Podcasts about Troubadour

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Composer and performer of lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages

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  • May 24, 2022LATEST
Troubadour

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Best podcasts about Troubadour

Latest podcast episodes about Troubadour

Rarified Heir Podcast
Rarified Heir Podcast #78 : Dave Jenkins & Jordan Summers (Paul Jenkins & Yale Summers)

Rarified Heir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 88:52


Today on the Rarified Heir Podcast, we are trying something new. That's right, not one but two guests. Yes, we've had more than one guest on at a time but so far that's been siblings only. Today, we have two previous guests on the podcast talking about the genesis of what drove them to become musicians yet both come from a familial acting background. Our returning champions are Jordan Summers, son of Yale Summers and Dave Jenkins, son of actor Paul Jenkins. Both grew up with parents who did a ton of television. Yale Summers starred in the hit series Daktari & had guest starring roles on The Outer Limits, McMillan and Wife and General Hospital among many others. Paul Jenkins was on The Waltons, Dynastyand Night Gallery and perhaps 200 more. So we posed the question: why did they choose music and not acting? The answer was fairly surprising. It was filmmaking and technology that led them from making Super-8 movies which led them to music. We hear great stories about how a high school band can go from three years of rehearsing to playing their first gig at the world Famous Troubadour with a homemade demo cassette handed out directly to the venue as their calling card. We hear about how Jordan Zevon's grandmother would try and cut the bands cables after rehearsal to ‘cut down that racket.” We hear about the time Herbie Hancock showed up at an early gig. And then there was the time TV theme song guru Mike Post managed their band. What, that never happened to you? We also hear about jam sessions at The Kibbitz Room with Rick James and Chrissie Hynde, of an all-star high school jazz band with Brian McKnight, superstar producer/musician Greg Kurstin and members of Buckcherry, The Wallflowers and more and long gone LA music venues like: FM Station, 14 Below, Luna Park, The Alligator Lounge and The Central. We're keeping time on this episode of the Rarified Heir Podcast. Everyone has a story. Take a listen.

KATS After Dark
Welcome Back Shapel

KATS After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 87:58


The gang is back in studio to talk about the Shapel, Chin and Lil Brow's show at the Troubadour, admonish Nick for not going, listen to some classic jams and play animal and hip hop versions of Sporcle. Check out George Harris's vlog! https://www.youtube.com/c/GOGEORGEGO Support our sponsor! https://MagicMind.co/darkUse promo code DARK for 20% off. Email your Magic Mind receipt to KATSAfterDark@gmail.com and we'll zoom you into the show to hear how Magic Mind has changed your life! More from the team: Shapel Lacey Shapel's World: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0JQcEd46e4&ab_channel=ThicccBoy Cattien Le Chin Suyi https://www.youtube.com/c/ChinSuYi Nick Davis Check out his other podcast, Another Podcast Show: https://www.youtube.com/c/AnotherPodcastNetwork

The Fighter & The Kid

The guys talk Chin, Lil Brows, Shapel and Mark's concert at The Troubadour, Bryan's fascination with Mark's body, Brendan's fashion advice to Bryan for his upcoming special recording at the Brea Improv this Thursday, Amber Heard on trial, relationship arguments, the fallout of Will Ferrell and Adam McKay, Neil Patrick Harris' Amy Winehouse controversy and much more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Back to the 80s Radio
Talking music with SteelHeart and More

Back to the 80s Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 56:25


We are heading down the home stretch with special interviews before the big night at the Troubadour in West Hollywood on May 19th. Special guests: Gina the Party Diva, Steel Heart, and Erik Himil from the 27 Show. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/backtothe80s/support

THE TROUBADOUR PODCAST - The Premier Red Dirt, Texas Country and Independent Music Podcast

Legendary Country Music icon Jerry Reed was a monster guitar player.  Some folks probably aren't aware that Jerry Reed, the guy that played the part of “The Snowman” in the 1977 Hollywood movie “Smoky and The Bandit” alongside Burt Reynolds, was not only a great singer and songwriter, he was also simply an uncanny animal with a guitar in his hands.  Let's just say, guitar players in the know, understand and realize just how good Jerry was. So, in 1997 when Jerry was needing to hire a new guitar player for his band, one can only imagine just how high the level of guitar-playing talent must have been for those auditioning for the job. On today's episode of The Troubadour, we're interviewing the guitar player Jerry Reed picked for that position and who played with him until Jerry's passing in 2008. His name is Mark Thornton and he's a multi-talented guitar player, engineer and producer based in Nashville. Mark's Nashville recording studio, Sidekick Sound, was founded in 1994 and since that time it's been graced by great artists like Marty Stuart, Chris Scruggs, the aforementioned Jerry Reed and others. Today, when Mark's not busy recording in his studio he can be found playing around Nashville with his band, “The Sidekicks”.  Or, you may find him driving his 1937 Ford stakebed truck, aka “The Nashville Show Truck”, to a nearby event where the truck operates as a vintage mobile stage for artists to perform on. You can learn more about Mark, his studio Sidekick Sound, and The Nashville Show Truck by visiting www.themarkthornton.com or by clicking on the show notes for this episode at www.thetroubadourpodcast.com . So here comes our visit with the multi-talented musician, engineer and producer, Mark Thornton. NASHVILLE SHOW TRUCK CONTACT MARK BY EMAILING HIM AT:  sidekicksound@yahoo.com How YOU can support the podcast! If you would like to support the podcast AND ALSO earn some free swag in the process  CLICK HERE to sign up as a Gold, Silver or Bronze supporter! You can listen to our wonderful podcast by clicking on any of the following links: The Troubadour Podcast Website, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean

Back to the 80s Radio
The Troubadour and The 27 Show

Back to the 80s Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:35


We have a full house of special guests on the show today. Don't miss out as we talk to Gina DeFranco, the executive producer at BWAROC.org, who turns concerts and events into stunning spectacles. We also talk with Erik Himil, musical director and guitarist of the 27 Show, Adi Argelazi who portrays Janis Joplin on stage, and Gabe Maska, who turns into Kurt Cobain. Thursday, May 19, 2022, " 27 The Show - Musical Adventure" will open at Doug Weston's Troubadour in West Hollywood, California. The "totally awesome" show with legends of rock portrayed: Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Robert Johnson, Amy Winehouse, and Kurt Cobain rock California again! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/backtothe80s/support

Earthdawn Survival Guide
EDSG Episode 120 - High Circle Troubadour

Earthdawn Survival Guide

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 33:57


* High Circle Troubadour * Review of Troubadour themes and concepts. * Ninth Circle Discipline Ability: Unnatural Charm. * Warden Tier abilities and Discipline talents. * Warden Tier talent options * Thirteenth Circle Discipline Ability: Encore * Master Tier abilities and Discipline talents. * Master Tier talent options. * Build options and commentary for high circle Troubadours. Email: edsgpodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @EDSGPodcast Josh on Twitter: @LoreMerchant Dan on Twitter: @boice_voice Get product information, developer blogs, and more at www.fasagames.com FASA Games on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fasagamesinc FASA Games Discord Channel: https://discord.gg/uuVwS9u Earthdawn Guild Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/earthdawnguild Earthdawn West Marches: https://discord.gg/hhHDtXW

Prine Time
Darden Smith - Texas Troubadour (Season 3, Episode 2)

Prine Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 28:17


DARDEN SMITH Open and empty. That's how Darden Smith describes the west Texas landscape that inspired his wildly creative new multi-media project, Western Skies. Comprising a new studio record, a book of photography, lyrics, and essays, and an accompanying album of readings set to music, the collection is an immersive journey through a world both real and imagined, a place of mystery and mythology, possibility and longing. Like his photographs, Smith's writing is steeped in isolation, though rarely lonely; timeless, yet acutely aware of the hours and minutes whizzing by like mileposts on the highway. The songs on Western Skies are spare and deliberate, often marked by a distinct sense of motion and transience, and the performances are similarly raw and intimate, reflecting the desolate beauty of the region that so captured Smith's imagination as he crisscrossed it time and again throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.Over the course of his remarkable three-and-a-half decade career, Smith has released 15 critically lauded studio albums, landed singles on both the country and pop charts (including the Top 10 hit “Loving Arms”), penned a symphony, scored works for theater and dance, published a widely celebrated book on creativity, exhibited works of visual art, and co-founded the non-profit SongwritingWith:Soldiers program, which pairs veterans with musicians in order to tap into the transformational possibilities of collaborative songwriting. (During the pandemic, the Austin-based artist also helped launch Frontline Songs, which connected musicians and healthcare workers to support them in telling their stories and healing their trauma.) The Daily News hailed Smith as “one of the most respected American musicians working today,” while the Austin Chronicle dubbed him a “master song craftsman,” and AllMusic called him “a singer-songwriter blessed with an uncommon degree of intelligence, depth, and compassion.”

Games From Folktales
382 - The troubadour

Games From Folktales

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 10:43


LagunaPalooza: Fantasy Concert
Hall & Oates "Live At The Troubadour"

LagunaPalooza: Fantasy Concert

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 60:25


Includes One On One, Sara Smile, When The Morning Comes, Maneater, Out of Touch, I Can't Go For That, Rick Girl, Kiss On My List, She's Gone, You Make My Dreams and Private Eyes.

The Pellicle Podcast
Ep31 — Chris Schooley of Troubadour Maltings in Fort Collins, Colorado

The Pellicle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 76:07


I first met Chris Schooley, and his business partner Steve Clark, back in 2015—not long after they had established their business, Troubadour Maltings, in the city of Fort Collins, Colorado. I had visited malthouses in the UK before, and looked on in awe at their immense scale, but what I found at Troubadour was something different entirely, not just in terms of their smaller scale, but in terms of the quality and flavour of what they were producing. Initially working out of a concrete saladin box that allowed them to produce up to five tons of malt at a time, what I discovered at this little malthouse was familiarity; I saw craft beer in what they were producing. Over time, and repeated visits to the malthouse, I got to know Steve and Chris well, and they became good friends. I would love listening to Chris in particular wax lyrical about the “potential” of barley malt, so much in fact that I credit him in my book, Modern British Beer, for helping me to properly connect beer back to its agriculture. Troubadour has gradually grown into a well-regarded “craft maltster”—as they are known in the US—one of about 70 nationwide. And things didn't slow down for them in lockdown, when they installed equipment that allowed them to triple capacity, as well as a new roaster that allows them to customise darker malts to brewers exacting specifications. Over their relatively short lifespan they've provided malt for large breweries like Odell, Oskar Blues, and New Belgium, as well as smaller breweries including TRVE, Cohesion, and Primitive. Honestly, you'll have to take it from me that you can really taste the difference in Troubadour's malt, and the beer it produces. Where often you'll hear this ingredient forms the “backbone” of beer, for me it's about more than that. It's about flavour, and freshness. If you ever find yourself in Northern Colorado seek out a glass of TRVE's Cold keller pils and taste it for yourself. Beers like this, and how maltsters like Troubadour are working closely not just with brewers, but with farmers—closing the loop on the agricultural supply chain—make me excited for what could be ahead in beer's future. This episode of The Pellicle Podcast is sponsored by Hand & Heart. We've partnered with them to offer listeners of The Pellicle Podcast a free 30-minute advice session. You could be a business owner wondering what the hell DEI means, an employee wanting to upskill, thinking about starting a business, or at a loss of how to develop your current business. To sign up head to www.handandheart.eu/pelliclePellicle is supporter by our Patreon subscribers — please consider helping to keep our independent magazine and podcast sustainable with a monthly, or yearly donation.

