Podcasts about Charlemagne

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King of the Franks, King of Italy, and Holy Roman Emperor

  • 644PODCASTS
  • 965EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST
Charlemagne

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Best podcasts about Charlemagne

Latest podcast episodes about Charlemagne

The John Batchelor Show
Can the EU become a State? Stanley Pignal @spignal, @TheEconomist. Charlemagne, The Economist;

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 11:19


Photo:  The Peace of Westphalia — Arnsberg Castle c 1588 Can the EU become a State? Stanley Pignal @spignal, @TheEconomist.  Charlemagne, The Economist;  https://www.economist.com/europe/2022/01/08/the-return-of-big-government-sparks-questions-for-europe Stanley Pignal, Charlemagne. @TheEconomist @spignal,

Storiavoce
Charles le Chauve : le petit-fils oublié de Charlemagne

Storiavoce

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 52:02


En 843, une frontière qui marquera toute l'histoire l'Occident se dessine ; d'un côté, la France et de l'autre, l'Allemagne. Ce "bipartisme" modèlera notre vision de l'Occident et influencera toute son histoire. Cette frontière ne se dessine pas sous le règne de Clovis, ni de Charlemagne, ni encore d'Hugues Capet mais sous celui de Charles le Chauve. Petit-fils de Charlemagne, sa popularité s'est effacée derrière celle de son grand-père. Et pourtant, le roi puis l'empereur dont il est question a voulu entretenir sa mémoire et a grandement participé à la fondation de la France. Pourquoi l'avoir alors oublié dans les livres d'histoire ? Comment ce roi monte-t-il sur le trône ? Qu'a t-il réellement accompli pour le rayonnement du royaume ? Découvrir la figure et le gouvernement de Charles le Chauve c'est aussi pénétrer la France des VIIIème et IXème siècles et découvrir l'histoire de la fondation de la nation. L'historien Laurent Theis répond aux questions de Mari-Gwenn Carichon. L'invité: Laurent Theis est historien spécialiste du Haut Moyen Âge (L'avènement d'Hugues Capet, Robert le Pieux : le roi de l'an mil) et spécialiste du XIXème siècle français (François Guizot) Il vient de publier une biographie remarquable de Charles le Chauve, l'Empire des Francs (Gallimard, 07-10-2021, 272 pages, 21,00 €).

The Victor Davis Hanson Show
The Traditionalist: The Left's Gifts to the GOP

The Victor Davis Hanson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 42:20


Listen in to Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler as they reflect on the Manchin decision, Omicron and the truth crisis, Kamala's run-in with Charlemagne, and the special gift to 2024, Hillary.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pissed Gof
69 MatRicks Wun

Pissed Gof

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 62:45


Merry Christmas ya filthy animals! I start with some recap of the movies I watched, and my thoughts without spoilers, I also talk heavily about the first matrix movie and spoil that movie that came out in 1999 (21 years ago dude cmon ya should have seen it by now) and why its important. I might go over the second and third one if you guys like this. I then talk about the Colorado Trucker protest, a CIA Child Sex Crime scandal, and the Biden saying "Lets go Brandon" as well as Kamala's Glitch in the matrix on Charlemagne's show. oh and at the end is the set I did on Christmas, Enjoy it! See ya in 2022 yall! Share, give me 5 stars(now available on spotify) and tell your friends if you like this! We gotta wake up the people! (Recorded 12/27/2021)

THE VANTES PODCAST
My Reaction: Charlemagne & Kamala Harris

THE VANTES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 41:36


Watch my reaction to the Charlemage & Kamala Harris interview --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/joeyvantes/message

On The Town with Tanya Cooper
Black boys, what?

On The Town with Tanya Cooper

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 15:22


What is happening to our black boys? Can we trust science after Tuskaghee experiment? We caught this and had to share what Charlemagne and Bro Muhammed was chatting about! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tanya-cooper/support

Conspiracy In The Force - Star Wars and Conspiracy Theories
The Christmas Special Group Pod (hosted by Mat from the Great Deception Podcast)

Conspiracy In The Force - Star Wars and Conspiracy Theories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 108:14


Merry Christmas! This is audio from The Great Deception Podcast's "Monday MasterDebaters" show last Monday 12.19.21. This was Christmas themed, though a lot of Covid info and news in there as well. I discuss a bit about my book release, and later in the episode I share my crazy Home Alone Devil theory. Check it out!! Hope you are all having a blast celebrating Christmas in person with your families! Episode description from original post: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/episode-10-monday-night-masterdebaters/id1584909455?i=1000545602218 Welcome to the Christmas Special of the Monday Night MasterDebaters. This was a fun one, we start out discussing Konspiracy Kyle's new book Intergalactic Totalitarianism (link below). Then things shift towards Kamala on Charlemagne, Myocarditis & strokes, and the cringe worthy song from the NIH Director on the pandemic. We then shift gears to the Christmas theme, touching on our Christmas Traditions, Santa & Krampus, Elf on the Shelf /Mench on the Bench, Favorite & least favorite Christmas movies, and some of the worst Christmas gifts we received. A really fun episode, I hope you all enjoy! I want to wish everyone a safe, happy, & Marry Christmas from the bottom of my heart to you all!!! Links to my new book Link to paperback: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NH424CG/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?keywords=intergalactic+totalitarianism&qid=1639538835&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyMTRSSjhYQUJVTVlYJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMTQzNDg1MTE5TFVVWUM3WUZXUSZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMTU1MTQ4M1M0WFJIQUZPSU1WQSZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU= Link to Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NMCZN9H/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?keywords=intergalactic+totalitarianism&qid=1639538905&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExTU8xVDBXTjYySEhFJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNzg1Mjc1MVc3UVNESE85TlZaVyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMTU1MzA0M1QxSUJDU0FOTVJBWiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU= --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conspiracyintheforce/support

