellow at Advancement Project. He directed voting rights advocates in New York, served as an international election observer for the National Democratic Institute and OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, and educated poll workers for the New York City Board of Elections. Keith is a graduate of NYU School of Law and Duke University. What should we be concerned about? All existing research suggests a real reason exists for courts to be cautious about doing video hearings. Studies have shown that video court cases have not always worked out as well as those cases when people have appeared in person. Higher bail amounts charged for video court cases in Chicago In Chicago, in the early 2000s, courts began using video for most of their felony bail hearings. A study that looked at 600,000 of those hearings found that judges imposed much higher bail amounts for those required to have video hearings rather than appearing in person. On average, the video cases paid 50% more bail, and in some instances, they paid up to 90% more. People detained in deportation proceedings People detained in deportation proceedings stood a much higher chance of being removed if they were required to appear by video rather than appearing in person. A quiet place to appear and access to broadband When people get detained, questions tend to arise about the quality of the broadband and them having access to a quiet place to appear. Also, when someone has to appear in court remotely from a jail or prison setting, the background could influence, impact, or change how a judge might view them as an individual.  The digital divide When someone not detained has to appear remotely, many different issues related to the digital divide could arise. They might not have the quality of internet that a judge might expect, and there are also massive differences in terms of the devices people are using to access the proceedings. Those issues need to be taken into account if the proceedings are to be fair. What has changed? Since Douglas has been advocating for the communities that have been affected by doing court proceedings remotely, there have been technological improvements that might make a difference.  Remote proceedings are here to stay Over the last year, courts have become very enthusiastic about how remote proceedings have been working out. Court leaders across the country have said that remote proceedings are here to stay because they have been efficient, speedy, and time-saving. The problem Most jurisdictions have not been talking to the people going through remote court proceedings or their attorneys to learn what is and is not working. A common concern A common concern with remote hearings is the ability for the client to communicate with their attorney during the proceedings. That ability gets hampered because remote tools do not allow the client and attorney to make eye contact and quietly confer about any information that might be relevant to the case during the proceedings. Eviction proceedings Douglas spoke to many individuals from legal aid organizations, representing people earning below certain income thresholds and going through eviction proceedings.  What you can do, on a local level, when someone's rights are violated Pay closer attention to what the courts in your jurisdiction are doing. Courts often allow for public comment or testimony when going through the process of proposing rule changes to allow for more remote proceedings. Engage with the courts and get involved. Watch your local courts to see the types of rule changes they are proposing, in terms of remote proceedings. If you disapprove and they do not require consent to move forward remotely, write to the court to tell them about your concerns and why you think consent should be required. Resolving the issues Advocates from all over the country are busy working on resolving these issues. They range from academics studying the impact of remote tools during the pandemic to practitioners in various spaces, guiding attorneys. Research More research is needed because we do not know enough about how people are being affected by remote tools. At the Brennan Center, they advocate for more resources towards that research to prevent the courts from inadvertently doing any harm. Some other issues that Douglas is working on that are happening where tech intersects with the judicial system Douglas is working on allowing the public access to court proceedings. During the pandemic, many courts started live streaming. That allows court watch groups to remotely observe the court proceedings and report to the public what is and is not working in the courthouses. That raised questions about the point of allowing public access to the courts.  The watchdog effect Public access makes the court aware that it is being watched and reminds them of their responsibility. Live streaming might result in a loss of some of that watchdog effect. So although technology has improved public access to the courts in some ways, we could also lose something along the way. Remote tools The use of remote tools in the courts is nuanced. They can lessen the burden that the courts place on people, but there are also times when those tools could be a cause for concern. That is why the courts need to work with their communities to find the right answers.  Resources: The Brennan Center for Justice Washingtech.org

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo
It's Us Who's On Trial

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:04


In today's episode, Chris takes a moment to analyze what's next after a Judge blocked Trump's efforts to keep documents out of the hands of the Select Committee, and then takes a deep dive on the surge in inflation, as reports show it reaching a 30 year high. While Chris sees inflation as cyclical,  what are the reasons behind it? How volatile is it and what are the ongoing indicators to watch?  Who wins and who loses in the policies put forward? A brief tutorial on Inflation 101.And Another Thing: The trial of Kyle Rittenhouse is about all of us and how we see the events that played out in Kenosha. Do you see a scared kid on the stand who was just trying to protect himself and the city during a protest? Or a vigilante who put himself into a bad situation with an illegal gun and killed 2 people?  The divisions around how we see this case is as much about us as it is about Kyle.

