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Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief | January 26, 2023

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 11:54


Give us about ten minutes a day and we will give you all the local news, local sports, local weather, and local events you can handle.   SPONSORS: Many thanks to our sponsors… Annapolis Subaru, the SPCA of Anne Arundel County,  Solar Energy Services,and Alpha Engineering. Today... An elderly man was killed in a hit-and-run bicycle crash. Two roommates plead guilty to killing a third roommate in 2017 in Annapolis. Mayor Buckley have moved Park and Rec Director, Archie Trader to the police department and hired Roslyn Johnson to run the department as he looks for a new direction. The Annapolis Patch is reporting on several store closings at the Annapolis Mall. Maryland Hall has an outstanding show this weekend and tickets are still available. The Homeowners Expo is coming in February and it looks to be especially good this year! And the Soup-er Bowl is coming to Heritage Baptist Church on Sunday, February 12th, and all non-Baptists are welcome too. Eagles fans will be embraced, Dallas fans ... not so much! And we have a little bit of podcast news as well! Trevor from  Annapolis Makerspace is here with your Maker Minute! And as usual, George from DCMDVA Weather is here with your local weather forecast! Please download their app to keep on top of the local weather scene! The Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief is produced every Monday through Friday at 6:00 am and available wherever you get your podcasts and also on our social media platforms--All Annapolis and Eye On Annapolis (FB) and @eyeonannapolis (TW) NOTE: For hearing impaired subscribers, a full transcript is available on Eye On Annapolis

Society of Reformed Podcasters
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part V)

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 39:58


Society of Reformed Podcasters
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part IV)

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 30:08


The Baptist Broadcast
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part V)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 39:57


In this third part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Roman Catholicism?" I cover part 4 out of seven differences between us and Rome (baptism) in this part. Check out parts 1-3 by clicking either link below! Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbolt... Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bnL... Part 3: https://youtu.be/pez9rKp2XGI Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCwzAc9QmzM

The Baptist Broadcast
Differences: Mariology, Scripture, & Tradition (Part VI)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 35:47


In this third part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Roman Catholicism?" I cover part 4 out of seven differences between us and Rome (baptism) in this part. Check out parts 1-3 by clicking either link below! Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbolt... Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bnL... Part 3: https://youtu.be/pez9rKp2XGI Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCwzA... Part 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiW94D7GYKM

Stay the Course
George Whitefield and the Baptists

Stay the Course

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 7:01


Society of Reformed Podcasters
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part III)

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 39:55


Truth Unbound with Walter Swaim
WHAT did Pastor Joel Say About Fundamental Baptists ?!

Truth Unbound with Walter Swaim

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 23:38


My Response to Pastor Joel about Fundamental Baptists Pastor Joel of Right Response Ministries was asked about his thoughts on independent fundamental Baptists. His answers are lacking much in several ways and this is my response (as an independent, fundamental Baptist all my life) to him and his remarks. Audio only & video on most podcast apps and at https://truthunbound.podbean.com Info: Pastor Joel's podcast on IFB's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S-bSmYt-74&t=295s Me about IFBer's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfFMXEFVcLg Info@TruthUnbound.org https://truthunbound.org/ The book “To Be Clear: Proclaiming the Gospel in a Post-Truth World” is available at Amazon.com and at TruthUnbound.org Facebook: search for “Truth Unbound”

Truth Unbound with Walter Swaim
WHAT Did Pastor Joel Say About Fundamental Baptists ?! [VIDEO]

Truth Unbound with Walter Swaim

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 23:38


My Response to Pastor Joel about Fundamental Baptists Pastor Joel of Right Response Ministries was asked about his thoughts on independent fundamental Baptists. His answers are lacking much in several ways and this is my response (as an independent, fundamental Baptist all my life) to him and his remarks. Audio only & video on most podcast apps and at https://truthunbound.podbean.com Info: Pastor Joel's podcast on IFB's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S-bSmYt-74&t=295s Me about IFBer's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfFMXEFVcLg Info@TruthUnbound.org https://truthunbound.org/ The book “To Be Clear: Proclaiming the Gospel in a Post-Truth World” is available at Amazon.com and at TruthUnbound.org Facebook: search for “Truth Unbound”

Two Journeys Sermons
Healed in Stages to See More Clearly (Mark Sermon 37) (Audio)

