Podcasts about Notting Hill

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คำนี้ดี
KND1007 #รวมฮิต จกศัพท์จดสำนวนภาษาอังกฤษจากหนัง 4 ประเภท

คำนี้ดี

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 120:00


ถ้าไม่มีโอกาสพูด ไม่มีโอกาสเจอฝรั่ง ก็ลองไปดูและฟังหนังฝรั่งเยอะๆ เพราะภาพยนตร์คือแหล่งรวมวัตถุดิบทางภาษาชั้นดีที่มีภาพ เสียง อากัปกิริยา บริบทเพียบพร้อมสำหรับการเรียนภาษาและจกศัพท์สำนวนไปใช้ในชีวิตประจำวัน    คำนี้ดี #รวมฮิต เอพิโสดนี้รวบรวมศัพท์สำนวนจากภาพยนตร์ 2 เรื่อง ‘Notting Hill' และ ‘Dead Poets Society' และคำคมสำนวนอีก 2 โหลจาก ‘ดิสนีย์' และ ‘หนังฆาตกรรม' 

THE STANDARD Podcast
คำนี้ดี EP.1007 #รวมฮิต จกศัพท์จดสำนวนภาษาอังกฤษจากหนัง 4 ประเภท

THE STANDARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 120:01


ถ้าไม่มีโอกาสพูด ไม่มีโอกาสเจอฝรั่ง ก็ลองไปดูและฟังหนังฝรั่งเยอะๆ เพราะภาพยนตร์คือแหล่งรวมวัตถุดิบทางภาษาชั้นดีที่มีภาพ เสียง อากัปกิริยา บริบทเพียบพร้อมสำหรับการเรียนภาษาและจกศัพท์สำนวนไปใช้ในชีวิตประจำวัน คำนี้ดี #รวมฮิต เอพิโสดนี้รวบรวมศัพท์สำนวนจากภาพยนตร์ 2 เรื่อง ‘Notting Hill' และ ‘Dead Poets Society' และคำคมสำนวนอีก 2 โหลจาก ‘ดิสนีย์' และ ‘หนังฆาตกรรม'

Where Do We Go From Here
114: Let's Talk About Sex (Education! And Masturbation! And Toys!)

Where Do We Go From Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 61:07


A sex educator is in the house, and she's taking us back to school for the education most of us never got. Erica Smith founded the Purity Culture Dropout™️ Program to equip people like us with information and education that is "accurate, queer inclusive, trauma informed, compassionate, and comprehensive." We discuss: why sex education is more than preventing negative health outcomes what happens when we pathologize all things sex related all things masturbation sex toys and sex shops Full show notes here Join us in patreon to hear Jess & Devi relive the romcom, Notting Hill. Also coming next week, Devi and Kelly debrief this conversation on sex ed and masturbation. It's $3/month (USD) and you get three episodes a month plus a ticket to the Green Room where you get to meet others in the community.  Erica Smith (she/her) is an award winning sexuality educator and consultant with over 20 years of experience. She has provided comprehensive sex education and advocacy to young women and LGBTQ+ youth in Philadelphia's juvenile justice system, worked in abortion care, and supported HIV+ and transgender adolescents and their families. In 2019, she developed the Purity Culture Dropout™️ Program to help people learn all of the sex education that they missed growing up in purity culture- sex ed that is accurate, queer inclusive, trauma informed, compassionate, and comprehensive. Erica lives in Philadelphia with her partner and house full of rescue animals. Connect with Erica on Instagram

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Hugh Bonneville, PLAYING UNDER THE PIANO: From Downton to Darkest Peru

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 25:20


Zibby interviews (in person!) Golden Globe and Emmy nominated actor Hugh Bonneville (star of Downton Abbey, Notting Hill, and Paddington!) about his memoir Playing Under the Piano: From Downton to Darkest Peru. Hugh talks about his real name, his childhood (it involved museums, the theater, and a mom in the secret service!), some hilarious early-career mishaps, and his plans for the future (retirement is not an option!). Finally, he shares his best advice for aspiring authors.Purchase on Amazon or Bookshop.Amazon: bit.ly/3hQ0HxwBookshop: bit.ly/3hWAblZSubscribe to Zibby's weekly newsletter here.Purchase Moms Don't Have Time to Read Books merch here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 6

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 35:03


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 7

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 40:55


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 8

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 35:46


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 9

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 42:54


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episodes 1 to 9

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 296:34


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 1

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 11:31


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 2

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 25:40


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 3

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 33:21


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 4

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 36:18


Dragnet
Notting Hill Mystery - Episode 5

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 35:09


Higher Fidelity
36. To The Window, To The Walsh

Higher Fidelity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 67:07


Myself and the returning delight that is Becky Walsh find ourselves hitting the ground running and not stopping for a breath until we've managed to run through, Joe Doherty and Tadhg Williams, to The King And I to Yul Brynner to Ben Kingsley to Vanessa Hudgens to Gandhi to Mother Reilly's in Rathmines (a night Joe Doherty will always REMember) to Modern Warfare 2 to Notting Hill to Adore playing in London to tongkat ali (and a customers reluctance to engage with the concept of washing up liquid) to compostable dog poop bags (and potential human use) to expired nori flakes to rotting pumpkins to to spitting a digestive biscuit out a car window on the way to Enniskillen soundtracked by Jack L to lethal petting zoos to Mary Kate and Ashley to Melvin Doo to Holes to my shock that Becky has never seen Holes to the Big Big Move to Joe's big big move to Barcelona and finally to the smell of burning before we even START the first segment.  After that its smooth sailing through Sonic Seconds with a guest appearance from Becky's housemate Lara, Vox Pas with slamming indictments of Morrissey (a first for him I'm sure) and then story time with Becky, Blink 182 and Machine Gun Kelly before rounding off with a round from the Acoustic Corner.