SBS French - SBS en français
C'est arrivé un 25 décembre: Le couronnement de Charlemagne en 800

SBS French - SBS en français

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 6:54


Le 25 décembre de l'an 800, Charles Ier dit Charlemagne, déjà roi des Francs depuis plus de 30 ans, est couronné Empereur à Rome par le pape Léon III.

The Rest Is History
12 Days: Coronation of Charlemagne and the collapse of the Soviet Union

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 33:08


To kick off our 12 Days of Christmas mini-series, Tom and Dominic remember the birth of the Holy Roman Empire and Mikhail Gorbachev's resignation See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Part Of The Problem
The Omicron Hype

Part Of The Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 67:54


Dave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in politics! On this episode of Part Of The Problem, Dave and Robbie discuss the measures being put in place by the State, and then we look at Kamala Harris recent appearance on Charlemagne's late night show, and discuss how she shows her true colors.This Episode Was Recorded On 12.22.21 Support Our SponsorsBlue Chew - https://bluechew.com use promo code PROBLEM at checkoutYokratom - https://yokratom.comzippix - https://zippixtoothpicks.comPart Of The Problem Airs every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 6pm ET on the GaS Digital Network! The newest 20 episodes are always free, but if you want access to all the archives, watch live, chat live, access to the forums, and get the show five days before it comes out everywhere else - you can subscribe now at gasdigitalnetwork.com and use the code POTP to save 15% on the entire network. Follow the show on social media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComicDaveSmithhttps://twitter.com/RobbieTheFirehttps://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/https://www.instagram.com/robbiethefire/https://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightSubscribe On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DSmithcomicBuy Daves Album : Dave Smith Libertas - https://bit.ly/2Nq5seMDave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in Politics three times a week, with the promise of bonus episodes! Libertarian Philosophy mixed with a sense of humor, POTP is one of the leading voices in libertarianism.Dave Smith is a New York based stand-up comedian, radio personality, and political commentator. Dave can be seen regularly on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and “Red Eye” on Fox News, as well as “Kennedy” on Fox Business Network. In 2013 Dave was featured as one of the New Faces at the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was also a featured performer on the New York Comedy Festival's “New York's Funniest” showcase in 2014 and 2015. Dave's outlet for his social commentary is his podcast, “Part of the Problem,” which is available on iTunes. Dave is also co-host of “The Legion of Skanks” podcast, available on the GaS Digital Network.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Move Left, Idiots!
Episode 236 - Kamala Goes Off On Charlemagne, Eric Adams Is A Psycho, & Socialism Wins In Chile

Move Left, Idiots!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 112:55


This week's episode is live!

DIPPED in Nonsense
107: Holler Days

DIPPED in Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 75:57


In this week's episode Cev and Q bring on the holiday cheer and share a PSA against scammers, RTFKT NFT company being acquired by Nike, Clone X, NFT trading pro tips, The Matrix Resurrection, advancements in technology, AI robotic technologies, tornadoes hitting the midwest, pilotS capturing UFO's over the Pacific Ocean, rich people building bunkers, Travis Scott getting dropped from Coachella, the Charlemagne tha God interview, Nancy Reagan being crowned the Throat Goat, Hollywood, Tori Lanes shooting Megan the Stallion in the foot, Q shares African history following the military campaigns fought between Kush Nubian Queen Kandake Amanirenas and the Roman Leader Gaius Petronius. HOLLAAAA linktr.ee/dipped

Truth Will Set You Free
#79 - 12.21.21

Truth Will Set You Free

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 134:35


This week, on Truth Will Set You Free we will talk about the pending lockdowns in this country with cases... again on the rise, the new influx of #omicron and the continued issues related to "science" and forcing the V.Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker have breakthrough cases of CoVid, Manchin verbally shuts down the Build Back Better plan and we will of course find some new, fun topics to discuss!We also have a special guest coming this week! Mo from many of Soonie's lives and you may know her as Let's Talk Darling? will be joining us this week as we find new topics to discuss!Topics for this week:1. CoVID running a muck in all areas of the country, most of which are the most highly V'd. - NFL, NYC, SNL, Democrats and more.2. Charlemagne tha Gods interview with Kamala Harris when he trigger her with the, “who's really in charge” question. Joe Manchin or Joe Biden.3. Tony Timpas case possibly being reopened again.4. Officer Kim Potter who shot Duante Wright accidentally with the taser.5. Joe Manchin6. North Korea

Dangerous World Podcast
Ep. 185 - MNMD X - XMAS Special!