Curiosity Daily
Why Asthma Gets Worse at Night, Earth's Largest Living Thing

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:17


Learn about a heroic experiment that helps explain asthma getting worse at night; and the largest living thing on earth. A heroic experiment has shed light on the centuries-old mystery of why asthma gets worse at night by Grant Currin Harrison, S. (2021, September 21). Why Does Asthma Get Worse at Night? Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/why-does-asthma-get-worse-at-night/  Study explores why asthma worsens at night. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210906151456.htm  Scheer, F. A. J. L., Hilton, M. F., Evoniuk, H. L., Shiels, S. A., Malhotra, A., Sugarbaker, R., Ayers, R. T., Israel, E., Massaro, A. F., & Shea, S. A. (2021). The endogenous circadian system worsens asthma at night independent of sleep and other daily behavioral or environmental cycles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(37), e2018486118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018486118  The largest living thing on earth is not the blue whale by Cameron Duke Fishlake National Forest - Home. (2021). Usda.gov. https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/fishlake/home/?cid=STELPRDB5393641 Lydia Ramsey Pflanzer. (2017, May 6). Largest living organism the Armillaria ostoyae fungus. Business Insider; Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider.com/largest-living-organism-the-armillaria-ostoyae-fungus-2017-5 Marshall, M. (2018). Humongous fungus is older than Christianity and weighs 400 tonnes. New Scientist. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2182291-humongous-fungus-is-older-than-christianity-and-weighs-400-tonnes/ Prepelka, B. (2019). Sequoia Giants - General Sherman - California. Scenicusa.net. https://scenicusa.net/032906.html Schmitt, C. (n.d.). The Malheur National Forest Location of the World's Largest Living Organism [The Humongous Fungus]. https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_033146.pdf Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 244 - Marine Maxims

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:44


COL Tom Gordon, USMC (Ret.) reviews some of the lessons in his new book "Marine Maxims," just published by Naval Institute Press. More on the book here: https://www.usni.org/press/books/marine-maxims

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 291 – Changing the Surface Navy's Maintenance Culture with CDR Ike Harris

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


By Jared Samuelson CDR Ike Harris joins the program to discuss his Proceedings article, “Change the Surface Navy’s Maintenance Philosophy.” Sea Control 291 – Changing the Surface Navy’s Maintenance Culture with CDR Ike Harris Links 1. “Change the Surface Navy's Maintenance Philosophy,” by Commander Isaac Harris, Proceedings, August 2021. 2. Comprehensive Review of Recent Surface … Continue reading Sea Control 291 – Changing the Surface Navy’s Maintenance Culture with CDR Ike Harris →

Sea Control
Sea Control 291 - Changing the Surface Navy's Maintenance Culture with CDR Ike Harris

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 31:52


Links:1.  Change the Surface Navy's Maintenance Philosophy, by Commander Isaac Harris, Proceedings, Aug 2021.2. Comprehensive Review of Recent Surface Force Incidents, US Fleet Forces Command, Oct 26, 2017.3. Fleet Review Panel of Surface Force Readiness (The Balisle Report), by VADM Balisle, Feb 26, 2010.

Don't Panic Geocast
Episode 307 - "Up, Up, and Away"

Don't Panic Geocast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 37:16


Weather balloons are one of the few ways to really get in-situ atmospheric measurements. John was over in Norman, OK working on a new balloon borne instrument. We talk about what all is involved in a launch! Launch Video (https://youtu.be/1bMu8VVpK50) Fun Papery Friday What do shark intestines have to do with the inventor of the AC motor? Find out! Leigh, Samantha C., et al. "Shark spiral intestines may operate as Tesla valves." Proceedings of the Royal Society B 288.1955 (2021): 20211359. (https://german.bio.uci.edu/images/PDF/Leigh%20et%20al.%20(2021)%20PRSB_online.pdf) Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! (https://www.patreon.com/dontpanicgeo) www.dontpanicgeocast.com (http://www.dontpanicgeocast.com) SWUNG Slack (https://softwareunderground.org) @dontpanicgeo (https://twitter.com/dontpanicgeo) show@dontpanicgeocast.com John Leeman - www.johnrleeman.com (http://www.johnrleeman.com) - @geo_leeman (https://twitter.com/geo_leeman) Shannon Dulin - @ShannonDulin (https://twitter.com/ShannonDulin)

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

Curiosity Daily
Jungles' Impact on Climate Change and a Music-Epidemic Link

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 14:47


Learn about the link between music download trends and epidemics; and how losing jungles contributes to climate change.  Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves by Cameron Duke Rosati, D., Woolhouse, M., Bolker, B., & Earn, D. (2021). Modelling song popularity as a contagious process | Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. Proceedings of the Royal Society A. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspa.2021.0457 Smith, D., & Moore, L. (2020). The SIR Model for Spread of Disease - The Differential Equation Model | Mathematical Association of America. Maa.org. https://www.maa.org/press/periodicals/loci/joma/the-sir-model-for-spread-of-disease-the-differential-equation-model Yirka, B. (2021, September 22). Music download patterns found to resemble infectious disease epidemic curves. Phys.org; Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-09-music-download-patterns-resemble-infectious.html More from archaeologist Patrick Roberts: Pick up "Jungle: How Tropical Forests Shaped the World — and Us": https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/patrick-roberts/jungle/9781541600096/  Website: https://www.patrickjroberts.com/   Follow @palaeotropics on Twitter: https://twitter.com/palaeotropics  Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping Guide app: https://www.cmzoo.org/conservation/orangutans-palm-oil/sustainable-palm-oil-shopping-app/  WWF Palm Oil Buyers Scorecard: http://palmoilscorecard.panda.org/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Crowds Fix Fake News, Choking Under Pressure, Punching Robot Shrimp