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 303: The Loneliness of the Indian Man

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 443:30


Women are not the only victims of patriarchy -- men are also diminished by it. Nikhil Taneja joins Amit Varma in episode 303 of The Seen and the Unseen to discuss what he has learnt about mental health, young people in India, the epidemic of loneliness in our country -- and the enormous power of storytelling. (For full linked show notes, go to SeenUnseen.in.) Also check out: 1. The Loneliness of the Indian Woman — Episode 259 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shrayana Bhattacharya).  2. Nikhil Taneja on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, IMDb and HT Brunch. 3. Yuvaa. 4. The internet—a toxic love story -- Nikhil Taneja. 5. The pandemic pretence of being ‘okay' -- Nikhil Taneja. 6. Keeping up with the algorithms -- Nikhil Taneja. 7. It is okay for men to cry -- Nikhil Taneja. 8. Reject the mission statement of your gender -- Nikhil Taneja. 9. Kindness: Don't be an A**hole! -- Nikhil Taneja. 10. Why young Indians are lonelier than ever before -- Nikhil Taneja. 11. How stories can heal our divided world -- Nikhil Taneja. 12. Nikhil Taneja on Advertising is Dead with Varun Duggirala. 13. Nikhil Taneja on the Filter Koffee Podcast with Karthik Nagarajan. 14. The Hunter Becomes the Hunted — Episode 200 of The Seen and the Unseen. 15. Episodes on The Seen and the Unseen that touched on feminism & gender with Paromita Vohra, Kavita Krishnan, Mrinal Pande, Kavitha Rao, Namita Bhandare, Shrayana Bhattacharya, Mukulika Banerjee, Manjima Bhattacharjya, Nilanjana Roy, Urvashi Butalia, Mahima Vashisht, Alice Evans, Ashwini Deshpande and Natasha Badhwar. 16. Hitesh Kewalya on Twitter, Instagram and IMDb. 17. Shubh Mangal Saavdhan and Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan. 18. Dev Anand and Roger Corman. 19. The Reflections of Samarth Bansal -- Episode 299 of The Seen and the Unseen. 20. This Be The Verse — Philip Larkin. 21. Caste, Capitalism and Chandra Bhan Prasad — Episode 296 of The Seen and the Unseen. 22. Gendered Leadership Course by Angellica Aribam. 23. Young India — Episode 83 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Snigdha Poonam). 24. Dreamers — Snigdha Poonam. 25. Men Must Step Up Now -- Amit Varma. 26. Beedi Jali Le -- Song from Omkara. 27. NH 10 (Navdeep Singh), Hichki (Siddharth Malhotra), Chhapaak (Meghna Gulzar), Rashmi Rocket (Akarsh Khurana) and Queen (Vikas Bahl). 28. Ghostbusters (2016, Paul Feig) and The Lost City (Nee Brothers). 29. 3 Idiots (Rajkumar Hirani), Dangal (Nitesh Tiwari), Badhaai Ho (Amit Ravindernath Sharma), Kantara (Rishab Shetty) and Thugs of Hindostan (Vijay Krishna Acharya). 30. Aamir Khan on Koffee With Karan (2018). 31. Parasite -- Bong Joon-ho. 32. Asghar Farhadi on Wikipedia and IMDb. 33. Delhi Crime. 34. TikTok and Indian Society -- The online course conducted by Amit Varma, now no longer on offer. 35. Vicky Donor (Shoojit Sircar) and RRR (SS Rajamouli). 36. Salim-Javed. 37. Range Rover — The archives of Amit Varma's poker column for the Economic Times. 38. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (Aditya Chopra) and Kaho Naa... Pyaar Hai (Rakesh Roshan). 39. Dev D (Anurag Kashyap), Udaan (Vikramaditya Motwane) and Oye Lucky Oye Lucky (Dibakar Banerjee). 40. Bhuvam Bam, Prajakta Koli and Amit Bhadana. 41. Man's World (Y-Films) and Ki & Ka (R Balki). 42. The Refreshing Audacity of Vinay Singhal — Episode 291 of The Seen and the Unseen. 43. Mumbai Diaries 26/11 -- NIkhil Advani. 44. 1000 True Fans — Kevin Kelly. 45. 1000 True Fans? Try 100 — Li Jin. 46. If You Are a Creator, This Is Your Time -- Amit Varma. 47. Episodes of The Seen and the Unseen on the creator ecosystem with Roshan Abbas, Varun Duggirala, Neelesh Misra, Snehal Pradhan, Chuck Gopal, Nishant Jain, Deepak Shenoy and Abhijit Bhaduri. 48. One Cut of the Dead — Shin'ichirō Ueda. 49. Dance Dance For the Halva Waala -- Episode 294 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Jai Arjun Singh and Subrat Mohanty). 50. Steven Soderbergh, Kevin Smith (Clerks), Sofia Coppola and Richard Linklater. 51. The Life and Work of Ashwini Deshpande -- Episode 298 of The Seen and the Unseen. 52. Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini and Mani Kaul. 53. Andaz Apna Apna (Rajkumar Santoshi), Gunda (Kanti Shah) and Disco Dancer (Babbar Subhash). 54. Womaning in India With Mahima Vashisht -- Episode 293 of The Seen and the Unseen. 55. Womaning in India — Mahima Vashisht's newsletter. 56. Desperately Seeking Shah Rukh: India's Lonely Young Women and the Search for Intimacy and Independence — Shrayana Bhattacharya. 57. Memories and Things — Episode 195 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Aanchal Malhotra). 58. Remnants of a Separation — Aanchal Malhotra. 59. Shravana Kumara, the pious son. 60. Kavitha Rao and Our Lady Doctors — Episode 235 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Kavitha Rao). 61. Lady Doctors: The Untold Stories of India's First Women in Medicine — Kavitha Rao. 62. Penelope Fitzgerald on Amazon and Wikipedia. 63. Roshan Abbas and the Creator Economy -- Episode 239 of The Seen and the Unseen. 64. Kuch Kuch Hota Hai -- Karan Johar. 65. The Chaos Machine -- Max Fisher. 66. The Social Dilemma -- Jeff Orlowski. 67. The Flying Spaghetti Monster. 68. Coming Out as Bisexual -- Mohit's talk at Main Hoon Yuvaa. 69. Nikhil Taneja's Twitter thread on his anxiety. 70. Nikhil Taneja's Facebook post on his anxiety. 71. Chandrahas Choudhury's Country of Literature — Episode 288 of The Seen and the Unseen. 72. Turtles All the Way Down -- John Green. 73. Don't think too much of yourself. You're an accident — Amit Varma's column on Chris Cornell's death. 74. The Road to Freedom — Arthur C Brooks. 75. Amit Varma's favourite shower gel. 76. The Prem Panicker Files — Episode 217 of The Seen and the Unseen. 77.  Amitava Kumar Finds the Breath of Life — Episode 265 of The Seen and the Unseen. 78. Schitt's Creek, Kim's Convenience and Parks and Recreation. 79. Greatest Events of WWII in Colour -- The Netflix docuseries mentioned by Nikhil. 80. Zeynep Tufekci's newsletter, Twitter and column archive. 81. Ed Yong on Twitter, Amazon, The Atlantic and his own website. 82. My Friend Dropped His Pants -- Amit Varma. 83. Love Actually, Four Weddings and a Funeral and Notting Hill by Richard Curtis. 84. Project Everyone. 85. Ladies Room, 6 Pack Band and Bang Baaja Baaraat. 86. Maja Ma -- Anand Tiwari. 87. Phone Bhoot, Badhaai Ho and Crash Course. 88. Let's Talk Consent. 89. Queeristan -- Episode 190 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Parmesh Shahani).. 90. Gray (Sakshi Gurnani) and Tasalli Se (Tarun Dudeja). 91. Dear Teenage Me.-- A podcast by Yuvaa on Spotify. 92. Humankind: A Hopeful History -- Rutger Bregman. 93. The Stanford Prison Experiment. 94. Invisible Women — Caroline Criado Perez. 95. Will -- Will Smith's autobiography. 96. Homeland Elegies -- Ayad Akhtar. 97. Yearbook -- Seth Rogan. 98. Shamoon Ismail on YouTube and Spotify. 99. Vampire Weekend on YouTube and Spotify. 100. Dev D by Amit Trivedi. 101. Hum Hai Rahi Pyar Ke -- Song from Nau Do Gyarah, starring Dev Anand. 102. The Before Trilogy by Richard Linklater. 103. Rambling Man -- An interview of Richard Linklater by Nikhil Taneja. 104. Superchor -- Song from Oye Lucky Lucky Oye. 104. Succession, Ted Lasso and Bojack Horseman. 105. Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory -- Raphael Bob-Waksberg. 106. The Lord of the Rings -- JRR Tolkein. 107. The Lord of the Rings -- The films. 108. The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power. 109. 8 Book Recommendations by Nikhil Taneja on Chalchitra Talks. 110. Weekly Movie Recommendations by Nikhil Taneja on Chalchitra Talks. 111. 80 Marvelous Recommendations by Nikhil Taneja on Chalchitra Talks. 112. Nikhil Taneja's 2020 and 2021 recommendations on Instagram. 113. Nikhil Taneja's 2022 favourites, specially compiled for The Seen and the Unseen. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! Episode art: ‘I'm not lonely' by Simahina.