Dangerous World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 108:43


Thank you for listening to another episode of DWP! Welcome to the Christmas Special of the Monday Night MasterDebaters. I was joined by Janet from Deplorable Nation, Ryan from Dangerous World Pod, Niko from Upstate Unconventional Pod, Konspiracy Kyle from Conspiracy in the Force Pod, and Kyle from The Big Dumb Podcast. This was a fun one, we start out discussing Konspiracy Kyle's new book Intergalactic Totalitarianism (link below). Then things shift towards Kamala on Charlemagne, Myocarditis & strokes, and the cringe worthy song from the NIH Director on the pandemic. We then shift gears to the Christmas theme, touching on our Christmas Traditions, Santa & Krampus, Elf on the Shelf /Mench on the Bench, Favorite & least favorite Christmas movies, and some of the worst Christmas gifts we received. A really fun episode, I hope you all enjoy! I want to wish everyone a safe, happy, & Marry Christmas from the bottom of my heart to you all!!! Kyle from Conspiracy in the Force Podcast IG @konspiracy_kyle linktr.ee/Konspiracy_Kyle intergalactic totalitarianism: https://www.amazon.com/Intergalactic-Totalitarianism-Authoritarian-Tactics-Traits/dp/B09NH424CG/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=intergalactic+totalitarianism&qid=1640058524&sprefix=intergalactic+tota%2Caps%2C125&sr=8-1 Janet from Deplorable Nation Twitter @KnowJanet IG: @deplorablejanet Ryan from Dangerous World Podcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DangerousWorldPodcast/posts IG: dangerousworldpod Merch: https://dangerousworldstore.com/ Niko: Upstate Unconventional Podcast IG @upstateunconventional Email: upstateunconventional@gmail.com Kyle from The Big Dumb Podcast IG:thebigdumb_podcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheBigDumbPodcast Merch: https://tbd-46.creator-spring.com/listing/the-big-dumb-shirtless-shirt Mat from The Great Deception Podcast IG: @thegreatdeceptionpodcast YouTube: https://youtube.com/user/Barons44 Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/hPdLAyfQQ2DP/ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@TheGreatDeceptionPodcast:6 Telegram: https://t.me/thegdpod Email: thegreatdeceptionpodcast@gmail.com Ryan's Holiday Selections: https://techmediatainment.blogspot.com/2010/12/top-30-funniest-christmas-porn-movie.html Patreon.com/DangerousWorldPodcast for only $3 get the full versions of every episode plus bonus episodes For $5 get additional weekly bonus episodes! YOUTUBE CHANNEL LINK https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCZAc1An-9So-YI5WB53p6MQ IG: DangerousWorldPod EMAIL: DangerousWorldPodcast@gmail.com IG: DangerousWorldPod Male Grooming

Deez Ninjas Podcast
Episode 55 "Almost Wile E. Coyote"

Deez Ninjas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 99:06


Welcome to Deez Ninjas Podcast! We're glad you came to kick it with us! This week on the pod Tas schools us on the massive number of Christmas songs out there(6:01), we commend Deion Sanders on his recruitment of a top 2 player to a HBCU(14:28), Derek Chauvin pleads guilty(21:56), the CDC recommends against the J & J vaccine(25:20), and the FDA takes a stand on abortion rights (30:13). Then we get into the Alec Baldwin murder mystery that's unfolding(45:45), Flava Flav avoids becoming Wile E. Coyote(50:51), new details emerge from the Meg Thee Stallion/Tory Lanes drama(1:01:53), Charlemagne riles up Kamala Harris on his talkshow(1:12:41), and lastly, people are buying farts in a jar(1:23:03). Make sure to follow our Ninjas on social media JJ Dynamite @clvbdynamite Vern Hayes @whatupvern Tas @mocha_vybez Barb @agent99time/@novelsbyB/@onlybarb Shanni Love @lovesooutspoken Nikki Savage @truthhurtswith_nikkisavage Also follow Deez Ninjas Podcast on social media too! FB/IG/Twitter @deezninjaspod Twitch @d33zninjas Tik Tok @deezninjasnetwork You can catch us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/deezninjasnetwork Or our website: https://www.deezninjas.com PLEASE MAKE SURE TO LISTEN, LIKE, COMMENT, AND SHARE!!!! THANKS IN ADVANCE.

The Todd Huff Radio Show
Democrats Are Furious Over Build Back Better

The Todd Huff Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 38:50


Democrats are furious over Manchin's refusal to support the BBB bill.

Todd Huff Show
Democrats Are Furious Over Build Back Better

Todd Huff Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 38:50


Democrats are furious over Manchin's refusal to support the BBB bill.

Harsh Reality Podcast
The Harsh Reality Podcast Ep.27

Harsh Reality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 102:49


• Prez announces no plans for student loan forgiveness and payments to resume in February despite rampant inflation. Are blue voters finally accepting the L?• Charlemagne's interview with the VP and the reactions with her "mad black woman" impersonation. Staged? Modern-day black face?• Germany locking down unjabbed, Aussie camps, and Canada set to conduct trials on toddlers despite risks. Is the US the last stronghold against the insanity?• Is this "Omarion" strain a distraction from the Ghislaine Maxwell trial? Punishment for Africans?• Tristan Thompson impregnates personal trainer for baby #3, DaBaby/Danileigh situation, Brittany Renner still on the troll, etc. Is lack of sexual urge control a detriment to the black man?• With the announcement of the Metaverse, are we officially on the cusp of “The Matrix” type society? Should we be concerned?• Wrap upFollow the ShowTwitter: @HarshPodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theharshrealitypodcast/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theharshrealitypodcastSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/harshrealitypodcast)

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Manchin ticks of AOC, Bernie and Psaki plus Kamala Harris' most cringeworthy interview ever - 12.20.21 - Hour 2

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 38:48


Kamala's interview with Charlemagne the God, Senator Manchin drives the far-left crazy, and AOC desperately needs a fact-check.