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 12:38


Learn about crowdsourced fact checking; why humans and monkeys choke under pressure; and a mantis shrimp punching robot. Join Cody and Ashley for a special live stream celebrating Curiosity Daily's 1,000th episode! Leave us a voicemail at 312-596-5208 or email a voice recording to curiosity@discovery.com and share your favorite fact you've learned from the podcast, and you may hear your message on the stream! Register for free here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/curiosity-dailys-1000th-episode-celebration-tickets-191163133077  Crowdsourced fact checking might actually work on social media by Steffie Drucker  Study: Crowds can wise up to fake news. (2021, September). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/926824   Allen, J., Arechar, A. A., Pennycook, G., & Rand, D. G. (2021). Scaling up fact-checking using the wisdom of crowds. Science Advances, 7(36). https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf4393   Edelman, G. (2021, September 9). Can the Wisdom of Crowds Help Fix Social Media's Trust Issue? Wired. Retrieved September 27, 2021, from https://www.wired.com/story/could-wisdom-of-crowds-help-fix-social-media-trust-problem  Monkeys choke under pressure just like humans do, which gives us a chance to better understand it by Grant Currin  Levy, M. G. (2021, September 2). You're Not Alone: Monkeys Choke Under Pressure Too. Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/youre-not-alone-monkeys-choke-under-pressure-too/  Smoulder, A. L., Pavlovsky, N. P., Marino, P. J., Degenhart, A. D., McClain, N. T., Batista, A. P., & Chase, S. M. (2021). Monkeys exhibit a paradoxical decrease in performance in high-stakes scenarios. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(35), e2109643118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2109643118  Scientists just built a mantis shrimp punching robot for the US Army by Cameron Duke Mantis Shrimps. (2021). Qld.gov.au. https://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Explore/Find+out+about/Animals+of+Queensland/Crustaceans/Common+marine+crustaceans/Mantis+Shrimps#.U7ZwLPmSxMg Small, mighty robots mimic the powerful punch of mantis shrimp. (2021, September 9). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927975 Steinhardt, E., Hyun, N. P., Koh, J., Freeburn, G., Rosen, M. H., Temel, F. Z., Patek, S. N., & Wood, R. J. (2021). A physical model of mantis shrimp for exploring the dynamics of ultrafast systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(33), e2026833118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2026833118 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Political Misfits
Assange Court Proceedings; Zuckerberg's Metaverse; Biden in Europe; Lebanon Crisis

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 110:27


Mohamed Elmaazi, journalist and contributor to numerous outlets including Jacobin, The Canary, The Grayzone, and The Real News, joins us to talk about the court proceedings in the appeal filed by the U.S. in the extradition case of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. We talk about whether the Yahoo News report describing conversations within the U.S. government about, among other ideas, assassinating Assange, has colored the public perception of the case, and whether it will affect the outcome of the case itself.Morgan Artyukhina, writer and news editor at Sputnik News, joins us to talk about Mark Zuckerberg's new plan to change the way we live our lives by unveiling his concept of the metaverse, which envisions conducting our daily interactions through avatars in virtual reality. We talk about how this move means that Facebook is treading even more into public utility territory, whether this transformation will make our government reconsider the way Facebook as a communication device is treated, and whether the company's ambitions are actually achievable. Reilly Colin Dixon, reporter for Yellow Springs News, joins us to talk about plans by famous and controversial comedian Dave Chappelle's plans to develop his hometown of Yellow Springs, Ohio by building a comedy club, restaurant, production studio and offices, and a business/housing mixed development project, the intersection between comedy and politics, whether celebrities are the best spokespeople for political causes, and the long history of activism and and counterculture of the town. Laith Marouf, international affairs analyst and media law consultant, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about President Biden's visit to Europe, where G-20 leaders are expected to endorse a 15 percent global minimum corporate tax rate, hold discussions on Iran, and seek to iron out supply chain issues. We also talk about Israel's announcement targeting six Palestinian groups, allowing authorities to freeze their funds and potentially arrest their leaders, as well as the ongoing crisis in Lebanon that has suffered shortages of essential goods and has seen multiple deadly protests, and how corruption at the top has been one of the main drivers of this crisis.

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 243

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 40:04


The authors of the IW Essay contest winner discuss how thinking about naval intelligence skills in three distinct ways can help community leaders make better use of industry and academia in developing talent. More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/october/new-typology-naval-intelligence-talent-development

Epigenetics Podcast
Enhancers and Chromatin Remodeling in Mammary Gland Development (Camila dos Santos)

Epigenetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 37:51


In this episode of the Epigenetics Podcast, we caught up with Camila dos Santos from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories to talk about her work on enhancers and chromatin remodeling in mammary gland development. The lab of Camila dos Santos focuses on epigenetic regulation of normal and malignant mammary gland development. After puberty, the next significant phase in mammary gland development occurs in pregnancy, including changes in cellular function, and tissue reorganization. A different and as significant change in mammary glands occurs in the development breast cancer. Camila dos Santos and her lab were recently able to show that the reaction of mammary glands to a second pregnancy is different than to a first one, which is accompanied by changes in the DNA methylome of the cells. Furthermore, the lab studies the connection of pregnancy-induced epigenetic changes of chromatin and the risk of cancer development.   References dos Santos, C. O., Rebbeck, C., Rozhkova, E., Valentine, A., Samuels, A., Kadiri, L. R., Osten, P., Harris, E. Y., Uren, P. J., Smith, A. D., & Hannon, G. J. (2013). Molecular hierarchy of mammary differentiation yields refined markers of mammary stem cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(18), 7123–7130. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1303919110 dos Santos, C. O., Dolzhenko, E., Hodges, E., Smith, A. D., & Hannon, G. J. (2015). An Epigenetic Memory of Pregnancy in the Mouse Mammary Gland. Cell Reports, 11(7), 1102–1109. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.015 Feigman, M. J., Moss, M. A., Chen, C., Cyrill, S. L., Ciccone, M. F., Trousdell, M. C., Yang, S.-T., Frey, W. D., Wilkinson, J. E., & dos Santos, C. O. (2020). Pregnancy reprograms the epigenome of mammary epithelial cells and blocks the development of premalignant lesions. Nature Communications, 11(1), 2649. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16479-z   Related Episodes Ultraconserved Enhancers and Enhancer Redundancy (Diane Dickel) Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation (Peggy Goodell) Cancer and Epigenetics (David Jones)   Contact Active Motif on Twitter Epigenetics Podcast on Twitter Active Motif on LinkedIn Active Motif on Facebook Email: podcast@activemotif.com