Why Do We Own This DVD?
206. Notting Hill (1999)

Why Do We Own This DVD?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 110:50


Diane and Sean discuss arguably the best rom-com of all time, Notting Hill. Episode music is, "She" by Charles Aznavour and Herbert Kretzmer, performed by Elvis Costello, from the OST.-  Our theme song is by Brushy One String-  Artwork by Marlaine LePage-  Why Do We Own This DVD?  Merch available at Teepublic-  Follow the show on social media:-  IG: @whydoweownthisdvd-  Twitter: @whydoweownthis1-  Follow Sean's Plants on IG: @lookitmahplantsSupport the show

The Jon and Rick Show
Meet top level owner and entrepreneur David Vos, then catch up with Nottinghill Invitational winning team, Sara Kozumplik and groom Sara Kelson

The Jon and Rick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 66:13


Learn about owning horses with Phillip Dutton from David Vos, an entrepreneur and engineer with experience in drones, frangible safety, and carbon credits. Then, catch up with Nottinghill invitational winning team, Sara Kozumplik and groom Sara Kelson. 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam joker wolf britain catholic mothers beatles lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge wright birmingham iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd apples pink floyd communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo climax sanford roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music elektra brian wilson cautionary tales lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill arthurian groupies jeff beck sainsbury marquee willows etta james freak out i ching opel gilmour dick clark howlin edwardian coasters john lee hooker walk like gk chesterton bo diddley labour mp wish you were here tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone syd barrett anjelica huston john peel new left manfred mann nick mason free school allemande amm sdp klose jimi hendrix experience johnny b goode shine on pretty things rubber soul girl guides oar liberal mps chubby checker notting hill carnival american bandstand psychedelic experiences ray davies harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records bacharach frith steptoe roky erickson tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer lodgers radio london entranced distributism ewan maccoll rick wright crazy diamond fred frith quaalude belloc pete anderson partita no incredible string band rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young interstellar overdrive dave gilmour cloudberry grimble norman smith nick kent ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman malcolm jones arnold layne smokestack lightnin dodder tilt araiza
Zolak & Bertrand
Counting Wins With Mike Reiss // Mike At The Movies // Today's Takeaways- 11/1 (Hour 4)

Zolak & Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 40:53


(0:00) - We start the final hour circling the Patriots schedule to determine their record(15:38) - Mike Reiss of ESPN gives his critique of the movie Notting Hill(27:03) - We react to the Steve Nash firing and the potential for Ime Udoka to become their head coach(36:06) - Today's Takeaways CONNECT WITH ZOLAK & BERTRANDhttps://www.instagram.com/zoandbertrandhttps://twitter.com/ZoandBertrandhttps://www.facebook.com/ZolakandBertrandhttps://www.instagram.com/985thesportshubhttps://twitter.com/985thesportshubhttps://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Gossip With Celebitchy
138: Prince Harry's memoir is called Spare, Duchess Meghan criticized for speaking about her experience, Kanye West faces consequences

Gossip With Celebitchy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 36:45


Introduction: Minutes 0 to 6:30 In case you missed our last episode, my five month old puppy was kicked out of puppy kindergarten and they wanted me to pay for private lessons for him. I hired someone else and my dog did great! Chandra's cat watches over her while she sleeps. She's also watching Murder, She Wrote and Unsolved Mysteries. We talk about UFOs. Royals: Minutes 6:30 to 26:00 We just got the title, cover and release date for Prince Harry's memoir, Spare. It's coming out January 10th but Chandra was hoping it would come out in December. Harry looks so unbothered on the cover. Last week Duchess Meghan's Variety interview came out. She was very diplomatic and focused on her life with Harry. We don't think When Harry Met Sally is the best romcom like Meghan said and prefer Notting Hill and Four Weddings and a Funeral. We think Harry and Meghan should produce romcoms for Netflix. Meghan confirmed the docuseries in that interview. She also spoke respectfully about the Queen. Meghan's podcast last week was about the archetype Bimbo and featured Paris Hilton. Meghan opened by saying she felt objectified while she was a briefcase girl on Deal or no Deal, but she was careful to say she was grateful for the opportunity and that it paid the bills and got her insurance and a SAG card. It was a nuanced conversation that was misunderstood by Whoopi Goldberg and Claudia Jordan, another former Deal or no Deal briefcase girl. This week's Archetypes podcast focused on the Angry Black Woman trope and featured interviews with Issa Rae and Ziwe. Meghan didn't talk about how the British press treated her, but it was the subtext. They talked about diminishing themselves, setting boundaries and how women are labeled as “difficult.” Late last week we got the trailer for season five of The Crown. King Charles keeps telling on himself by objecting so strongly. A friend of the royal family told the London Times the show was trying to destroy the royal family. Judy Dench wrote an open letter to the London Times asking that a disclaimer be added to the Crown. We later learned that she was up for a role on the show which fell through. Netflix did add a disclaimer – to the YouTube description. Netflix executives called out King Charles in a recent Deadline interview. King Charles is selling off his late mother The Queen's prized racehorses, which seems petty, especially so soon after his mother died. He could hand over operations to a family member instead and it's not like he needs the money. I play a segment from Zoom where we talked about the royals. Camila is in India at some kind of wellness center. I guess we'll know what she's been doing if she comes back with a new face. Chandra thinks she's there to dry out and isn't there for plastic surgery. Kanye West: Minutes 26:00 to 32:45 Kanye West is finally facing consequences for being anti-Black, misogynistic and antisemitic. It took long enough. He's been dropped by The Gap, Adidas, Balenciaga and his agency, CAA. His culty school for kids, The Donda Academy, is also shutting down. He recently turned up at Sketchers headquarters and was turned away by security. I play a segment from Zoom where we talked about Kanye. Comments of the Week: Minutes 32:45 to end Kaiser's comment of the week is from s808 on the response to the announcement of Harry's book title. My comment of the week is from Miranda on the post about Dr. Oz saying that abortion decisions should be made by the states along with “women, doctors, local political leaders.” Thanks for listening bitches!

Deutero Cannons
Wells, Part 2: Chesterton's Critique

Deutero Cannons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 24:17


Before listening to this episode, check out part one -- "H.G. Wells: Apostle of Humanist Globalism," which argues that Wells' globalist faith is a "pattern of the world" (Romans 12:1-2) that Christians and people of good will everywhere need to recognize and reject. In this episode, Justin digs into some G.K. Chesterton's critiques of Wells and the globalists of his day, specifically in his novel The Notting Hill. Be watching for more episodes coming soon on "patterns of the world" past, present, and future.

Paul McKenna's Positivity Podcast
108 - Hugh Bonneville

Paul McKenna's Positivity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 27:51


My guest today is an actor famous for appearing in films such as Downton Abbey, Notting Hill, The Monuments Men and the Paddington Bear series, amongst many others. His new book Playing Under The Piano paints a vivid picture of his career on stage and screen. I'm talking today with Hugh Bonneville… The Positivity Podcast sees Paul McKenna interview some of the world's most interesting people. From film stars, to entrepreneurs and entertainers, you'll learn the tips and tricks that the best in the business use to stay positive. Don't forget to rate and subscribe to the podcast and share your best bits from the episode online. Paul McKenna Twitter: @ImPaulMcKenna Paul McKenna Instagram: @IamPaulMcKenna

My Time Capsule
Ep. 233 - James Dreyfus

My Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 41:33


James Dreyfus is best known for playing Constable Goody in The Thin Blue Line alongside Rowan Atkinson and Tom in Gimme Gimme Gimme with Kathy Burke. He was in the film Notting Hill, playing Martin the bookseller alongside Hugh Grant, he starred opposite Bette Midler in the American sitcom Bette, and took over the role of Thermoman in the BBC comedy My Hero from Ardal O'Hanlon. James Dreyfus is guest number 233 on My Time Capsule and chats to Michael Fenton Stevens about the five things he'd like to put in a time capsule; four he'd like to preserve and one he'd like to bury and never have to think about again .Follow James Dreyfus on Twitter: @DreyfusJames .Follow My Time Capsule on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @MyTCpod .Follow Michael Fenton Stevens on Twitter: @fentonstevens and Instagram @mikefentonstevens .Produced and edited by John Fenton-Stevens for Cast Off Productions .Music by Pass The Peas Music .Artwork by matthewboxall.com .This podcast is proud to be associated with the charity Viva! Providing theatrical opportunities for hundreds of young people. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Reel Reactions
Too Famous to Fall In Love??

Reel Reactions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 15:53


This episode Havah tells Scott about Notting Hill (1999) a rom com with Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant

Spectator Radio
Marshall Matters: James Dreyfus

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 37:44


This week Winston speaks with actor James Dreyfus, star of Gimme Gimme Gimme, The Thin Blue Line and Notting Hill. They discuss his cancellation from Dr Who, the misogyny and homophobia of Trans Radical Activists, Stonewall, the LGB Alliance, and why he's willing to put his neck on the line.

Marshall Matters
James Dreyfus: cancelled from Dr Who for supporting JK Rowling

Marshall Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 37:44


This week Winston speaks with actor James Dreyfus, star of Gimme Gimme Gimme, The Thin Blue Line and Notting Hill. They discuss his cancellation from Dr Who, the misogyny and homophobia of Trans Radical Activists, Stonewall, the LGB Alliance, and why he's willing to put his neck on the line.

Leafing Out - a podcast about gardening
Whoopsie Daisy Watering!

Leafing Out - a podcast about gardening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 23:01 Transcription Available


Gabe and Rebecca introduce a learn-from-our-mistakes segment inspired by Hugh Grant in Notting Hill: whoopsie daisy! In this case the topic is: don't forgot to water your damn plants! But is watering that simple? How much water do plants really need? And what does it mean "water until established"? They get into all that and so much more.

Persons Unknown
Kelso Cochrane (Unsolved Murder)

Persons Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 42:43 Transcription Available


It was a little after midnight on September 17th 1959 when Kelso Cochrane was attacked and murdered on his way home to his home in North Kensington, Notting Hill in West London. The 32 year old Antiguan carpenter was set upon by a group of white youths just a short distance from the bedsit that he shared with his fiancé Olivia. Despite evidence to suggest the attack had been racially motivated, within 24 hours of the murder the police insisted that this was not the case. Arrests were made but no charges were ever brought. The aftermath witnessed campaigners from the black community across the UK demand change whilst fascist groups attempted to ignite a race war. Over 60 years later the quest for justice for Kelso Cochrane is ongoing.Follow Persons Unknown:  Instagram and FacebookSources: For a full list of sources please see the Facebook page  British Newspaper Archive Belfast Telegraph 18/05/59Birmingham Daily Post18/05/59, 19/05/59, 22/05/59Daily Mirror 18/05/59, 19/05/59, 20/05/59,, 21/05/5922/05/59Western Mail18/05/59, 23/05/59Shields Daily News18/05/59Aberdeen Evening Express 18/05/59Daily Herald 18/05/59, 19/05/59, 22/05/59, 23/05/59, 06/08/59Halifax Evening Courier18/05/5919/05/59Daily News19/05/59, 20/05/59, 21/05/59, 23/05/59, 05/08/59Kensington Post22/05/59, 07/08/59The People24/05/59Sunday Mirror 24/05/59Websiteshttps://www.ourmigrationstory.org.uk/oms/murder-in-notting-hillhttp://www.wakingthedead.org/kelso-cochrane.htmlhttps://www.mylondon.news/news/west-london-news/horrific-murder-kelso-cochrane-notting-18257872.amphttps://amp.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/apr/14/turbulent-times-kelso-cochrane-police-searchhttps://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/police-probe-first-racist-murder-24216906.amphttps://the-upsetter.com/black-death/crime/https://www.urbankapital.com › postSixty-one years since Notting Hill murder of Kelso Cochranehttps://socialistworker.co.uk/features/who-killed-kelso-cochrane/https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2034957/amp/Patrick-Digby-killed-Kelso-Cochrane-Notting-Hill-book-says.htmlhttps://thelondonpress.uk/2021/05/21/were-still-broken-family-of-black-man-killed-in-unsolved-racist-murder-appeal-for-met-apology/https://stevesilver.org.uk/who-killed-my-brother/Promos: Buzzsprout — Easiest Way to Start a PodcastStart podcasting today. It's the easiest way to start, grow, and monetize your podcast.Brand

Zestology: Live with energy, vitality and motivation
Allergy Testing (feat. Dr. Roshni Menon) #403

Zestology: Live with energy, vitality and motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 38:54


How could this help unlock your health, allergy or intolerance issues?

AlloCiné
Julia Roberts en 3 films : Notting Hill, Erin Brockovich, Le Mariage de mon meilleur ami

AlloCiné

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 33:28


3 films avec Julia Roberts... La Rédac d'AlloCiné vous partage ses films préférés de la comédienne, à l'affiche la semaine prochaine de Ticket To Paradise, son retour à la comédie romantique (en salles le 5 octobre 2022).Le podcast 3 films pose son regard pour cet épisode sur la filmographie d'une actrice, qui nous accompagne depuis des années, via des comédies romantiques, mais pas seulement. 3 films passe en revue 3 incontournables d'une filmographie, et 3 pépites.On va parler de certains de ses plus gros succès, et de films un peu plus méconnus, comme L'Expérience interdite ou Les nuits avec mon ennemi.N'hésitez pas à partager, noter, commenter l'émission et à vous abonner à AlloCiné Podcasts. Tous nos épisodes sont à retrouver sur les plateformes de podcast, dont Deezer, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Acast...Crédits :• Journaliste - Présentatrice : Brigitte Baronnet• Journalistes - Chroniqueurs : Laetitia Ratane, Clément Cuyer, Thomas Desroches• Réalisation : Raphaël Garcia• Montage : Gaya Hamimi Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

180 grados
180 Grados - Calexico, Röyksopp, Jamie XX y Margo Price - 21/09/22

180 grados

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 59:25


Calexico presentan 'Rambler' y es un placer hacerles un hueco especial en este podcast. Escuchamos también a Röyksopp junto a GUNHILD RAMSAY KOVACS, en un rompepistas titulado 'Me & Youphoria', a Jamie XX con su homenaje al Carnaval de Notting Hill en un pelotazo titulado 'Kill Dem' y a Margo Price con otro de los adelantos de su próximo álbum, la seductora y magnética 'Change Of Heart'. SMASHING PUMPKINS – Beguiled WHITE LUNG - Tomorrow SLUG - Casual Cruelty EASY LIFE ft GUS DAPPERTON - Antifreeze MURA MASA ft BAYLI – Demon Time RÖYKSOPP ft GUNHILD RAMSAY KOVACS - Me & Youphoria MARGO PRICE - Change Of Heart BASURITA – Septiembre LADY BANANA - Overflow CALEXICO – Rambler RIPOLL – Podemos Seguir CAROLINA DURANTE – Moreno de Contrabando PELIGRO! - I Love Rock 'n Roll JULIEN CHANG – Snakebit BEEN STELLAR - Manhattan Youth LITTLE DRAGON ft JID – Stay JAMIE XX - Kill Dem TAI VERDES – Kingdom Come PEPPERMINT PATTY - A Cuckhold' S Refrain Escuchar audio

Cine Millonario - El Podcast
EXCLUSIVO - The Batman - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Cine Millonario - El Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 81:18


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! ¡Como te prometimos vuelve The Batman en exclusiva para nuestros Patreon! ¡Nos hemos traído a Nina Rancel, que nos acompañó en Notting Hill, para debatir sobre el regreso del caballero oscuro! ¿Nos gusta que sea tan oscura? ¿Son demasiado evidentes las referencias? ¿Se hacen largas sus casi 3 horas? ¿Qué nos ha parecido Catwoman? ¿Cómo vemos el futuro de esta nueva trilogía y el universo que plantean?Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Cine Millonario - El Podcast. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/712864

Hey Now! Hey Now!
Notting Hill

Hey Now! Hey Now!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:27


Whoopsiedaisies. Today we're discussing the surreal but nice Richard Curtis and Julia Robert's classic - Notting Hill. We love everything about this Romantic Comedy - Hugh Grant in his floppy days, Prescription Scuba Goggles, and serotonin inducing goats that play violins. The only negative is we just wish they considered having more horses in it. And hounds.Pro tip: Best listened to with some cold water or a glass of orange juice (if you haven't already spilt it on yourself!)Ready to get Quizzie McGuire? Don't miss your chance to attend our 90's and 00's movie trivia night on September 28th! Tickets available now! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hey-now-hey-now-nostalgic-movie-trivia-night-tickets-413686566657Find us on Instagram! @heynowheynow, @sandfordemily, @barneyleigh93We are delighted to announce that our nostalgic greetings card collaboration is back with a brand new collection! You can browse the full range, in collaboration with Zoe Spry here: https://www.zoespry.com Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

BDSIR NETWORKS
BDSIR NETWORK Presents: RePPiN4U: THE NOTTING HILL AFTERMATH!

BDSIR NETWORKS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 120:00


1. DJ MISS C BROWN – RePPiN4U Intro 2. BAKNAFFEK – Opening 3. CORMEGA – Essential 4. ARMANI CAESAR F/ BENNY THE BUTCHER/STOVE GOD COOKS HILL - Hunnit Dolla Hiccup 5. 2WO OFFISHALL/GRE8GAWD/CAPPADONNA - Mona Lisa 6. SUPREME CEREBRAL & YOGA FLAME KANE F/ DJ TMB – Pardon Me 7. DANGERMOUSE & BLACK THOUGHT F/ MF DOOM – Belize 8. RUCIANO- Era 9. POSITIVE K – Nobody 10. DJ LORD JAZZ F/ YOUNG ZEE/PACEWON - They Don't Want Money 11. THE GAME F/ A$AP ROCKY – Money, Cash, Clothes 12. DA U.A. - Gawd Body Flow 13. BLIND REVERENDO/BUNNA INTERVIEW 14. BLIND REVERENDO – My Darling 15. AFRICA UNITE F/ DAVID HINDS – Non e Fortuna 16. DJ KHALED F/ SKILLIBENG/BUJU BANTON/CAPLETON/BOUNTY KILLER/SIZZLA - These Streets Know My Name 17. G.B. (GOD BLESS) - Deadly 18. CAPPADONNA – Wize Men 19. DIAMOND D & POSDNUOS – Flying High 20. CHOWTIME PSYCH – Top Boy 21. KOOL G RAP F/ BIG DADDY KANE – Fly Til I Die 22. TERMANOLOGY – Spit That Pain 23. RAPPER BIG POOH F/ BLAKK SOUL – Broken Dreams 24. BILLY DANZE – Purge 25. THE GAME – Father's Prayer

Latin American Spanish
News In Slow Spanish Latino #482 - Learn Spanish through current events

Latin American Spanish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 7:37 Very Popular


Comenzaremos la primera parte del programa hablando de los miles de migrantes que han llegado a la ciudad de Nueva York desde Texas en busca de asilo; y de las más recientes revelaciones en la investigación de los 43 estudiantes desaparecidos en México en 2014. Hablaremos también de la curiosa forma que los mosquitos tienen de detectar a los humanos; y para finalizar, del regreso del carnaval caribeño de Notting Hill a Londres después de una brecha de 3 años.   Para nuestra sección Trending in Latin America les tenemos dos conversaciones muy informativas. Primero, hablaremos del interesante debate detrás del nombre del Día del Niño. Cerraremos la emisión hablando de las obras del pintor Pérez Alcalá recuperadas por Bolivia. - El estado de Texas envía miles de migrantes a la ciudad de Nueva York - Nuevas revelaciones en investigación por los estudiantes desaparecidos en Iguala - La razón por la cual los mosquitos son tan buenos detectando humanos - El carnaval caribeño regresa a Londres - ¿Debería el Día del Niño cambiar de nombre? - Bolivia recupera obras invaluables del artista Pérez Alcalá

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

John Illsley is the bass guitarist of the band Dire Straits. He has received multiple BRIT and Grammy Awards, and a Heritage Award. As one of the founding band members, with guitarist brothers Mark and David Knopfler, and drummer Pick Withers, Illsley played a role in the development of Dire Straits' sound. By the time the group disbanded in 1995 changes in personnel meant that Illsley and lead singer Mark Knopfler were the only two original band members remaining. Illsley was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Dire Straits in 2018. In this episode, John speaks with Jack about his thoughts on The Beatles, their influence on him and Dire Straits, Paul McCartney's bass playing, whether or not there will be a biopic about Dire Straits, and his favorite Dire Straits record. Check out John's recent solo album, VIII: https://open.spotify.com/album/4VVX7O3Jc8yJ0wJih8jTXf?si=qlKyeTrARSaN2RoXTbB0Hw You can also buy John's book, "My Life in Dire Straits", here: https://www.amazon.com/My-Life-Dire-Straits-Biggest-ebook/dp/B08WBXZCQ1 If you like this episode, be sure to follow this podcast! Follow us also on Twitter and Instagram. Or click here for more information: Linktr.ee/BeatlesEarth ------------------------------- The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed "Beatlemania", the band acquired the nickname "the Fab Four", with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band's entourage sometimes given the informal title of "fifth Beatle". By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars and had achieved unprecedented levels of critical and commercial success. They became a leading force in Britain's cultural resurgence, ushering in the British Invasion of the United States pop market, and soon made their film debut with A Hard Day's Night (1964). A growing desire to refine their studio efforts, coupled with the untenable nature of their concert tours, led to the band's retirement from live performances in 1966. At this time, they produced records of greater sophistication, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as "the White Album", 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). Heralding the album era, their success elevated the album to the dominant form of record consumption over singles; they also inspired a greater public interest in psychedelic drugs and Eastern spirituality, and furthered advancements in electronic music, album art and music videos. In 1968, they founded Apple Corps, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band's legacy. After the group's break-up in 1970, all principal members enjoyed success as solo artists and some partial reunions have occurred. Lennon was murdered in 1980 and Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active. The Beatles are the best-selling music act of all time, with estimated sales of 600 million units worldwide.[4][5] They hold the record for most number-one albums on the UK Albums Chart (15), most number-one hits on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart (20), and most singles sold in the UK (21.9 million). The band received many accolades, including seven Grammy Awards, four Brit Awards, an Academy Award (for Best Original Song Score for the 1970 documentary film Let It Be) and fifteen Ivor Novello Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, and each principal member was inducted individually between 1994 and 2015. In 2004 and 2011, the group topped Rolling Stone's lists of the greatest artists in history. Time magazine named them among the 20th century's 100 most important people. Dire Straits were a British rock band formed in London in 1977 by Mark Knopfler (lead vocals and lead guitar), David Knopfler (rhythm guitar and backing vocals), John Illsley (bass guitar and backing vocals) and Pick Withers (drums and percussion). They were active from 1977 to 1988 and again from 1990 to 1995. Their first single, "Sultans of Swing", from their 1978 self-titled debut album, reached the top ten in the UK and US charts. It was followed by hit singles including "Romeo and Juliet" (1981), "Private Investigations" (1982), "Twisting by the Pool" (1983), "Money for Nothing" (1985), and "Walk of Life" (1985). Their most commercially successful album, Brothers in Arms (1985), has sold more than 30 million copies; it was the first album to sell a million copies on compact disc[4][5] and is the eighth-bestselling album in UK history. According to the Guinness Book of British Hit Albums, Dire Straits have spent over 1,100 weeks on the UK albums chart, the fifth most of all time. Dire Straits' sound draws from various influences, including country, folk, the blues rock of J. J. Cale, and jazz.[7] Their stripped-down sound contrasted with punk rock and demonstrated a roots rock influence that emerged from pub rock. There were several changes in personnel, with Mark Knopfler and Illsley being the only members who lasted from the beginning of the band's existence to the end. After their first breakup in 1988, Knopfler told Rolling Stone: "A lot of press reports were saying we were the biggest band in the world. There's not an accent then on the music, there's an accent on popularity. I needed a rest." They disbanded for good in 1995, after which Knopfler launched a solo career full-time. He has since declined numerous reunion offers. Dire Straits were called "the biggest British rock band of the 80s" by Classic Rock magazine; their 1985–1986 world tour, which included a performance at Live Aid in July 1985, set a record in Australasia. Their final world tour from 1991 to 1992 sold 7.1 million tickets. Dire Straits won four Grammy Awards, three Brit Awards (Best British Group twice), two MTV Video Music Awards, and various other awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2018. Dire Straits have sold over 120 million units worldwide, including 51.4 million certified units, making them one of the best-selling music artists. Brothers Mark and David Knopfler, from Newcastle in northeast England, and friends John Illsley and Pick Withers, from Leicester in the east midlands, formed Dire Straits in London in 1977. Withers was already a 10-year music business veteran, having been a session drummer for Dave Edmunds, Gerry Rafferty, Magna Carta and others through the 1970s; he was part of the group Spring, which recorded an album for RCA in 1971. At the time of the band's formation, Mark was working as an English teacher, Illsley was studying at Goldsmiths' College, and David was a social worker. Mark and Withers had both been part of the pub rock group Brewers Droop at different points in and around 1973. The band was initially known as the Café Racers. The name Dire Straits was coined by a musician flatmate of Withers, allegedly thought up while they were rehearsing in the kitchen of a friend, Simon Cowe, of Lindisfarne. In 1977, the group recorded a five-song demo tape which included their future hit single, "Sultans of Swing", as well as "Water of Love" and "Down to the Waterline".[18][19] After a performance at the Rock Garden in 1977, they took a demo tape to MCA in Soho but were turned down. They then went to DJ Charlie Gillett, presenter of Honky Tonk on BBC Radio London.[20] The band simply wanted advice, but Gillett liked the music so much that he played "Sultans of Swing" on his show. Two months later, Dire Straits signed a recording contract with the Vertigo division of Phonogram Inc. In October 1977, the band recorded demo tapes of "Southbound Again", "In the Gallery" and "Six Blade Knife" for BBC Radio London; in November, demo tapes were made of "Setting Me Up", "Eastbound Train" and "Real Girl". The original Dire Straits line-up in Hamburg, Germany (1978); L to R: John Illsley, Mark Knopfler, Pick Withers and David Knopfler The group's first album, Dire Straits, was recorded at Basing Street studios in Notting Hill, London in February 1978, at a cost of £12,500. Produced by Muff Winwood, it was first released in the United Kingdom on Vertigo Records, then a division of Phonogram Inc. It came to the attention of A&R representative Karin Berg, working at Warner Bros. Records in New York City. She felt that it was the kind of music audiences were hungry for, but only one person in her department agreed at first. Many of the songs on the album reflected Mark Knopfler's experiences in Newcastle, Leeds and London. "Down to the Waterline" recalled images of life in Newcastle; "In the Gallery" is a tribute to Leeds sculptor/artist Harry Phillips (father of Steve Phillips); "Wild West End" and "Lions" were drawn from Knopfler's early days in the capital. That year, Dire Straits began a tour as opening band for Talking Heads, after the re-released "Sultans of Swing" finally started to climb the UK charts. This led to a United States recording contract with Warner Bros. Records; before the end of 1978, Dire Straits had released their self-titled debut worldwide. They received more attention in the US, but also arrived at the top of the charts in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Dire Straits eventually went top 10 in every European country. The following year, Dire Straits embarked on their first North American tour. They played 51 sold-out concerts over a 38-day period. "Sultans of Swing" scaled the charts to No. 4 in the United States and No. 8 in the United Kingdom.[24][26] The song was one of Dire Straits' biggest hits and became a fixture in the band's live performances. Bob Dylan, who had seen the band play in Los Angeles, was so impressed that he invited Mark Knopfler and drummer Pick Withers to play on his next album, Slow Train Coming. Recording sessions for the group's second album, Communiqué, took place in December 1978 at Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas. Released in June 1979, Communiqué was produced by Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett and went to No. 1 on the German album charts, with the debut album Dire Straits simultaneously at No. 3. In the United Kingdom, the album peaked at No. 5 in the album charts. Featuring the single "Lady Writer", the second album continued in a similar vein to the first and displayed the expanding scope of Knopfler's lyricism on the opening track, "Once Upon a Time in the West".[28] In the coming year, however, this approach began to change, along with the group's line-up.

The Independent Republic of Mike Graham

Leader of the Social Democratic Party William Clouston kicks off today's show to discuss the ongoing cost of living and energy crisis, and what the next PM needs to do in order to improve the state of the nation. Dr Laurence Gerlis joins shortly after to discuss how a new app is being created in order to minimise NHS waiting times - is this a waste of money when compared to the track and trace app? Former Detective Chief Inspector and author of a new report for the Policy Exchange David SPencer joins The Independent Republic for the first time to discuss Priti Patel's new demands for police to start getting back to basics and avoid the woke agenda. After a weekend of crime at Notting Hill carnival where 209 arrests were made, former Chief Exec of The Notting Hill carnival and criminal barrister Dr Claire Holder joins Mike to discuss what needs to be done in order to turn the now unmanageable carnival back into an orderly celebration, and Paris correspondent at the Times Adam Sage closes the show to discuss the 25th anniversary of Princess Diana's death, Adam recalls being one of the first reporters to respond to the scene. All that and so much more, so tune in! Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Métissages - Couleur3
Le mix de Ruben Estevez (Spécial Notting Hill 2022)

Métissages - Couleur3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 116:52


The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #470

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 91:14


Callum and Harry discuss the Notting Hill circus, Nigeria going 100% diverse, and Sunak's tell all Spectator lockdown interview.

Métissages - Couleur3
Le mix de Fred Studer (Spécial Notting Hill 2022)

Métissages - Couleur3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 117:00


Métissages - Couleur3
Le mix de Joh Erba (Spécial Notting Hill 2022)

Métissages - Couleur3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 116:55


A long way from the block
My follow up conversation with London based Fashion Designer and Artist Kervin Marc.

A long way from the block

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 61:04


From Lords cricket ground to central saint martins art college to Spitalfields market and now to the world.With sustainability and upcycling being the buzzwords of the moment, Kervin Marc Designer of Tag 3 Militaire, artist and upcycling extraordinaire for years have reworked military materials. Using kit bags, tents and all manner of discarded ex-military findings. Marc has on display the history of his designs and arts.After a very successful interview in 2021 he agreed to come back on for a part 2.In this episode we continue the discussion  on what motivates him to bring high quality fashion to the world.  With his own store front in the Notting Hill neighborhood of London he has created a great place for conversation and community. https://kervinmarc.com

Confessions of a Closet Romantic
Adapting Austen: Netflix's Persuasion with Romancing the Story

Confessions of a Closet Romantic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 30:16


Apparently I'm one of the few people on the globe who enjoyed Netflix's Persuasion with Dakota Johnson :) I take a deep dive into this adaptation with Sarah Gamez, romance writer, filmmaker and host of Romancing the Story podcast. We chew over what the filmmakers got right and perhaps got wrong in this version. And I confess that pretty much any Jane Austen adaptation is a good adaptation for me as long as it's billed the right way.https://www.confessionsofaclosetromantic.comSarah Gamez hosts the wonderful Romancing the Story: Writing Romance, Storytelling, and Business of Books podcast featuring interviews with authors and entrepreneurs discussing "storytelling structure, self-publishing must-haves, and developing narratives, while exploring different genres and medias as well as romance. After all, every story is a love story." Sarah is a marvelous interviewer and her wide-ranging discussions are fascinating.Tony-nominated British theater director Carrie Cracknell directed this version of Persuasion, and co-writer Ron Bass,  also wrote My Best Friend's Wedding and Entrapment as well as Rain Man. Both clearly know how to stage a witty, romantic, emotional story with real stakes. Netflix's Persuasion is a Work of Sneaky Genius. "For years, we Brits have peddled a superficial, Richard Curtis-esque version of ourselves in movie theaters across the pond in films like the Bridget Jones franchise, Love Actually, Notting Hill, and Four Weddings and a Funeral...The conceit was so effective that, really, it was only a matter of time before the Americans turned the game on its head and started serving Britishness back to us."BookDownload a free Persuasion e-book at Project GutenbergMovies/TV ShowsThe one and only Bridget Jones' DiaryAnd the one and only Phoebe Waller-Bridge, writer and star of FleabagAnd there is nothing like S1 of BridgertonOr the 1995 version of PersuasionOr the 2005 Pride and Prejudice!My, how I love me a Jane Austen adaptation. And now, only if you're brave: Netflix's PersuasionSupport the show

The Big Travel Podcast
142. On location in Ibiza – Hotelier Marc Rahola; From Telephone Operator to Founder, Ibiza's Contrasts, London's Notting Hill & What Makes a Hotel Entrepreneur

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 36:05


Ibizan hotelier Marc Rahola went from hotel telephone exchange boy to founder of a chain of boutique hotels and properties by, in his own words, making a series of happy accidents and mistakes. Od Hotels now have many properties all over Europe including the beautiful Ocean Drive Talamanca where Lisa and Marc have coffee and explore… how a Paris Hotel CD inspired Marc's boutique hotel concept, expanding to the Cote D'Azure, Madrid, Barcelona, Sevilla, London and more, feeling at home in London's Notting Hill, gigging with his band, Freddie Mercury and George Michael's Ibiza, ALL the DJs, recommendations for hidden Ibiza and how Darwinian adaption and remaining curious can be the making of a game-changing business.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Just Keep Swimming -- Positive Mental Attitude

Season of Sharing: Adrian Share Some of His Favorite Books The Napoleon of Notting Hill: by G. K. Chesteron The Alchemist: by Paulo CoethoIntentional Living: by John C. MaxwellBoundaries: by John Townsend Learn More about The Immortal Craft Back-to-School Special on IG!!!https://instagram.com/immortalcraftbarberloungeProduced By NXiii!!!HEAVENLY CONNECTION Available Now!!!!https://lnk.bio/orgnxiii13

The A24 Project
145 - Elizabeth: A Portrait in Part(s)

The A24 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 20:36


Dallas and Lee review Roger Michell's final film which is a documentary on the life of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-lived, longest reigning British monarch and longest serving female head of state in history.

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
145 - Elizabeth: A Portrait in Part(s)

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 20:36


Dallas and Lee review Roger Michell's final film which is a documentary on the life of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-lived, longest reigning British monarch and longest serving female head of state in history.

A Tight 45 with Tabari McCoy
A Tight 45 with Tabari McCoy - Episode 076 – Hatty Preston

A Tight 45 with Tabari McCoy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 50:03


Don't let her pretty face – or cockney accent – fool you: Hatty Preston may be only 4 years into her stand-up comedy career, but she's a captivating, funny presence when she is on stage. And that makes her a perfect guest for the next episode of A Tight 45 with Tabari McCoy!A London-born, Chicago-built comedian, Preston is a regular at comedy clubs across her native city and adopted comedy hometown. The 2018 winner of ‘Breakin Thru' stand up competition, she also runs the popular regularly-sold-out ‘The Big Fizz' show at Notting Hill's Little Yellow Door when back across the pond in London. Whilst in Chicago she is a regular at all major comedy venues: Laugh Factory, Zanies, Comedy Bar and Second City. At The Laugh Factory she was a semi-finalist in their ‘Verified Laughs' competition and is a regular on their Saturday Night 'Chicago's Best Stand-Up' show. She has opened for major US comics such as Theo Von  and has performed at the prestigious New York Comedy Club and The Stand as well as The Creek and The Cave, Go Bananas (where she and Tabari first met) and The Virgil in Los Angeles. She also has performed at several  festivals across the US in Cleveland, Iowa City, Madison and Milwaukee in Wisconsin and Raleigh, North Carolina.As an actress, Hatty is best known for playing Princess Maribel in the E! Entertainment Network 's first scripted drama "The Royals" and for originating the role of Minty in Jennifer Saunders's ‘Viva Forever!' in London's West End.On this episode (out on all major platforms on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022), Hatty chats with Tabari about why she got out of acting, how she got into stand-up comedy, the oft-maligned subject of women in comedy, America vs. the UK and accents a'plenty!Check out this episode and others you may have missed at https://atight45.buzzsprout.com/or wherever you get your podcasts today! For more on Tabari or ask a question, be sure to visit www.tabarimccoy.com or email tabari@tabarimccoy.com.

Shat the Movies: 80's & 90's Best Film Review
Notting Hill (1999)

Shat the Movies: 80's & 90's Best Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 67:07 Very Popular


Ash and Gene ditch the third wheel this week for a romantic stroll along the River Thames and up to "Notting Hill," where they sing along to '90s English ballads, discuss meeting celebrities, and rediscover the magic of Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts.  Shat The Movies commissioner Will commissioned this episode for his British wife, and we sincerely apologize for ruining it by nitpicking why a bookstore owner would carry bad books, why the hair and makeup crew had to go so hard, why people don't appreciate being able to see boobs whenever they want, and why Alec Baldwin was even in this movie. SUBSCRIBE Android: https://shatpod.com/android Apple: https://shatpod.com/apple All: https://shatpod.com/subscribe CONTACT Email: hosts@shatpod.com Website: https://shatpod.com/movies Leave a Voicemail: Web: https://shatpod.com/voicemail Leave a Voicemail: Call: (914) 719-7428 SUPPORT THE PODCAST Donate or Commission: https://shatpod.com/support Shop Merchandise: https://shatpod.com/shop Theme Song - Die Hard by Guyz Nite: https://www.facebook.com/guyznite