Doc G
The Doc G Show April 13th 2022 (Featuring Deathcruiser aka Adam Roth)

Doc G

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 126:59


The Doc invites returning guest Adam Roth on the show! The two talk about his air B&B project, his shows with Grizfolk, playing the Troubadour, releasing new music as Deathcruiser, writing new music, and his new single Life Number Two! Listen now! Monologue (Paul Rudd's Rejection Letter): 0:00:21 Birthday Suit 1: 15:05 Ripped from the Headlines: 19:47 Shoutouts: 40:25 Previously on The Doc G Show: 42:10 Leftover Headlines: 45:05 Adam Roth (Deathcruiser) Interview: 53:08 Deathcruiser - Life Number Two: 1:44:28 Birthday Suit 2: 1:55:25 Birthday Suit 3: 1:59:56

Renaissance Festival Podcast

VISIT OUR SPONSORS: Louisiana Renaissance Festival https://www.larf.net/ The Ren Cruise https://www.therencruise.com/  SONGS Pea Soup Fog performed by Axel the Sot and Gibbon the Troubadour from the album Keelhauler Up Into the Pear Tree performed by Heather Dale from the album The Road to Santiago https://heatherdale.com Skillywidden performed by Cantiga from the album A Timeless Journey http://www.cantigamusic.com/ Eight & Forty Faeries - Eight & Forty Sisters performed by Darcy Nair from the album I Feel My Heart Fly Rosin the Beau performed by Iron Hill Vagabonds from the album Whiskey & Promises http://www.ironhillvagabonds.com/ My Lute, Awake(2018) performed by The Lost Boys from the album Paul's Walk https://www.facebook.com/TheLostBoys1599/ Rambles Of Spring performed by Celtic Shores from the album Let's Raise Another Pint www.matthughesmusic.com Medieval Medley performed by Saxon Moon from the album Awakening https://www.facebook.com/saxonmoonmusic/ Tarantella Napoletana performed by Vince Conaway from the album Dell'Italia http://vinceconaway.com/ La Rotta performed by Vince Conaway from the album Dell'Italia http://vinceconaway.com/ Sugar And Flame performed by Gallows Humor from the album Necrodancer http://gallowshumorband.com/ Paddy West performed by Jack Salt and the Captain's Daughter from the album Bring Us a Barrel https://jacksalt.bandcamp.com Banderivna performed by Ky Hote from the album Ukrainian Melodies http://www.kyhote.com Parting Glass performed by Embra from the album Three Part One Heart https://www.facebook.com/EmbraKC/ SEGMENTS Festival update brought to you by The Ren List http://www.therenlist.com HOW TO CONTACT US Post it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/renfestmusic Email us at renfestpodcast@gmail.com HOW TO LISTEN Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/renaissance-festival-podcast/id74073024 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/76uzuG0lRulhdjDCeufK15?si=obnUk_sUQnyzvvs3E_MV1g Pandora http://www.pandora.com/ Podbay http://www.podbay.fm/show/74073024 Listennotes http://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/renaissance-festival-podcast-minions-1Xd3YjQ7fWx/

Luke Has a Podcast
Let Me Tell You 'Bout My Best Friend ft. Billy Sheehan

Luke Has a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 50:20


Billy and Luke have been best friends since 2009. They have seen hundreds of concerts and watched thousands of hours of Professional Wrestling. Listen to the two best friends chat about their music taste and why they started watching Wrestling in the first place!(This episode was recorded before Taylor Hawkins tragic passing. We are both severely crushed to hear this. Our hearts and love go out to his family and all the lives he touched)Tours:Joy Oladokun - 4/11 the Troubadour & 4/13 Great American Music Hall in SFGinger Root - 4/12 @ LA PalladiumEmily Wolfe - 4/22 The Lodge in Highland ParkThe Aces - 6/4 @ WeHo Pride & 8/21 @ YouTube Theater LA----------------------------Hosted by Luke Schoepf.Theme Music by Ed Russek.Additional tunes from Jonny Lemons Follow the show on Social Media: @lukehaspodcastEmail: lukehasapodcast@gmail.comListen to all the new music I mentioned in mySpotify New Releases Playlist

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"CAPTAIN BILLY’S MAGIC 8 BALL" - J.J. CALE- "A LIGHT TOUCH" FEATURING THE ALBUM "TROUBADOUR" BY J.J. CALE IN HIGH DEFINITION WITH NARRATIVE - EPISODE # 52 - THE CAPTAIN EXPLORES HIS COVE OF 8 TR

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Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 39:25


"CAPTAIN BILLY’S MAGIC 8 BALL" - J.J. CALE- "A LIGHT TOUCH" FEATURING THE ALBUM "TROUBADOUR" BY J.J. CALE IN HIGH DEFINITION WITH NARRATIVE - EPISODE # 52 - THE CAPTAIN EXPLORES HIS COVE OF 8 TRACK TREASURES JUST FOR YOU!!

Erie Music History Podcast
020 Jamie Shaw

Erie Music History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 59:45


From Satin Steel to ...The O'Needers? Jamie Shaw is our guest this week, and he talks about playing guitar in the 1980s in popular metal band Satin Steel, which even played a gig at the world-renowned Troubadour in West Hollywood, CA. Jamie played in more than just Satin Steel, though, and he talks about how he even transitioned to playing drums in the The O'Needers for the last 13 years.Thanks again to the JPT Foundation for sponsoring the the Erie Music History podcast. The goal of the foundation is to provide education scholarships to grade school-age children as well as annual giving to local organizations and charities. The foundation also has a large hall that hosts bingo four days a week and is available for rentals.  Many thanks to everyone who has donated or provided financial support for this podcast. If you would like to become a Patreon supporter (it's only $5/month and you can cancel anytime) go to the Erie Music History Podcast page on Patreon.com. For information on what bands/musicians are playing in Erie, PA and the surrounding area, please check out Jack Stevenson's 2 Man Happy Hour podcast and webpage. 

THE TROUBADOUR PODCAST - The Premier Red Dirt, Texas Country and Independent Music Podcast

On today's show we welcome back past guest and our buddy William Clark Green.  Will's new record comes out on March 25th and is titled “Baker Hotel”.  Carly and I were lucky enough to be able to listen to an advance digital copy of the record and it's vintage William Clark Green loaded with great songwriting and some tracks that you simply can't listen to without tapping your toes.  So, make sure you go out and pick up a copy of “Baker Hotel” as soon as it becomes available.  So, let's get rolling with this episode of The Troubadour featuring our good buddy, singer-songwriter, William Clark Green! MAKE SURE AND CHECK OUT THE EPIC VIDEO FOR “BAKER HOTEL” BY CLICKING HERE!  How YOU can support the podcast! If you would like to support the podcast AND ALSO earn some free swag in the process  CLICK HERE to sign up as a Gold, Silver or Bronze supporter! You can listen to our wonderful podcast by clicking on any of the following links: The Troubadour Podcast Website, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch
The Homeless with Cindy Johns, Carriage Town Ministries

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 25:58


Cindy Johns of Carriage Town Ministries discusses homelessness in the Flint area.   Carriage Town Ministries began in 1950 as the Flint Rescue Mission on the banks of the Flint River at Grand Traverse Street. The organization has been helping the poor for 70 years. The community has supported the work of the organization throughout those years. Many faithful Flint area churches and individuals recognize the calling of Matthew 25 to be ministers to the hungry, the thirsty, and the individuals in need of a place to stay.  Carriage Town today is located on a campus of learning and restoration in Flint's historic Carriage Town neighborhood. Visitors and residents find a haven of safety and acceptance, learning and responsibility, structure and productivity…A place to find a new birth, a sense of purpose for today, clothing items, and hope for tomorrow.  We discuss specifically the remarkable progress people in serving the homeless population. Carriage Town Ministries welcomes volunteers, donations of certain clothing items, and monetary donations.   Michigan's Troubadour, Neil Woodward, and songwriter David O. Norris provided the music in this podcast. Neil Woodward performs the song Peach Tree Creek. The song Peach Tree Creek honors Michigan's 10th Infantry Regiment from the Flint area, who fought the civil war battle at Peach Tree Creek. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiofreeflint/message

Vibrant Visionaries
Episode 74 – Anton Barbeau – Psychedelic Troubadour Shares Sonic Postcards & Polaroids

Vibrant Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 42:24


Longtime friend Anton Barbeau shares sweet, and funny stories behind many of his incredibly catchy songs, and globe-spanning creative collaborations. We even discover, during this […] Read More

The Ground Shots Podcast
Ted Packard on bodies as a multiplicity, coyote-trickster troubadour-ing, music as ecological channeling, kids and nature connection, & creating communities of mutuality