Many Minds
Plants, languages, and the loss of medicinal knowledge

Many Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 41:44


Our planet is home to an astonishing diversity of plants—close to 400,000 species. Over the millennia, indigenous communities around the world have been studying those plants, experimenting with them, using them as a sort of free-growing pharmacy. Certain species, prepared in certain ways, might be used for digestive ailments; others for the skin, teeth, or liver. But this vast trove of medicinal knowledge is now under threat. Under two threats, really—we're losing plant species and we're losing indigenous languages and cultures. My guests this week are Dr. Rodrigo Camara-Leret and Dr. Jordi Bascompte, both of the University of Zurich's Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies. Rodrigo is a Senior Researcher there, and Jordi is a Full Professor. We discuss their remarkable recent paper titled 'Language extinction triggers the loss of unique medicinal knowledge', published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). In the paper, Rodrigo and Jordi analyzed data from three hotspots of biocultural diversity—New Guinea, the Northwest Amazon, and North America. They were trying to better understand the nature of indigenous medicinal knowledge, the threats it is facing, and how we might best protect it. This is one of those papers that immediately grabbed me. It's deeply, unclassifiably interdisciplinary; it takes on an urgent question with a clever approach; and it tells us something we genuinely didn't already know. As I already said, our global stores of ethnobotanical knowledge are under threat—and from different directions. What Jordi & Rodrigo's work shows is that, in order to protect that knowledge, we need to focus on protecting indigenous languages. Before we get to it, just wanted to mention that, as it happens, Jordi was just very recently awarded the prestigious Ramon Margalef prize for his groundbreaking contributions to the field of ecology. So it was an extra special honor to have him on this episode. Alright friends—on to my conversation with Dr. Rodrigo Cámara-Leret and Dr. Jordi Bascompte. Enjoy!   The paper we discuss is available here. A transcript of this episode will be available soon!   Notes and links 4:45 – The Bascompte lab focuses on the architecture of biodiversity. 9:30 – Dr. Cámara-Leret and Dr. Bascompte have previously worked together on indigenous knowledge networks. 12:00 – The concept of “ecosystem services” is central in ecology. 16:30 – Dr. Cámara-Leret has previously worked on plant biodiversity in New Guinea, as well as on ethnobotany in Northwestern South America.   25:30 – A 2000 paper estimated that only about 6% of the world's plant species have been screen for biological activity. 36:20 – Dr. Bascompte very recently won the 2021 Margalef Award for his contributions to ecology. End-of-show recommendations: Dr. Bascompte recommends Perspectives in Ecological Theory, by Ramon Margalef. Dr. Cámara-Leret recommends Where the Gods Reign, by Richard Evans Schultes, and One River, by Wade Davis.   You can find Dr. Cámara-Leret on Twitter (@R_CamaraLeret) and follow his research at his website. You can follow Dr. Bascompte's work at his lab's website. Many Minds is a project of the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI) (https://disi.org), which is made possible by a generous grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation to UCLA. It is hosted and produced by Kensy Cooperrider, with help from assistant producer Cecilia Padilla. Creative support is provided by DISI Directors Erica Cartmill and Jacob Foster. Our artwork is by Ben Oldroyd (https://www.mayhilldesigns.co.uk/). Our transcripts are created by Sarah Dopierala (https://sarahdopierala.wordpress.com/). You can subscribe to Many Minds on Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Google Play, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions. Feel free to email us at: manymindspodcast@gmail.com. For updates about the show, visit our website (https://disi.org/manyminds/), or follow us on Twitter: @ManyMindsPod.

Immigration Review
Ep. 78 - Precedential Decisions from 10/18/2021 - 10/24/2021 (Fraihat; termination of proceedings; IJI authority; adverse credibility; inconsistency; reporting to police)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 16:21


[2:51] Chavez Gonzalez v. Garland, No. 20-1924 (4th Cir. Oct. 20, 2021)termination; Matter of S-O-G- & F-D-B-; IJ inherent authority; Auer/Kisor deference; administrative closure [9:33] Lopez Troche v. Garland, No. 20-1718 (1st Cir. Oct. 18, 2021)adverse credibility standard; attorney inconsistency; reporting to police; withholding and CAT; HIV; LGBTQ; Honduras *Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.www.kktplaw.com/Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwisewww.docketwise.com/immigration-review"Modern immigration software & case management"*Want to become a patron of Immigration Review? Check out our Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview *CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: "Immigration Review Podcast" or @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreview*About your host: https://www.kktplaw.com/attorney/gregg-kevin-a/*More episodes at: https://www.kktplaw.com/immigration-review-podcast/*Featured in the top 15 of Immigration Podcast in the U.S.! https://blog.feedspot.com/immigration_podcasts/DISCLAIMER: Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide specific legal advice. Rather, the Immigration Review® podcast offers general information and insights regarding recent immigration cases from publicly available sources. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the podcast host. The Immigration Review® podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state. MUSIC CREDITS: "Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 242 - Elusive Quest for Victory in War