The Vince Coakley Radio Program
The Vince Coakley Radio Program 12-20 Hour 2

The Vince Coakley Radio Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 32:58


The Federal Government, Charlemagne the God Interview, Stolen Legos See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Mock and Daisy: Daily Dish: Manchin saves America, Kamala and Charlemagne, and more

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021


Kamala Harris gets heated in her interview with Charlamagne Tha God on Comedy Central. Joe Manchin is getting attacked by Psaki, The Squad, and just about every Democrat for rejecting the Build Back Better act. And you will not believe how much money Elon Musk is paying in taxes!!! Please visit our great sponsors: My […]

Mock and Daisy's Common Sense Cast
Daily Dish: Manchin saves America, Kamala and Charlemagne, and more

Mock and Daisy's Common Sense Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 30:47


Kamala Harris gets heated in her interview with Charlamagne Tha God on Comedy Central. Joe Manchin is getting attacked by Psaki, The Squad, and just about every Democrat for rejecting the Build Back Better act. And you will not believe how much money Elon Musk is paying in taxes!!!Please visit our great sponsors:My Pillowhttps://www.mypillow.com/chicksNow get BOGO Giza Dream Sheets with promo code CHICKS. The Association of Mature American Citizenshttps://amac.us/chicksThe benefits of membership are great, but the cause is even greater.Omaha Steakshttps://omahasteaks.comThe holidays are HERE! Now save over 50% when you order the Perfect Gift Package and get 8 FREE burgers with keyword CHICKS. Cozy Earthhttps://CozyEarth.comEnter promo code CHICKS and save 35%.

Alain Elkann Interviews
Giacomo Cattaneo Adorno - 101 - Alain Elkann Interviews

Alain Elkann Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 44:55


A LONG HISTORY OF VINICULTURE. Giacomo Cattaneo Adorno is engaged in wine making and the other historical traditions of “Castello di Gabiano”

Le Cours de l'histoire
Pourquoi dit-on que Charlemagne a inventé l'école ?

Le Cours de l'histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 3:44


durée : 00:03:44 - Le Pourquoi du comment : histoire - par : Gérard Noiriel - Il y a belle lurette que nos enseignants ne racontent plus à leurs élèves que Charlemagne a inventé l'école. Ce mythe pourtant, s'est prolongé jusqu'à nous.

Shoot Da Thr33
Travis Scott and Charlemagne interview | Friday vs. Boyz n the hood | ShootDaThree(3) Podcast Ep.51

Shoot Da Thr33

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 51:25


History Unplugged Podcast
What the Middle Ages Can Teach Us About Pandemics, Mass Migration, and Tech Disruption

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 54:43


The medieval world – for all its plagues, papal indulgences, castles, and inquisition trials – has much in common with ours. People living the Middle Ages dealt with deadly pandemics, climate change, mass migration, and controversial technological changes, just as we do now in 2021. Today's guest, Dan Jones, author of POWERS AND THRONES: A New History of the Middle Ages looks at these common features through a cast of characters that includes pious monks and Byzantine emperors, chivalric knights and Renaissance artists. This sweep of the medieval world begins with the fall of the Roman empire and ends with the first contact between the Old World and the New. Along the way, Jones provides a front row seat to the forces that shaped the Western world as we know it. This is the thousand years in which our basic Western systems of law, commerce, and governance were codified; when the Christian Churches matured as both powerful institutions and the regulators of Western public morality; and when art, architecture, philosophical inquiry and scientific invention went through periods of seismic change. We discuss: • The height of the Roman empire and its influential rulers, as well as the various reasons it fell, including climate change pushing the Huns and so-called “barbarian” tribes to the empire's borders. • The development of Christianity and Islam, as well as the power struggles and conflict ignited in the name of religion, chivalric orders such as the Knights Templar, and the rise of monasteries as major political players in the West. • The intimate stories of many influential characters of the Middle Ages, such as Constantine I, Justinian, the Prophet Muhammad, Attila the Hun, Charlemagne, El Cid, Leonardo Da Vinci, Genghis Khan, Marco Polo, Martin Luther, and many more. • The development of global trade routes and commerce across Europe, Asia, and Africa and the expanding map during the Age of Exploration. • The Black Death, which decimated up to sixty percent of the local population in the fourteenth century and led to widespread social unrest and the little Ice Age, the period between 1300-1850 triggered by volcanic activity that created a climate so regularly and bitterly cold that it contributed to the Great Famine of 1315-21.