The Ground Shots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 201:40


Direct link to episode with extra photos and Ted's poetry: https://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com/podcastblog/tedpackard   Ted studied History and Anthropology at Christopher Newport University, got a Master's in Teaching, went on the road with the Momentary Prophets band, and then went to study with Alderleaf Wilderness College and Wilderness Awareness School. He taught various program for youth around the greater Seattle area for many years before relocating to Durango, Colorado to dry out, as he says. After some years of a break, Ted just started up a new nature connection program for youth in the Durango community. Ted does lots of things, including various handcrafts, refurbishing guitars and other instruments, music-making, writing, wood-burning and more. As college peers, we spent a lot of time together researching things like mushroom cults, the esoteric origins of Judeo-Christian religion, the anthropology of psychedelics, zen koans, and more. We both have lived in different places since and woven in and out of each others' lives so we spent some time really checking in about how we think about things now vs. when we were radical activist driven neo-pagan coyote-trickster troubadour mind-melters.     In this episode with Ted, we talk about: Ted's nature connection mentorship work with youth in Washington and Colorado Ted's upbringing in northwestern Virginia Our experience in college of community: artists, philosophers, musicians, activists, and neo-pagans and our reflections on that time now seasonal ritual as a somatic map ways that Ted's anger at an eco-cidal culture has transformed over the years to a yearning for finding points of connection vs. telling someone they are wrong or how to live what is a community of mutuality in a broken society that emphasizes hyper-individualism? activism can look many ways and can even be in small moments of advocacy awareness of the isolation of capitalism is often crippling the reality that financial security is generally not available to our generation (millennials) Ted's musical projects which include Momentary Prophets from his early 20's, that had a coyote-troubadour element with community driven instigation, as well as his own solo projects paying attention to ‘nature' bringing you closer to crazy synchronicities that become signposts to keep going weaving a web of interrelated ideas and ecologies as a way of being trauma, neutrinos, quantum physics intersecting eastern philosophy, bodies as multiplicity, the mycelium nature of everything, music as ecological channeling   Links: The Emerald Podcast, mentioned on the podcast Daniel Quinn, author we mention on the podcast Mystic Moon of Norfolk, VA, pagan community mentioned Terence McKenna, mentioned on the podcast Mountain Justice: organization dedicated to ending mountain top removal in Appalachia Momentary Prophets on Facebook Momentary Prophets on Bandcamp (Interstitial music featured on the episode) Ted's music on Bandcamp (he is putting out a new album RIGHT NOW, his individual music featured in the intro of this episode) Wilderness Awareness School Living Earth School Sophie Strand Ted's Patreon for his music, art, writing Ted's revived blog of writing (do yourself a favor and read and savor) Ted's Venmo if you'd like to donate to help support his musical projects : @Theodore-Packard Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute monthly to our grassroots self-funding of this project  For one time donations to support this podcast: Paypal : paypal.me/petitfawn VENMO: @kelly-moody-6 Cashapp: cash.app/$groundshotsproject   Our website with an archive of podcast episodes, educational resources, past travelogues and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com  Our Instagram pages: @goldenberries / @groundshotspodcast Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Music: by Ted Packard and Momentary Prophets This episode hosted by: Kelly Moody Produced by: Kelly Moody and Ted Packard

Biblioteca Del Metal
Malice - (Nacidos En Los Senderos Estilísticos De Judas Priest)

Biblioteca Del Metal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 64:14


Colabora Con Biblioteca Del Metal: Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anarkometal72 Y Donanos Unas Propinas En BAT. Para Seguir Con El Proyecto De la Biblioteca Mas Grande Del Metal. Muchisimas Gracias. La Tienda De Biblioteca Del Metal: Encontraras, Ropa, Accesorios,Decoracion, Ect... Todo Relacionado Al Podcats Biblioteca Del Metal Y Al Mundo Del Heavy Metal. Descubrela!!!!!! Ideal Para Llevarte O Regalar Productos Del Podcats De Ivoox. (Por Tiempo Limitado) https://teespring.com/es/stores/biblioteca-del-metal-1 Malice es una banda estadounidense de heavy metal de Los Ángeles, California en la década de 1980. nacidos en los senderos estilísticos de Judas Priest, los cinco ganaron cierta notoriedad en el área de Los Ángeles por sus incendiarias actuaciones en vivo. No solo los sonidos se parecían a los de los sacerdotes, sino también la voz del líder James Neal, un practicante budista, muy similar a la de Rob Halford. Esto los llevará a ser considerados entre los grupos que más se inspiraron en el legendario grupo británico y a ser definidos como su respuesta Americana. Malice se formó en Los Ángeles en 1980 por el bajista Mark Behn de Portland, Oregon. Behn había tocado anteriormente en la banda Fire Eye, pero también en otro grupo local llamado Kharma, donde en ese momento también tocaba el baterista Pete Holmes, entonces conocido por ser un miembro de Black ''N Blue. El guitarrista Mick Zane comenzó su carrera en 1978 en la banda Rude Awekening, liderada por Matt McCourt, este último más tarde miembro de The Wild Dogs. Zane y McCourt, junto con Jeff Horton de Wild Dogs y Pete Holmes de Black ''N Blue, formaron la banda DMZ en 1981. El guitarrista Jay Reynolds fue parte del mismo círculo de músicos, y fue causalmente miembro de las bandas de punk rock fundadas por Matt McCourt, "The Violators" y "The Ravers" en 1979. Fue Reynolds quien agrupará a los músicos que formarán parte de Malice en el futuro. Al regresar a Portland después de una temporada en Hawái, donde había tocado con varias bandas, el guitarrista fundó The Ravers. Cuando la banda se disolvió, Reynolds reunió lo que sería la primera formación de Malice, que consistía en James Neal, Matt McCourt, Deen Castronovo (en ese momento en The Wild Dogs) en la batería, y el entonces de dieciséis años de edad, Kip Doran en la guitarra. La primera aparición de la banda fue en el álbum recopilatorio Metal Massacre vol. 1 lanzado por Metal Blade Records en 1983, en el que participaron con las pistas "Captive of Light" y "Kick you Down" . En esa ocasión, Malice aún no era una banda completa, pero se habían unido solo para grabar algunas canciones. Los cinco decidieron fundar un proyecto completo solo después de las sesiones. Con la introducción del bajista Mark Behn y el baterista Peter Laufmann, el grupo establecido se trasladó a los Ángeles. La popularidad de Malice pronto voló al extranjero, donde el mensual holandés Aardschok dedicó la portada y un artículo a los estadounidenses solo dos meses después de su nacimiento. El primer concierto de la banda fue en noviembre de 1982 en el Troubadour club en Los Ángeles como respaldo a Metallica y Pandemonium. Un cambio de formación vio la introducción del nuevo baterista Cliff Carruthers, procedente de las bandas Snow (banda en la que Carlos Cavazo también tocó en Quiet Riot, y su hermano Tony luego en Hurricane) y Assassin. El quinteto lanzó una demo producida por el conocido Michael Wagener que mostraba el potencial del quinteto. Malice entonces se encontró en medio de una guerra discográfica, que finalmente fue ganada por Atlantic Records. Major firmó un acuerdo con el grupo en julio de 1984. Las demos incluyeron la mitad de las pistas que conformarían el debut, mientras que las pistas restantes fueron producidas por Ashley Howe. El álbum en el principio. fue publicado en 1985. La segunda licencia del álbum To Kill fue producida por Max Norman y lanzada en 1987. Los miembros de Megadeth Dave Mustaine y David Ellefson, así como los miembros de Black ''N Blue Tommy Thayer y Jaime St.James, participaron como invitados especiales. Malice jugó en apoyo de W. A. S. P. en la costa oeste, y junto a Slayer en Europa. A pesar de sus notables actuaciones, en la gira con este último, Malice se encontró mal recibido y cubierto de insultos por los fans de Slayer. En 1988, Malice apareció en una escena de la película vice versa, dos vidas intercambiadas con el juez Reinhold. En 1989 se lanzó el EP Crazy in The Night, en el que Neal no participó, pero fue reemplazado en el estudio por dos vocalistas: Mark Weitz, de diecinueve años, ex miembro de L. A. Rocks y Odin, y Paul Sabu, famoso compositor de bandas conocidas, así como el artista AOR. Weitz más tarde tocó con Americade, Eyes e Impellitteri. Reynolds se unió a Megadeth por un breve período, Pero pronto fue reemplazado por Jeff Young. Zane, Behn y Carothers intentaron apoyar el proyecto Malice, pero sin ningún sello y productores dispuestos a apoyar al grupo se disolvió permanentemente en 1990. En 1995, Zane y Behn regresaron a la escena con la banda de Los Ángeles Monster, lanzando el álbum Through the Eyes of the world en Long Island Records. Monster vio a su viejo compañero de banda de Kharma Pete Holmes en la batería, quien también había disuelto recientemente su Black '' N Blue. El ex guitarrista de malice Jay Reynolds resurgió en 2004 como miembro de Reformed Metal Church. En noviembre de 2006, se anunció que Malice se reuniría con el guitarrista Mick Zane y Jay Reynolds, el bajista Mark Behn, Pete Holmes de black ''N Blue en la batería, y el nuevo vocalista Brian Allen. En 2010, James Rivera, el cantante principal de Helstar, se unió a la banda y en mayo de 2012, New Breed of Godz fue lanzado. El 23 de diciembre de 2016, el guitarrista Mick Zane murió de un tumor cerebral.

Tuna on Toast with Stryker
Tuna on Toast with Incubus Michael Einziger

Tuna on Toast with Stryker

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 67:37


In this episode, Ted Stryker welcomes the talented songwriter, performer and entrepreneur Mike Einziger from Incubus to the Tuna on Toast podcast studio (aka my second bedroom) Michael Einziger and Stryker talk about his new love for Curb Your Enthusiasm and Larry David. The guys discuss albums like Fungus Amongus and Science and relearning those early songs for the upcoming Incubus tour. Mike talks about selling out musical venues like The Roxy and The Troubadour even before the band received radio play. Mike tells Stryker all about the early Incubus shows and house parties, hustling passing out fliers, opening for Sublime and signing his first ever autograph. Mike and Stryker discuss MIXhalo, Mike is the Co-Founder & Co-Chairman of this wireless technology platform. They also talk about his latest venture which is called Versicolor Technologies..Mike is the Co-Founder & CEO of this biotechnology startup. Mike tells Stryker about hearing "Pardon Me" on the radio for the first time and the success that followed. especially after getting added to the MTV rotation. The guys talk about recording the Morning View album. Mike tells Stryker that after Light Grenades he started to question if this is what he really wants to do the rest of his life....Record, promote, tour repeat. Mike is not sure if Incubus will be recording many more new songs. Mike and Stryker talk about the connection Incubus has made with so many people! The guys then talk about the disappearance of Elaine Park, Elaine went missing back in 2017, her car was found in Malibu. Mike and Stryker discuss the case as well as the podcast To Live and Die in LA (hosted by Neil Strauss) If you have any info, please contact 1800 551 3080 (the tip line). What a fun episode this was with Mike. Incubus is such a great band with so many songs we all love. Thank you for watching and listening to another epiode of Tuna on Toast with Stryker

Nice Minds
Episode 49 (featuring Colin The Troubadour)

Nice Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 28:08


This episode is with my good friend Colin The Troubadour formerly known as Analyrical. Colin is an incredibly talented hip-hop artist from the twin cities who I've known for about 15 years. In this episode we talk about how we know each other, his origins with hip-hop in St. Paul, freestyle rapping, our love for Eyedea, his new project he's coming out with, advice for younger artists, and much more. To pre-order Colin's latest project "all'italia, con amore" for only $3 you can do so here: https://colinthetroubadour.bandcamp.com/releases Check out the other stuff I have going on including beats for artists, sample packs for producers, and more: http://www.NiceGuyEnt.com​​​​ Follow me @NiceGuyEnt on IG!

The Walter Paisley Movie House
Sky Elobar, Part 1

The Walter Paisley Movie House

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 36:17


Sky Elobar is one of the most unique character actors working today. He's shown up in supporting roles on television and in film, as well as the leading role in one of our favorite movies, 2016's singular The Greasy Strangler. But wait, there's more! He's also a musician, having recorded albums with his '90s funk-rock band, Seventh House, a wine connoisseur, and just an all around great guy. We discuss his early days growing up in Pittsburg, his time at the prestigious Berkley School of Music, and playing gigs at places like LA's Troubadour and NYC's legendary CBGB. Also, we get a visit from his awesome pup, Coco. Find Sky here: IMDB Twitter Instagram (Follow Sky here to see him, and his adorable puppers.)

Daily Short Stories - Science Fiction
The Troubadour - Robert A. W. Lowndes

Daily Short Stories - Science Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 8:36


View our full collection of podcasts at our website: https://www.solgood.org/ or YouTube channel: www.solgood.org/subscribe

I Am All In with Scott Patterson
One on One: Dave Gruber Allen

I Am All In with Scott Patterson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 47:58


The multitalented, incredibly fun and hilarious Dave Allen joins Scott. He is better known to us as The 2nd Troubadour! According to Taylor, he's a “Long-haired freak” with “Van Halen Hair”. A “Hirsute Hippie” known as “Rapunzel” and “Lady Godiva”. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane
Alicia Blue – Singer Songwriter, Lyricist

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 19:35


    Alicia Blue chats with us about how she got her start in music. Alicia was a well practiced poet and then one day took the leap at an open mic night, sung her lyrics to music and was shocked by the thrilling reaction of the audience. It was at that moment she took her role as singer songwriter to the next level. She talks about how she got Spotify playlisted, having her music noticed by music sync agents, getting a manager, her new music and her upcoming gig at the Troubadour performing for Fan Girl Cafe!

I Am All In with Scott Patterson
You Weren't Babbling (S2, E17 "Dead Uncles and Vegetables")

I Am All In with Scott Patterson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 68:26


Scott was not pleased with his performance in this episode. Find out why and the scene in particular that really really made him cringe. Do you agree that Taylor and "The Proprietor aka Troubadour #2 aka Dave Gruber Allen" stole the show? What are you thoughts as to why Emily wanted to get so involved in Sookie's Wedding? Should Lorelai get a job at Luke's Diner?  Burn one, then pass me a pink stick and throw some mud on it with a hot blonde with sand and make sure its foot's out the door. Finally, Scott asks this question and we want to know your thoughts...Why would Lorelai even be interested in Luke?  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE TROUBADOUR PODCAST - The Premier Red Dirt, Texas Country and Independent Music Podcast

Welcome to episode #149 of The Troubadour!  Today's episode features Alabama singer-songwriter Matt Prater. To find out more about Matt and his music go to www.mattpratersmusic.com . How YOU can support the podcast! If you would like to support the podcast AND ALSO earn some free swag in the process  CLICK HERE to sign up as a Gold, Silver or Bronze supporter! You can listen to our wonderful podcast by clicking on any of the following links: The Troubadour Podcast Website, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean

The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD
What Promising Gigs Changed Music Forever for the Better? The TuneSmith Series Episode PP The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD

The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 14:27


Five decades after David Bowie's seminal tour, we reflect on the concerts that have left a mark.Billie HolidayCafé Society, New York City, early 1939The 23-year-old Billie Holiday was mostly unknown outside the jazz loop when she began her 1939 residency at this liberal New York club. Her understated, delicately implacable debut of Strange Fruit, a terrifying depiction of lynchings in the south, made a unique new vocal sound famous worldwide. The birth of bebopMinton's Playhouse, New York City, 1941Rising young originals such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and the guitarist Charlie Christian lived off commercial swing gigs in 1941, but they forged the revolutionary modern jazz style called bebop in tumultuous after-hours Harlem jam sessions, where Thelonious Monk and the drums innovator Kenny Clarke were in the house band. Buddy Holly and the CricketsUK tour, March 1958Britain had never seen a rock band before March 1958. Then, for 25 consecutive nights, came the first true rock band – guitar, bass and drums, a revolution in horn-rimmed specs. A schoolboy Keith Richards caught a London show, but many more future stars would see Buddy Holly on TV during his visit, when he appeared on Sunday Night at the London Palladium. Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Muddy WatersWhalley Range, Manchester, 7 May 1964It was the brilliant idea of the Granada TV producer Johnnie Hamp to film a selection of blues greats in south Manchester's derelict Wilbraham Road railway station, mocked up to looked like the deep south, with “wanted” posters, washtubs and even goats and chickens. About 200 people arrived by rail to see the Gospel and Blues Train: Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson, Cousin Joe, Otis Spann and the duo Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee giving intense performances on the platform. Waters was mobbed by blues-mad youngsters. Tharpe arrived in a pony and trap and seized the opportunity presented by a Mancunian downpour to strap on an electric guitar and launch spontaneously into Didn't It Rain? Countless musicians, including Mick Jagger, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, subsequently told Hamp they were influenced by the show, which broadcast to millions and was instrumental in taking the blues explosion to the mainstream. Bob DylanNewport folk festival, Rhode Island, 25 July 1965 It was a Sunburst Fender Stratocaster that stole the show at Newport in 1965. Dylan's decision to play an electric guitar on a largely acoustic bill stunned the crowd, with many booing and jeering. Audiences for his world tour were similarly polarised, one disgruntled heckler in Manchester yelling: “Judas!” at the former folk hero. Essentially, it was the birth of folk rock – the real-time expansion of a genre. Frankie Valli and the Four SeasonsFranklin & Marshall College, Pennsylvania, 1966A show in a college gym was the breakthrough that made arena rock possible. The PA system supplied by the Clair brothers so impressed Valli that he took them on tour as his personal sound engineers. Other artists noticed the quality and soon they were in demand. Their sound systems spurred rock's spread to the big halls. The Velvet UndergroundThe Dom, New York City, 7 April 1966A former Polish wedding hall hosted the birth of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. Andy Warhol showed films and worked the lights, his “superstars” danced and the Velvet Underground played at a volume witnesses tended to describe in terms of violence: rock music as envelopment and sensory assault. The BeatlesCandlestick Park, San Francisco, 29 August 1966The Beatles' final real gig wasn't a great show. The stadium was half-empty, the band at the end of their tether, struggling to recreate the sound of their latest recordings. But it represented a shift in rock music: no more Beatles gigs meant more time in the studio – and albums that would change everything, again. The 14 Hour Technicolor DreamAlexandra Palace, London, 29 April 1967British counterculture's coming-out ball. Every one of the country's psychedelic luminaries played – Pink Floyd, Soft Machine, Tomorrow and the Pretty Things among them. Performance art was provided by Yoko Ono, while the sense that the audience was as much part of the spectacle as the artists presaged 80s rave culture. Big Brother and the Holding CompanyJanis Joplin as part of Big Brother and the Holding CompanyJanis Joplin at Monterey as part of Big Brother and the Holding Company. Monterey pop festival, California, 17 June 1967Arriving at Monterey with a lesser-known San Francisco psychedelic bluesy rock band, 24-year-old Janis Joplin gleefully demolished every stereotype of the “demure” female singer. The hard-living, hard-rocking Texan's raucous, gut-wrenching performance attracted international attention and has been described as one of the greatest ever. Terry RileyPhiladelphia College of Art, 17 November 1967Not the birth of minimalism, but certainly its breakthrough. Riley's eight-hour set of tape manipulation and organ pulses, played to an audience seated on hammocks and cushions, generated an early recording of his classic Poppy Nogood and set the pace for electronic experimentalism in chill-out environments decades ahead. James Brown‘Are we together or we ain't?' James Brown calms stage invaders on 5 April 1968.Boston Garden, 5 April 1968The night after the assassination of Martin Luther King, violent protests spread across many US cities. In Boston, Brown's show was almost cancelled for fear it might become a hotspot for public outcry. Instead, the show was repurposed: broadcast live on TV and radio in an effort to ease the grief and tension. Fans climbed on stage as he sang I Can't Stand Myself (When You Touch Me); police officers rallied. Brown paused the song. “I'll be fine,” he told the officers, then turned to the stage invaders: “You're not being fair to yourselves and me, or your race. Now, I asked the police to step back, because I think I can get some respect from my own people … Are we together or we ain't?” The crowd cheered. The fans climbed down. Brown turned to the drummer: “Hit that thing, man.” Mahalia Jackson and Mavis StaplesHarlem cultural festival, New York City, 13 July 1969Effectively buried until the 2021 documentary Summer of Soul resurrected its memory, the 1969 Harlem cultural festival was possibly the greatest selection of black talent ever assembled, from Sly Stone and Stevie Wonder to Nina Simone. If you had to pick a highlight, Mahalia Jackson and Mavis Staples' charged performance of Take My Hand, Precious Lord might be it. Jimi HendrixJimi Hendrix at WoodstockWoodstock festival, New York, 18 August 1969Often cited as the gig that defined the 60s, the countercultural festival attracted half a million people to upstate New York. Hendrix's deconstruction of The Star-Spangled Banner was interpreted as a protest at the Vietnam war, while “three days of peace and love” showed that people power could change history. The WhoThe University of Leeds, 14 February 1970A Leeds Civic Trust blue plaque outside the university's refectory now honours the site of the incendiary live performance of the post-Tommy, Keith Moon-era Who captured on Live at Leeds, often cited as the greatest live rock album. Elton JohnThe Troubadour, Los Angeles, 25 August 1970Not quite overnight success, but close: Elton John walked on to the stage of a celebrity-packed Troubadour a largely unknown British singer-songwriter, and walked off it a star. Aside from the music, a backstage decision to wear an outrageous outfit and a burst of energetic showmanship midway through the gig helped: two lessons he has never forgotten. BB KingCook County jail, 10 September 1970Two years after Johnny Cash's turn at Folsom prison, the blues legend King performed in Chicago to an audience of 2,000 prisoners, mostly young and black. A subsequent live album highlighted the dire conditions at the jail, helping bring about prison reform, which became a lifelong cause for King. Aretha Franklin at Fillmore West5-7 March 1971Franklin's appearance at Fillmore West wasn't a star-making performance – she was already very much a star – but it featured the Queen of Soul at the peak of her powers, actively seeking to build a bridge to a post-hippy audience, covering Stephen Stills, Bread and the Beatles. Judging by the crowd's reaction, it worked. David BowieHammersmith Odeon, London, 3 July 1973The moment when David Bowie appears to announce his retirement during this show is astonishing: the crowd's screams become a vast howl of disappointment, peppered with yells of “No!” Did he mean it? Bob Marley & the WailersThe Lyceum, London, 17-18 July 1975Probably the most dynamic and exhilarating reggae concerts ever. Perhaps more importantly, the presentation was familiar enough to the rock establishment to allow them to feel comfortable with roots reggae. The Last WaltzWinterland Ballroom, San Francisco, 25 November 1976This Thanksgiving Day show was billed as the Band's “farewell concert appearance”. Sex PistolsRiver Thames, 7 June 1977Mick Smith, Consultant M: (619) 227.3118 E: mick.smith@wsiworld.com Commercials Voice Talent:https://www.spreaker.com/user/7768747/track-1-commercials Narratives Voice Talent:https://www.spreaker.com/user/7768747/track-2-narrativesDo you want a free competitive analysis? Let me know at:https://hubs.ly/Q0139TgJ0Website:https://www.wsiworld.com/mick-smithLinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/company/wsi-smith-consulting/Make an appointment:https://app.hubspot.com/meetings/mick-smithBe sure to subscribe, like, & review The Doctor of Digital™ Podcast:https://www.spreaker.com/show/g-mick-smith-phds-tracksSign up for the Doctor Up A Podcast course:https://doctor-up-a-podcast.thinkific.com/

The Manny Matsakis Show
S2 EP 015 Stan Bedwell | Air Raid Troubadour

The Manny Matsakis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 65:54


My guest today on this football conversation is Stan Bedwell who's one of the premier disciples of Hal Mumme's creation – The Air Raid Offense. My first recollection of meeting Stan was when he was Co-Offensive Coordinator at Manchester University during our game in Defiance, Ohio. Stan has lived the life of a Football Troubadour singing the virtues of the Air Raid on an International stage. He is also known for his karaoke performances. Stan has played overseas for many years and his playing career in Europe has given him the opportunity to explore some beautiful cities and interesting regions of the world. As he straddles his chosen vagabond lifestyle as a football coach and mentor of coaches in the Air Raid he stays uniquely grounded in his lifestyle. I'm sure you will enjoy listening to this International Man of Mystery, the incomparable Stan Bedwell, as he creates a football coaching life on his terms. Fogo de Chao Information Patrick Kennedy National Group Sales Contact pkennedy@fogo.com 214-915-2010 (Phone) https://www.fogogroups.com/ Website with locations near you! Get Your Deep Blue Football Coaches Kit Deep Blue Rub Deep Blue Oil Deep Blue Stick (Analgesic) Have the best day ever, Click Here => Deep Blue Coaches Kit Click Here to sign up => The Power Parthenon Newsletter and, you'll receive my report: 20 Lessons I Learned from Bill Snyder.

Meet Me For Coffee
Jarvis Church vocalist from The Philosopher Kings

Meet Me For Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 23:33


Eaton is the lead singer for the R&B-pop group The Philosopher Kings, which reached its peak popularity in the 1990s.During the group's 10-year hiatus, Eaton began a solo career, releasing the album Shake it Off in 2002 under the stage name Jarvis Church, derived from two parallel streets in Toronto, Ontario.The Philosopher Kings subsequently reunited and released a new album in February 2006. In 2008 he released his second solo album called The Long Way Home. In 2012 he released his 3rd solo album The Soul Station Vol 1: The Songs of Sam Cooke, A Tribute, and in 2015 continued with his second in a series of albums spotlighting the music of soul singers called The Soul Station Vol 2: The Songs of Curtis Mayfield, A Tribute. As a producer, in 1999 he discovered Nelly Furtado at the Honey Jam showcase in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and in 2001. He co-produced Nelly Furtado's debut album Whoa, Nelly! with his Philosopher Kings bandmate Brian West. In 2001 they were nominated for the producer of the year Grammy. Their production team is known as Track and Field, and they also appear on the production credits of Esthero's album Wikked Lil' Grrrls. Track and Field also produced Canadian rapper K'naan's albums The Dusty Foot Philosopher and Troubadour, and the title track from Stacie Orrico's 2006 album Beautiful Awakening. He appeared on the song "Saturdays" by Nelly Furtado on the album Folklore. He scored the music for and appeared on the television series Da Kink in My Hair in 2007. #jarvischurch #canadianmusic #muchmusic #knaan #nelly

World Music Special
Endo Anaconda: Der Berner Troubadour nimmt seinen Weltschmerz mit

World Music Special

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 113:50


Der Tag nach seiner Todesmeldung fühlt sich an, als hätten wir einen «Moudi» (Kater). Der kauzigste und sogleich liebenswerteste Schweizer Troubadour hinterlässt Spuren. Und füttert unseren Weltschmerz. Wenn er gegen die Berge ansingt, oder in einer marokkanischen Raï-Version von «Sidi Abdel Assar».

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane
Megan Holiday – Radio Host & on air personality

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 27:01


  We interview kroq radio host and on air personality, Megan Holiday! Megan chats about how she got her breaks in the radio industry, her sobriety, as well as hosting the upcoming Fan Girl Cafe Weho event at the Troubadour with our very own Jess Bowen!

Unspoken Unsung
From the Archives: Hedges Capers

Unspoken Unsung

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 83:20


In 1968 Hedges Capers and Donna Carson were discovered at the famed Troubadour in LA. Troubadour owner Doug Weston managed Hedge & Donna, who released six albums and made major concert and TV appearances. But that's only this story's beginning.

Lacrosse All Stars Network
Jim Calder, Author and Hall of Famer, Tales of a Lacrosse Troubadour

Lacrosse All Stars Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2022 21:00


Jim Calder has lived a lacrosse life. His experiences as a player, fan, coach, and parent are the stuff of legends. I recently sat down with Jim to discuss his latest book, Tales of a Lacrosse Troubadour. About Jim Jim Calder, born in Canada but raised in New York, grew up as one of the only Canadians to play purely field lacrosse. He took his talents to Hobart College where he was a 2x All-American and 2x National Champion. In 1978 he would be named to the Canadian national field team, a team that would win the World Championships. Calder's accomplishments in the game are to long to list but the fact that he is in both the Canadian Lacrosse Association and Hobart College's Hall of Fames tells you just how special his life have been. About the Book This is Jim's third book related to lacrosse, following in the footsteps of "Lacrosse the Ancient Game" and "Women Play Lacrosse". The purpose and theme of the book are best described in an excerpt from Jim below: Jim CalderThis book is a product of the pandemic. We all miss our sport and it has been painful to deal with the realities of our time and what they've done to the game being played. Hopefully, we are almost through the worst. There has been a positive side as I was able to devote hundreds and hundreds of hours to the project. It kept me occupied when I needed something to help me deal with the drudgery of the days. It has been medicine. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lax-all-stars/message

Lacrosse All Stars Network
Jim Calder, Author and Hall of Famer, Tales of a Lacrosse Troubadour

Lacrosse All Stars Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2022 21:00


Jim Calder has lived a lacrosse life. His experiences as a player, fan, coach, and parent are the stuff of legends. I recently sat down with Jim to discuss his latest book, Tales of a Lacrosse Troubadour. About Jim Jim Calder, born in Canada but raised in New York, grew up as one of the only Canadians to play purely field lacrosse. He took his talents to Hobart College where he was a 2x All-American and 2x National Champion. In 1978 he would be named to the Canadian national field team, a team that would win the World Championships. Calder's accomplishments in the game are to long to list but the fact that he is in both the Canadian Lacrosse Association and Hobart College's Hall of Fames tells you just how special his life have been. About the Book This is Jim's third book related to lacrosse, following in the footsteps of "Lacrosse the Ancient Game" and "Women Play Lacrosse". The purpose and theme of the book are best described in an excerpt from Jim below: Jim CalderThis book is a product of the pandemic. We all miss our sport and it has been painful to deal with the realities of our time and what they've done to the game being played. Hopefully, we are almost through the worst. There has been a positive side as I was able to devote hundreds and hundreds of hours to the project. It kept me occupied when I needed something to help me deal with the drudgery of the days. It has been medicine. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lax-all-stars/message

program Fred's Country
Fred's Country w04-22

program Fred's Country

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 56:00


program Fred's Country 2022 w # 04: Happy New Year 2022 !!! Part 1: - David Lee Murphy, Party Crowd – Out With A Bang - 1995 - Buck Ford, Lonely - I'm Gettin' There - 2022 - Aaron Watson, Crash Landing - S – 2021 - George Strait, Troubadour. - The Gambler – 1978 Part 2: - Dusty Leigh, Take A Ride With Me - S - 2021 - Forever and Ever Amen- (mix) Jon Pardi, Zac Brown Band & Randy Travis, Fred 2002 - Brendyn Kyle feat Sarah Hobbs, Regret - S - 2022 Part 3: - Carly Pearce, Ashley McBryde, Never Wanted To Be That Girl - 29: Written in Stone – 2021 - Miranda Lambert, If I was a Cowboy - S – 2021 - Buck Ford feat Kevin Denney, Talking to Hank - I'm Gettin' There - 2022 - Six West vs Clint Black, Desperado Part 4: - Dwight Yoakam, Honky Tonk Man - Guitars and Cadillac etc ... – 1986 - Special CMA 90's (mix) + Forever Country, Fred 2002 - Chad Cooke Band, I Just Want You - S - 2022

Literacy Quebec Podcast
Episode 52 - Raffi and Family Literacy Day!