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 45:09


Retired Marine Corps Col. Tom Greenwood discusses how the mission of the U.S. military might be better described as fighting and succeeding in the nation's wars. More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/october/elusive-quest-victory-war

Breaking Bad Science
Episode 71 - Hangover Cures

Breaking Bad Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 28:46


We'd love to hear from you (feedback@breakingbadscience.com)Look us up on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/385282925919540Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breakingbadsciencepodcast/Website: http://www.breakingbadscience.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscienceIs veisalgia an unfortunate punishment for a good time or something Arnold's Kindergarten Cop might tell you to just, "Stop Whining" about? Maybe more importantly, what is veisalgia? Well, normally we refer to it as a hangover. So what is it truly and can we cure it with some sort of weird eye of newt and tail of rat type concoction? Join hosts Shanti and Danny as we discuss why we get hungover, what we do about it, and if it can really be cured.ReferencesMcGovern, P., et. al.; Fermented Beverages of Pre- and Proto-historic China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 21-Dec-2004. 101:51 (17593 - 17598). Doi: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0407921102Bustamante, J., et. al.; Alterations of Motor Performance and Brain Cortex Mitochondrial Function During Ethanol Hangover. Alcohol. Aug-2012. 46:5 (473 -479). Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alcohol.2011.09.027Karadayian, A., et. al.; Alcohol Hangover Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Free Radical Production in Mouse Cerebellum. Neuroscience. 24-Sep-2015. 304 (47 - 59). Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.07.012Murphy, J.; Researchers ‘Cure' Hangover in Largest Study of its Kind. MDLinx. 14-May-2020. https://www.mdlinx.com/article/researchers-cure-hangover-in-largest-study-of-its-kind/6ifEDqpNIq3UGm5czMTdWNLieb, B., Schmitt, P.; Randomised Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Intervention Study on the Nutritional Efficacy of a Food for Special Medical Purposes (FSMP) and a Dietary Supplement in Reducing the Symptoms of Veisalgia. BMJ Nutrition Prevention and Health. 30-Apr-2020. 3:1 (31 - 39). Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjnph-2019-000042Royle, S., et. al.; Pain Catastrophising Predicts Alcohol Hangover Severity and Symptoms. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 20-Jan-2020. 9:1 Doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010280Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscience?fan_landing=true)

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 223 - Amanda Loves Watership Down

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 98:54


The gang discusses two papers that look at the impact of ecological interactions on the evolutionary history of groups. The first looks at potential competitive interactions that could control rabbit body size, and the second paper uses the fossil record to investigate potential clade interactions between two groups of bryozoans. Meanwhile, Curt researches in real time, Amanda gets to talk about a childhood favorite, and James makes future plans.   Up-Goer Five (Curt Edition): Our friends talk about two papers that look at how animals trying to get food and sometimes fighting with each other can change how they live and grow and make more of themselves. The first paper looks at animals that jump and have hair and their name sounds just like hair. These things that sound like hair do not get really big in most cases, even though we know that they could get big if we try and make it happen. This paper looks for reasons why these "hairs" don't get very big. It turns out that "hairs" eat things that a lot of other animals that eat. And while there are a lot of other things in the paper here that help to build this idea, the big idea is that that how big these "hairs" get may be held back by the smallest of the other animals that eat their food. "Hairs" get about as big as the smallest of these other animals in a place. The second paper looks at animals that grow on top of other things. There are two big groups of these animals, and when we look at how they grow, usually one group will grow over the other group. This means this one group is better at growing in a space and can push out the other group. In the past we used to have more of the group that gets pushed out, but over time we have more of the new group that is better at growing in a place. Some have thought maybe this means that what we see happening in small places may explain this larger change over time. But it is more than just that because it is not just one group going down and another going up. This paper uses a lot of number work to see how these two group may change each other. They find that it is more than just a simple one up one down thing. They find both groups change each other in a few ways. They also don't find that the things happening in the small spaces is causing these bigger changes. It could be because of the type of things we are looking at makes it harder to see these changes, but with what they have it looks like maybe this is not what is causing this change.   References: Tomiya, Susumu, and Lauren K. Miller. "Why aren't rabbits and hares larger?." Evolution 75.4 (2021): 847-860. Lidgard, Scott, et al. "When fossil clades ‘compete': local dominance, global diversification dynamics and causation." Proceedings of the Royal Society B 288.1959 (2021): 20211632.