The Soapbox Podcast
Episode 137: Take 'Em to Chili's

The Soapbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 112:04


On this episode, Donte and Solange talk about their night at round of flames, Donte questions why silence bothers people so much, Kanye West and Drake's concert, Travis Scott interview with Charlemagne, Honeymoon phase in a relationship, Khuran brings up a question to the panel and much more! Make sure you guys subscribe to catch the next episode of The Soapbox! Follow us on Ig: @Sunnyte_ @khurann @Solange.buon @thesoapboxpodcast Twitter: @Sunnyte_ @KhuranAmal @soapboxpodcast1 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-soapbox8/support

Stay Busy with Armon Sadler
S3:E10 - "Transitions" ft. Kojo Dadzie (TMTG)

Stay Busy with Armon Sadler

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 104:52


The Busy Boys bring back a familiar face in The Multi Talented Gentleman, Kojo Dadzie. CHAT (6:57) - Drake withdraws Grammy nominations, Kanye West's Free Larry Hoover Concert featuring Drake and an epic rant from Armon, JacquEeEeEes Generational National Anthem Performance, Travis Scott's interview with Charlemagne, Lucky Daye's latest single “CANDY DRIP,” expectations for his upcoming album, and his place among R&B men currently, Rick Ross' newest album ‘Richer Than I've Ever Been,' A Boogie's EP ‘B4 AVA.' SLIDE DECK (54:30) - “Time Coming” by Kai Ca$h (Kojo), “All In My Head” by SiR (Nic), “Candy Grapes” by Fousheé ft. Steve Lacy (Armon). NEW SEGMENT - Kojo Tell Us! BOARD MEETING - Update on Kojo's life, his aspirations for 2022, therapy in and out of the doctor's office, albums of the year. Stay Safe, Stay Humble, Stay Busy!

The 3 Piece Podcast
Episode 136 Cease and Desist!

The 3 Piece Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 129:52


Hey y'all! Another week, Another episode of the ladies exercising their 1st Amendment Rights! This week the ladies discuss the “Out of Line”interviews from Akademiks and Charlemagne and Travis Scott The Kanye West Ft Drake concert, Jussie Smollett's guilty verdict the new Amazon Series “Harlem” Power and more!

CrossXCultured
Ep. 96- Joohsay Smoolay

CrossXCultured

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 89:56


We begin this episode giving a moment of silence to Nick Cannon's 5 month old son, Zen. Sending our love and prayers. Comedian Rebel Wilson speaks about the new challenges in her career after her weight loss. Travis Scot sits with Charlemagne the God in his first interview after the AstroWorld Tragedy. Chris Cuomo catches some second- hand heat frothier, Andrew Cuomo's accusations. We have followed this case from the very beginning, and now we have a verdict, lets talk Jussie Smollett. #CarefortheCulture goes to medical illustrator that brings awareness to African-American anatomy. #OlodooftheWeek goes to Stevie J for being a bird. Join us as we catch up with the latest in Music and TV. This week's episode is , “Will Smiths or Russell Wilsons” this is.. CrossxCultured

You Can't Make This Up Podcast

Killa recaps his big event in Chicago, more motion sickness on Dizzle's ride back from the ATL, Kev battles the elements while Christmas Shopping. Plus, thoughts on Charlemagne's interview with Travis Scott, Kanye & Drake's Free Larry Hoover concert. Quick hitters: RIP to former NFL wideout Demaryius Thomas, Megan Thee Stallion graduated from TSU on Saturday, & KD vs Trae Young. Stay connected with the fellas @Dj_Killa_Kev & @1KevNash & @GrandpaDizzle on Twitter & IG!

Tha Storm Podcast
Lack Pack (Episode 143)

Tha Storm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 177:03


Our friend, hip-hop artists Biggs joins us for this fire new episode. (10:33) @yaga.boiii on IG asks: "Have any of you been in a spot where you wanna get stuff done, you make plans, but come time to execute you lose motivation?" (36:12) Kanye and Drake Re-unite for the "Free Larry Hoover" Concert (49:38) Juice Wrld album "Fighting Demons" Review (1:21:05) Travis Scott's Conversation with Charlemagne (1:37:19) Platinum End Episode 11 Review (1:54:17) Worlds Greatest Assassin Episode 11 Review (2:03:28) Demon Slayer S2 E1 Review

Les livres ont la parole
L'INTÉGRALE - "La plus secrète mémoire des hommes" de Mohamed Mbougar Sarr (Philippe Rey) (11/12/21)

Les livres ont la parole

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 5:04


"La plus secrète mémoire des hommes" de Mohamed Mbougar Sarr (Philippe Rey) Le coup de cœur du libraire : Vanessa Amiot de la librairie Charlemagne à Toulon (83) : "Glen Affric" de Karine Giebel (Plon)

Cheries World
throwback interview with the owner of Safe Pods

Cheries World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 43:04


This week we throw it back with an Interview with Tommy Baggiero of Safe Pods. Safe Pods is a company ensuring the safety of our children, places of worship, and general public from activeSafePOD is a family owned company.  Safety for what we hold dear is the common denominator responsible for the development of our products.  Through the development of our A.C.T. Modular Pods, A.R.C. Pod System and in conjunction with our affiliate organizations, we harden facilities with products and technology at the forefront of security .Watch Cherie's World on YouTube every Wednesdayhttps://youtube.com/c/OfficialCherieJohnsonFollow Cherie on Instagram https://instagram.com/cheriejohnson75?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=17fep1gaqln0nLike Cherie on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Cherie-Johnson-255226641178871/Follow Cherie on Twitter https://twitter.com/cheriejohnson75Subscribe to Cherie's World on Apple Podcasts AND PLEASE LEAVE A 5 STAR RATING AND A REVIEW https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cheries-world/id1456421636#episodeGuid=e974e3542db247c1b61c70bc84e5dce0If you would like to advertise or have your business or product featured on Cherie's World and Cherie's social media email us at cheriesworldpodcast@gmail.comhttps://therealcherie.com/