Literacy Quebec Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 51:05


Welcome to Season 8 Episode 6 of What's Literacy Got To Do With It? by Literacy Quebec! In today's episode, we celebrate Family Literacy Day with the one and only Raffi! Family Literacy Day is this Thursday, January 27th, which aims to raise awareness about the importance of reading and engaging in other literacy-related activities as a family, and this year's Family Literacy Day theme is: Learning in the Great Outdoors! Raffi is a perfect person to help us come together to celebrate and approach learning and growing together with kindness, caring, and play. A renowned singer known by his first name alone, Raffi is a pioneer in quality recordings for children on his independent label, Troubadour. For millions of fans, Raffi's music is the soundtrack of their childhoods, and they have taken his signature song “Baby Beluga” to heart. In 2010, he founded the Raffi Foundation for Child Honouring—to promote an integrated philosophy that views honouring children as the best way to create sustainable, peacemaking cultures. Raffi has received the Order of Canada, the Order of BC, the U.N. Earth Achievement Award, and four honorary degrees. In summer 2020 Raffi released a 40th -anniversary version of “Baby Beluga” with famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma. That was followed by “For All You Do”, in collaboration with Yo-Yo Ma and Lindsay Munroe. This song is a musical expression of gratitude to essential workers during the pandemic and was a fundraiser for Direct Relief. Show Links Check out Raffi and his music Learn more about the Raffi Foundation for Child Honouring Check out LQ's Youtube page for the recording of our event with Raffi Have questions or need help? Contact Literacy Quebec's Literacy Helpline or call 1-888-521-8181 Find out more about Literacy Quebec Network events on Facebook What's Literacy Got To Do With It? is a community-based podcast for English-speaking, lifelong literacy learners in Quebec. Our hosts, Chris Shee and Jaimie Cudmore from Literacy Quebec explore community building, lifelong curiosity, and multiple types of literacy. It's incredible what we can learn from each other. Subscribe, share our podcast, and write to us at admin@literacyquebec.org, call us at 514-508-6805. Subscribe to our Youtube Channel for videos of interviews and follow us on Facebook and Instagram @LiteracyQuebec Special thanks: Podcast Theme Music by Gerry Legault and LQ's team, including Peter Morgan and Barbara Testa Gabaud, Margo Legault, and Lara Thompson, for their support. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/literacy-quebec/message

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane

Today we chat with singer songwriter Trace! She chats about her finding her identity as a singer, her super famous legendary singing Mom, being signed to Ultra and what is involved in being signed to a label, getting 31 million hits on her songs on Spotify and seeing the behind the scenes of Spotify for Artists as well as her upcoming gig at the Troubadour for Fan Girl Cafe! We really enjoyed this chat!  

Peaceful Power Podcast
Jack Stafford Ayurvedic Troubadour

Peaceful Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 25:18


Jack Stafford is a British singer-songwriter and super troubadour. He is most well-known for his thought-provoking lyrics. He is on a mission to bring spirituality to the centre stage and mysticism back into the mainstream. Jack grew up in the UK but quickly moved to Amsterdam, where he lived a toyboy lifestyle working as a copywriter, musician and fashion designer. However, this led to burnout, so Jack sold all his possessions and set off on a bicycle tour as a nomadic troubadour. He travelled through 45 countries, playing over 700 house concerts in return for a place to sleep. He recorded many of his crazy adventures in his songs, and through those—plus countless self-help books and podcasts, as well as yoga, his Ayurveda songs, and Vipassana meditation—he grew and grew to become a unique modern-day troubadour. The culmination of his life skills is the unique Podsongs podcast, where—together with other musical artists from around the world—he interviews special people in selfless service to others, and writes a song to bring greater awareness to their work. Jack lives in seclusion in the South of Italy. He is a qualified Ayurvedic Practitioner, student of metaphysics and Italian representative of The Aetherius Society - he also hosts another podcast called the Mysticast. Connect with Jack www.podsongs.com twitter.com/podsongs facebook.com/podsongs instagram.com/podsongs youtube.com/thejsf Spotify: Jack Stafford Where to connect with Andrea Website: https://andreaclaassen.com/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/seasonallivingmamas Freebie: 5 Day Ayurvedic Challenge- https://andreaclaassen.com/5-day-ayurvedic-challenge Divine Body Wisdom Book- https://andreaclaassen.com/book Freebie: Ayurvedic Winter Guide- https://andreaclaassen.com/ayurvedic-winter-guide Andrea Claassen Bio Andrea Claassen is an Ayurvedic Wellness Counselor, RYT 500 hour yoga teacher, and Wild Woman Project Circle leader who has been in the wellness space since 2007. Her mission is to help people slow down, tune in, and connect to your divine body wisdom. She does this by teaching her Peaceful Power Practices centered around movement, mindfulness & mother nature through an Ayurvedic lens. You can hear more from Andrea on her Peaceful Power Podcast where she aims to deliver actionable takeaways to live a more holistic lifestyle. Connect with Andrea on her website at www.andreaclaassen.com

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
Jack Stafford | The Life of a Modern Troubadour

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 54:57


About Jack Stafford: Jack Stafford is a British singer-songwriter and super troubadour. He is most well-known for his thought-provoking lyrics. He is on a mission to bring spirituality to the centre stage and mysticism back into the mainstream. Jack grew up in the UK but quickly moved to Amsterdam, where he lived and worked as a copywriter, musician and fashion designer. However, this led to burnout, so Jack sold all his possessions and set off on a bicycle tour as a nomadic troubadour. He travelled through 45 countries, playing over 700 house concerts in return for a place to sleep. He recorded many of his crazy adventures in his songs, and through those—plus countless self-help books and podcasts, as well as yoga, his Ayurveda songs, and Vipassana meditation—he grew and grew to become a unique modern-day troubadour. The culmination of his life skills is the unique Podsongs podcast, where—together with other musical artists from around the world—he interviews special people in selfless service to others, and writes a song to bring greater awareness to their work. Jack lives in seclusion in the South of Italy. He is a qualified Ayurvedic Practitioner, student of metaphysics and Italian representative of The Aetherius Society - he also hosts another podcast called the Mysticast. Listen to Podsongs: https://podsongs.com/about To register for upcoming Walled Garden events, go to thewalledgarden.com/events

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane
Betsy Martinez – Music Photographer, Fan Girl Cafe Founder

Babes Behind the Beats with Jess Bowen & Bowie Jane

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 30:08


Today we chat with music photographer and Fan Girl Cafe founder Betsy Martinez! Betsy chats with us about her new awesome music Cafe concept opening in Los Angeles as well as her upcoming Fan Girl Cafe event at The Troubadour on 27 Feb 2022 featuring performances by Jan, Trace, Kat Cunning, Alicia Blue and Noah Vonne! And guess what? Our very own Jess Bowen is hosting the show with Megan Holiday!! Couldn't be more fun. TICKETS – https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fan-girl-cafe-presents-jax-kat-cunning-trace-alicia-blue-and-more-tickets-227898359127

Du raisin et des papilles
Hommage à Brice Bauer: troubadour et gardien de la Cathédrale de Strasbourg

Du raisin et des papilles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:32


Court-métrage à mi chemin entre le documentaire et la fiction, réalisé par Ahmet DERE, avril et mai 2020, prenant pour décor et prétexte le premier confinement afin d'évoquer le travail de B.BAUER entant que musicien gagnant sa vie au quotidien devant la cathédrale de Strasbourg... Très triste d'avoir appris hier soir le décès du covid de Brice Bauer, c'est terrible. Nous les strasbourgeois nous connaissons tous ce magnifique violoncelliste de talent qui faisait résonner le parvis de la Cathédrale avec de magnifiques mélodies. J'avais plaisir à l'écouter, cet homme devant la gigantestesque cathédrale millénaire avec qui il savait faire résonner les pierres de grès rouges. Il fermait les yeux et était comme habité par la musique, une musique qui venait d'ailleurs, peut-être de Dieu et des anges. Il ne parlait jamais, juste jouait. Il avait reçu un prix prestigieux de musique mais il préférait la rue à une belle carrière qui lui était promise. Il était aussi un peintre et un écrivain de poèmes. Durant le confinement il était seul et parfois se prennait des amendes des forces de l'ordre mais il répondait qu'il ne voulait pas que " Strasbourg s'éteigne " et que la musique l'habitait. C'était beau, il jouait du Bach, des grands, magnifique. Il a dit un jour alors qu'on lui mettait une amende, le policier lui a dit en même temps " On en a besoin ". Il était notre troubadour de la cathédrale comme " le bossu " de la Notre Dame de Paris. Dieu doit être heureux de l'accueillir près de lui pour le remercier d'avoir donner tant de grâce et sourires au pied de sa demeure. Il avait 42 ans et père d'un petit garçon. A Strasbourg nous avons perdu l'un de nos plus beaux concitoyens, une partie de nous. J'en pleure. Merci Brice pour ces mélodies, la cathédrale ne sera plus pareille mais elle t'appartient éternellement maintenant. Et de la haut envoie nous de douces mélodies. Soutenez-nous !

MYA Life Ayurveda
Episode 140: Ep #140: Spreading Ayurveda Through Song: An Interview with Jack Stafford Ayurvedic Troubadour

MYA Life Ayurveda

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 53:19


Jack Stafford is a one of a kind original- and Ayurvedic Troubadour. And through song he is teaching the world about Ayurveda one note at a time. In this week's episode, I visit with Jack about everything from his story and background, how he became a troubadour, and the future birth of his son. You will learn:  Jack's journey from traveling musician to Ayurvedic Troubadour and the creation of Podsongs How the ancient Rishi's used sutras to pass down Ayurvedic truths Pulse diagnosis and simple practices to become attuned to the pulse Kundalini and breath practice in India Aetherius society and multidimensional existence Transforming the birth experience using Ayurveda Podcast References:The Aetherius society  https://www.aetherius.org/Jack Stafford's podcast https://podsongs.comThe Serpent Power teachings with Nehemiah Davis https://www.youtube.com/mysticknowledgeYou can contact Jack at:@jackstaffordtroubadour on Instagram@jacktroubadour on Twitter@thejackstaffordfoundation on FB@podsongs on all channelsHaven't gotten your FREE Ayurveda Starter Kit with tongue scraper and mala beads? Order yours at https://ayurvedalifeschool.com/freestarterkitReady to put your habits into practice? Join the self-paced 28 Day Immersion and see your life change. https://ayurvedalifeschool.com/ayurvedaimmersionConnect with me online:https://ayurvedalifeschool.comSocial Media:Ayurveda Life SchoolNamaste.

Tasty Brew Music
Rex Pryor - from Prison Warden to Flatlands Troubadour

Tasty Brew Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 37:14


My friend Rex Pryor grew up in a small northwestern Missouri town… you become aware of these roots very quickly when listening to his songs. We met through a mutual friend, the late Scott Ford, who tragically passed away New Year's Eve 2021. Although now retired from a storied career in corrections and law enforcement, Rex remains busy writing and performing music and serving on the Board of Directors of the Heartland Song Network, a Kansas non-profit dedicated to empowering the art of the song through education, collaboration and mentorship. Rex recently joined me on KKFI's Tasty Brew Music Radio Show to feature songs and stories from the Exit 13 Duo new release “Flatlands.” As is the case with many songwriters in the Heartland, Rex is self-taught on the guitar (he picked it up at the age of 45). He really is enjoying leading a lyrical life in the Heartland performing as a solo, as a duo with his nephew and with his Band, Exit 13. Enjoy this conversation with Rex Pryor about music education, collaboration and travelling the Flatlands!

Now Hear This Entertainment
NHTE 413 Jonathan Cummings

Now Hear This Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 60:47


A singer, songwriter, guitar player, and drummer based in southeast Florida. Having also lived in Los Angeles, he has had the distinction of working with many greats in rock, pop, and jazz, including Barry Manilow. Plus, he is currently part of the national touring production “Mercury: The Story of Queen's Front Man.” He has also performed in national touring productions such as “Broadway Music on Tour” and “The Music of Andrew Lloyd Weber,” plus he is the creator of “The Troubadour's Journey.” He has also been a music educator since the 1980s in California, Tennessee, and in Florida.

Science Fiction - Daily Short Stories
The Troubadour - Robert A. W. Lowndes

Science Fiction - Daily Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 8:36


View our full collection of podcasts at our website: https://www.solgood.org/ or YouTube channel: www.solgood.org/subscribe

Off The Chain
Join us as we sit down with Country-pop artist Larry Jay

Off The Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 60:00


It's been said that country-pop singer-songwriter Larry Jay's songs are “Five chords and the truth.” The New York native, now residing in California, injects that truth with hopeful lyrics and tasty melodies, to create his own brand of Award-winning Americana-tinged southern fried music.A first runner-up in multiple songwriting contests, including the prestigious John Lennon Songwriting Contest, Larry Jay says he started writing and performing music “To set my soul free.”  Jay has performed at the famed and historic Troubadour in Los Angeles, and he's shared the stage with Neil Young sideman and member of Crazy Horse, Sonny Mone.“When I perform, it's just me and my guitar, and my rhythm tracks looper.  I like to keep things intimate.   ””You can hear Larry Jay weekly via Livestream on his facebook page at https://bit.ly/3lh4AYD.Links:Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/artist/6LQmkpR1sJUY3SUxqwEUyj?si=CAbyY_OdQxKg4c3S-HkLQA:IG: https://www.instagram.com/larryjay_music/ Twitter: @lwdc123,Website: https://www.larryjaymusic.com/,“Drunk On Dreams” video: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=253281759334952 CONTACT: Michael Stover MTS Management Group michael@mtsmanagementgroup.com  

The Present Age
Artist Bryan Brinkman explains the WTFs of NFTs [podcast + transcript]

The Present Age

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 31:55


Welcome to the Present Age podcast. I’m your host Parker Molloy.Joining me on today’s show is animator and crypto art creator Bryan Brinkman. His work has appeared at places like The Tonight Show, Saturday Night Life, and even Sesame Street. Today, he’s going to teach me a bit about NFTs.Parker Molloy: So, joining me today on the podcast is Bryan Brinkman. Hello.Bryan Brinkman: Hello, Hey Parker.How's it going?It's going very well.So, I wanted to have you on the podcast to talk to you about your art and your work, which I really like and enjoy. And also the one thing that I don't understand, but I want to understand, NFTs. Can you help me understand what an NFT is and how that applies to the art world, basically?I can do my best to try.All right.Because it's an ever-growing description because every week there's something new happening in the space. But just to start out, I would say an NFT stands for Non-Fungible Token. Kind of the idea behind it is that you can authenticate digital assets through the blockchain. And so, as a way of storing imagery or content. It's a way of saying, "Hey, I possess this digital asset," and that gives you the ability to trade it and resell it or do whatever you want with it. And so that's kind of the basic idea around what an NFT is, but then what that asset can be is exploding into a million possibilities.Yeah, I was reading something the other day about how people have other applications of the same blockchain technologies. Someone was saying, "Oh yeah, one day we could have contracts and deeds to houses and stuff like that on there". And that's really interesting. And I think that part of the issue is that a lot of people just struggle to understand the concept, because for instance, like in NFT might be something like a video or a GIF, or just a still image. Right?And people might think, okay, well, why would I buy this when I can just look at it anytime I want, I can make my own copy of it. I could just pull up a website that has this on it and look at it. For people who are thinking about trying to kind of explore that space as either a creator or someone who just wants to get involved and support artists. I guess that's another big thing, which I understand that that is definitely one of the reasons someone would want to pay for something as opposed to just looking at it on the internet.I think that's a good question. The first thing that comes to people's minds, when they say it is, why would I pay for JPEG when I can just download it or screenshot it? And I think that same idea can be applied to a lot of art. Why does any art have value? It's because there's a group of people that all agree it has value, and that gives it value.I think you can kind of look at the NFT collectible art market as being similar to what baseball cards were in the 90s. Those cards are printed for probably a penny on a piece of cardboard paper, but the value is whether a lot of people altogether go, "Hey, this Michael Jordan rookie card is worth more than this other card."And so I think it kind of falls into the same thing as that the NFT is just a medium and a canvas for people to create on. And the idea of I could just screenshot that, well, you can't go and sell a screenshot, but you can authenticate that you own the original copy of an NFT and someone will want to buy that.And that's really interesting. And that's a good point. I mean, the only real differences, the fact that there's a physical object to hold onto with, for instance, with baseball cards, which funnily enough, I was recently thinking about maybe getting back into collecting baseball cards because every once in a while, when the world gets too chaotic, I try to pick up a new hobby. So I don't just explode on Twitter or something like that.And a few years back it was comic books. I was like, I'm going to just get really into comic books and that's been helpful. And then it was video games, and it's all these like going back to my childhood kind of things. And so I think baseball cards is the next kind of going down and just looking into the state of that industry right now is really interesting as well. I don't know, I remember growing up and it'd be like, here's this one card, this is the card for this player for this year.And now it's like, “Well this one, if it has a blue border, it's worth more than if it has a multicolored.” And I'm just like, man, it's so complicated now.Well, the sports card, yeah. The sports card industry's kind of changed a lot recently too. I've been looking at like, they have like column like penny cards. When you buy these boxes and they have pieces of jerseys and autographs and all these amazing hand drawn pieces of cards and stuff, they've really upped the trading card game to keep up with kind of the collector mentality in recent years. Which is something I wasn't very aware of until like the past year.Yeah. And just the day I was looking at Topps, the trading card company. They have a section on their website that's now just Topps and NFTs. And it's kind of that same idea of trying to be like, yeah, you can own this rare whatever. And then there are some people who sell like a penguin or something. And I'm trying to understand that. And I don't know, I feel like I'm just like a million years old.No, I think there's, in my mind there's kind of two worlds of NFT collecting right now. There's the art side. And then there's the kind of the collectible side and the collectible side falls into that kind of sports card mentality where there's high volume and there are big communities backing it. And with the penguins, there's 10,000 of those penguins. And so having a feature in the New York Times will give all these people excited and the prices fluctuate, and it falls into more of like kind of a stock market mentality where there's kind of this liquidity to these collectibles. Whereas the art side falls into a slightly different category where it's more of like artists building communities around their work and their style. And that falls into kind of like the auction house world and the New York gallery world versus kind of like the sports card collectors.So there's all these different entry points. And I would say like a lot of the space grew because of a website called NBA Top Shot that came out about a year ago and kind of brought that sports card, collecting mentality into the space. And then all these people did it. They kind of got a sense and they started to wrap their minds around, "Hey, these digital assets hold value". And then they started looking elsewhere. And so that they kind of branch off into what else there is, because I think it was [inaudible] who's an artist in the space. He made a tweet the other day. That was like, "When you used to meet a celebrity, you'd ask for an autograph, but now you ask for a selfie," and that mentality of what has more value to people these days? Is it the digital experience or is it this physical thing you hold? I think that's changing rapidly, especially with video game skins, and how you manage your digital content and video game worlds. For instance, I think translates very one-to-one with NFT world.That's yeah. That's a good point.Kids, these days. They care more about digital assets than putting paintings on their wall. They, they want to show paintings on their phone that they can show their friends.Yeah. And that's really interesting. And I mean, one way I have been trying to wrap my head around that over the past several months. And one thing that I've seen as a criticism of NFTs and just things that involve crypto generally is like the energy consumption of that. But it, everything seems so unclear when it comes to the environmental effect of any of this. Do you have any thoughts on that? I mean, I'm sure you have thoughts on that.Yeah. I mean I think it was around January, after I'd been in the space for a year, that article kind of came out written by this guy named Memo and it was kind of this jarring account of how much energy could be consumed at a maximum amount, if everything travels all these places and burns all this energy. And there's certainly different blockchains that consume different types of energies. And there's these arguments of kind of proof of work versus proof of stake. Ethereum is not the best at it. And they are actively trying to move to this new Ethereum 2.0, that will reduce this all by like 99%, but it's a slow process. So in the meantime, there's a lot of these kinds of like, they call them side chains where people can kind of mint on these layers, two solutions that take up less energy.But after that article came out, a lot of the NFT websites made commitments to offset their carbon emissions. So, I mean I've seen in the six months or so I guess it's been maybe eight months since that article came out, that has been a key point of almost every project is to offset that as artists. I did my calculations and offset it and I've done charities to raise money for that. And so there's a lot of ways you can kind of work towards that in the short term while they're kind of finding solutions in the long-term.And then a lot of artists that really feel strongly about it have moved to other blockchains, like Tezos, there's a website called hic et nunc, which is a very silly name, but I consider it to be kind of like the Brooklyn indie comic NFT site. So there's a lot of really cool art there, that's a lot more affordable and they call it clean NFTs. And so there's a lot of different ways people are kind of working to get around that in the short term, but there is certainly a lot of criticisms that are, I think are valid about Bitcoin and other blockchains that aren't working towards solutions in the longterm.Yeah, that's it, it's one of those things where I feel like the backlash to it was so swift where it was, if you buy an NFT, you're destroying the planet and you'd be like, whoa, I don't think that that is necessarily fair. Just saying that to people. I feel like that kind of scared a lot of people away from like really participating in this as either a consumer or an artist. And hopefully, that kind of over time will-I think the math and the calculations were all based on worst-case scenarios. Looking at it, the idea that miners are only going to consume pure energy isn't necessarily true because they're going to want to be using renewable energy just for their own profits’ sake. And a lot of mining happens on kind of solar power and renewable energy consumption. So I think there was a swift backlash and then people started to kind of understand that minting one NFT isn't the equivalent of an entire day of London's energy consumption. Yeah. So I think people started to kind of look into it, figure out what the accurate amount was. I mean, I had places reaching out to me asking me to help them like figure out calculations. Like I'm not a math scientist, but I can do my best to help, but yeah-“Please animate this and also do a bunch of very complicated math equations for it.”But yeah, I think in the end, I think it's somewhere in between the two, it's not, it's not urgent issue and it's also not a non-issue it's somewhere in between and you have to kind of work towards doing your best to address it as you can.Yeah, definitely. And so one of the things I wanted to kind of ask you about was just all of your other work that you've done over the years. I mean, just looking at your website, you have Tonight Show, Saturday Night Live, Sesame Street, a music video for The Good Life, one of my favorite bands, which is-We're both big Tim Kasher fans.Yeah. That's very, very cool. Cause I totally forgot you did that one, which it's a good video it's for "The Troubadour's Green Room", right?Yeah, yeah, yeah, no, that was such a fun one to do because they basically reached out to me and they were like, do you want to do this video? Here's three songs from the new album. And I just kind of sat and closed my eyes and listened to the songs until imagery came about. And they just let me kind of dream up visuals and kind of make something on my own. And so they were very hands-off and they just let me have fun with it. It was a blast cause I'm such a huge fan. I'm originally from Omaha, Nebraska, so I grew up a big Saddle Creek Records fan.I mean, I'm from Illinois, so it's not too far away, but also grew up a big fan of Saddle Creek. Every band that was on there, I would go out and buy their albums as soon as it came out. Any of the bands that Tim Kasher would be in or Connor Oberst or any of the guys from The Faint, all of those bands are so good.I love The Faint, that they were my entry point to Saddle Creek when I was young, seeing those concerts were such a blast. I mean, they still are, anytime they come around town, I try to see them. But yeah, I think that kind of career path I took, I kind of went to school for animation. And then I found work kind of working in advertising and TV. I worked on some animated series, like the Life and Times of Tim, which was this very small, HBO cartoon, but it was a lot of fun to work on. So I kind of did all these paths before eventually kind of working. I worked at The Tonight Show for like eight years, but in my free time, I would try to do music videos. I would try to do posters for concerts. I would do these pop culture, art gallery shows in LA.And I was always trying to kind of like find ways to be creative because it was just like, that's my hobby. That's what I love doing. And then once kind of NFTs came around, it was like, oh, I no longer have to worry about turning my digital work into physical work to sell. This is a perfect platform for me to create animations. And I don't have to make short films for film festivals anymore. I can just make little short things that tell stories. And I found it to be just like the perfect amalgamation of all these things I've been trying to do for years. Cause I mean, I'm going to date myself, but when I was in high school, I was creating little flash cartoons for newgrounds.com, uploading them and then getting excited when people would be like, I like this one or I get upset when they say I hate this one, but it was that same concept where it's been years later I'm still doing the same thing where I'm just kind of making whatever I want to make and then I put it out there and I see what people think.Yeah. And it's really cool. And I love your style just generally speaking. The colors that you use, the really weird-ass kind of... I mean, just on your website under on the crypto page, there's one of the animations is like a person being ripped in half, but it's weird because it's not in this really gruesome way. It's just sort of like, Hey... unzip, zip back up kind of thing. And I just really enjoy that. How would you describe your art style? Also, just anyone listening to this, you can go over to my website, readthepresentage.com and I'll be sure to include some of your Tweets that have your images and stuff in there, so they can see what on earth we're talking about.Giselle Flores recently said I was a conceptual cartoonist, which I thought was very funny and kind of fitting, but I think the concept behind when I joined the NFTs was I had been doing these kinds of gallery shows and a lot of curators and people in the scene kept telling me "If you want to be a successful artist, you have to do the same style over and over because that's what galleries expect you to do when they put you in a show, they want you to do the work that you're famous for, because that's what sells". And I was kind of hated that mentality of like putting yourself into a corner, especially early on in your artistic career. I mean, I was living out in LA shortly after college and I just thought that's the worst way to get stuck in a style like so early.And so when I started doing NFTs, I kind of wanted to break away from that. I saw it as an experimental area to do whatever in. And so my thesis behind my art was I'm just going to stick with a color scheme and then I can do whatever style I want. I can do 3D, I can do 2D cartoons, I can do paintings. As long as they have those colors in it, it all ties together into this overarching style that I can claim to have. And so that's been kind of my through-line, but then that allows me to do dark neon animations or colorful, bright poppy animations.And that was kind of my way of breaking out of that trap of getting stuck, doing the same thing over and over. Even though a lot of artists do that and they make a great living off doing the same thing over and over, I just found it to be a little... I didn't want to get trapped in that too early. But now a year and a half into it, I'm starting to revisit the same themes and visuals and stuff, because now I've kind of developed a style through this experimental journey.Yeah. The colors that you use are just some of my favorites basically, they all work so well together, it is a really neat throughline for so much of your work. And even though, as you were saying, the style kind of shifts around and whatnot. It's always so interesting to learn about something that I just am so totally clueless about. And that's what this is kind of been, which is great.Yeah. And that's kind of the fun of like NFTs is like, I started doing it as just kind of making GIFs, because back when I started the NFT space, you couldn't even upload videos to the blockchain, the technology wasn't ready yet. And so everyone was kind of making these short looping GIFs, because that's how you could get a lot of mileage out of like a 50 megabyte file size limit. And so that's like kind of where I started. It was like, how can I make things? How can you make it loop nicely so that it keeps going, and it doesn't feel like you're only making three seconds of animation kind of stuff, but then over time, you start to get comfortable with that. And then you find new platforms, whether it's, I did a release on a website called art blocks, which is a generative art where you create art entirely with code.And then when people create it, they get a randomly generated piece of art. And so I did that in January and now that's becoming one of the most sought after platforms and styles of art, because it allows an artist to make an unlimited supply of art, but each one's unique. And I think that's a really cool thing that NFTs can do that can't be replicated outside the space very easily. And then also I did a piece for a platform called like async music, which allows you to sell music in a way that the album art changes and the audio changes based on who owns different layers of the track. And so for instance, you could have a band and you, as an owner of the guitar stem, you could change how the guitar sounds in the song. And when people listen to it, they have to listen to the version you choose as the owner of that guitar track. And then that also changes the visuals of the album. And so there's so many cool ways that like, the technology is creating new mediums altogether for like how music and stuff is released.Yeah. That last thing just sounds so interesting to me, it sounds like a total nightmare for artists to have to be like "Here you go, good luck. Let's be what happens with my work", like that sort of thing. But it's really just cool and different. And I don't know I'm always excited to just see new ways to... I hate saying consume, but enjoy, appreciate work and that's so, yeah. Is there, is there anything else that you want to make sure that people hear or anything you want to plug or talk about, or you know, whatnot.Yeah, well, I think as much as I don't necessarily care to talk about the money of the space. There is a lot of pluses for artists and creators to join the space. And one of those is that with the blockchain technology, as a creator, you can use the smart contracts of NFTs to benefit yourself longterm. And by that, I mean, when I sell a piece of art, you sell it for X amount of money, but through the contract, when it resells down the road, you get 10% royalty in perpetuity. And so something I sold for $200 a year ago could resell for thousands and I'll make more on the secondary royalty than I did on the primary sale. And so that incentivizes this kind of ecosystem of collectors and artists to both want each other to succeed because if someone buys my stuff, I want to grow the value for them, and they want to grow the value for me on the secondary.And so this is kind of symbiosis of support. And so the connection with artists and collectors is a lot deeper in this space than it was in the traditional art world where someone would buy my work. I would have no idea where it went. If they sold it on eBay or something, that's their thing and I've no part in that. But in this, I'm very hyper aware of every transaction, because a little bit will funnel back to me at some point. And I want to see the people that support me early on to succeed later on. And so it's a really a wonderful community of people that are kind of supporting each other.Interesting. I had no clue that that was the thing, because that's how I was looking at it with anything art related or related to collecting things. Once it's out of the original artist's possession, it's kind of like "If I pay for this, I'm not supporting the artist, I'm supporting the person who bought this from the artist", but that's different. And that I did not know. So that's interesting.Yeah. It creates a fun, passive income over time as you continue to grow. And it also incentivizes you to sell things at a cheaper rate early on and build up your community of people, because if it grows, then you benefit from that growing longterm. And so it's really kind of a wonderful solution that they figured out with the space. And a lot of the platforms are really good about including that, but it took years. I mean, I joined the space in January 2020, but space has been building for many, many years before that. And the efforts of all those artists pushing for those royalties and the collectors also that supported the artists early on, I've kind of like helped build this platform now that, in the past year has kind of exploded. And so it's been really awesome to see some of these artists that were making stuff three years ago, sold it for $5 seeing itself for hundreds of thousands of dollars. And then they get tens of thousands of dollars on that. Yeah, Absolutely. Now, if someone wants to, I guess I'm kind of both ends of this, if someone is like, okay, I listened to this and I'm interested in NFTs as a creator, how do you get started with like, if someone is a total beginner in this space, total novice, where do you go? Because there's so much out there that is just so I don't know. It's just seems it's very, if the crypto feels complicated and that's been kind of my experience in trying to like move things back and forth between wallets and stuff. And I'm just like, I don't even know what the hell I'm doing.Yeah, no, it's definitely tricky. There's a lot more resources now than there was when I started, when I started, I kind of got intrigued because an artist I collected named Killer Acid was putting stuff out. And I was like, what is this? I don't understand what this etherium symbol is. And I kind of spent a couple of weeks kind of Googling and looking at Twitter and kind of figuring out what this all was. Now there's a lot more resources on YouTube and Google, School of Motion has some great articles on how to get started and set up a wallet. The thing I would say is, there is an entry fee barrier now that wasn't there when I started because of etherium and the currency of the space is worth a lot more than when I started. It cost me like $40 to like get started.Now, I think it would cost a lot more. So I would say when I mentioned earlier, like hic et nunc, Tazos, that's a much cheaper way to get started, build a community before you then branch over to like etherium, which is more expensive right now. So I would recommend new artists kind of look at that. Join Discords, start following people on Twitter. Really spend some time looking at the space, seeing what people are buying, because I think the problem we see right now is everyone kind of sees these headlines about NFTs are worth so much money. And then they kind of dive in, they try to sell something that they haven't been able to sell elsewhere. And they're not really creating for the space necessarily. They're just kind of shoehorning in something they've been trying to sell in another form, whether it's like physical or something else. That is tough.New artists, you have to build trust with collectors that you aren't going to just sell something to make a bunch of money and then leave. And that takes time, you have to continue to put out work. So if, if you're a new artist, I would say like create four or five pieces of art that you feel good about selling and then start to see if people like it, see if it's connecting with people, share it. And then you don't even have to mint and pay the money to make it first. You can just put it out there, see if people want to buy it. And then once you have people that are willing to kind of help fund your initial output or... is that the word? Your initial launch, it's a lot more helpful. And there's also some organizations that will help artists with their first mint. I think it's called Mint Pass. I'll send you the link later, but there's a bunch of these kinds of organizations that help artists that can't afford to get started kind of put out their first pieces of art, which are very wonderful resources.Cool, Cool. This has been so interesting to me and just thank you so much for coming out. I'm so glad we were able to finally get this scheduled cause I reached out two weeks ago and then you said yes. And then my world became crazy for a little bit. So I'm glad we were able to make this work.I really appreciate you having me on here. And yeah, if anybody has questions about NFTs or whatever, feel free to reach out to me. I'm pretty available and I'm happy to help some people understand the space because it is confusing. Get full access to The Present Age at www.readthepresentage.com/subscribe