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma | Proceedings from a live event held during the Society of Hematologic Oncology 2021 Annual Meeting

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 57:58


Featuring perspectives from Drs Andrew Evens, Ian Flinn and Gilles Salles, including the following topics: Introduction (0:00) Follicular Lymphoma (FL) (1:40) Case: A man in his early 70s with relapsed/refractory (R/R) FL — Andrew M Evens, DO, MSc (6:47) Case: A woman in her late 60s with R/R FL and an EZH2 mutation — Ian W Flinn, MD, PhD (15:00) Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) (21:40) Case: A man in his early 70s with MCL — Dr Flinn (28:51) Case: A woman in her late 60s with MCL who received a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor and received chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy — Dr Evens (33:18) Case: A man in his early 60s with R/R MCL — Dr Flinn (36:04) Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) (37:41) Case: A man in his early 80s with R/R DLBCL — Dr Flinn (43:53) Case: A woman in her late 70s with DLBCL — Gilles Salles, MD, PhD (46:46) Case: A man in his late 20s with R/R DLBCL treated with CAR T-cell therapy — Dr Salles (51:00) CME information and select publications

Kentucky Author Forum
Ethan Kross and Maria Konnikova

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:10


Writer and Professor Ethan Kross discusses his book “Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters and How to Harness It'', with journalist and author Maria Konnikova. Ethan Kross is a best-selling author and award-winning professor in the University of Michigan's Psychology Department and its Ross School of Business. He studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions and relationships. Kross' research has been published in Science, The New England Journal of Medicine, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among other peer-reviewed journals. He has participated in policy discussion at the White House and has been interviewed on CBS Evening News, Good Morning America, Anderson Cooper Full Circle, and NPR's Morning Edition. Kross' pioneering research has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, The Economist, The Atlantic, Forbes, and Time Magazine. Maria Konnikova is the author, most recently of “The Biggest Bluff'', a New York Times bestseller, one of the Times' 100 Notable Books of 2020, and a finalist for The Telegraph Best Sports Writing Award for 2021. She is a regularly contributing writer for The New Yorker and has won numerous awards, including the 2019 Excellence in Science Journalism Award. Konnikova's writing has been featured in The Best American Science and Nature Writing and translated into over twenty languages. She also hosts the podcast “The Grift”. Konnikova's podcasting work earned her a National Magazine Award nomination in 2019.

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Multiple Myeloma | Proceedings from a live event held in conjunction with the 2021 Pan Pacific Lymphoma Conference

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 90:31


Featuring perspectives from Drs Muhamed Baljevic, Joseph Mikhael and Nina Shah, moderated by Dr Robert Orlowski: Introduction (0:00) Up-Front Management of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma — Robert Z Orlowski, MD, PhD Selection and Sequencing of Therapies for Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma — Joseph Mikhael, MD (32:36) CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor) T-Cell Therapy for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma — Nina Shah, MD (50:28) Novel Agents and Strategies Under Investigation in Multiple Myeloma — Muhamed Baljevic, MD (1:10:11) CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia | Proceedings from a live event held during the Society of Hematologic Oncology 2021 Annual Meeting

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:03


Featuring perspectives from Drs Jeff Sharman, Mitchell Smith and Philip Thompson, including the following topics: Treatment of CLL in 2021 Introduction (0:00) First-line therapy for a younger and fit patient with CLL (11:52) Case: A man in his mid-60s with IGHV-unmutated CLL — Mitchell R Smith, MD, PhD (16:20) Case: A man in his mid-30s with IGHV-unmutated CLL — Philip A Thompson, MD, BS (20:24) Case: A woman in her late 60s with IGHV-mutated, trisomy 12, TP53 wild-type CLL — Jeff Sharman, MD (25:11) First-line therapy for older and frail patients with CLL (26:55) Case: A man in his early 70s with IGHV-unmutated CLL — Dr Thompson (31:04) First-line therapy for patients with high-risk CLL (33:37) Choice of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor for the treatment of CLL (36:02) Prevention and management of COVID-19 in patients with CLL (43:21) Future Treatment of CLL Future role of BTK inhibitors combined with venetoclax in the management of CLL (48:33) Future role of pirtobrutinib (LOXO-305) in the management of CLL (52:22) Case: A woman in her late 60s with multiregimen-relapsed CLL — Dr Sharman (55:10) Case: A woman in her mid-50s with multiregimen-relapsed CLL — Dr Thompson (57:32) CME information and select publications

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes | Proceedings from a live event held during the Society of Hematologic Oncology 2021 Annual Meeting

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 83:49


Featuring perspectives from Drs Courtney DiNardo, Daniel Pollyea, David Sallman and Eunice Wang, including the following topics: Introduction (0:00) Prologue: A Personal Reflection on Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (1:01) Case: A woman in her mid-80s with newly diagnosed AML — Daniel A Pollyea, MD, MS (8:28) Up-Front Treatment of AML in Patients Who Are Not Eligible for Intensive Therapy (11:54) Case: A man in his early 70s with AML and a complex monosomal karyotype — Dr Pollyea (24:32) Management of AML with Targetable Mutations (33:14) Case: A woman in her late 70s with AML and a FLT3-ITD mutation — Courtney D DiNardo, MD, MSCE (40:04) Case: A man in his late 70s with AML and diploid cytogenetics — Dr DiNardo (48:41) Other Currently Available and Investigational Treatment Strategies for AML (51:57) Case: A man in his mid-60s with secondary AML and DNMT3A and FLT3-ITD mutations — Eunice S Wang, MD (54:50) Case: A woman in her late 50s with leukemia cutis — Dr Wang (1:06:25) Case: A woman in her late 60s with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) — David Sallman, MD (1:09:20) Case: A man in his late 70s with high-risk MDS — Dr Sallman (1:15:37) Case: A man in his mid-80s with high-risk MDS — Dr Sallman (1:22:27) CME information and select publications