CQFD - La 1ere
Énigmes mathématiques au temps de Charlemagne

CQFD - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 21:31


Des mathématiques, oui, mais qui parleront aussi aux plus littéraires : une énigme sortie de manuscrits moyenâgeux ! Un livre vient de paraître sur le sujet " Énigmes mathématiques au temps de Charlemagne ". Pour en parler, Jérôme Gavin, Mathématicien, enseignant de mathématiques au Collège Voltaire à Genève et Philippe Genequand, historien, professeur à lʹUniversité de Montréal, spécialiste du Moyen-Âge. Un dossier dʹHuma Khamis.

Female Startup Club
How she sold 100,000 units in her first year of business, with AVEC's Denetrias Charlemagne

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 43:45


Today we are learning from Dee Charlemagne who is the co-founder of AVEC Drinks. Made with real fruit juice, low or no sugar, and natural botanicals, Avec's drinks are the better-tasting — and better for you — mixers you deserve.Now before we get into it - there are so many pieces of gold in this episode, we chat through the money stuff, selling through 100,000 units in the first year in business and landing the NY Times on launch day. Grab a pen and paper, you'll need it. LINKS WE MENTION: Avec's InstagramDenetrias' LinkedInFemale Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramDoone's TikTokIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.com

AIR Podcast
AIR 040 / Charlemagne Palestine

AIR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:51


Can you believe?! This is the 40th episode of AIR, and this month's guest is American composer, musician, and visual artist Charlemagne Palestine. Born and raised in New York, Charlemagne plays a wide variety of instruments — favouring hours-long pieces for piano and organ, often utilizing techniques like strumming that he himself has invented. His music is expansive both in tone and quantity, and his style has often been described as “playing an entire building.” In fact, I had intended the theme for today's episode to be maximalism — but true to his own rebellious nature, Charlemagne almost immediately rejected the term's usage in our interview. Instead, we approached the topic of a “total art experience,” the many ways he creates visceral music, and the physicality of playing. ++ Music: From "Four Manifestations on Six Elements" - Charlemagne Palestine (2020) "Strumming Music" - Charlemagne Palestine (1974) From "Schlingen-Blängen" - Charlemagne Palestine (1999) Clip of Charlemagne playing the carillon at AV Festival 2013 From "Four Manifestations on Six Elements" - Charlemagne Palestine (2020)

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Oooh, Spooky
Episode 155 - Family Ghost, Aaron's Plagues, Weiße Frauen, Charlemagne's Omens, Mao's Portrait

Oooh, Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:40


Or Familial Specter, A-Bomb's Tricks, White Lady, ThaGod's Portents, Chairman's Picture.

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs
Eureka 270: Avec

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 14:31


Alex Doman and Denetrias Charlemagne are the co-founders of Avec, a New York-based premium mixer brand. Avec's line of drinks are made with natural botanicals and real fruit, which are low on sugar and calories. The pair met at Columbia Business School, after Doman had a previous career in consulting in UK hospitality, where Charlemagne worked in brand for a number of notable US companies. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-11-11: Jeffrey J. Jillson, Deer check stations, and Russell Stewart

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 3:48


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Jeffrey J. Jillson was a professional ice hockey player who played in the NHL for the San Jose Sharks, Boston Bruins and the Buffalo Sabres. Now, for our feature story: With Rhode Island's deer hunting season underway, state wildlife officials are reminding hunters that deer taken during the first two days of the muzzleloader season this past Saturday and Sunday must be physically checked at one of five state-operated sites. The same rule applies for the first two days of shotgun deer season on December 4th and 5th. It also applies to deer taken with archery equipment. Check stations allow state biologists with the help of volunteers to collect samples and take data that provides insight into the overall health of Rhode Island's deer population. The check stations are located in Exeter, Richmond, Glocester, West Kingston and Tiverton. Deer taken on Patience Island, Prudence Island, and Block Island are exempt, but must still be reported using the online system. For more information on all things Westerly and Rhode Island, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from Randall Realtors Compass in Westerly. They're looking for real estate agents. You'll need to obtain a real estate license before you start. Pay can be $100,000 or more per year. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=ca280a731c2da875&advn=7652287743140876 Today we're remembering the life of Russell Stewart, beloved husband to June. Russ was born in New London, CT and  lived in Stonington and North Stonington for most of his life. Russ attended the UCONN where he earned a bachelors degree. He then earned masters degrees from both Trinity College and Eastern Connecticut State University. Before retiring from teaching, he earned a law degree from UCONN Law School. He received a Fulbright Scholarship to study in India, and numerous fellowships to universities and colleges around the country. He worked as a social studies teacher for the town of Groton for some 20 years, where he is often fondly remembered for playing piano for his students. Russ also served as President of the New London Central Labor Council in 1967 while representing the Groton Teacher's Union. Russ was an avid traveler, often with various members of his family, always with his wife. He visited over 60 countries and every state in the union consistently making new friends wherever he went. While there, he would pursue other interests such as rock and mineral hounding or genealogy. Russ traced his line back to multiple Mayflower passengers and to Charlemagne. Russ played the piano and performed many weekends in local bands. At home he enjoyed listening to all kinds of music and sharing his huge musical selection with anyone wanting to listen. He was an avid fan of the UCONN huskies, particularly the women's basketball team whom he watched in person attending their home games and following them to several Final Fours. Russell Stewart was an amazing man who touched the lives of countless people. He will be dearly missed by his wife of 65 years, his sons, his daughter, his half sister, many family members, and all his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Russ's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FriendsLikeUs
Timing Is Everything