Two Journeys Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023


A two-step miracle of healing by Jesus gives us a picture of how our salvation also happens in stages. - SERMON TRANSCRIPT - I. An Unusual Miracle Turn in your Bibles to Mark chapter 8. As we resume our study in this incredible and glorious Gospel of Mark, we come this morning to a truly unusual miracle, a remarkable miracle. All of the miracles are remarkable, but this one's unique in some incredible ways. In this miracle account, Jesus's power seems to flicker a bit, I guess, I don't know how we would say it —that it seemed like it didn't work the first time. Do you think that Jesus is just giving us an example of perseverance? “If at first you don't succeed, try again.” That is not what's going on here, but it's strange for Jesus to have to circle back and to heal this man, it seems a second time, like somehow Jesus' power had been inadequate or somehow seemed to fail. This is especially acute when we remember the instantaneous nature of all of Jesus' other miracles. Just walk through it. As we've seen in the Gospel of Mark. In Mark chapter 1, Jesus touched a leper and he was instantly cured of his leprosy. There's no healing process, no therapy that he had to go through. He was just healed. His flesh was restored and renewed. Mark chapter 2, the paralyzed man just got up and walked out in full view of them all. No therapy needed for him. When Jesus in Mark 4 said, "Peace be still," the wind and the waves were instantly silent, instantly quiet. The quelling of the turbulent waves was just astonishing power. It might usually have taken hours for them to settle down, but instantly quiet. In Mark 5, when He commanded the legion of demons to leave the tragic demoniac of the gatherings, thousands of demons instantly left and went into the pigs. There was no hesitation. In that same chapter, the woman with the bleeding problem for twelve years touched the hem of his garment and immediately felt within her body that she was freed from her suffering. Again, no therapy, no pattern of healing, it was just done. Again in that same chapter, Mark 5, when Jesus visited Jairus' house, He touched that little girl, and she was instantly raised from the dead. Whatever fever or illness had brought her to death was gone. All she needed was a good meal at that point. Best of all, I think Mark 7, the Syrophenician woman, the mother answered Jesus humbly and with faith, "Yes Lord, even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from the master's table." And Jesus said, "For such a reply, you may go, the demon is gone." Well, that's instantaneous. What's so remarkable in Mark 7 and that healing is that Jesus didn't say anything, do anything or go anywhere. It just was in his mind, it's done, instant healing. Remember the worship that came at the end of that chapter, Mark 7, with the healing of the deaf-mute and the people said about Jesus, they're overwhelmed with amazement and said, "He's done everything well until this.” This didn't seem to go so well. There must have been some intentionality here, and I think there was. II. A Man Healed in Stages There's intentional healing in stages, but why? Why a healing in stages? Look again at the account. Verse 22 -25, “They came to Bethsaida and some people brought a blind man and begged Jesus to touch him. He took the blind man by the hand and led him outside the village. When he had spit on the man's eyes and put his hands on him, Jesus asked, ‘Do you see anything?’ He looked up and said, ‘I see people, but they looked like trees walking around.’ Once more, Jesus put his hands on the man's eyes, then his eyes were opened and his sight was restored and he saw everything clearly.” The location is Bethsaida, which we know from other scriptures was the hometown of Peter, Andrew, and Philip and probably Nathaniel. It's near where Jesus fed the 5,000. Almost certainly many of the people there had been miraculously fed by Jesus that day. So what happened? The issue is blindness. Blindness was tragically common back then. Jesus healed many blind people throughout his ministry. Blind people are obviously in great distress, many of them ultimately had to resort to begging just to survive. In this case, this blind man has friends that care about him. Some friends brought the blind man to Jesus and begged him on his behalf for him to heal him. It's a beautiful picture I think of intercession. Similar to the four friends, you remember, that dug through the roof and lowered the paralyzed man down and lay them in front of Jesus, they cared about this man. These friends didn't have to work so hard as those friends did, but they had the same level of compassion and care for their friend. Stop for a moment and let's just do an application right here. This to me is a picture of intercessory prayer for lost people, that we would be bringing spiritually blind people to Jesus, for him to heal them spiritually. That's where we're going in the sermon, and I think it's just a teachable moment here. Who is like that for you? Are you praying for someone by name? Do you have a lost friend or coworker or neighbor or relative that you know by name and you are bringing this person to Jesus and saying, "Lord, please open his eyes, open her eyes.”? It's this teachable moment of intercessory prayer. Now, back to the account, we see the healing. Jesus takes this blind man by the hand, similar to the healing of the deaf-mute, the personal touch. He loves to do this, touching people, but in this case with him being blind, He's got to lead him and He leads him outside the village. Then He spits, He uses his saliva to heal the blind eyes of this man. Similar to John chapter 9, which we'll discuss later in the sermon, the man born blind. In that case, He spat on the ground and made some mud with the spit and smeared it on the man's eyes and sent him away and he went to the pool at Siloam and washed and his eyes were open, he could see. But the same thing in this case is the spitting. In this case, Jesus spat directly on the man's eyes, something that ordinarily would be a great insult. When Jesus was being mocked, they spat on him. But in this case it's not that at all. It's just the applying of moisture of water from Jesus' mouth for his healing. Having done this the first time, He asked him what he can see. Jesus knows everything. He knows what he can see, but He wants him to speak his experience and so he does, in verse 24, "I see people, but they look like trees walking around." Some sight has been restored, but it's not clear. People don't look like trees. His vision's working, but it's not clear, it's fuzzy, it’s not distinct. It's not reality, but it's better than it was. This is directly contrast with the final outcome, verse 25. Once more Jesus put his hands on the man's eyes, then his eyes were open, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. It's just beautiful, I love that word “clearly.” He saw things as they really were. The same word is used of the deaf-mute. He can speak clearly at the end of Mark 7. It’s the same thing. So seeing things as they actually are, they're not fuzzy, they're not blurry, that's reality. The account ends with this command about the village. He had pulled the man outside the village to heal him. After the healing, He commands him not to return to the village. Verse 26, “He sent him home to his home saying, 'Do not even enter the village.’" This may be like all the other commands to silence in these accounts where Jesus warned the healed person not to tell anyone. My usual go-to on that, has been crowd control. It's very clear that the Holy Spirit does not ultimately want this healing a secret because it's clearly been published around the world a billion times and twenty centuries of making this healing known to everybody. This is temporary injunction to not tell anyone, crowd control. As you see in John 6, the crowds got unruly, wanted to take Jesus by force and make him king. That seems to be why He does that. Some scholars, however, believe that it's an act of judgment on the City of Bethsaida. I think it's possible because Bethsaida had been the site, as I said, of the feeding of the 5,000 and many miracles, and Jesus specifically takes Bethsaida to task in Matthew 11 and cries down a prophetic judgment on Bethsaida. Matthew 11:21-22, "Woe to you Chorazin! Woe to you Bethsaida! If the miracles that were performed in you had been performed in Tyre and Sidon, they would've repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I tell you it'll be more bearable for Tyre and Sidon on the day of judgment, than for you Bethsaida." So it could be we're at the point where Jesus does not want to give any more evidence of his deity and his wonder-working power to Bethsaida, possibly. I don't know exactly when the sequence was, but that's possible. So that's the account, just walking through it of what happened. III. The Salvation Analogy: Physical and Spiritual Healing Now let's talk about the spiritual analogy, the salvation analogy, physical and spiritual healings. Why this two-step? We can reject any failure or fault on Jesus' part. Jesus was not having a bad day. We all have bad days. Sometimes you have to kind of circle back, do something a second time. “Don't give up, don't get discouraged, look at Jesus, He never gave up. Don't do that.” That's not what's going on here. There's got to be some intentionality. Mark 7 still holds, “He has done everything well,” including this. Everything He does is for a purpose. My idea here is Jesus was picturing that our spiritual healing comes to us in stages. That's my thesis, my idea. Whether that's his intentionality in this miracle or not, our salvation does comes in stages. But I think it's not hard to prove that Jesus' miracles were meant to be more than just physical, they're also to teach us things spiritually. I do believe that Scripture gives us permission to link the physical healings done by Jesus to the spiritual healing we need so much. Isaiah 53 starts that link. Isaiah 53:5 says, of Jesus, "He was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities: the punishment that brought us peace was upon him; and by his wounds we are healed of our transgressions and our iniquities.” "Scripture gives us permission to link the physical healings done by Jesus to the spiritual healing we need so much" Again, Luke 5, as we quoted many times, 31-32, “Jesus said, ‘It's not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I've not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.’" There it is a clear link of our repenting from sin being likened to healing by a doctor. We need therapy, we need spiritual healing. We are sick with sin. That's the real sickness Jesus came to cure through repentance. Then the clincher for me with this whole blindness issue is in John chapter 9. In John chapter 9, Jesus heals a man born blind. It's a marvelous chapter. This man is healed, Jesus isn't around when he's healed, he'd gone away to the pool at Siloam. And then the spiritual police— Scribes, Pharisees, teachers, law, high priests, haul him in before the tribunal. They're grilling this guy as if he has done something wrong. It's a remarkable account, really is. It’s got some interesting moments like when the parents get hauled in and they say, "Is this your son? The one you claim was born blind?" Stop right there. “What would our motive be of faking his blindness? It's been nothing but hard for us.” It's just amazing how obtuse these people are, and they're trying to force this man into their narrative of Jesus's life as an evildoer, as a messenger of Beelzebub. They're trying to force him, but this guy won't have anything to, he has none of it. He is just simple and is like, "You want to know what happened? I was blind, he put mud on my eyes, I washed and now I can see. What else you want to know?" "Well, we want to know who you think he was." "I think he was a prophet.” They start to curse at him and yell at him and said, "We don't even know from where this man comes." He said, "You don't know where he came from and he opened my eyes. Kind of obvious to me. If this man were not from God, he could do nothing. How is it you can't see where he is from?" Then they end up cursing him out and basically excommunicating him, kick him out of the synagogue because they'd already decided that if anybody said that Jesus was the Christ, they'd be put out of the synagogue, so they throw him out. Jesus goes and finds him, and it's not accidental. The next chapter, John 10, is the good shepherd that goes and looks for the sheep. He goes and finds this man, but the enemies come out and they're surrounding him and they're still right there. And Jesus says these words, John 9:39-41, "For judgment, I have come into the world so that the blind will see and those who see will become blind." Now that's a key verse in my mind of Jesus here. Some Pharisees who are with him heard him say this and asked, "What are we blind to? So tell us what you mean by that statement." John 9:41, Jesus said, "If you were blind, you would not be guilty of sin. But now that you claim you can see, your guilt remains." In other words, you are blind. But they're physically fine. He's definitely talking about spiritual blindness. That gives me exegetical permission to see Jesus's healing of people physically blind as a picture of our spiritual healing from spiritual blindness. Jesus openly makes that connection here in John 9. The man born blind, his eyes were opened. He knew who Jesus was because he had said when Jesus went to him and said, "Do you believe in the son of man?” "Who is he, sir?" the man asked. "Tell me so that I can believe in him." Jesus said, "You have now seen him. In fact, he is the one speaking with you." Then the man said, "Lord, I believe," and he worshiped him. He didn't receive just physical sight that day, he received spiritual sight, the ability to see Jesus as savior. So we have every right to see all these physical healings as pictures of our spiritual healing, our salvation. There are many such verses that speak about this. One very clear one is in Acts 26:18, and that's the third time, in the book of Acts we have the account of the conversion of Saul of Tarsus. The Lord said to him as He converted Saul, Paul, says, "I'm sending you to the Gentiles," listen to these words, "to open their eyes and turn them from darkness to light." Well, there it is. Our salvation, therefore, is likened to the giving of spiritual sight, moving us from darkness to light, "To open their eyes and turn them from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God so that they may receive forgiveness of sins in a place among those who are sanctified through faith in me." So that openly tells us our salvation is like we were blind and now we see. IV. Saved in Stages Therefore, I believe that Jesus saved this blind man in stages to picture our salvation coming to us in stages. What does that mean? The time orientation of our salvation is taught in the Bible. We have been saved, we are being saved, and we will be saved. Now we Baptists are used to, "So when were you saved?" Or, "Are you saved?" and all that. We tend to kind of boil “saved” down to the moment of being born again. That's okay at one level, but it's not okay if we think that's all salvation is. Salvation's bigger than that, but it is that. We have been saved in the past, that being born again, justified if we came to faith in Christ. Ephesians 2:8-9, uses that language, "For it is by grace you have been saved through faith and this not of yourselves, it's the gift of God, not by work so that no one can boast.” The moment you trust in Christ and repent of your sins, at that moment you're saved. Ephesians 2:8 tells you, "Saved from the wrath of God," but we're being saved as well.vA number of verses use this, but most plainly, 1 Corinthians 1:18, "The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God." So we are being saved by the ongoing power of the cross. The gospel keeps ministering to us, "We are being saved." Then salvation's future, “We will be saved." Romans 5:9 uses that language, "Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God's wrath through him.” There is a yet future salvation, it hasn't come to us yet, and we will be saved. So that's the time orientation. It's a process. Theologically, the process comes in these three stages, justification, sanctification, glorification. Justification is the beginning of the Christian life. What is justification? It's the instantaneous declaration by God that we, who are sinners, are righteous in his sight. We are declared not guilty of our sins. The simple language is, we're forgiven of all sins, past, present, and future. But more theologically, we are declared righteous in his sight. How is that? How are sinners like us declared righteous? “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.” That's how we are justified, we are forgiven, we are made righteous by faith in Jesus. It happens by a double imputation or crediting our sins to Jesus and He dies under the wrath of God on the cross. As 2 Corinthians 5:21 says, "God made him who had no sin, to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God." That's the second imputation. His righteousness credited us and on that basis, God declares us righteous. He counts our faith in Christ as righteousness and He declares us not guilty, acquitted, totally forgiven of all of our sins. That's justification. But that's not the end of salvation. There’s a process and the next is sanctification. That gradual process of transformation where little by little, we are made more and more conform to Christ. We more and more think like Christ, love like Christ, act like Christ. Progressively, gradually. Many verses speak of this. Ephesians 4: 22-24 says, "You were taught with regard to your former way of life, to put off your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires; to be made new in the attitude of your minds; and to put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness." You're putting off wickedness, you're putting off sin and corruption and putting on purity and righteousness. The key text in the entire Bible on sanctification is Romans 6, 7, and 8. Those three chapters, by the way, we are walking through those chapters carefully on Wednesday evenings. The next two weeks will be on creation/evolution, but then when we resume on Wednesday evenings, the adult Bible study will be walking through those chapters. I invite you to come. But Romans 6 teaches sanctification most plainly. Romans 6:3-8 says, "All of us who are baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death. We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may walk in newness of life.If we have been united with him like this in his death, we will certainly also be united with him in his resurrection. For we know that our old self was crucified with him, dead once for all, the old self, so that the body of sin might be rendered increasingly powerless, weaken gradually. Romans 6:6, "So that we should no longer be slaves to sin because anyone who has died has been freed from sin." Now if we died with Christ, we believe we'll also live with him, we'll walk with him, that kind of new life. Spiritual union with Christ means positionally, died to sin, at the instant of justification, we're dead to sin forever and then progressively, through new habits, through the transformation of the mind and the heart, by obedience to God's word, little by little becoming more and more like Christ. The progressive nature of sanctification is plain in Roman 6:19, "Just as you used to offer the parts of your body and slavery to impurity and to ever-increasing wickedness, so now offer them in slavery to righteousness, leading to holiness." That ever-increasing language that's progressive. We are to become more and more holy, more and more conform to Christ. That's salvation, that's sanctification, progressive. Paul commands the Philippians, "Continue to work out your salvation with fear and trembling. For it is God who works in you to will and to act according to his good purpose." We have work to do, brothers and sisters. We have work to do in our salvation. We're not done being saved. It comes to us in stages. We must work out our salvation with fear and trembling. But we're not on our own, God is working in us. Every good thing we do in sanctification, God worked it in us by His spirit. We are commanded to grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ [2 Peter 3:18]. That's the second stage. The third stage is glorification, the final stage of salvation. This occurs also in two stages unless we're the final generation. If we are still in the mortal body, when Jesus returns in the clouds, we get to skip the whole death thing. You have to go through a lot of other things, read about it in Revelation. But if we're not, we're going to die. If you're a Christian, you die in the Lord. The instant that you die, your spirit will be separated from your mortal body and the mortal body will go to corruption, but your spirit will go to perfection, instant perfection. That's step one of glorification. At that moment, your disembodied spirit will be present with the Lord, absent from the body, but present with the Lord, and you will be done sinning forever. How many of you are looking forward to that? Don't raise your hand, just smile. I'm looking forward to that. Free at last from sin, free at last. Then the final stage of our salvation is the resurrection of the body conformed to Christ's glorious body. Philippians 3:21 speaks of this, "By the power that enables him, Jesus to bring everything under his control, will transform our lowly bodies so that they'll be like His glorious body." We're going to get a resurrection body. Now all three of these stages are essential to our salvation. The Bible's very clear, we do not get it all at once. Therefore, I believe the healing of this blind man in stages, pictures our salvation in stages, but especially for me, our sanctification. Now I'm going to go back to that middle stage and say especially that I want to talk about the improvement of your spiritual sight for the rest of this sermon. That your eyesight, spiritual eyesight, will get better and better. I'm arguing here that faith is the eyesight of the soul. I’ve said that many times before, I think it's a good analogy. The Bible likens faith to sight. 2 Corinthians 5:7, "We walk by faith, not by sight." They're very similar, faith and sight. Hebrews 11 does the same thing, "Faith is the assurance of things, hope for the conviction of things what, not seen." Later in that same chapter, Hebrews 11:27, it speaks of Moses, "By faith Moses left Egypt, not fearing the king's anger, he endured as seeing Him who is invisible." Let me say that again. "As seeing Him who is invisible." How do you do that? It's in the faith chapter — by faith you see Him who is invisible. Ephesians 1:18 speaks of the eyes of the heart being enlightened. What is that? What are the eyes of the heart if not faith? The ability to see invisible spiritual realities, past, present, and future. That's the eyes of the heart being enlightened. Physical eyesight is vital to our lives. Jesus said in the Sermon of the Mount, "The eyes are the lamp of the body. If your eyes are good, your whole body will be full of light. But if your eyes are bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light within you is dark, how great is that darkness?" Do you have a sense Jesus was speaking about spiritual eyesight there? I do. But He's using the physical analogy. You know how important eyesight is to you? Why is it important? Because it means your whole body's full of light, it means you can see reality, you can see the world around you as it really is —the lay of the land, the rising and falling and undulation of the earth. The road curving left, going straight, then curving right, you can see it. The ditch on the right-hand side of the road. Luke 6:39, "Can a blind man lead a blind man? Will they not both fall into a pit?" Because your eyes tell you the pit is there, but if you're blind you can't see it. Eyesight has to do with reality, what is. Is a pit there or not? Have you guys ever walked into a darkened room you've never been in before? You're staying as a guest in somebody's house. You get up in the middle of the night, for whatever reason, and you walk through the room and yep, there was a coffee table there about shin high. Do you know what I'm talking about? You discovered it, but not by sight, because the room was dark. Now you can go eastern mystic there and say, it isn't really there. Oh no, it's there. Your shin's telling you it's there. We're talking truth. We're talking reality. The coffee table is there and the eyes tell you. Jesus used this analogy in John 11, when he says, "Are there not twelve hours of daylight? A man who walks by day will not stumble for he sees by this world's light. It is when he walks at night that he stumbles for he has no light." The light and the eyesight tell you what is. They tell you what's around. Moving into the spiritual realm, the spiritual reality, spiritual eyesight, faith tells you what really is in the spiritual realm, what the truth is. Now, biblically, our faith can be weak or strong. It could be non-existent, you have no faith, in that case you're dead in your transgressions and sin. You have no faith. But if you are a Christian, your faith can be weak or strong. Jesus frequently commented on the level of people's faith. For example, the Roman centurion in Matthew 8, “When Jesus heard what he said, He was amazed and said, "I tell you the truth, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith." Or again, to that Syrophenician woman, He said, "Woman, you have great faith. Your request is granted." So you can have great faith, meaning great in quantity. It's a dimmer-switch kind of thing. It's like you can have a little faith, more faith, great faith. You know the disciples, how often did Jesus complain about them? "Oh you of little faith." Remember when Peter began to sink? He said to Peter, Matthew 14:31, "You of little faith, why did you doubt?" "Little faith," that was like his number one nickname for his apostles, "You of little faith." Therefore, it seems vital for us to increase our faith. Faith can increase. Biblically, it is possible for you to have more faith a year from now than you do now. 2 Thessalonians 1:3, "We ought always to thank God for you, brothers, and rightly so, because your faith is growing more and more." What does that mean? You have more faith than you did a year ago. And the love you have for each other is increasing. Again, 2 Corinthians 10:15, "Our hope is that, as your faith continues to grow, our area of activity among you will greatly expand." You can have more faith a year from now than you do now. Therefore, in the analogy I'm using today based on this miracle, it means clearer and clearer spiritual vision. You see things more and more clearly as you progress. Spiritual things, you see them more clearly than you used to. How does that happen? "Faith can increase. " It happens first with Bible intake. Good, sound, biblical instruction, feeding on God's Word. Get in God's Word. I would commend in the analogy we're using today, Psalm 119:18, where the psalmist says, "Open my eyes, that I may see wonderful things in your law." “Open my eyes”, what does that mean? “I'm reading the Bible. I might miss something. Give me clearer spiritual vision on the text.” From that, everything flows. Like what? As you take in God's Word and as you obey it, obedience is essential. Don't be merely a hearer of the word but a doer of it also. John 14:21 is the key on this, "Whoever has my commands and obeys them, he is the one who loves me and whoever loves me will be loved by my father and I too will love him and manifest or disclose or show myself to him.” V. Ever-Increasing Spiritual Sight The double combination is: have his commands and obey them. Then what'll happen, more and more, God will manifest himself to you. You'll see him. What will you see? There's some different things I've looked through in the Bible that link spiritual reality to vision, seeing things. What are you supposed to see if you get clearer and clearer vision? If you started with men like trees walking around, but then your vision gets clearer, what are you seeing more clearly? First, let’s start with Christ crucified, the agonies, the agonies of Christ's death. Do you see it? Galatians 3:1, "Oh foolish Galatians, who has bewitched you before your very eyes?" Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed as crucified. How do you do that? Preaching. Paul preached Christ crucified. Then, like Isaac Watts said, “when I survey the wondrous cross,” you're supposed to survey it. Look at him. Look at Jesus bleeding out on the cross. What are you supposed to see when you see that? You see all the attributes of God if you know what to look for. You see his love, you see his power, you see his compassion. There's not an attribute of God that you cannot see in the cross. Just surveying it, how long can I look? It's beautiful, powerful, terrifying. By faith you should look at the cross daily, I Corinthians 1:18, "By the cross we are being saved." Secondly, you see the glories of Christ's resurrection. You can see his resurrected glory, the radiance that comes from his resurrected body. 2 Corinthians 3:18, "We all with unveiled face beholding the glory of the Lord." How do we do that? By faith. You can see the glory of the resurrected Christ as Saul of Tarsus saw on the road to Damascus, a light brighter than the sun. You can see the resurrected glory of Christ. "We all with unveiled faces beholding the glory of the Lord are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to the next." The more you see that glory, the more you will shine like Moses, that's the analogy he's making there. You are going to shine with the glory of God. As I said earlier, what's your goal for 2023? I'd like to be more glorious. I'd like to shine more and more with the glory of the Lord. Then behold, with unveiled faith, his resurrected glory. Thirdly, see the greatness of Christ's kingly power at work in you. Ephesians 1:18, “The eyes of your heart, your faith. The eyes of your heart may be enlightened." They're enlightened. What am I going to see? In that chapter, Ephesians 1, what you'll see is, "Pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you. The riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints and his incomparably great power at work in you who believe." That power, by the way, of the three, that's the only one He zeroes in on. “That power is like the working of his mighty strength, which He exerted in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion in every title that can be given, not only in the present age, but also in the one to come. And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is His body, the fullness of Him who fills everything in every way.” Wow. What's all that about? Power. Do you understand how great is Christ's kingly power? All authority of Heaven and earth has been given to him, but to what end? For you. To benefit you, to finish your salvation in this dangerous world. To protect you and get you there, to get you to Heaven. He's never going to fail. He wants you to see the eyes of your heart, be enlightened, to see that kind of power. Nothing can snatch you from his hands. Fourthly, to see the vileness and the details of your own sin. What? You're supposed to see that? How can you be sanctified without it? That's the journey ahead of you. The reason you need sanctification is because you're a sinner, a habitual sinner. You're in a mortal body of sin. You have habits of sin. Do you see it? You don’t, not like you should. “Oh Lord, show me my sin." Hebrews 11:1, "Faith is the assurance of things hoped for." That sounds good to me, but it's also the conviction. Conviction, conviction of things not seen. Conviction? What does that mean? Like a convict like in a court of law, you've been convicted of crime. By faith you see your sin and you need to and you need to see how violent it is. When you see Jesus bleeding on the cross, you know it's because you sinned. And what will it make you do?If you see it for what it is, it'll make you hate it like He does. You have to see it as it really is so that you can hate it like He does. Fifth, to see the lostness of people around you. We don't. That's why we don't witness. We don't see them by faith. We don't see what it's going to be like for them on judgment day when they don't have a mediator, when they don't have anyone answering for them, they will hear those dreadful words, "Depart from me, you who are cursed into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels." They don't fear that. You're supposed to fear on their behalf because they don't fear like they should. Remember those disciples in John chapter 4? They go into the Samaritan village and buy lunch, to-go. Not eating with these people. For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans. What are they doing there, they asked. It's got to be one of the times the apostles questioned Jesus, like, "Jesus, why are we here? This is weird." There was another way to get up to Judea, but no, the text said they had to go through Samaria. Why? Because this woman and the village was there. They came back with lunch, but without a single Samaritan inquiring about Jesus. Not one. Jesus said to them, "I have food to eat that you apparently know nothing about." What is that food? Could somebody have brought him lunch? “My food is to the will of him who sent me and finished his work. That's what my food is. What about you? Lift up your eyes and look at the fields. They're white for harvest. Don't you see these lost people? Don't you see them?” Listen, brothers and sisters, I'm speaking to myself as much as to you. I don't see lost people the way I should. I don't have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart like Paul does in Romans 9. But I want to. Couldn't you ask the Lord to help you see lost people, not like trees walking around, but as they really are under the wrath of God and in great danger? Six, see needy people around you. This is similar to the last one where it just has to do with physical miseries, poverty, sickness, brokenness, sadness. Remember the parable of the good Samaritan. Let me just read it so we don't miss the detail. “A priest happened to be going down the same road and,” listen to these words, "when he saw the man he passed by on the other side." He saw him physically, he didn't seem him spiritually. To the Levite, when he came to the place and saw him he passed by on the other side. He saw him physically, but he didn't seem him spiritually. “But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came to where the man was. When he saw him, he took pity on him.” He saw him physically and spiritually and was a good neighbor to him. We don't tend to do that. We, like the priest and Levite, see physically, but not spiritually and go by on the other side. We don't alleviate suffering like we could. Seventh, see the brevity of your life. See your coming death. It's coming soon, sooner than you think. Psalm 90 teach us to number our days that we may gain a heart of wisdom. Where's the seeing verse? All of these, by the way, had seeing in them. That's how I found them in the Bible, I was searching. “God, show me seeing verses.” So here it is, Psalm 39:4, "Show me, oh Lord, my life's end and the number of my days. Let me know how fleeting is my life." “Show it to me. Let me see my own death. Let me see myself in the ICU, let me see me with my relatives, my grandchildren around my bed weeping for you. Let me realize like Ecclesiastes tells you to do, to be very aware that you're going to die. Show it to me.” Along with that, with Ecclesiastes, see the vanity of this world, the temporary nature of it. The ordering, the physical ordering of all the stuff in the world is temporary. In Matthew 24:2, when his disciples came and said, "Lord, look at these incredible stones, these amazing buildings," [talking about the temple]. "Do you see all these things?" Jesus said, "Not one stone here will be left on another. Everyone thrown down." Same is true of the whole world. All of it is destined for fire. It's all temporary. Therefore, see the reality of the coming Judgment Day. 2 Peter 3, "The day of the Lord will come like a thief. The heavens will disappear with a roar. The elements will be destroyed by fire and the earth and everything in it will be laid bare.” Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be? You ought to live godly and holy lives, as you look forward to the day of God, and speed it's coming. That day will bring about the destruction of the heavens by fire and the elements will melt in the heat. Look forward to that coming day. See it coming and speed it's coming. Finally, 10th, "See the glories of heaven." In the same chapter 2 Peter 3:13, "In keeping with this promise, we are looking forward to a new Heaven and a new earth. The home of righteousness." That's ten things you can see more clearly in scripture if you ask the Lord to open your eyes. At present, how many of those do you see men like trees walking around? VI. Our Eternal Destination: Perfect Heavenly Vision Our eternal destination is perfect vision. We're going to see everything clearly in heaven. How do I know that? 1 Corinthians 13:12 talks about this healing, very similar to the miracle we talked about today. We see but a poor reflection as in a mirror. That's, “I see people like trees.” Now we see, but a poor reflection as in a mirror, “then we shall see face-to-face. Now I know in part then I shall know fully even as I am fully known.” We're going to see everything clearly and we're going to see God face-to-face. 1 John 3 says that, "Dear friends, now we are children of God and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when he appears we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is." Then Revelation 22:3-4, "The throne of God and of the Lamb will be in the city. His servants will serve him. They will see his face and his name will be on their foreheads." In heaven, we'll have perfect clear vision, something to look forward to. Close with me in prayer. Father, thank you for this miracle. Thank you for the way it taught us about spiritual vision. I pray, oh Lord, that you would sharpen our vision in these ten areas and other areas beside help us to start with Scripture, to see things in your Word that we have not seen before. And then to obey the things you tell us to do and not be mere hearers. And we know that if we have your commands and obey them, you're going to manifest yourself to us. Reveal yourself. So please, oh Lord, do that. We pray in Jesus' name. Amen.

Society of Reformed Podcasters
The Difference Between Baptists & the Eastern Orthodox (Part II)

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 26:39


Society of Reformed Podcasters
The Difference Between Baptists & the Eastern Orthodox (Part I)

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 51:19


The Baptist Broadcast
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part IV)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 30:08


In this third part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Roman Catholicism?" I cover part 4 out of seven differences between us and Rome (baptism) in this part. Check out parts 1-3 by clicking either link below! Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbolt... Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bnL... Part 3: https://youtu.be/pez9rKp2XGI

The Irenic Protestants
1.0: Protestantism: the Hall and the Rooms---- Season 1 Launch

The Irenic Protestants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 27:19


In this episode, we announce our plans for season 1 of the Irenic Protestant Podcast. The guys catch up and talk a little bit about what they are reading, where they are thinking about getting their masters, and whether or not we should include Baptists in the category of classical Protestants. Follow us on Twitter: @Irenicprotest Feel free to email us: protestantirenics@gmail.com Huge thank you to the Davenant Institute for sponsoring our show! You can learn more about Davenant and all they do at https://davenantinstitute.org/

The Baptist Broadcast
The Difference Between Baptists & Roman Catholicism (Part III)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 39:55


In this second part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Roman Catholicism?" I cover parts three out of seven differences between us and Rome in this part. Check out parts 1 & 2 by clicking either link below! Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rbolt... Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bnL...

Theology Applied
QUESTIONS - Questions About Independent Fundamental Baptists, Leighton Flowers, & Justin Peters

Theology Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 23:31


Can you name one thing you like about the Independent Fundamental Baptists? Also, what are the biggest problems with IFB, in your opinion?

The Baptist Broadcast
The Difference Between Baptists & the Eastern Orthodox (Part II)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 26:39


In this second part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Eastern Orthodoxy?" I cover two more points of contrast between Baptists and Eastern Orthodoxy in this part.

LoveIsrael.org (audio)
Luke Chapter 1 Part 7

LoveIsrael.org (audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 28:34


God was at work 2000 years ago, in bringing about supernaturally the conception of John the Baptists. And then as we know, through a virgin birth, we see how Messiah entered into this world to bring about salvation. And when we look at the Scripture concerning the birth of these two men, we see something we see that prophecy surrounds their birth. And why is that? To donate please visit us at: https://www.LoveIsrael.org/donate Checks may be sent to: LoveIsrael.org 6355 N Courtenay Parkway Merritt Island, FL 32953 Feel free to download our MyBibleStudy App on telephone https://get.theapp.co/yjjq , we don't know how long we can post the teachings on YT https://www.instagram.com/mybiblestudyofficial/

LoveIsrael.org
Luke Chapter 1 Part 7

LoveIsrael.org

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 28:34


God was at work 2000 years ago, in bringing about supernaturally the conception of John the Baptists. And then as we know, through a virgin birth, we see how Messiah entered into this world to bring about salvation. And when we look at the Scripture concerning the birth of these two men, we see something we see that prophecy surrounds their birth. And why is that? To donate please visit us at: https://www.LoveIsrael.org/donate Checks may be sent to: LoveIsrael.org 6355 N Courtenay Parkway Merritt Island, FL 32953 Feel free to download our MyBibleStudy App on telephone https://get.theapp.co/yjjq , we don't know how long we can post the teachings on YT https://www.instagram.com/mybiblestudyofficial/

The Baptist Broadcast
The Difference Between Baptists & the Eastern Orthodox (Part I)

The Baptist Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 51:18


In this first part of a short series on the difference between Baptists and other traditions, I ask the question, "What are the differences between Baptists and Eastern Orthodoxy?"

NC Baptist
Life Initiatives In N.C. and Beyond

NC Baptist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 35:18


How can your church stand for life in 2023? N.C. Baptists' Seth Brown discusses life initiatives in North Carolina and beyond with the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission's Brent Leatherwood. Because of your generosity, N.C. Baptists are standing for life.

RenewalCast
The Importance of a Good Catechism with Guest James Renihan

RenewalCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 26:54


Today we have a conversation with James Renihan on the importance of a good catechism -- this is a lost method of training in the larger evangelical church today! I think you will see the importance of a good catechism as you listen to our conversation with Drl Renihan! Check the new exposition of the 1689 London Baptist Confession Here for presale at Founders!James M. Renihan has served as Dean of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies since 1998, and was recently appointed President of IRBS Theological Seminary. He has been a pastor in churches in Massachusetts, New York and California, and currently serves at Christ Reformed Baptist Church, Vista, CA. He is a graduate of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (Ph.D.), Seminary of the East (M.Div.), Trinity Ministerial Academy, and Liberty Baptist College, (B.S.). His academic work has focused on the Second London Baptist Confession and the broader Puritan theological context from which it arose. He has been published in many journals, and is the author of multiple books including Edification and Beauty, A Toolkit for Confessions, True Love, Faith and Life for Baptists and several others. Dr. Renihan and his wife Lynne have five adult children, who all love and serve Christ, and nine grandchildren. Two of his sons are pastors of Reformed Baptist churches.

Preaching & Teaching
Baptist Identity Pt.3 | Tom Nettles

Preaching & Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 56:50


This is lecture 3 of our course "History of the Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles.

Hacks & Wonks
Phil Gardner on Managing the Successful Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez Congressional Campaign

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 62:35


On today's very special Friday show, Crystal welcomes Phil Gardner to spill all the details behind the drama of Washington's Third Congressional District race from his vantage as the campaign manager for now-U.S. Representative-elect Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez. As we hear about the nailbiter of a race in Southwest Washington between a rural Democrat and a right-wing fascist, Phil outlines the strategy memo he wrote that propelled an untraditional and underestimated candidate to flip a seat that had been held by Republicans for 12 years. With little to no support for the campaign from the establishment, Phil tells how a scrappy campaign fought for every vote by leveraging volunteer enthusiasm and connecting with voters in every place across the district. He and Crystal then reflect on lessons learned, possible downballot impacts, the need for continued vigilance against anti-democratic forces, and the hope that is manifested by engaging and being active. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Phil Gardner at @gardnerphil.   Phil Gardner Phil Gardner is a Washington state political strategist and the campaign manager for U.S. Representative-elect Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez. He spent this fall working in Southwest Washington but normally lives in Tacoma. Phil's managed successful campaigns for federal, state, and local office, including those of Superintendent Chris Reykdal, State Auditor Pat McCarthy, Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards, and State Rep. Jessica Bateman's first campaign for Olympia City Council. Phil previously served as Chief of Staff for Lt. Governor Denny Heck. He also served as Heck's District Director and Communications Director when Heck represented the South Sound in Congress. Phil went to college in Washington, D.C. and worked on Capitol Hill where he developed a strong preference for living and working back home in the better Washington.   Resources “Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler concedes; Perez will face Kent for the 3rd District” by Lauren Ellenbecker from The Columbian   Phil Gardner August 9th Strategy Memo - Can Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez win? Yes.   “Kent, Perez brawl over two different Americas in WA congressional race” by Joseph O'Sullivan from Crosscut   Straight Talk bonus round: Marie Gluesenkamp Perez and Joe Kent from KGW News   Election To Watch: Marie Gluesenkamp Perez on the Verge of Upsetting Pro-Trump Candidate Video edited by Meg Herschlein from More Perfect Union   “Why aren't national Dems bankrolling WA's 3rd Congressional race?” by Joseph O'Sullivan from Crosscut   “Congressional candidate Joe Kent wants to rewrite history of Jan. 6 attack” by Jim Brunner from The Seattle Times   “In Washington state, controversial ties and rhetoric are upending a House race” by Claudia Grisales from NPR-KQED   “How did Marie Gluesenkamp Perez pull off the upset of the year in Southwest WA?” by David Gutman from The Seattle Times   “The Future Is … Doorknocking?” by Alexander Sammon from Slate   “Marie Gluesenkamp Perez Is Going From An Auto Repair Shop To Congress” by Daniel Marans from The Huffington Post   “Party reps say Gluesenkamp Perez won House seat, not Democrats” by Brennen Kauffman from The Daily News   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Well, this is an exciting show for me. I'm very excited to be welcoming Phil Gardner to the show. Now, Phil Gardner is known by a lot of people who are in political circles, Democratic circles - but for those who aren't, he is a political strategist and was the campaign manager for Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez, who is the newest Congressperson in Washington's Third Congressional District, which a Democrat hasn't won in how long? [00:01:13] Phil Gardner: 12 years. [00:01:14] Crystal Fincher: 12 years. And beat Joe Kent in one of the longest-shot victories that we saw this cycle, if not the longest-shot victory that we saw this cycle in the nation. So very excited to talk to Phil and talk about this race. Welcome to the show. [00:01:33] Phil Gardner: Thank you, Crystal. I'm really glad to be here - appreciate you noticing what we did. [00:01:38] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely - hard not to notice, but definitely noticed that you were making some moves even before the conclusion of the election. I guess just starting off - getting a little bit more familiar with you - what is your background and what was your path to get to Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez's campaign? [00:01:58] Phil Gardner: Yeah, so I grew up in Pierce County outside Puyallup, graduated high school in Tacoma. So I'm from, consider myself from the state - I was actually born in Texas, but I'm a Washingtonian - and have worked in and out of politics on the Democratic side, both here in the state and back in Washington, D.C. I worked for Lieutenant Governor Denny Heck as his Chief of Staff in Olympia and also back on Capitol Hill as his Communications Director. And then have done a bunch of different campaigns in either manager or general consultant roles, like Superintendent Reykdal's 2020 re-elect for our statewide School Superintendent, the mayor here in Tacoma - I was a part of her first election in 2017, Jessica Bateman - her first run for City Council. So I have had my hand in a bunch of different political and campaign things all over the state. And actually the first federal race I was ever involved with, I was an intern on Denny Heck's 2010 campaign in the Third Congressional District against Jaime Herrera Beutler, which was the last time the seat was open. So it's not quite a full circle moment because - obviously Jaime Herrera Beutler lost in the primary and this - sort of a very different tone than what that campaign was like, but it has been an interesting sort of 12-year journey for me to find myself back down there. [00:03:30] Crystal Fincher: Back down there and in a situation where - for quite some time, Jaime Herrera Beutler looked like a comfortable incumbent. But then this year happened - and after Trump happened and MAGA Republicans - seeing a different blend of Republicans in the district, certainly around the state, and a crowded Republican field. How did you get connected with Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez and how did just starting the campaign unfold? [00:04:04] Phil Gardner: Yeah, so this was an absolutely wild ride that I only got on maybe two-thirds of the way into it for a lot of people that were involved pre-primary - like Marie, most significantly. But I guess to think of the timeline here - for these federal races, they're really two-year affairs at this point just because of the amount of money involved and such. And Joe Kent declared his candidacy against Jaime Herrera Beutler shortly after the January 6th insurrection, so way back in early 2021. And then he got the endorsement of the former president and that sort of propelled him into the leading anti-Jaime Herrera Beutler Republican. And I was watching all of that as anybody checking the news was aware of it. I assumed in the end that Jaime would make it through to the general election one way or another because there were also many, many Democrats running. And I just figured that she's lost a lot of support from within her party, but surely there's enough of a base to get her through against widely divided opposition. But little did I know that Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez had much different plans for what was going to happen. She jumped in the race in February, which is quite late to jump into a Congressional race - February the year of. But as she said many times, she saw a bunch of Joe Kent signs going up around her county where Jaime Herrera Beutler signs used to be. And it reminded her in 2016 when she saw all these Trump signs appearing. And she felt that if this guy really beat Jaime, and there was a good shot at that, that the Democrats didn't have a good candidate who could beat Joe Kent. So she got in in February while she had a - I guess at that point - he was a six-month old at home, running a small business with her husband. But yeah, yeah. But she felt that this was - we needed somebody to go up against this guy if the worst were to happen. And a lot of people didn't really take her very seriously. I think that it's fair to say that - because people didn't think Jaime was likely to lose the primary, they didn't want to do anything to - they wanted her to be able to run the race that she wanted to run. And so I think there was a lot of Democratic establishment players in the state who were not as helpful down their pre-primary. Again, not saying that they were supporting Jaime necessarily, but they just didn't see it as a priority. And there were others who were helpful, but because of that, it was - I think for Marie, it was a kind of lonely primary in a lot of ways - because a lot of people just didn't understand and see the district as she did. And in the end, they were able to clear the field. There was some negotiations and talks between the Democrats down there and that sort of got itself sorted out. And she was the only major Democratic candidate on the ballot in the primary. And she advanced and got 31% of the vote. And then as we all saw, it turned out Jaime was in a lot more trouble than I think any of us really understood. And ended up coming in very narrowly behind Joe Kent, by about a thousand votes, but that's all it took. And again, I didn't see it coming. I was watching this as anybody was - but I did have a friend, Delana Jones, who is a mail consultant, and I worked with her on Victoria Woodards' campaign - and she did Marie's mail as well. And I remember - I think it was the Thursday after the primary, and I was actually sitting in my office at the State Capitol because I was Lieutenant Governor's Chief of Staff at the time - just sort of looking at the numbers. And Joe Kent was not ahead yet, but based on the trend from what was coming in, it was just obvious that he was going to pull ahead once they actually finished counting all these votes. And I texted Marie's consultant and I was like - This is going to happen. OMG, what the hell are we going to do? And we got to talking - and I had actually been planning to take the fall off and reset my career and sort of think about what I wanted to do because I've been doing nonstop Congressional service or campaigns since Trump took office, basically, and was pretty burnt out. But Marie, prior to the primary, had one paid staffer - and she did a great job in what she was able to do, but she had no campaign experience. She just graduated from college. And all of a sudden you're in this tightly, tightly nationally competitive race, if you could get the resources into there. So I said, Well, it's a less than 100-day thing. I know it'll end. And Marie's great - I'd never met Marie before, but I knew Joe Kent was a fascist and we could not let someone like that win a seat in Congress from our state. And we certainly could not do anything less than give everything we could to try and stop it. So I took a detour - I was actually in Taiwan for a lot of August because I had a prearranged trip to do that. So there was a lot of nights of working on candidate questionnaires while I was in Taiwan and then during the day - anyway, so I finally got back onto the ground in Southwest Washington - it was Labor Day weekend. And so for me that - yeah - that is in my mind when my direct involvement began, but that's how I ended up at that point. So it was not a plan, but when Joe Kent wins the primary, you got to scramble the jets. [00:10:09] Crystal Fincher: Got to engage. [00:10:11] Phil Gardner: Yeah. Yeah. [00:10:12] Crystal Fincher: Wow. So looking at just even Marie deciding to run, I completely get feeling the alarm of looking at Joe Kent, feeling that he could win, and the history of the district saying - and he could win it all. What made her think she could win? [00:10:37] Phil Gardner: Yeah. She gets her district, she gets her community. She lives 45 minutes from anywhere, God bless her. I've been out there to that house on that gravel road and it is rural - she gets her water from a well, her Internet from a radio tower. And out there in Skamania County in the Columbia River Gorge, communities are just different when you live that far away from large population centers. And your local government - the resources are just nowhere near what they are in other places. And I think she knew that a lot of communities in the district were a lot like that. And that's true about a third of the population that lives outside of Clark County, and even parts of Clark County are a lot like that. But I also think beyond that dynamic, I think she knew - in this community, but I think all over the country - that Democrats had not done a good job of recruiting candidates who really look like America or really look like their base. The sort of prototypical, let's-go-candidate-recruiting is - Can you find somebody who has won an office before? Can they self-fund? Can they raise a bunch of money from a pre-existing donor network? Do they not have family obligations that are going to get in the way? Can they take time off to work, or do they not even work anymore? And Marie doesn't check any of these boxes, which is why when parties go to recruit, they often - in fact, very, very, very rarely come up with moms who run small businesses, and live out in rural areas, and who have a father from Mexico. But just because of the circumstances of this, she didn't ask for an invite to be the candidate. She stepped up because she saw it needed to be done. And then she won the primary and came up against Joe Kent - and that usual sort of screener for who are we going to run in really competitive races that just didn't occur because it wasn't even on the radar of the folks in DC. But I think she could see that was so necessary in order to connect with people like her - who work in the trades, with Latino voters - who in some parts of the country, we've had a ton of difficulty in the Trump years, with a lot of sort of conspiracies and misinformation that goes around, but nevertheless has struggled in places like Florida and South Texas. But also in the wake of the Dobbs decision, having a woman who had recently had a miscarriage and who was having a family and planning to grow her family, be able to talk about the real consequences and impacts of Joe Kent's nationwide abortion ban with no exceptions. So I think she was - for Joe Kent - a particularly good foil, but she is also, I think, as anybody who has watched her, she is just a very gifted and talented public servant. I think it's wonderful that this is the way in which people have come to learn about her, but she has been down there in Skamania County really doing that work. She ran for County Commissioner in 2016. And Hillary Clinton, I think she outran Hillary Clinton by eight percentage points in a rural red county. So she knows what she's doing. I guess that is one message - I don't want to leave people with this notion that what happened here was a fluke or unexpected or not. It happened because she knew that this opportunity was there and then decided to take advantage of it. And slowly everybody came on board, or at least enough to get us over the finish line. [00:14:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And that was apparent for a while. This - one, it takes a great candidate to win, period. Even if you have a great team around you, if you don't have a candidate who does connect with people, who does understand the district, and who is really - feels a personal responsibility for making things better, it doesn't connect, certainly not at this level. So she was a great candidate - saw the opportunity, stepped up thankfully, and was ready to run. But it absolutely took a great strategy, which you put together. You shared publicly a strategy memo that you put together basically saying, Hey, can Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez win? Yes, she can. And this, in detail, is how. What did you identify? What was in that plan? [00:15:13] Phil Gardner: Yeah. So I wrote that back in August when it was - there were sort of two camps that happened right after the primary. There was a bunch of people who were like, Oh my gosh, this is obviously competitive. We have to jump at this. Let's do this. And then there are others who were like, We've got no shot. This just is not going to happen. And so I said, Okay, then I guess we need to explain to people who I don't think should have needed explanation, but did, that this is how we're going to win this race and just show beyond a doubt that we could. And so there are three components to it. The first is making sure that every Democrat knows who Joe Kent is and turns out in votes. And not just partisan Democrats, but progressives, working class folks, everybody who lives in Vancouver and Clark County - which is the most Democratic area - just very mobilize your base. This is stuff that Democrats, when they're on their game, know how to do - and devoting the resources and the attention to making sure that was going to happen. The second was in the rural areas - the six counties outside of Clark County - which run from where Marie lives in the Columbia River Gorge, all the way out to the Pacific coast, and then all the way up into Thurston County, nearly to the State Capitol. There are some cities in there that we knew we could maybe win, but - and then Pacific County, we thought we could win and we did win. But broadly speaking, we knew in those rural areas - we're probably not going to win a lot of these communities. But it makes a huge difference if we are getting 35% of the vote there versus getting 30% of the vote there. And I think that is something that Democrats have all too often written off about rural areas is - it's sort of, Well, we're going to lose those areas by a lot, so we shouldn't even try. And losing them by 10 points less than you lost them is a bunch of votes that could be your winning margin, depending on the sort of nature of the district or the state. So we wanted to take that really seriously. And we knew that Marie was a really great candidate to connect with those folks. And then the third aspect of it was - and these folks lived in all kinds of geographies - but making this very direct appeal to Republicans and Independents, who - anyone who supported Jaime Herrera Beutler, and just really could not stomach Joe Kent. And that was one of the most apparent things coming out of the primary. And the initial sort of looking at - who can Marie win - started with - who cannot stomach Joe Kent. And that is a very long list of people because Joe Kent often seems like he is intentionally trying to exclude and ostracize. And in fact, he is very intentionally trying to do that much of the time. But people can actually hear what he has to say and don't like the things he's saying. And I still don't think he's really ever caught on to that. But we knew that there were a bunch of people who supported Jaime Herrera Beutler, who maybe voted for Mitt Romney, but really didn't like Trump and the sort of direction the party was going under that. But these were not people who would typically vote for a Democrat, or really even consider a Democrat, unless you went out and made this very specific case to them and made it - not try to trick them, just be very honest, which was that - Look, Joe Kent is terrible. Here's all the terrible things in case you weren't aware. I'm Marie, I'm not a Republican, but I believe in democracy. I am going to listen to you. I'm going to hold town halls. I'm not going to embarrass you on the national stage. And asking those Republicans and those conservatives even to - again, not necessarily become Democrats, but just lend us your vote in this election against this guy, so we can beat him. That's basically what it said on paper. And then of course, the challenge is doing all of that all at once, and raising the money as you're spending it and etc, etc. But yeah, but that was the core. And we stuck with that through the end. [00:19:11] Crystal Fincher: And so that is really interesting. An experience that I went through - you talked about letting people know who Joe Kent is - it is actually hard to do justice to how bad and scary he is by just explaining. And was in a number of situations with - did the KIRO election coverage, right? So talking to people there in the newsroom, another Republican consultant, right? It's just - trying to explain how just problematic he is. And they're just like, Well, maybe well, I heard it was moderating in the general election and he's moving that direction. And I'm like, No, you don't understand. And I had watched a number of his video clips, just researching going into there. It's just like - Okay, I just need you - sit down, watch this. And they watched a clip of him just - it's like he was not in the same reality as other people. Just conspiracy theories - denied - like January 6th was some CIA conspiracy, just all these things. And one, just - my goodness, Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez also sitting there next to him and having to debate someone who's not making sense in the same kind of reality that you are, but also trying to explain things. But after watching him directly, they're just like, Oh, okay, I get it. It was so alarming. Even Republicans there were alarmed. And so there absolutely was an opportunity to mobilize people and to get votes from people who traditionally didn't vote for Democrats. Now with that, how did you negotiate and how did you move forward and talk through - Marie is a Democrat, she has Democratic values - making that appeal to Republicans. How do you broaden a base while maintaining consistency with your values? [00:21:13] Phil Gardner: Yeah. And it was a daily balance and a sort of figuring it out as we went. A lot of it was based on - well, it was mostly Marie's instincts. That's another - she did a lot of press during the election and afterwards. And as a communications professional who has prepped a lot of candidates for interviews, she does not require much at all. We chat about sort of the points she may want to make and if there's sort of one way she's explaining something and I'm like that may be misinterpreted, but by and large, she just knows what - she can smell what's good and what's off. And I think she knew what the media in her district was going to be. So using her as a guidepost - you know, she - right to repair, which is this issue that she talks about a lot, which is this sort of basic concept of if you own a piece of mechanical equipment or electronic equipment, you should be able to repair it. And there's home medical devices, tractors, iPhones, there's this long litany of things. And I will admit when I first heard her talking about this, I was like, This is, I don't, this is not a top of mind issue for voters. And it isn't - yet. I think it's becoming, partly because she is talking about it more and more in national media. But what was so interesting about it is people took it seriously. And it was very different from what they'd heard, not just a Democrat, but any sort of candidate talk about. And it did feel, the more they thought about it, more relevant to their day-to-day life than Joe Kent's latest vaccine gene therapy conspiracy or something. She also talked a lot about the dangers of microplastics, which is something that there's a bunch of research that - there's just more and more presence of these almost-permanent plastics in very small quantities in placentas and fish and just anything you can measure. And what better way to replace all that plastic packaging than with paper and cardboard products grown in Washington's Third Congressional District. She took this very, again, not something that was in the headlines or a lot of people were talking about, but managed to connect it right back into voters lived experiences and daily lives, and talk about in a way that was different from Democrats. So she wasn't trying to sound like a Republican. She was just trying to sound and be like a different Democrat. And it is working, [00:23:44] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, no. And I did notice that - the first thing I noticed was in the broader conversation about how Democrats, how the country sometimes is becoming more polarized - that bluer places are becoming bluer, redder places are becoming redder, and a number of Democrats are not performing well in rural areas. And to your point earlier, lots of times Democrats are not trying to compete in rural areas - thinking, Man, I just saw the margin in these other races when someone else tried to run, there's no way I'm gonna win there. So what's the point? But you saw the point. Hey, if you improve performance and you win in other areas, that's a win altogether. And one, her being a rural resident period and understanding the different context of life in rural areas, which is different. And I think a lot of people who do not live in rural areas, are not familiar with, or haven't spent a lot of time in rural areas - underappreciate just how different day-to-day life can look and be. It can be very, very different. And some of the things that you talk about in a metropolitan context, just there is no context for that thing out there. So talking about it just does not connect. It's not relevant. And I feel like, especially with a lot of Democrats not showing up in rural areas, that they are hearing lots of things from Democrats that they just don't see in their daily lives or that address their specific challenges. And Marie was able to directly speak to that, based on her own experience and really caring about making it better. And showing up and the campaign showing up - showing up is - you can't win without it. You got to do that. You did it well. You got the message out. But also trying to pull together a campaign, a Congressional-sized campaign, without a lot of external help was a challenge you had to deal with. There was lots of coverage about the national party not helping as much as they did in some other close races - whether it's because they didn't consider this being close enough to engage with or not - not receiving the kind of support that you, seeing it as a competitive race, probably hoped for. What was that experience like and how did you manage your way through that? [00:26:31] Phil Gardner: Yeah, it was excruciating at points. It was very frustrating, because we had an internal poll that we released publicly as far back as late August that showed Marie ahead by two. And this was at a time in national politics when the generic ballot was a little bit better for Democrats. And then there was this sort of whole freak out during the fall. And then I guess it turned out to be not quite that bad. But we had polling done by a very reputable pollster - I know people are trained to be skeptical of internal polling, but we hired a very reputable firm that everybody back in D.C. knew. And - [00:27:08] Crystal Fincher: By the way, most campaigns do. [00:27:11] Phil Gardner: Yeah. Like the campaigns - one, they're not going to spend all this money on research that's bunk. But it was, I think, two things. One was this knowledge that this district was - I don't think you'll find this in writing anywhere, somebody will say it on the record - but the district was drawn to elect a Republican. It's part of how our redistricting system works - is there's an incumbent protection that goes on. And this was Jaime Herrera Beutler's district. And in order to forge an agreement, they agreed to keep the incumbent safe. So with that knowledge that this district was drawn to elect a Republican, the notion that it could flip to a Democrat in a midterm with a Democrat in the White House, just - I think no matter what sort of facts you tried to put in front of people, they just could never get past that. But I think also that - I think people didn't - if Marie had been some, a man with a nice haircut - I just think there was something about who she was, and the fact that she was a young mom, and had never run for federal office before that people just thought, Well, surely she can't be putting together a campaign that could actually win. This is a novelty that's happening out there. And that was frustrating. But I could also see, as we were trying to convince people of our credibility, that our fundraising was going extremely well, especially online. We've - driven by a lot of that media coverage, but then also the long list of people who are horrified by Joe Kent. In the end - third quarter, the third fundraising quarter - Marie raised $2.2 million in the third quarter, which was more than any other Democrat challenging for an open seat or against a Republican incumbent, except for the guy running against Marjorie Taylor Greene. But Marie outraised Democratic incumbents in frontline districts. And I thought at that point, surely they will now see that this is not some fly-by-night scam we're running out here - it looks non-traditional because it must be, but surely now. And even at that point - no, Marie was never named one of the DCCC's Red to Blue candidates. And we asked for that - we knew that there was, it was unlikely that we were going to get air support that we can't legally coordinate, but we just wanted the designation so that when we called donors in other states, they would know we were - because there's a lot of these donors who, if you don't, if you're not Red to Blue, they don't think you're a serious candidate. And that would have cost the DCCC nothing and they wouldn't give it to us. And, of course now it's - they're apologetic and such, but I don't know - I try not to dwell on it and be bitter about it because in the end, we won. And I do think there's a silver lining in that because it wasn't on the DCCC's radar, the national Republicans also did not really get it on their radar. The national Republicans never spent anything for Joe Kent, which - we had always anticipated that as soon as we had our big fundraising quarter and started running our ads, they would come in with all these negative ads to slime Marie, and it just never came. And I don't know whether that was because the Republicans never really believed it was competitive, or because they just really didn't actually want Joe Kent in their caucus. And their attitude was - Well, if he doesn't make it, it's not our fault. It's his fault. And we've got a lot of other people who aren't so difficult that we're going to spend on. So I don't know, but it was - and he himself had a terrible, he was basically unable to raise any significant amount of money after the primary. Because I think once he had defeated Jaime Herrera Beutler, there was just not a lot of energy. And he was going around telling people that he had this under control - it was a safe Trump seat. And by the time he tried to pivot, it was too late to get his donors to notice or care. So that is one thing - I actually, I think Joe Kent ran a terrible campaign in the primary. He just had Trump's endorsement and that was enough. And then they continued that terrible campaign into the general and it finally caught up with them. But, yeah, it was still on the inside - it was, and if you were on the ground there, anybody who was able to come - it felt very competitive. We could see that obviously we had all of the Democrats - anyone who voted for Joe Biden was behind us. And we were picking off these - elected Republicans were willing to appear in TV ads to support Marie. And it's - well, surely there's some amount of people who are coming along with this because we can see them. It was just not clear whether it'd be quite enough. But the notion that on Election Night, it leaned Republican - I think if the rankers who had put it in that category been on the ground, I think they would have felt very differently. Because it was not a surprise that it was competitive to folks who were in the picture. [00:32:09] Crystal Fincher: Right. It was absolutely competitive - I think, just looking from the outside, it was - Hey, this is going to be close. Is she going to get enough? But especially in that situation, I think part of my personal frustration with some of the national establishment is that we also have to be willing to fight, and that we can't only engage when we feel like it's a sure thing. And if anything was worth fighting for, surely it was worth fighting - even if you hadn't yet engaged with how good of a candidate Marie was, you certainly could see how terrifying the prospect of having Joe Kent as a Congressperson is and was just unacceptable. And he was so far outside of what so many people consider acceptable or moral or decent. And we certainly have seen Republicans as a whole become more extreme, but he was like tip-of-the-spear extreme and proud of it and resistant to any kind of advice to do anything else. And so I am so thankful that you saw that opportunity, that we don't have Joe Kent as a representative. But also hope that the things that you talked about, the reasons why maybe they didn't support Marie - create a lot of people a lot of reflection - and people who do have the ability to influence the people and the ability to influence where resources are spent locally and nationally, starting from just who an ideal candidate is. We've talked before on this show looking, hearing - Oh man, they're a great candidate. And a lot of times that's code for a guy who's a military veteran, a guy who is a business owner. And really it's code for this person has a profile that could be a Republican, but they're a Democrat. And reality is so much broader than that. The community is so much broader than that. And the things that people are struggling with today just throughout everyday life are felt by so many more people. Even who is considered the working class a lot of times is coded as just white people. And it's so many people. And so having a young mom who is running - family running an auto shop, living in rural Skamania County - was someone who was absolutely relatable. And I hope we learned those lessons - certainly at the legislative level, candidates who look more, who are like Marie, or who are candidates of color or LGBTQ candidates are actually outperforming and increasing turnout to greater degrees than candidates in majority communities are. So I really do hope we take out the filter that sometimes prevents us from seeing the people who are the most connected within their communities and who do understand them the most. Going in and just how you went about defining who Joe Kent was and how you went about defining who Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez was - to people who maybe they realize an election is happening when they get the ballot in the mail, they were not tuned in throughout the months prior in the campaign, and you've got to reach them somehow, maybe not in person. How did you go about doing that? And what was your strategy there? [00:35:41] Phil Gardner: Yeah. In running against Joe Kent, this was one of the challenging things because as you alluded - well, you had said earlier - it's hard to understand how bad he is unless you sit down and really take the time to - Oh my God, he really - he really thinks that. And of course, we don't have the luxury of voters actually mostly having the time or interest to do that. So it was a real - what are the worst things of the terrible things he's said and done that we're going to be able to bring up? And we had some polling to help with this, but we also just used some intuition behind what was easy to explain and what was really going to click. And so we narrowed around a top five hits on Joe Kent because we would spice it up a little. But one is his national ban on abortion with no exceptions, which was his stated stance. Another was he told the New York Times that he wanted to put Anthony Fauci, they wanted Fauci arrested for murder. And there was one part in a Rotary that never got reported because it was a private event - but I was there - and someone stood up and said, Do you really believe this - that Anthony Fauci should be indicted for murder? And Joe Kent's response was, Well, he'll get a trial. This is what this man actually believes. [00:36:52] Crystal Fincher: Geez. Yeah. [00:36:54] Phil Gardner: Then there was the election denial, January 6th stuff - I guess that was actually - we mostly talked about that for the framework of Joe Kent wanting to abolish vote-by-mail. We found that was something that polled very terribly because - and I was a little skeptical to use it because I thought it would just be so unfathomable to people at this point that they wouldn't really believe anybody could or would do that. But it really did click. I'm glad we leaned into that. He wanted to ban immigration for 20 years to establish a white majority. And that's a conversation stopper in a lot of rooms. And what was interesting is that is the one that more than anything else, Joe Kent would react very emotionally negative to. The other stuff, he wouldn't really try to dispute it. But that one he would. I don't know exactly why that is. I think on a certain level, he may know how messed up and horrific and toxic - and he may just know that he definitely doesn't want his brand to actually be associated with the people sort of spending every day of their lives pushing for that policy, which are people who exist in white nationalist circles that Joe hangs out in - but yeah, it was - Oh, and then the fifth one, which he started talking about in the campaign - and he went to the right - was this whole defunding the FBI. Which, as a Democrat running in a Trump district, obviously we thought a lot about how was she going to talk about law enforcement because it's a top issue in any district, but especially when you're trying to win Republicans. And then Joe Kent just comes in and says, I think we should get rid of the FBI. And bunch of moms in Longview and Centralia, if you tell them - Are you going to sleep better at night with the FBI gone? - that's just not something that resonates with a lot of people in the communities that we needed to win over from the Republicans. So that was the sort of cornucopia of awful-Joe Kent. But there was even terrible stuff that doesn't even make that list. He wanted to legalize machine guns. He doesn't believe people should watch professional sports because it's emasculating to watch other men. Yeah, no, this is an actual thing. [00:38:51] Crystal Fincher: I didn't even know this one. Oh my gosh. [00:38:53] Phil Gardner: Yeah. His tweets are just - there's just so many, there's just so much - but a lot of it, it's can we really turn this into a mail piece or a TV ad? Probably not. But it is just so weird. And then with Marie, it was a lot of biography, but then basically just doing the counterpoint to a lot of what Joe was doing. She supports abortion rights. She believes in voting rights. She is not focused on these bizarre cultural conspiracies. And Joe said and did horrible, horrible mailers and statements regarding healthcare for trans people. And there was a debate in Longview where there was an audience participation point and they clearly organized to have his people come up and try to bait Marie on all these sort of cultural things about sports and bathroom. And this part never aired, I think, because the host realized that he had completely lost control of the room. But Marie would not yield an inch on any of those issues, and doesn't on any LGBTQ issues, and doesn't on any core rights issues - because that's who she is and what she believes. And that authenticity is what really matters and not engaging on these things that are so clearly just meant to divide. It was both mirroring him and just not swinging at the pitches that she didn't want to swing at. [00:40:09] Crystal Fincher: And that's so important. One, I think people in rural and even suburban situations that I've been in - there are people who understand that they may disagree with you on some things. But they want to be able to trust you. They want to know that you're going to stand by your word and that what you see is what you get. And so her having the courage to stand by her convictions, I think helped - even with people who - Hey, I'm a Republican, you're a Democrat, but I can see that you seem to want to help, that you seem to understand the challenges that we're facing, and you get things done. Am I going to agree with you a hundred percent? No. But do I think that you understand how to help me? I do. I think you can help. I think that makes a big difference. And just the campaign not taking the bait is a good thing and not engaging earnestly with bad-faith tactics and calling out the bad-faith tactics, instead of trying to fact check or engage in all the minutiae and all that was a smart decision. And one I hope other people see how you handle it, see how others handle it, and do the same thing. So now, we're at the point of the election. You have done a good job communicating who Joe Kent is, which - I really don't think people understand how challenging that is - even, some people think, Well, he's horrible. It must be really easy to run against him. It's hard to convince people - people who are horrible in a special way, impressively horrible, unusually horrible. It's hard to make people believe that someone actually is that horrible. People's first thought - Surely he doesn't believe that, man, this is a misstatement. This is an exaggeration. So you did that very well. Going through, turning out the votes, turning out the base, how did you approach just getting everyone to get their ballot in? [00:41:59] Phil Gardner: Yeah, well, we tried to work the mobilization messaging into those same persuasion messaging that we were doing, like the vote-by-mail. We would say, Hey, not only are we reminding you to get your ballot in and that your ballots coming in the mail, but you should be aware the other guy, Joe Kent - he wants to get rid of this whole system. He wants us to go back to standing in line at polling stations. So if you'd ever like to vote in another election by mail again, we would really appreciate your support for Marie. But it was a mix of very traditional mobilization operations. I guess with the voter mobilization, this was one of the challenges coming in after the primary was - to really do a lot of voter mobilization programs well, it requires money and investment and time. It's always put to the side by a lot of campaigns so they try to start it in July or something. To really have it really effective, you really need to have it in place starting pretty early in the year, depending on the size of the race. That just wasn't really present as much. There was a Coordinated Campaign presence from the State Party because Patty Murray was on the ballot, but there was nothing at the scale that we would have liked or would have been considered proper. But I thought that there was - the only option that – well, another thing is we couldn't really hire staff at this point from other place because any sort of top-field talent is generally already on a campaign at this point. But there was a lot of energy from volunteers, and we noticed that. And so we tried this – it goes by a lot of names – the snowflake model, where you're really taking volunteers and giving them job duties and responsibilities that in a lot of campaigns would really be paid staff - and I think ideally should be paid staff, or at least people should be compensated for work that they're doing that they're not volunteering on. But it's a complicated model because if people just lose interest or don't have the enthusiasm, it doesn't really gel together. But there was enough, I think, both positive enthusiasm for Marie and antipathy for Joe Kent that - our field director had never worked in politics before. He'd never worked on any campaign before. He was a friend of Marie's from college, who had just run a restaurant for five years that had gone under because of some supply chain issues. But he was very, very organized and very good at logistics. We hooked him up with a brilliant strategist in Oregon named Hannah Love, who knows all sorts of field and mobilization stuff, and she transferred knowledge. Eventually, we had 500 people coming out to canvasses. So it was a lot of traditional stuff like that, but in a sort of non-traditional way - mixed with our messaging. And then there were very specific communities who we wanted to go and talk to and make sure that they understood who Joe Kent was. One was the Ukrainian community, which is quite large in the Portland metro area, including on the Vancouver side. A lot of the members of the Ukrainian community here in the Pacific Northwest - it originated with folks who were fleeing the Soviet Union because they were evangelical Christians or Baptists and were being persecuted for their religious beliefs. Not everybody who's come over here since then is also a pastor or something, but they have family or friends - and so it's a very religiously conservative community. But they knew what Joe Kent's stance was on support for Ukraine, which is - Joe Kent doesn't think there should be any. In fact, he thinks it's all sort of a conspiracy theory to start World War III that Biden and Obama are all-in on and such. They didn't agree with Marie on a lot of things, but they knew that. Marie came and showed up and talked to them and looked them in the eye and said, I'm not going to abandon you and your family. And I think that really resonated. And then also up in Pacific County, the Chinook Indian Nation, which has lived in the mouth of Columbia since time immemorial - they have been seeking federal recognition for many, many decades. There's no real question that they have all the necessary paperwork, and people should look into this online if they want to learn more about it, but it really is a travesty that they've not yet been federally recognized. Marie met with the Chairman and learned about this and heard - and we put out a statement making very clear that she supports recognition and would fight for it in Congress. I know that the Chairman and members of the Chinook indian Nation made sure that everybody who lives in the district knew that. It's a lot of this very targeted outreach that - the cookie cutter appeals and mass appeals are necessary and good - but we knew we were going to have to squeeze every - look under every rock or every mountain, whatever metaphor you want to use. It's not just one thing, but it was a mix of things. [00:46:17] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and you did a great job. So now we're to Election Night. What did it feel like when you got the results? [00:46:25] Phil Gardner: It felt really good. I guess we all lived through this, but how I was looking at it is - because our results didn't come until 8pm and I think the results from the East Coast were not looking quite as bad for Democrats as I think we had feared. And so I was like, Oh, okay, well, maybe we could do this. Because for all that we did, just so much of this is just national tides that you ultimately don't have first-hand control over, but - [00:46:52] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and I should mention - going up to the results on the East Coast, that there was a lot of talk about races narrowing in the final weeks. There were a lot of internal polls that showed races narrowing in the final weeks of the campaign. So there was a big question about - are things falling out of our grip democratically? And so there was cause for a little bit of relief at least. And especially as we got further from the East Coast, further West - things were looking pretty good. And then 8 o'clock hits. [00:47:20] Phil Gardner: Yes. So we're there in the Hilton - at the Clark County Democrats, their Election Night party usually is. And we knew that what we got on Election Night was going to be the highest that we were going to get. It was going to be our high-water mark - because Joe Kent, one of his conspiracy theories was that everybody should return their ballot on Election Day so then they know, they can't figure out how many fake ballots they need to create if we vote late. It's just bonkers stuff. But as a consequence of that, we knew that he was going to gain in these later counts. So I said, If we're not ahead on election night, then that's probably ballgame, folks. But even so, we needed to be ahead by a big margin. We needed to be ahead in Clark County by more than 10 points. And it came in, and I think we're ahead by 12, 12 and a half. And it's a little more exciting in these districts with multiple counties because there's some suspense where it's - Oh, okay, but what are we going to get in Lewis and what are we going to get in Pacific? And they just kept coming in, and they kept coming in and hitting those marks. And I was just like, Marie was just - we always knew that it could happen, but then for it actually to be happening - it just felt very surreal and out-of-body. And she was just overjoyed. And of course, very quickly composed herself to go get the speech done, and do - I think she did 9 or 10 interviews that night. But it was, it felt really good. But at the same time, we also didn't feel like we could truly celebrate because we did know it was going to narrow. And so the race ended up getting called - Saturday night after the election was when all the media outlets came out. But I personally felt confident that I no longer had worry bugs crawling around my head that we were going to win - I felt that way on Wednesday night. And that was when I knew how many ballots had come in and I could see what the margins were. And I could also see - using these analytic models on the back end, I could essentially see the uncounted ballots - what those were probably going to be like. Because the ballots are roughly counted in the order they're received. So at that point, we know that there's this whole big batch of Election Day votes for Joe Kent, and I knew they would be better for him - but you look at the partisan modeling and I'm like - that's really not going to be quite enough for him. But there's one thing to know that and one thing to actually say it publicly, because you want to respect the process and that tiny chance you could get egg on your face. But that was, that was almost, that was excruciating in a sense. I mean, it was nice to have that internal confidence that we knew, but it was still maddening to go that many days after - but much better than obviously the alternative outcome. And they called that race Saturday night. And Sunday morning we were on a plane to DC. So she got to new member orientation just in time, but - not a day too late. [00:49:58] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I saw that. I was like, that was quick. [00:50:01] Phil Gardner: Yep, it was interesting. They had invited Joe Kent, but they had not invited Marie at first. [00:50:07] Crystal Fincher: Interesting. [00:50:08] Phil Gardner: Yes. And then what they do in a lot of these races that are close, they invite both of them. And so then we were both invited and then Joe Kent was uninvited. But the materials for him were still lying around - I was at one point accidentally handed Joe Kent's parking pass for Capitol Hill. And I was - I'm sorry, this is actually not the person who won that election. And they were very apologetic and I get their - so it was just odd, almost - seeing the physical artifacts of this alternative reality that could have happened. [00:50:37] Crystal Fincher: I'm glad we are not in that timeline - that would be a very bad timeline. We have more than enough challenges in this timeline that we do have, but that was such an exciting and uplifting race. So now, because no one can ever rest and because Congressional campaigns start as soon as they end - now there's talk about, Okay, so can she hold the district? Can she get re-elected? It's one thing to have an aberration like Joe Kent on the ballot, but maybe that doesn't happen next time. How do you think she should be approaching these next couple of years? How can she hold a seat? [00:51:12] Phil Gardner: Yeah, I think the starting point is to understand that she can. There are Democrats who represent districts that are more Republican or voted for Trump by a wider margin. Mary Peltola up in Alaska is the most recent example, but there's also a member from northern Maine named Jared Golden, who has a very timber-friendly, very rural district that shares some similarities to the Third. So we know it can be done, so we're not trying to do something nobody's ever done. But it's going to require her basically doing what she said during the campaign. There's not going to be some giant pivot - it's the same person she's been. I think without - well, first of all, I think it's quite likely that Joe Kent runs again. I think Joe Kent is her most likely 2024 opponent because Joe Kent was planning on winning and then running again. And we didn't even get into this, but he apparently has no actual job - so he's not busy doing something else during the day other than running for office. So I anticipate he will run again, and I think he may have the name ID to be the Republican nominee again. But even without that, in the eventuality that Marie ends up running against somebody who is less conspiratorial on the Republican side, I think that voters are going to give her a chance. I think a lot of these Republican voters who originally voted for her because they were soured on Joe Kent - I don't think, at least from the conversations I've had with them and then some of the community members who have supported them - they are still with Marie. There will be a Republican. I don't know who it'll be. I don't know exactly how that'll impact how people make their choices down there. But it's at this point an opportunity for Marie to show that she is that independent voice, that rural Democrat, that Democrat from the trades, working mom - and show people what a sort of different kind of politics and different kind of Democrat is. One of the first decisions Marie has made so far - back in Congress, there are these sort of ideological caucuses. There's a Progressive Caucus, and there's the more conservative one called the Blue Dogs, and then there's one sort of in the middle called the New Dems. And Marie's decided not to join any of them. She's joining the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, who was supportive during the campaign too. But I think she doesn't feel like she fits into a box really well, and her district doesn't really fit into a box well. And she's gonna need to be seen and be different from the sort of Puget Sound-area Democrats in the delegation and figure out exactly what that path is with her district. Because the nice thing is she showed up not owing anybody any favors, because so few people believed in her. So I'm just very excited to see - she's 34. She's born in 1988. It is just so amazing that we have, from our state, this just incredible public servant who really does represent generational change and change in a lot of ways, and is doing it in a seat where we beat a fascist. I'm just so excited and delighted to see what she's able to do. [00:53:52] Crystal Fincher: I love it. And obviously, you did an incredible job on this campaign. You did great work. What other staffers or volunteers should we be on the lookout for from the campaign who are also superstars? [00:54:05] Phil Gardner: Great question. So we had at maximum five staff. Tim Gowen, who was our Field Director, is going to be joining Marie's district office. Peter Sandifer, who is our Political Director. Julian Chapin, who read Michelle Goldberg's New York Times article, emailed us and said, I'd love to drive across the country and come work for you - and that's how you get to become a Deputy Field Director on our campaign because that's the kind of world it was. And then Madeleine Newton, who was the staffer before the primary and stayed on as the Deputy Campaign Manager. And then a whole suite of consultants from around the Seattle area and some back in DC. I'm also just excited to see a lot of these volunteers who were engaged for the first time - what they end up doing. We had a lot of people who said they voted for Jaime Herrera Butler in the primary and then knocked on doors for Marie - it was the first candidate they ever knocked on doors for. It was, there are certain campaigns - they're usually presidential campaigns - but there are certain campaigns that really just leave a lasting impact on the people who were a part of them. And I think for a lot of people in Southwest Washington, this is going to be one of them. And I'm excited to see where that goes. [00:55:06] Crystal Fincher: I'm so excited about Southwest Washington. It's politically, in my opinion, the most exciting area in the state and the area with the biggest opportunity in the state. Just looking legislatively, there are districts that are so close that have been so close that have been on the other side of 48-52%, 49-51%, 49-50% races over the past couple few cycles. With a Democrat in Congress, new people engaged in the district, people hearing from Democrats and talking to Democrats who maybe just hadn't before - presents so much of an opportunity. What do you see the opportunity being downballot moving forward? [00:55:47] Phil Gardner: Yeah, well, I do think there - in Clark County especially, which this is the biggest county in the district, 61-63% of the vote where Vancouver is. But then there's a band of suburbs right around Vancouver as well. And Marie won by 10 points there. And it is one of those counties, like the suburbs of Atlanta or the Dallas suburbs, that once Trump came on the scene, there was a lot of moderate suburbanites who were - I don't know about this direction that this party's going. And so in addition to Joe Kent sort of accelerating that and Marie being appealing, there has been this phenomenon over the last six to eight years down there, where those Clark County suburbs are becoming much more friendly towards Democrats. And I think that, like you said, we keep getting real close. We redrew two of them pretty significantly and got up to 48%, 47% in a few of these. But I think it will be interesting and I'm optimistic that - there's almost a tipping point in a lot of these communities, where once the sort of prevailing cultural norms become more progressive, become more open-minded, become more friendly to folks on the Democratic side of the aisle - that that just keeps going. And I don't quite know where it stops. I think it'll take some time for it to happen, but I think it's going to keep going in that direction. And I think that's going to create some real opportunities for Democrats in those - in the 17th and the 18th, especially. But also need to run great candidates - candidates who are going to work hard, who know districts. And I will leave that to the folks working in state politics to figure that out. But I think that candidates who fit profiles that we know voters are going to like, we know this person is compelling, we know there's so much about them that fits in with our messaging, really making the person the message. I think we should look more seriously at those sort of opportunities and maybe not so much at what do we think is always going to be the best sort of candidate based on what's always been done. [00:57:43] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Any parting thoughts that you would leave with people about things that you learned from this campaign or how people should be operating moving forward? [00:57:53] Phil Gardner: Gosh, I both feel like I've learned so much and had no time to really stop and process at all. But I guess I'll go as big picture as we can get because that was a motivator for me in this, which is that I - sure many people listening to this - have felt very deep fear and concern that we're slipping into a sort of very anti-democratic culture and government. And this creeping fascism that we see all around us in different forms - the trajectory is really, really, really concerning. I believe Joe Kent represents that, and that was a big motivating factor for why I was willing to throw up everything to go and do this. And then it turned out Marie was fantastic as well, and so we get sort of a twofer out of it. But I think after this election - because Joe Kent lost, because so many of these election deniers around the country lost, I do think we should feel heartened that there is apparently a bottom for a bunch of voters. And there are consequences to saying these things. But I also still feel that history is a long time and this is just one election cycle and we can't rest on our laurels. So as I look forward into 2024 and beyond, I would love love nothing more than to get back to the days where we're just fighting and trying to advance progressive causes on the sort of traditional D versus R axis that we may have known. But I think at least for the time being, there is also this very dark anti-democratic force that is out there and very present - and it's going to require more than I think what is typically thought of as being necessary. The careerists are not going to be able to solve this. It is a problem beyond the people just clocking in to work on campaigns. And we all work very hard and I think there are many brilliant people, but this is a force beyond what we have dealt with before. I spend a lot of time thinking about how we make sure that doesn't grow and doesn't go on. And again, I think we gave it a good bop on the nose this time, but I think it may be back and don't take our eyes off that ball. So that was a little darker than I intended, but I do think it's important. [00:59:55] Crystal Fincher: But real. I spend quite a bit of time thinking about that. It's real, but there is hope. There is cause for hope. [01:00:04] Phil Gardner: Yes. [01:00:05] Crystal Fincher: And I think that in so many circumstances, I needn't look any further than my own family history - that that has been the only thing that has got people through some of those times - engaging, being active, doing what you can, and just holding onto that hope, and continuing to push. So appreciate so much you joining us today to have this conversation. Thank you for saving us from Joe Kent. And for putting Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez on our radar and in our Congress. Just such a huge win. Such an exciting win. I know some - Election Night - I'm just like, Look at the Third District. People are like, Okay, what were you working on? I'm like, But look at the Third District. And stuff that I was working on turned out really well, I was really excited about that. But this was as exciting, I think, as a result gets because - I'd shared with people before - certainly felt that this race was worth engaging in, and fighting for, and knew it should be close. Didn't know if it could be. So had thought about the reality of Joe Kent and allies having significant control in our country and it was terrifying. So yeah, just so excited to be able to talk about this race with you, and such a great job on both the strategy and execution. And I also love hearing that your Field Director was new to politics and knocked out of the park anyway. And you were just a scrappy bunch who fought through without any - very little establishment support - and just made a way. So really good job, really exciting. And thank you for joining us today. [01:01:43] Phil Gardner: Thank you. Absolutely. Thanks for having me on. [01:01:45] Crystal Fincher: Thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our assistant producer is Shannon Cheng and our Post-Production Assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. You can find Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks and you can follow me @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Saint Athanasius Podcast
The Second Adam and The New Birth by M.F. Sadler | 2021 Book Reviews (#1)

Saint Athanasius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 15:06


Outline:Introduction and OverviewRich Lusk's PrefaceAre You Born Again?Regeneration and ConversionUnworthy Reception of BaptismConclusionSaint Athanasius ChurchContra Mundum SwaggerVideo VersionFeller of Trees Blog (Transcript)

The WorldView in 5 Minutes
Nigerian Muslims forced 10,000 rape victims to get abortions, Court forces girls to run against boys, Canadian COVID administrator dead at 35

The WorldView in 5 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022


It's Tuesday, December 20th, A.D. 2022. This is The Worldview in 5 Minutes heard at www.TheWorldview.com.  I'm Adam McManus. (Adam@TheWorldview.com) By Kevin Swanson Nigerian Muslims forced 10,000 rape victims to get abortions A Reuters investigation found that the Nigerian military is adding insult to injury for women kidnapped and abused by radical Islamist insurgents. The military somehow recovers the women and forces them to submit to abortions if they are pregnant. Reuters concluded that “Since 2013, the Nigerian Army has run a secret, systematic and illegal abortion program in the country's northeast, terminating at least 10,000 pregnancies among women and girls, many of whom had been kidnapped and raped by Islamist militants, according to dozens of witness accounts and documentation.” In addition, Open Doors calculates that 4,650 Christians have been killed, and 3,500 were kidnapped last year.  Violence against U.S. churches Hostility against U.S. churches is on the rise, almost three times the incidents of violence in 2022 as compared to 2018. The Family Research Council report found a total of 420 documented acts of hostility targeting 397 individual churches. There were 12 gun-related incidents, and 11 bomb threats.  Most were incidents of vandalism. This amounts to 1 in 20,000 churches per year reporting a gun-related incident. This compares to 110 to 130 shootings on school campuses per year, which is a rate of about 1 in 1,000.  Canadian COVID administrator dead at 35 Here's another high profile sudden death -- in Canada this time.   Adam Exton was the Director of Parliamentary Affairs at Health Canada during the COVID-19 crisis, and led the roll out of the COVID shot for Canada.  He is dead at 35 years of age.   Argentina beats France for World's Cup Soccer Argentina is the soccer world champion, beating out France in extra time in Sunday's game. That's Argentina's first World Cup victory since 1986. An estimated two million people rushed out into the streets of central Buenos Aires Sunday night to celebrate the win. One fan told NDTV, “Let's be clear. Argentina is in trouble, economically, socially; it's bad. So, this distraction is richly deserved.”  Argentina is falling apart economically and socially Indeed, Argentina's inflation rate is about 93% year over year.  The value of the Argentina peso has dropped 94% against the dollar, over the last five years. Shockingly, 80% of their children are born out of wedlock — about the highest rate of all nations in the world, with the exception of Columbia. Argentina was the first nation in Latin America to legalize same sex faux-marriage in 2010.  Argentina is 66% Catholic, 22% secular atheist, 9% Pentecostal, and 2% other Christian.  Psalm 10:16 reminds us that “The LORD is king forever and ever; and the nations perish from His land.” Peru's president impeached Peru's newly elected president, Pedro Castillo, was leading the pink wave towards more redistribution of the wealth and a rewrite of the nation's constitution.   But, this has been stopped short by an impeachment vote from Peru's Congress. Castillo will be replaced by Vice President Dina Boluarte, who ran under the Marxist banner of the Free Peru Party in 2021  Court forces girls to run against boys Last Friday, a three-judge panel of the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed a challenge to Connecticut's policy of allowing transgender students to compete in girls' high school sports. The court rejected arguments by four biological female runners who said they were unfairly forced to race against biologically male athletes, reports CBN. In arguments before a federal judge in Connecticut in February 2021, Roger Brooks, a lawyer for the Alliance Defending Freedom, said Title IX guarantees girls "equal quality" of competition, which he said is denied by having to race boys who have inherent physiological advantages. Brooks said the male transgender sprinters improperly won 15 championship races between 2017 and 2020 and cost girls the opportunity to advance to other races 85 times. The Second U.S. Circuit Court is populated with seven Democrats and six Republicans. Alliance Defending Freedom decried the ruled. Christiana Kiefer of ADF said, “Right now, 18 states have enacted laws that protect women and girls from having to compete against males, and polls show that a majority of Americans agree that the competition is no longer fair when males are permitted to compete in women's sports.”   ADF is considering an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.  NASDAQ down Stocks are down for the week. The NASDAQ Composite Index is down 1,000 points, settling around 10,500 Monday. That's the lowest mark on the index since November 8th. Jan. 6 panel recommends 4 criminal charges for Trump over Capitol riot Former President Donald Trump should face criminal charges for his actions in connection with last year's January 6, 2021 events, according to the Democrat Party-dominated House Select Committee, reports The New York Post. The charges recommended include: obstruction of an official proceeding, conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to make a false statement, and insurrection. The report concluded that “None of the events of January 6th would have happened without [Donald Trump].” Churches cancelling Christmas Day services And finally, only five days left until Christmas. More churches are cancelling worship this Sunday for the holiday— according to Lifeway Research.  Only 84% of churches are committed to holding worship services. That's down from 89% in 2016.    Denominationally, 95% of Lutherans, 91% of Methodists, 84% of Presbyterian/Reformed, 64% of non-denominational churches, 60% of Baptists, and 45% of Pentecostals are holding Christmas Eve services. Hebrews 10:25 warns us not to “forsake the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching.”  Close And that's The Worldview in 5 Minutes on this Tuesday, December 20th, in the year of our Lord 2022. Subscribe by iTunes or email to our unique Christian newscast at www.TheWorldview.com. Or get the Generations app through Google Play or The App Store. I'm Adam McManus (Adam@TheWorldview.com). Seize the day for Jesus Christ.

Theology In Particular
Episode 72: Political Theology Of 17th Century Particular Baptists with James Renihan

Theology In Particular

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 42:43


In Episode 72 of Theology In Particular I bring questions from one of our listeners regarding the political theology of 17th century Particular Baptists to Dr. James Renihan. I found his answers interesting and insightful. I think you will too..  Links International Reformed Baptist Seminary: irbsseminary.org If you have feedback, questions, or suggestions, please email me at joe@emmausrbc.org

NC Baptist
Making Disciples. Making Leaders. What's the Difference?

NC Baptist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 31:14


What's the difference between making disciples and making leaders?    N.C. Baptists' Brian Upshaw sits down with Senior Pastor Matt Capps of Fairview Baptist Church in Apex, North Carolina, to discuss one of the greatest needs of pastors — developing leaders.    Register for the 2023 Disciple-Making Conference to learn more at disciplemakingconference.org. 

Church History on SermonAudio
Church History (38): Early English Baptists

Church History on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 55:00


A new MP3 sermon from Heritage Reformed Baptist Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Church History (38): Early English Baptists Subtitle: Church History Speaker: Mike Waters Broadcaster: Heritage Reformed Baptist Church Event: Sunday School Date: 12/18/2022 Length: 55 min.

The Man of God
Baptist Identity Pt.3 | Tom Nettles | Preaching & Teaching

The Man of God

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 57:25


This is lecture 3 of our course "History of the Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles. Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary Providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/support

Preaching & Teaching
Baptist Identity Pt.2 | Tom Nettles

Preaching & Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 56:50


This is the second lecture from our course "The Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles at CBTS. Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary Providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org.

The Man of God
Baptist Identity Pt.2 | Tom Nettles | Preaching & Teaching

The Man of God

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:39


This is the second lecture from our course "The Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles at CBTS. Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary Providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/support

Iron Sharpens Iron Radio with Chris Arnzen
December 13, 2022 Show with Dan Nelson on “Early Baptists: A Comprehensive Study of the Anabaptist & English Baptist Movements”

Iron Sharpens Iron Radio with Chris Arnzen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 119:38


December 13, 2022 DAN NELSON, author, teacher, dramatist & Baptist historian, who will address: "EARLY BAPTISTS: A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY of the ANABAPTIST & ENGLISH BAPTIST MOVEMENTS"   Subscribe: iTunes  TuneIn Android RSS Feed Listen:

UNITY Lutheran Church
(12-11-22) The John The Baptists Among Us

UNITY Lutheran Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 15:15


Pastor David Patterson, UNITY Lutheran Church, Brookfield, WI, December 10-11, 2022

Preaching & Teaching
Baptist Identity Pt.1 | Tom Nettles

Preaching & Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 46:48


This is the first lecture from our course "The Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles at CBTS. Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary Providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org.

The Man of God
Baptist Identity Pt.1 | Tom Nettles | Preaching & Teaching

The Man of God

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 46:48


This is the first lecture from our course "The Baptists" taught by Tom Nettles at CBTS. Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary Providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/support

Meet the Mentor with Dr. Bill Dorfman
Dr. Sherri Arnold-Graham

Meet the Mentor with Dr. Bill Dorfman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 20:41


Reverend Dr. Sherri Arnold-Graham is the visionary founder and CEO of Dunamis Development Associates. She is the former pastor of the historic Oberlin Baptist Church in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she became the first female pastor of a mainline Baptist church in the history of Raleigh, North Carolina. Dr. Arnold-Graham served as the first Director of Development for a Lilly Grant at Shaw Divinity School and is the distinguished immediate past Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Woman's Baptist Home and Foreign Missionary Convention of North Carolina, an Auxiliary to the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, Inc. As a Convention Officer, she used the culmination of her pastoral legacy, business acumen for corporate development and her innate love for executive servant leadership in, “Missions and Stewardship,” to successfully serve over 1700 Baptist churches (over 500,000 Baptists) of North Carolina. Dr. Arnold-Graham's record of record-breaking results in transforming ministries, communities, conferences and conventions to 21st Century Kingdom Building Missions and multi-generational evangelical gatherings is truly spirit-led and reliant upon the Dunamis power of God. Dr. Arnold-Graham earned a B.B.A. in Personnel and Enterprise Management from Emory University in 1984, and a Master of Divinity from Shaw University Divinity School in 2007. She is listed in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities from both Emory and Shaw. She also served as a Graduate Research Assistant to Dr. Gardner C. Taylor and ultimately Associate Professor at Shaw Divinity School for the class, “The Preaching of Gardner C. Taylor.” While at Emory she interned with corporate giants like Columbia Pictures and Coca-Cola: ultimately landing a job with Procter & Gamble. Her spectrum of work ranges from Legal Aid to Wall Street and includes seven years as a paralegal in the investment industry with Federated Investors and Rogers & Wells in New York City. She once was quoted as saying, “God promoted me from investing in commodities to investing in souls.” Dr. Arnold-Graham is the Founder & President of The Sherri Arnold Graham Foundation (A Ministry for Breast Cancer Awareness & Support) a non-profit providing Free Mammograms and awareness campaigns to uninsured and under-insured women in the United States, United Kingdom and the Caribbean Islands. Dr. Arnold-Graham earned the Doctor of Ministry degree from United Theological Seminary where her research chronicles the power of Christian preaching to transform people and communities. Dr. Arnold-Graham has devoted herself to the study of homiletics beyond U.S. borders to include Oxford University, Oxford, England and at the American University of Paris. Dr. Arnold-Graham is a dynamic international conference presenter who speaks on the Transforming Gospel of Jesus Christ, Community Empowerment Strategies, Health Disparities, Health & Spirituality, and Faith-based Health Care Mission Collaborations. She is known and has proven to be a gracious and graceful servant leader called to exemplify the power of humility in ministry. Dr. Arnold-Graham is a native of Clairton, Pennsylvania and is the daughter of the late Willie James Arnold and Elouise Combs Arnold. She is married to Dr. Ernesto Graham; they have two children: Faith Sheree (a Massage Therapist) and Ernesto, II (a Junior at Morehouse College). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NC Baptist
Go2Years: How to Lose Students for the Right Reasons

NC Baptist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 36:02


  How can churches lose students for the right reasons? N.C. Baptists' Alex Hugo sits down with missionary Alicia Jones and Baptists on Mission's Teresa Jones — a mother and daughter duo serving on mission together — to discuss student mobilization.   Learn more and connect with our collegiate ministry at ncbaptist.org/college.

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference
Has Q-Anon Jumped The Shark?

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 59:58


Jesus Christ gets a Twitter Blue Check, the mayor of New York cracks down on the mentally ill, and there's a big win for religious freedom in the lower courts. Afterward, Pastor wonders if Q-Anon has been played out. Visit Matthew Pancake's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/matthew.pancake Visit Pastor Gary Held's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/garyheld Visit our Website www.RadicalGraceRadio.com Visit Our Youtube Page

The Reluctant Theologian Podcast
Ep. 109 Reformed Thomism and Salvation: Southern Baptists and Aquinas with Owen Strachan

The Reluctant Theologian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:29


The Southern Baptists seem to be completely obsessed with Thomas Aquinas these days. Of all the dead theologians that one could flock towards, the Baptists are all about the Dumb Ox right now. But what exactly is this Reformed Thomism? Does Reformed Thomism offer a biblical view of salvation? In today's episode, I've got Owen Strachan on to answer these questions and more! Credits Host: R.T. Mullins (PhD, University of St Andrews) is a visiting professor of philosophy at Palm Beach Atlantic University. Guest: Owen Strachan (PhD, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is the provost and research professor of theology at Grace Bible Theological Seminary. Music by Rockandmetal_domination – Raising-questions. rtmullins.com Support the Show: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=66431474 https://ko-fi.com/rtmullins

Reformation Baptist Church
The Doctrine of Baptism

Reformation Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 48:28


Why are we Baptists? God has worked in covenants throughout history, and baptism is the sign of the New Covenant. This sermon examines why we baptize only those who profess Christianity.

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference
We're All Doing Advent Wrong?

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 60:02


Non-denominational churches are growing despite mainline declines, Greg Locke gets the boot at Youtube, and The Chosen takes the box office by storm. And after all that, pastor says we're doing Advent wrong. Or at least mixed up. Visit Matthew Pancake's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/matthew.pancake Visit Pastor Gary Held's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/garyheld Visit our Website www.RadicalGraceRadio.com Visit Our Youtube Page

Reason Together
166 - Thanksgiving is a Religious Holiday

Reason Together

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 54:54


Today on RTP — Not many think Thanksgiving is a religious holiday. We discuss why it is. Also, a young girl trashes her father… at his funeral. And should there be political parties? Then, we discuss some crazy feedback from last week. In the aftershow we get into the history of Thanksgiving, modern day separatists, and should we still be called Baptists. >>> Aftershow available for Elite Patrons only. Don't miss out — Become an Elite Patron!SHOW NOTES:Woke Woman SHAMES Father At His FuneralScriptures Verses Cited: Romans 1; 2 Timothy 3:2-3; Colossians 1:17; 1 Corinthians 1:21Your support helps us pay our podcast editor, blog editor, writers, and upgrade our site to offer merch. Become a PatronBuy a T-shirtLeave an iTunes ReviewDiscuss the EpisodeSubmit a Question, Feedback, or Topic SuggestionGet a Free Trial with Audible

Baptist Without An Adjective
163. Lee Spitzer on Sympathy, Solidarity, and Silence

Baptist Without An Adjective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 45:57


Lee Spitzer, historian for the Baptist World Alliance and affiliate professor of church history at Northern Seminary in Chicago, talks with Word&Way President Brian Kaylor about his new book Sympathy, Solidarity, and Silence: Three European Baptist Responses to the Holocaust. He also discusses issues of helping refugees, defending democracy, and wrestling with history. He previously appeared on the program in episode 18. Note: Don't forget to check out our other podcast Dangerous Dogma, and our e-newsletter A Public Witness that helps you make sense of faith, culture, and politics.

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: November 18, 2022 - Hour 3

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 51:08


Special guest host Ken Hensley Nancy - I'm going to the Holy Land and it is offering for us to renew our baptismal vows in the Jordan River. Can we do that? Ken expands on a topic from the first two hours about “faith alone” and how he came to abandon Sola Scriptura (02:57) Noah - I read a prayer asking God to save the departed souls from the fires of hell. How does that work with the Catholic Church teaching that souls in hell not being able to go to heaven? Giovanni - Why are Baptists so specific about the form of Baptism if it is Just a symbol?

Life and Books and Everything
Life and Ministry with Mark Dever

Life and Books and Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 55:12 Transcription Available


In this fun, punchy, and (hopefully) edifying conversation, Kevin interviews his good friend, Mark Dever, about his conversion, his ministry on Capitol Hill, whether you have to be an extrovert to evangelize, and why Kevin likes G.K. Chesterton and Mark doesn't. Timestamps: Intro, Guest, and Sponsor [0:00-4:21] Does Membership Make Churches Unfriendly? [4:22-8:58] Dever's Youth and Conversion [8:59-15:13] Practicals for Evangelism [15:14-19:14] Dever's Later Education [19:15-25:42] Ministry in DC [25:43-36:16] Dever's Influences [36:17-40:22] Strengths and Weaknesses [40:23-44:10] Presbyterians and Baptists [44:11-48:14] Evangelicalism [48:15-55:12]

The Man of God
Hymns of John Fawcett | Particular Pilgrims

The Man of God

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 13:58


I have introduced you to several of John Fawcett's writings – especially his sermons and devotional works. But he was also a fine hymn writer. Several of his better productions are still sung today. He believed in singing psalms and hymns in public worship, not merely for private edification. The Baptist churches in his day, that is in the latter 1700's, would have predominantly sung the psalms and hymns of Isaac Watts. His song books were very popular. But as Baptists and others began to also pen hymns for worship, new collections were desired. And of course, a section of hymns for the ordinance of believer's baptism was needed for their churches. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/support

Real Christianity
Can I Expect My Kids to be Saved? Yes, Here's Why…

Real Christianity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 74:29


In this special edition of Real Christianity, pastor Dale Partridge and pastor Joel Webbon tackle the doctrine of Covenant Succession (or expectant redemption). However, this doctrine, which is most commonly known as a Presbyterian position, is unpacked by two reformed Baptists making this discussion novel and important. Ultimately, this discussion is intended to offer hope to any Christian parent concerned for the souls of their children.

Catholic Answers Live
#10866 Meeting Protestant Challenges - Karlo Broussard

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022


Questions Covered: 00:48 – Does the Church believe in a closed canon?  04:11 –  I think you’re leaving out the important point that the Baptists claim of being able to trace their line back to Jesus is incorrect.  15:40 – Which denomination would the Catholic Church consider having valid apostolic succession?  22:33 – How can we Catholics defend the teaching of having images and them not being idols?  30:40 – In what ways could a priest help a Baptist in a situation where demonic forces could potentially be involved?  35:33 – What’s the best way to approach a protestant pastor with a large following who is spreading blatant lies about the Blessed Mother?  45:53 – My protestant brother is slowly making his way to the Catholic Church. How do I encourage him to be open to the Catholic Church?  52:06 – I’m a Protestant Freemason. Why would I not be allowed to be Catholic if I'm a Freemason?  …

Wretched Radio
CHILDHOOD BAPTISTS AND BAD CATHOLICS

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 54:50 Very Popular


It’s Witness Wednesday from Kennesaw State University. Meet a couple students with goals of becoming business owners, but zero religious goals. Wretched Radio | Air Date: October 26, 2022 https://media-wretched.org/Radio/Podcast/WR2022-1026.mp3 It’s Witness Wednesday from Kennesaw State University. Meet a couple students with goals of becoming business owners, but zero religious goals. ___ Download Now (right click […]