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 241 - They Are Not Broken Shower Shoes

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 36:37


John Cordle and Dennis Volpe discuss how the Navy should examine how it treats those who took the challenge of command and fell from grace—and how others could learn from their experience. More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2021/july/they-are-not-broken-shower-shoes

Dark Histories
The Borley Rectory Affair

Dark Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 84:33


When Harry Price published his first book covering Borley Rectory in 1940, he would have been well aware of how sensational, and potentially controversial, the title would appear. “The Most Haunted House in England” shot Borley Rectory to fame, cementing the name in history with the likes of Jack the Ripper, The Salem Witch Trials and later, The Amityville Horror. That the contents of the book stirred up so many years of controversy is an outcome that was bound to have materialised regardless of the title, with stories of spectral nuns, monks and horse-drawn carriages, ghostly writings on the wall and secret passages, all set in the spiritualist boom between the wars. Tables tipped, planchettes moved, bells rang and eventually the house burnt to the ground. Eighty years later, the legend of Borley still lives on fighting against allegations of fraud all the way. Sources Price, Harry (1940) The Most Haunted House in England. Longmans, Green, UK Price, Harry (1946) The End of Borley Rectory. George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd., UK. Dingwall, Eric J., Goldney, Kathleen M. & Hall, Trevor H. (1956) The Haunting of Borley Rectory - A Critical Survey of the Evidence. Proceedings for the Society for Psychical Research, Vol. 51, Part 186, January, 1956. UK. Adams, Paul, Brazil, Eddie & Underwood, Peter (2009) The Borley Rectory Companium. The History Press, UK `Ωcv|”aqTabori, Paul & Underwood, Peter (2017) The Ghosts of Borley. UK. Wall, V.C. (1929) Ghost Visits to a Rectory. The Daily Mirror, 10th June 1929, UK Wall, V.C. (1929) Weird Night in Haunted House. The Daily Mirror, 14th June 1929, UK Clarke, Andrew (2021) The Bones of Borley Rectory. [online] Foxearth.org.uk. Available at: [Accessed 11 August 2021]. ---------- For extended show notes, including maps, links and scripts, head over to darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories The Dark Histories books are available to buy here: http://author.to/darkhistories Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/cmGcBFf The Dark Histories Butterfly was drawn by Courtney, who you can find on Instagram @bewildereye Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.

Daybreak Insider Podcast
October 14, 2021 – High Court Proceedings

Daybreak Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:41


Supreme Court Arguments. Hold The Salt. Space....The Final Frontier  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Goalkeepers' Union
175: Between the Sticks #112

Goalkeepers' Union

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:13


A quick roundup of all the international goalkeeping action, including Danny Ward, Sam Johnstone, Craig Gordon and Kasper Schmeichel. Proceedings begin, however, with yet another trophy for Hugo Lloris. Much to the dismay, bizarrely, of Don Hutchison.

MinuteEarth
Hyena Butter: Weird & Informative (Just Like Us!)

MinuteEarth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 1:59


Get your butt-, er, book here: https://www.minuteearth.com/books/ Hyenas communicate via an information-dense physical medium (hyena butter) - and now MinuteEarth does too (book). SUPPORT MINUTEEARTH ************************** If you like what we do, you can help us!: - Become our patron: https://patreon.com/MinuteEarth - Share this video with your friends and family - Leave us a comment (we read them!) CREDITS ********* Kate Yoshida | Script Writer and Narrator David Goldenberg | Director Arcadi Garcia i Rius | Illustration, Video Editing and Animation Nathaniel Schroeder | Music MinuteEarth is produced by Neptune Studios LLC https://neptunestudios.info OUR STAFF ************ Sarah Berman • Arcadi Garcia i Rius David Goldenberg • Julián Gustavo Gómez Melissa Hayes • Alex Reich • Henry Reich • Peter Reich Ever Salazar • Leonardo Souza • Kate Yoshida OTHER CREDITS ***************** Hyena audio clips by Dr. Kenna Lehmann OUR LINKS ************ Youtube | https://youtube.com/MinuteEarth TikTok | https://tiktok.com/@minuteearth Twitter | https://twitter.com/MinuteEarth Instagram | https://instagram.com/minute_earth Facebook | https://facebook.com/Minuteearth Website | https://minuteearth.com Apple Podcasts| https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/minuteearth/id649211176 REFERENCES ************** Hofer, H., M. L. East, I. Sammang, and & M. Dehnhard. 2001. Analysis of volatile compounds in scent-marks of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and their possible function in olfactory communication. Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 9:141–148. Retrieved from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4615-0671-3_18 Theis, K.R., Venkataraman, A., Dycus, J. A., Koonter, K.D.S., Schmitt-Matzen, E.N., Wagner. A.P., Holekamp, K.E., & Schmidt, T.M (2013) Symbiotic bacteria appear to mediate hyena social odors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110: 19832–19837. Retrieved from: https://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1306477110 Theis, K. R., Schmidt, T. M. & Holekamp, K. E. (2012) Evidence for a bacterial mechanism for group-specific social odors among hyenas. Scientific Reports 2, 615. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431069/ MinuteEarth (2021). MinuteEarth Explains: How Did Whales Get So Big? & Other Curious Questions about Animals, Nature, Geology and Planet Earth. Retrieved from: https://www.MinuteEarth.com/books