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 105:55


Calise Hawkins, Masavia Greer, and Hollie Harper visit Friends and discuss timing in the business of comedy, paid family Leave, teacher/parent relationships and more with host Marina Franklin. Calise Hawkins is a stand-up comedian and writer. She writes for "Doin The Most With Phoebe Robinson" on Comedy Central and wrote for season 1 and 2 of HBOmax "That Damn Michael Che " Show. She has performed her standup on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (NBC), Russel Simmons Presents Live At The El Rey (Comedy Central), Gotham Live (Fox), Stand Up in Stilettos (TV Guide Channel), Nick Mom's Night Out (Nickelodeon), among others. She has written for Comedy Central's @midnight and Hood Adjacent, Adult Swim's Soft Focus, AMC's Unapologetic with Aisha Tyler, and MTV's Totally Clueless, Girl Code, and Charlemagne's Uncommon Sense. She was also a cast member of Oxygen's Funny Girls. Masavia Greer is a veteran of the New York comedy scene who has worked with some of the world's biggest comedic talent. For over 20 years, Masavia managed multiple clubs in New York City, including the Boston Comedy Club and Stand Up New York. He was a Talent Coordinator for HBO's Bad Boys of Comedy Season 2, and worked on the production side at Comedy Central, the Conan O'Brien Show, and more. Masavia prides himself on mentoring new and emerging comics, as well as advising seasoned veterans.  Hollie Harper is a comedy nerd from South Jersey. She is currently the creator and co-exec producer of Hella Late! with Hollie Harper on BRIC TV and a co-host of the nationally trending Twitter Storytelling Chat “BlerdDating.” Hella Late! with Hollie Harper was recently accepted into the 2021 NYC Web Fest. Hollie was a semi-finalist in the 2019 NBC Standup Competition and has been featured on NY1, and in Black Enterprise Magazine, Thrive Global and Confessional Magazine. Her popular sketch comedy show AMERICAN CANDY has played the Comic Strip, Gotham Comedy Club, BAM Café as well as the Chicago Sketch Comedy Festival. Time Out Chicago named them one of the five groups to watch. Hollie is a regular host for West Side Comedy Club in NYC and works with Gold Comedy and Stand Up Girls, two programs that empower young women by teaching them standup comedy. She was recently the talent coordinator and casting coordinator  for “Blood Lassi” on Spotify, written by Pratima Mani, and moderated the panel for the Emmy Award winning, WOC editing team of Black Lady Sketch Show for The Black TV and Film Collective. She is also the Creative Director of the very successful Black Women in Comedy Laff Fest. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Plot Spackle
We Named the Plot Holes Indiana (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade)

Plot Spackle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 76:22


Oh, hello my friends! We are pleased to see that you found this episode safely. Which is saying something, as the guys talk about Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. On this episode, John puts himself on the wrong side of history. Richard tells you how to light thermite. And Eric quotes Breaking Bad. So remember your Charlemagne, grab some camels, and listen to Plot Spackle!Music: TheFatRat - Epic https://lnk.to/ftrepic

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum
EP16 Powers Thrones and Dan Jones

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History: Addendum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 92:38


Historian Dan Jones' specialty is the Middle Ages. Dan Carlin adores the Middle Ages. Normans anyone? 1. Powers and Thrones: A New History of the Middle Ages by Dan Jones 2. The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors by Dan Jones 3. The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones 4. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England by Dan Jones 5. Crusaders: The Epic History of the Wars for the Holy Lands by Dan Jones

In Our Time: Culture
The Song of Roland

In Our Time: Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 51:58


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss an early masterpiece of French epic poetry, from the 12th Century. It is a reimagining of Charlemagne's wars in Spain in the 8th Century in which Roland, his most valiant knight, chooses death before dishonour, guarding the army's rear from a pagan ambush as it heads back through the Roncesvalles Pass in the Pyrenees. If he wanted to, Roland could blow on his oliphant, his elephant tusk horn, to summon help by calling back Charlemagne's army, but according to his values that would bring shame both on him and on France, and he would rather keep killing pagans until he is the last man standing and the last to die. The image above is taken from an illustration of Charlemagne finding Roland after the Battle of Roncevaux/Roncesvalles, from 'Les Grandes Chroniques de France', c.1460 by Jean Fouquet, Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, Ms Fr 6465 f.113 With Laura Ashe Professor of English Literature and Fellow in English at Worcester College, University of Oxford Miranda Griffin Assistant Professor of Medieval French at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Murray Edwards College And Luke Sunderland Professor in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Durham University Studio producer: John Goudie

In Our Time
The Song of Roland

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 51:58


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss an early masterpiece of French epic poetry, from the 12th Century. It is a reimagining of Charlemagne's wars in Spain in the 8th Century in which Roland, his most valiant knight, chooses death before dishonour, guarding the army's rear from a pagan ambush as it heads back through the Roncesvalles Pass in the Pyrenees. If he wanted to, Roland could blow on his oliphant, his elephant tusk horn, to summon help by calling back Charlemagne's army, but according to his values that would bring shame both on him and on France, and he would rather keep killing pagans until he is the last man standing and the last to die. The image above is taken from an illustration of Charlemagne finding Roland after the Battle of Roncevaux/Roncesvalles, from 'Les Grandes Chroniques de France', c.1460 by Jean Fouquet, Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, Ms Fr 6465 f.113 With Laura Ashe Professor of English Literature and Fellow in English at Worcester College, University of Oxford Miranda Griffin Assistant Professor of Medieval French at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Murray Edwards College And Luke Sunderland Professor in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Durham University Studio producer: John Goudie

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols

Soon after he was crowned the Holy Roman Emperor, Charlemagne oversaw the completion of an impressive church at his royal residence. On this episode of 5 Minutes of Church History, Dr. Stephen Nichols guides us through the Palatine Chapel, where emperors would be crowned for centuries to come. Read the transcript: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/charlemagnes-chapel/ A donor-supported outreach of Ligonier Ministries. Donate: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/donate/

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
Jason Lee (on Hollywood Unlocked, Breaking "Khloe/Tristan Story", The Kardashians & BFFS Rihanna & Cardi B.)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 68:58


Jason Lee steps Behind The Rope. Media Mogul, Entertainment Journalist, Reality TV Star, Author. Of course, Jason is also the CEO, Editor-In-Chief and Founder of Hollywood Unlocked, THE Pulse of Pop Culture, media giant that breaks stories with 2.7M followers hanging on it's every word. Jason was not always the self made media mogul we see before us today. We chat about humble early beginnings, role models such as Wendy Williams, Charlemagne tha God and Howard Stern and early days as a star of VH1's Love & Hip Hop Hollywood. In an almost unprecedented move, Jason opens up about very publicly challenging CBS via #FreeJasonLee which led to the eventual release of his Reality TV Contract and discusses where his gusto to “take on” a major network comes from. We chat Nene Leaks and her own contract disputes with Bravo. Jason chats breaking the viral Jordyn Woods, Khloe Kardashian, Tristan Thompson “cheating” scandal, the “click power” of The Kardashians, other celebs which the public just cannot get enough of, set backs a la Karen Civil, and just how he manages to serve, stir, and deliver the tea while maintaining close celebrity friends like Rihanna, Cardi B, Lil' Kim, Tiffany Haddish, Blac Chyna and more. @hollywoodunlocked @theonlyjasonlee @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef Bonus Episodes Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope Brought to you by THIRDLOVE - http://www.thirdlove.com/velvet (20% Off First Purchase) Brought to you by SIMPLISAFE - https://www.simplisafe.com/velvetrope (20% Off Entire New System & First Month Free) Merch Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lions of Liberty
535. Neoreactionary "Charlemagne" on "Libertarian Diagnostic Failure"

Lions of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 67:23


In this week's flagship Lions of Liberty podcast, Marc is neoreactionary writer and YouTube "Charlemagne" to discuss his SubStack post "Libertarian Diagnostic Failure." Charlemagne first details how Donald Trump sparked his interest in politics, which soon led him to the writings of Curtis Tarvin aka Mencius Moldbug. Charlemagne describes just what the neoreactionary philosophy entails, before proceeding to explain why libertarianism has failed so drastically to take hold politically. This one is sure to ruffle some feathers, so feel free to share your thoughts with us on Twitter @LionsOfLiberty or over in our Facebook group, the Lions of Liberty Forum. Create more LIBERTY in your own life by joining myself, Pete Quinones, Brian McWilliams, John Odermatt and more entrepreneurs over at the Nomad Network! Invest in your future with iTrustCapital and use code LIONS for 1 month FREE  Get access to all of our bonus audio content, livestreams, behind-the-scenes segments and more for as little as $5 per month by joining the Lions of Liberty Pride on Patreon OR support us on Locals! Patrons also get 20% off all merchandise at the Lions of Liberty Store, including our hot-off-the-press Hands Up Don't Nuke! T-Shirt! Get 25% off your selection of the AMAZING CBD products over at PalomaVerdeCBD.com and use discount code "ROAR" at checkout! Check out the other Lions-hosted podcasts: Second Print Comics podcast with Marc Clair and Remso Martinez The BOHRing podcast with Brian, Odie, Howie and Rico

Economist Radio
Editor's Picks: October 18th 2021

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 23:55


A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the first big energy shock of the green era, how covid-19 will move from pandemic to endemic (11:29) and our Charlemagne columnist assesses the odds of “Polexit” versus a “dirty remain” (17:21) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.