Futility Closet
360-Haggard's Dream

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:38


In 1904, adventure novelist H. Rider Haggard awoke from a dream with the conviction that his daughter's dog was dying. He dismissed the impression as a nightmare, but the events that followed seemed to give it a grim significance. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe Haggard's strange experience, which briefly made headlines around the world. We'll also consider Alexa's expectations and puzzle over a college's name change. Intro: Marshall Bean got himself drafted by reversing his name. An air traveler may jump into tomorrow without passing midnight. "Bob, although he belonged to my daughter, who bought him three years ago, was a great friend of mine, but I cannot say that my soul was bound up in him," Haggard wrote. "He was a very intelligent animal, and generally accompanied me in my walks about the farm, and almost invariably came to say good morning to me." Sources for our feature on Haggard's nightmare and its sequel: H. Rider Haggard, The Days of My Life, 1923. Mrs. Henry Sidgwick, "Phantasms of the Living," Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research 86:33 (October 1922), 23-429. H. Rider Haggard, Delphi Complete Works of H. Rider Haggard, 2013. Peter Berresford Ellis, H. Rider Haggard: A Voice From the Infinite, 1978. C.L. Graves and E.V. Lucas, "Telepathy Day by Day," Bill Peschel, et al., The Early Punch Parodies of Sherlock Holmes, 2014. Harold Orel, "Hardy, Kipling, and Haggard," English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 25:4 (1982), 232-248. "Spiritualism Among Animals" Public Opinion 39:18 (Oct. 28, 1905), 566. "Character Sketch: Commissioner H. Rider Haggard," Review of Reviews 32:187 (July 1905), 20-27. "Rider Haggard on Telepathy," Muswellbrook [N.S.W.] Chronicle, Oct. 8, 1904. "Case," Journal of the Society for Psychical Research 11:212 (October 1904), 278-290. "Mr. Rider Haggard's Dream," [Rockhampton, Qld.] Morning Bulletin, Sept. 24, 1904. "Has a Dog a Soul?" [Adelaide] Evening Journal, Sept. 21, 1904. "Spirit of the Dog," The World's News [Sydney], Sept. 10, 1904. "Thought-Telepathy: H. Rider Haggard's Dog," [Sydney] Daily Telegraph, Aug. 31, 1904. "Dog's Spirit Talks," The World's News [Sydney], Aug. 27, 1904. "Telepathy (?) Between a Human Being and a Dog," [Sydney] Daily Telegraph, Aug. 25, 1904. "Mr. Rider Haggard's Ghost Dog," Kansas City Star, Aug. 22, 1904. "The Nightmare of a Novelist," Fresno Morning Republican, Aug. 21, 1904. "Psychological Mystery," Hawaiian Star, Aug. 20, 1904. H.S., "Superstition and Psychology," Medical Press and Circular 129:7 (Aug. 17, 1904), 183-184. "Canine Telepathy," [Montreal] Gazette, Aug. 10, 1904. "Telepathy (?) Between a Human Being and a Dog," Times, Aug. 9, 1904. "Haggard and His Dog," Washington Post, Aug. 7, 1904. "Mr. Haggard's Strange Dream," New York Times, July 31, 1904. "Country Notes," Country Life 16:395 (July 30, 1904), 147-149. "Mr. Rider Haggard's Dream," Light 24:1229 (July 30, 1904), 364. "Telepathy Between Human Beings and Dogs," English Mechanic and World of Science 79:2053 (July 29, 1904), 567. John Senior, Spirituality in the Fiction of Henry Rider Haggard, dissertation, Rhodes University, 2003. Wallace Bursey, Rider Haggard: A Study in Popular Fiction, dissertation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1972. Morton N. Cohen, "Haggard, Sir (Henry) Rider," Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Sept. 23, 2004. Listener mail: "How to pronounce Akira Kurosawa," Forvo (accessed Oct. 1, 2021). Sarah Sicard, "How the Heck Do You Pronounce 'Norfolk'?" Military Times, July 30, 2020. William S. Forrest, Historical and Descriptive Sketches of Norfolk and Vicinity, 1853. "Dubois, Wyoming," Wikipedia (accessed Oct. 1, 2021). "Our History," Destination Dubois (accessed Oct. 2, 2021). This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Tony Filanowski. Here's a corroborating link (warning -- this spoils the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

The Proceedings Podcast
Proceedings Podcast Episode 240 - Guadalcanal Quintet

The Proceedings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:46


Trent Hone talks about the five battles of Guadalcanal. More here: https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval-history-magazine/2021/october/guadalcanal-quintet

Radio Cachimbona
*PREVIEW* These Are Sham Proceedings

Radio Cachimbona

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 8:25


*PREVIEW* On this #litreview, Yvette interviews deportation defense attorney Sophia Gurúle about Harsha Walia's new book "Border and Rule." They discuss the intertwined histories of indigenous land theft and anti-Black slavery, applaud Walia's clear-eyed analysis about the difference between honoring the right to move and gentrification, and explain why "no borders" is preferable to "open borders." Become a patron and listen to the rest of the episode here: https://www.patreon.com/radiocachimbona?fan_landing=true Follow @radiocachimbona on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook