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Best podcasts about national public radio

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Latest podcast episodes about national public radio

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast
Best of 2021: Mitch Prinstein | The Power of Likability in a Status Obsessed World

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 56:46


Your happiness and success are tied to your popularity. And it goes all the way back to high school. In today's episode, Mitch Prinstein helps us to explore the correlation between popularity and happiness by sharing secrets to boosting your likability through things such as understanding what makes people tick; developing empathy for others; making people feel good about themselves; using humor in moderation and many more ways!Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D. is board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology and serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He and his research have been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, the Los Angeles Times, CNN, U.S. News & World Report, Time magazine, New York magazine, Newsweek, Reuters, Family Circle, Real Simple, and elsewhere. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chasing Immortality
Diane de Poitiers: Liquid Gold

Chasing Immortality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 64:01


Adhamy, Amir. “What Did a Lady-in-Waiting Actually Do?” HistoryExtra, 26 Nov. 2020, www.historyextra.com/period/what-did-lady-ladies-in-waiting-do-role.Akingswhore. “Akingswhore.” A King's Whore, 1 Feb. 2018, akingswhore.tumblr.com/post/170353396161/diane-de-poitiers-3-sep-1499-25-apr.Andy. “Everything You Need to Know About Edible Gold Leaf.” Cooked Best, 15 Feb. 2021, cookedbest.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-edible-gold-leaf/#:%7E:text=Uses%20of%20Edible%20Gold%20leaf%3A,-Edible%20gold%20leaf&text=The%20gold%20leaf%20flakes%20add,or%20in%20pre%2Dfab%20flakes.Author, Guest. “Beauty Secrets of a Royal Mistress.” DC on Heels, 17 Feb. 2015, dconheels.com/2015/01/30/beauty-queen.Bates, Claire. “Dying to Look Good: French King's Mistress Killed by Gold Elixir of Youth.” Mail Online, 22 Dec. 2009, www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1236916/Dying-look-good-French-kings-mistress-killed-gold-elixir-youth.html.Beck, Shari. Portrait in Black and White: Diane De Poitiers in Her Own Words. Bloomington, IN, iUniverse Booksellers, 2011.Biller, Lauren Davis And Diana. “7 Ways That People Died Trying To Become Immortal.” Io9, 16 Dec. 2015, io9.gizmodo.com/7-ways-that-people-died-trying-to-become-immortal-1691947345.Burkovski, Amanda. “Henry and Diane: A Love/Sad/Fantastic Story Illustrated With the Character's Real Portraits.” Medium, 15 Nov. 2019, medium.com/@AmandaBurkovski/henry-and-diane-a-love-sad-fantastic-story-27d255735225.Carley, Claudia Suzan. “Diane de Poitiers vs. Catherine de Medici.” WordPress.Com, 14 Oct. 2015, castlesandcoffeehouses.com/2015/06/15/diane-de-poitiers-vs-catherine-de-medici.CeeGunn. “Jousting Rules in Medieval and Modern Times.” HowTheyPlay, 19 Mar. 2021, howtheyplay.com/misc/Medieval-Jousting-Rules.Charlier, Philippe. “A Gold Elixir of Youth in the 16th Century French Court.” The BMJ, 16 Dec. 2009, www.bmj.com/content/339/bmj.b5311.full.---. “Fatal Alchemy: Did Gold Kill 16th Century French Courtesan And Favorite Of Henri II.” British Medical Journal, Dec. 2009, www.bmj.com/bmj/section-pdf/186428?path=/bmj/339/7735/Diagnosis.full.pdf.Climans, Kyle. “Extravagant Facts About Diane de Poitiers, Royal Mistress.” Factinate, 29 Jan. 2021, www.factinate.com/people/facts-diane-de-poitiers.Cloud, Amanda. “Gender Roles of Women in the Renaissance.” Cedarcrest.Edu, Cedarcrest.edu, www2.cedarcrest.edu/academic/eng/lfletcher/shrew/acloud.htm. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.Consort, Newberry. “Queen of the Arts: Catherine de' Medici.” The Newberry Consort, 25 Feb. 2019, www.newberryconsort.org/queen-of-the-arts-catherine-de-medici/#:%7E:text=When%20Catherine%20moved%20to%20France,sons%2C%20be%20trained%20in%20dance.Context Travel Contributors. “Royal Rivalry: Diane De Poitiers and Catherine De Medicis.” Context Travel, 2 Mar. 2020, www.contexttravel.com/blog/articles/royal-rivalry-diane-de-poitiers-and-catherine-de-medicis.DA SOLLER, CLAUDIO. “THE BEAUTIFUL WOMAN IN MEDIEVAL IBERIA: RHETORIC, COSMETICS, AND EVOLUTION.” Faculty of the Graduate School University of Missouri-Columbia, 2005, pp. 1–201, mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10355/4175/research.pdf.Delors, Catherine. “Diane De Poitiers Returns to Her Grave… « Versailles and More.” Versailles and More, 2010, blog.catherinedelors.com/diane-de-poitiers-returns-to-her-grave.Dhwty. “A Mistress with the Midas Touch: Her Hunger for Gold Would Be the Death of Her.” Ancient Origins, 13 Feb. 2018, www.ancient-origins.net/history-famous-people/mistress-midas-touch-her-hunger-gold-would-be-death-her-009589.“Diane De Poitiers...Three Cold Baths a Day and a Perfectly Disciplined Body...the Beauty Secrets That Made the Ladies of the Court Enragees.” Vogue | The Complete Archive, 1 Oct. 1969, archive.vogue.com/article/1969/10/01/diane-de-poitiersthree-cold-baths-a-day-and-a-perfectly-disciplined-bodythe-beauty-secrets-that-made.Dovey, Dana. “No Fairy Tale: Tiny Bacteria Spin Gold From Toxic Heavy Metals.” Newsweek, 7 Feb. 2018, www.newsweek.com/gold-bacteria-heavy-metal-toxic-798615.Encyclopedia.com Contributors. “Diane de Poitiers (1499–1566) | Encyclopedia.Com.” Encyclopedia, 2020, www.encyclopedia.com/women/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/diane-de-poitiers-1499-1566.Enviromental Protection Agency. “Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining Without Mercury.” US EPA, 16 Nov. 2020, www.epa.gov/international-cooperation/artisanal-and-small-scale-gold-mining-without-mercury#:%7E:text=In%20many%20countries%2C%20elemental%20mercury,mercury%20to%20obtain%20the%20gold.Food and Drug Administration. “Edible Gold Leaf FDA Certificates. Host Your next Event, Style Your Menu and Make a Memorable Experience for Your Guests.” Ediblegold.Com, 2019, ediblegold.com/fda.html.GardensOnline Pty. Ltd. “Chateau de Chenonceau.” GardensOnline, Gardens Online, 2021, www.gardensonline.com.au/inspiration/gardensoftheworld/show_92.aspx.Greenberg, Jake. “Drinking Gold Did Not Help the 16th-Century French Elite Fight Aging.” InsideHook, 21 Sept. 2018, www.insidehook.com/daily_brief/news-opinion/drinking-gold-16th-century-french-aging.“Heavy Metal Poisoning: What You Should Know.” WebMD, 22 Jan. 2018, www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/what-is-heavy-metal-poisoning.Johnson, Jon. “Mercury Poisoning: Symptoms and Treatment.” Medical News Today, 9 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320563#causes.Kate. “Drinking Gold for Youth: Beauty Treatment Kills Woman.” The Belgravia Centre, 27 Oct. 2010, www.belgraviacentre.com/blog/drinking-gold-for-youth-beauty-treatment-kills-woman-473.Katy, and Nathan. “Queens Podcast - Side Hustle: Diane De Poitiers, Episode 18 on Stitcher.” Stitcher, uploaded by Queens Podcast, 5 Feb. 2018, www.stitcher.com/show/queens-podcst/episode/side-hustle-diane-de-poitiers-episode-18-53157060.Kynaston Bowden, Caroline Mary. “FEMALE EDUCATION IN THE LATE SIXTEENTH AND EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES IN ENGLAND AND WALES: A STUDY OF ATTITUDES AND PRACTI CE.” Institute of Education University of London, 1996, pp. 46–60, discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10019233/1/389405.pdf.Lindsay Holiday. “Queen Catherine de' Medici.” YouTube, uploaded by Lindsay Holiday, 4 Aug. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGHfRrzRMOM.Malone, Noreen. “Waity Katie's Ladies.” Slate Magazine, 15 Apr. 2011, slate.com/human-interest/2011/04/kate-middleton-s-ladies-in-waiting-what-will-they-do.html.Marquez. “A Brief History of The Medici Family.” YouTube, uploaded by Marquez, 26 Mar. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGEyzt47VYU.McDowall, Carolyn, and Carolyn McDowall. “Diane de Poitiers – Moon Mistress and Woman of Influence.” The Culture Concept Circle, 9 June 2014, www.thecultureconcept.com/diane-de-poitiers-moon-mistress-and-woman-of-influence.Mejia, Paula. “Drinking Gold Was a Grisly Anti-Aging Trend of 16th-Century France.” Atlas Obscura, 7 Jan. 2019, www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-did-people-prevent-aging.Michael Jiroch. “A Walk Around Château de Chenonceau, Loire Valley, France.” YouTube, uploaded by Michael Jiroch, 30 Jan. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KujZuJ8syQ.Milne, Andrew. “24 Hours at Château de Chenonceau with Diane de Poitiers.” Explore France, 29 Oct. 2019, us.france.fr/en/loire-valley/list/diane-de-poitiers-chateau-chenonceau.Montagne, Renee. “NPR Cookie Consent and Choices.” NPR Morning Edition, National Public Radio, 18 Dec. 2009, choice.npr.org/index.html?origin=https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=121600083.National Center for Enviromental Health. “Hypothermia|Winter Weather.” Center for Disease Control, 26 Feb. 2018, www.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/staysafe/hypothermia.html.Nicholson, Joseph. “How Is Mercury Used to Purify Gold?” Sciencing, 2 Mar. 2019, sciencing.com/how-mercury-used-purify-gold-4914156.html.Osterloff, Emily. “What Is Ambergris?” Natural History Museum, www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/what-is-ambergris.html. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.Paris, By Henry Samuel In. “French King's Mistress Poisoned by Gold Elixir.” The Telegraph, 22 Dec. 2009, www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/6865939/French-kings-mistress-poisoned-by-gold-elixir.html.Quora Contributors. “What Happens When You Eat Gold.” Quora, 4 Feb. 2020, www.quora.com/What-happens-when-you-eat-gold.Sidney, Deana. “Beauty, Brains and Style –– Diane de Poitiers and Renaissance Potage-Green Sauce.” Lost Past Remembered Blog, 15 Mar. 2015, lostpastremembered.blogspot.com/2015/03/beauty-brains-and-style-diane-de.html.The BMJ. “Fatal Alchemy.” YouTube, 4 Jan. 2010, www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSvaf-4Cbj4.“The Garden of Catherine De Medicis.” Chenonceau, 29 May 2017, www.chenonceau.com/en/gardens/the-garden-of-catherine-de-medicis.The Italian Tribune. “How Did the ‘Mona Lisa' End up in France?” Mona Lisa's Florence, 30 Mar. 2019, becomingitalianwordbyword.typepad.com/monalisabook/2016/03/how-did-the-mona-lisa-end-up-in-france.html.Tran, Christine. “Raunchy Facts About King Francis I, Father Of The French Renaissance.” Factinate, 26 Feb. 2021, www.factinate.com/people/41-raunchy-facts-about-king-francis-i-father-of-the-french-renaissance/#:%7E:text=Francis%20I%20of%20France%20passed,of%20his%20lungs%20in%20shreds.%E2%80%9D.U of M Medicine. “Hypothermia and Cold Temperature Exposure | Michigan Medicine.” University of Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, 26 Feb. 2020, www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/aa53968spec#:%7E:text=Hypothermia%20can%20occur%20when%20you,(21%C2%B0C)%20water.User, Super. “Gold Chloride.” Espi Metals, espimetals.com/index.php/msds/137-Gold%20Chloride. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.Weather and Climate Contributors. “Average Monthly Water Temperature in Nice (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur), France - (Celsius).” World Weather & Climate Information, weather-and-climate.com/average-monthly-water-Temperature,nice,France. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.White, Karen. “What's the Right Temperature for Your Pool?” American Pool, 1 June 2015, americanpool.com/2015/06/01/whats-right-temperature-pool/#:%7E:text=While%20pools%20should%20be%20never,toddlers%20learning%20how%20to%20swim.Wikipedia contributors. “Anne of France.” Wikipedia, 13 Apr. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_France.---. “Catherine de' Medici.” Wikipedia, 20 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_de%27_Medici.---. “Diane de Poitiers.” Wikipedia, 29 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diane_de_Poitiers.---. “Ether Addiction.” Wikipedia, 13 Jan. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ether_addiction.---. “Henry II of France.” Wikipedia, 20 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_France#Early_years.---. “Italian War of 1536–1538.” Wikipedia, 19 Dec. 2020, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_War_of_1536%E2%80%931538#:%7E:text=The%20Italian%20war%20of%201536,particular%20the%20Duchy%20of%20Milan.---. “Lady-in-Waiting.” Wikipedia, 6 Apr. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady-in-waiting#:%7E:text=The%20duties%20of%20ladies%2Din,at%20court%3B%20care%20of%20the.

Jake Gallen's Guest List Podcast
Things Every Entrepreneur Should Know | Dennis Yu | +164

Jake Gallen's Guest List Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:27


Dennis Yu's mission is to create a million jobs. Not just any jobs, but meaningful work for digital marketers who get certified and progress at the same time.  $500 a month in the Philippines, Pakistan, and Nigeria is life-changing money. Real estate agents, mortgage brokers, doctors, and other local service businesses, following the direction of the most respected figurehead in their industry, purchase implementation packages that are serviced by our network of agency owners. These agency owners never need to sell, because of our relationship with the figureheads of each industry. They manage their client relationships and the workers performing tasks in our “Content Factory”. None of this would be possible without the generous support of partners such as DigitalMarketer, Social Media Examiner, Fiverr, GoDaddy, Keap, OmniConvert, Onlinejobs.ph, Tom Ferry, Barry Habib, and others who believe in training up millions of digital marketing professionals. Dennis has managed campaigns for enterprise clients like The Golden State Warriors, Nike, and Rosetta Stone. He's an internationally recognized lecturer in Facebook Marketing and has spoken over 730 times in 17 countries. Dennis has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, LA Times, National Public Radio, TechCrunch, Fox News, CNN, CBS Evening News and co-authored “Facebook Nation” – a textbook taught in over 700 colleges and universities. He's a regular contributor to Adweek's SocialTimes column and is published in Social Media Examiner, Social Media Club, Tweak Your Biz, B2C, SocialFresh, and Heyo. Dennis has held leadership positions at Yahoo! and American Airlines and studied Finance and Economics at Southern Methodist University and London School of Economics. He ran collegiate cross-country at SMU and has competed in over 20 marathons including a 70-mile ultramarathon. He was ranked as the number one speaker of the conference at the PPC Caesar's Award 2018. Besides being a Facebook data and ad geek, you can find him eating chicken wings or playing Ultimate Frisbee in a city near you.|Dennis YU|www.themasterpresentation.comTwitterFacebook|JakeGallen|InstagramTwitterFacebookLinkedin|TimeStamps|0:00 - Introduction4:45 - Who is Dennis yu?8:00 - Facebook Ads13:00 - Amplify Social Prood18:14 - Quality Metrics25:20 - Instagram28:00 - Blitz Metrics35:00 - Delegating Work46:00 - Chiro Revenue52:00 - Micro Niches57:00 - Podcasting01:00 - Public Speaking01:05 - What does Las Vegas Mean to You?|LISTEN and SUBSCRIBE to the platform of your choice|-Apple Podcasts-Spotify-Google Podcasts-Amazon Podcasts-Youtube (VIDEO RECO

New Books in American Studies
Adam Bonica and Maya Sen, "The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 68:33


Why have conservatives decried 'activist judges'? And why have liberals - and America's powerful legal establishment - emphasized qualifications and experience over ideology? The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary (Cambridge UP, 2020) tackles these questions with a new framework for thinking about the nation's courts, 'the judicial tug of war', which not only explains current political clashes over America's courts, but also powerfully predicts the composition of courts moving forward. As the text demonstrates through novel quantitative analyses, a greater ideological rift between politicians and legal elites leads politicians to adopt measures that put ideology and politics front and center - for example, judicial elections. On the other hand, ideological closeness between politicians and the legal establishment leads legal elites to have significant influence on the selection of judges. Ultimately, the judicial tug of war makes one point clear: for good or bad, politics are critical to how judges are selected and whose interests they ultimately represent. Adam Bonica is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. His research has been published in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, and JAMA Internal Medicine. Maya Sen is Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her research has been published in journals such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, and has been covered by the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Economist, National Public Radio, and other outlets. Ursula Hackett is Senior Lecturer in Politics at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her Cambridge University Press book America's Voucher Politics: How Elites Learned to Hide the State won the 2021 Education Politics and Policy Best Book Award from the American Political Science Association. Her writing guide Brilliant Essays is published by Macmillan Study Skills. She tweets @UrsulaBHackett. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Adam Bonica and Maya Sen, "The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 68:33


Why have conservatives decried 'activist judges'? And why have liberals - and America's powerful legal establishment - emphasized qualifications and experience over ideology? The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary (Cambridge UP, 2020) tackles these questions with a new framework for thinking about the nation's courts, 'the judicial tug of war', which not only explains current political clashes over America's courts, but also powerfully predicts the composition of courts moving forward. As the text demonstrates through novel quantitative analyses, a greater ideological rift between politicians and legal elites leads politicians to adopt measures that put ideology and politics front and center - for example, judicial elections. On the other hand, ideological closeness between politicians and the legal establishment leads legal elites to have significant influence on the selection of judges. Ultimately, the judicial tug of war makes one point clear: for good or bad, politics are critical to how judges are selected and whose interests they ultimately represent. Adam Bonica is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. His research has been published in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, and JAMA Internal Medicine. Maya Sen is Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her research has been published in journals such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, and has been covered by the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Economist, National Public Radio, and other outlets. Ursula Hackett is Senior Lecturer in Politics at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her Cambridge University Press book America's Voucher Politics: How Elites Learned to Hide the State won the 2021 Education Politics and Policy Best Book Award from the American Political Science Association. Her writing guide Brilliant Essays is published by Macmillan Study Skills. She tweets @UrsulaBHackett. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
Adam Bonica and Maya Sen, "The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 68:33


Why have conservatives decried 'activist judges'? And why have liberals - and America's powerful legal establishment - emphasized qualifications and experience over ideology? The Judicial Tug of War: How Lawyers, Politicians, and Ideological Incentives Shape the American Judiciary (Cambridge UP, 2020) tackles these questions with a new framework for thinking about the nation's courts, 'the judicial tug of war', which not only explains current political clashes over America's courts, but also powerfully predicts the composition of courts moving forward. As the text demonstrates through novel quantitative analyses, a greater ideological rift between politicians and legal elites leads politicians to adopt measures that put ideology and politics front and center - for example, judicial elections. On the other hand, ideological closeness between politicians and the legal establishment leads legal elites to have significant influence on the selection of judges. Ultimately, the judicial tug of war makes one point clear: for good or bad, politics are critical to how judges are selected and whose interests they ultimately represent. Adam Bonica is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. His research has been published in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, and JAMA Internal Medicine. Maya Sen is Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her research has been published in journals such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, and has been covered by the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Economist, National Public Radio, and other outlets. Ursula Hackett is Senior Lecturer in Politics at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her Cambridge University Press book America's Voucher Politics: How Elites Learned to Hide the State won the 2021 Education Politics and Policy Best Book Award from the American Political Science Association. Her writing guide Brilliant Essays is published by Macmillan Study Skills. She tweets @UrsulaBHackett. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

A Quest for Well-Being
Moving Forward & Embracing Life After Loss

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 52:57


— “Simple pleasures, or even times of the purest happiness imaginable, juxtaposed against moments of almost indescribable pain. As I gaze across the table at my husband and my surviving son, I know with absolute certainty that the three of us, each in our own way, are moving forward and embracing life, which is what I truly believe Kieran would have wanted us to do. Valeria Teles interviews Margaret Thomson — the author of “The World Looks Different Now: A Memoir of Suicide, Faith, and Family.” Margaret Thomson is an author and journalist whose world was forever altered the day her son Kieran took his life at the age of twenty-two. A medic in the Army, Kieran had been preparing for his first-ever deployment to Afghanistan at the time of his death, on August 28, 2010. Upon receiving the unthinkable news, Margaret and her husband Tim found themselves plunged into what can only be described as every parent's worst nightmare. Lifelong Christians, the couple held tightly to their faith, even as Margaret found herself wondering whether she, too, might someday choose to follow in the path her son had taken. In desperation, Margaret turned to writing, which had long been a constant in her life, as a means of focusing her mind and organizing her thoughts. In itself relatively simple, the act of putting pen to paper—or fingers to keyboard—served almost as a form of therapy, eventually bringing more solace than Margaret had ever thought possible. A professional journalist whose work has appeared in a variety of media outlets in the U.S. and Britain, Margaret relied on her journalistic training in her search for the deeper truths that she felt certain were lying behind her son's death. “I was determined to put on the armor of the journalist in the hope that doing so would give me at least a degree of emotional distance,” Margaret says, “which was extremely foolish of me since there is, of course, nothing in the world that can protect you when it comes to dealing with your own, intensely personal loss.” Margaret Thomson and her husband Tim live in the greater Nashville, Tennessee, area. Margaret is a journalist who's worked in both print and broadcasting. Her written work has appeared in a number of British and American publications while her radio reports have been heard on broadcast outlets including ABC Radio News, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and National Public Radio. To learn more about Margaret Thomson and her work, please visit: margaretrileythomson.com     — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

Active Self Protection Podcast
Stabbed By A Madman! Tina Bollman and Lisa Varner

Active Self Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 55:54


In this episode of the Active Self Protection Podcast we sit down with Tina Bollman and Lisa Varner as they tell us about the day a deranged, repeat-offender brutally attacked Tina in her home with a kitchen knife and about the emotional aftermath and criminal trial. Also, we sit down with a special guest, author and National Public Radio investigative reporter Tim Mak and discuss his new book entitled Misfire: Inside The Downfall Of The NRA. Active Self Protection exists to help good, sane, sober, moral, prudent people in all walks of life to more effectively protect themselves and their loved ones from criminal violence. On the ASP Podcast you will hear the true stories of life or death self defense encounters from the men and women that lived them. If you are interested in the Second Amendment, self defense and defensive firearms use, martial arts or the use of less lethal tools used in the real world to defend life and family, you will find this show riveting. Join host and career federal agent Mike Willever and the rest of the ASP staff as they talk to real life survivors and hear their stories in depth. You'll hear about these incidents and the self defenders from well before the encounter occurred on through the legal and emotional aftermath. Title music by Jorikbasov.

Bande à part
151: Helen Levitt

Bande à part

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 28:26


We talk about the thought-provoking exhibition of Helen Levitt's work at the Photographer's Gallery in London. See links below. ‘Helen Levitt: In the Street', The Photographers' Gallery, London (15 October 2021 – 13 February 2022): https://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/whats-on/helen-levitt-retrospective Photographers' Gallery, ‘Helen Levitt: In The Street - Interview with exhibition curators Walter Moser & Anna Dannemann' (26 October 2021): https://youtu.be/IfvaZBoIuYw Helen Levitt, Janice Loeb, James Agee, ‘In The Street' (1948), The Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://youtu.be/hznvV2bBkX4?t=194 ‘Tomorrow is Ragamuffin Day', New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (23 November 2016): https://www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org/blog/tomorrow-ragamuffin-day Vincente Minelli (director), Irene (costume supervisor), ‘Meet Me in St. Louis' (1944): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0037059/ ‘Helen Levitt's Indelible Eye', All Things Considered, National Public Radio (17 January 2002): https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1136521 (interview with Helen Levitt by Melissa Block) Hamleys: https://www.hamleys.com/ Wilterminus, ‘The Sound of dial-up Internet' (10 November 2008): https://youtu.be/gsNaR6FRuO0

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
247 Speaking Of Race with Journalist and Bestselling Author Celeste Headlee

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 79:26


Our ability to communicate and collaborate is core to our humanity. Yet we live in a time where many of us seem to have a very tough time having real, powerful dialogues. In this episode of Follow Your Different, Celeste Headlee shows us how it's done. Celeste Headlee is the author of the bestselling book; We Need to Talk: How to have conversations that matter. She has also given out a TED talk, titled 10 Ways to have Better Conversations, which has 25 million views. Her most recent book is called Speaking of Race, which emphasizes the need to talk about racism, and how to do it. What you're about to hear is a deep conversation on why authentic conversations matter and how to have them. Also, pay close attention to her ideas on how you can be a more powerful conversationalist, and why our brain rewards us when we have real dialogue.   Celeste Headlee and the Passion for Conversation The conversation starts off with Celeste sharing where her passion for conversations came from. Celeste shares that there are a few things that bother her as one gets older. Though the one thing that upsets her is when there are things that can be fixed, that are totally fixable, though having proper conversations. “I mean, there's just very little that we can't talk through as human beings. And so I'm passionate about it because it's universal. Every single person on the planet needs to be able to converse with others and communicate with others well, and be it's just the root of problem solving. I mean, this is what solves problems, period, whatever they are.” – Celeste Headlee   Why People are not having Meaningful Conversations Celeste shares her thoughts as to why people seem to have lost the ability to have a meaningful conversation. She has discovered an interesting tidbit while researching for her second book, and it dates all the way back to the Industrial Revolution. While recent developments and social norms may have exacerbated the situation, the turning point seems to have happened when one guy discovered how to use steam to make our lives better. “Prior to the Industrial Revolution. Most people lived in rural areas, most people interacted with maybe 100 or 150 people over the course of their lives. Then all of a sudden, the Industrial Revolution came in. Everybody flips over till most people are living in urban areas. Because of that, most people are encountering 1000s of people over the course of a week or a month instead. And it just happened too quickly. We weren't able to adjust evolve that fast.” – Celeste Headlee   Bringing Back Good and Meaningful Conversations Celeste thinks that most people don't know what conversation is anymore. There are some who say that they are good conversationalists. That is, they are good talkers. Those are not the same thing at all. In order to be a good conversationalist, you have to not only be a good talker. You also have to listen as well as you talk. “I imagine (Oscar Wilde) was not a good conversationalist. Fantastic talker, but not good in conversation. Why? Because you have to be able to listen as well as you talk. And the smarter you are, the harder that challenge becomes. The wittier you are, the funnier you are, the harder that becomes. But also, listening is just hard. It's hard for our species. I think that some of the people that we think of as not being good in conversations are much better than they get credit for. And those are the people who speak less than they listen.” – Celeste Headlee   To hear more from Celeste Headlee on the importance of having a meaningful conversation, download and listen to this episode.   Bio Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist who has appeared on NPR, PBS World, PRI, CNN, BBC and other international networks.  She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows including Tell Me More, Talk of the Nation, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. For many years, Celeste has been a mentor and managing editor for NPR's Ne...

Futility Closet
362-The Leatherman

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 33:14


In 1856, a mysterious man appeared on the roads of Connecticut and New York, dressed in leather, speaking to no one, and always on the move. He became famous for his circuits through the area, which he followed with remarkable regularity. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the Leatherman, whose real identity remains unknown. We'll also consider the orientation of churches and puzzle over some balky ponies. Intro: Western Poland contains a grove of 400 pine trees that appear to have been deliberately bent. In 1902 Montgomery Carmichael published the life story of an imaginary man. Image: The Leatherman, photographed on June 9, 1885, by James F. Rodgers at the Bradley Chidsey House, Branford, Ct. Sources for our feature: Dan W. DeLuca, ed., The Old Leather Man: Historical Accounts of a Connecticut and New York Legend, 2008. Robert Marchant, Westchester: History of an Iconic Suburb, 2018. Jim Reisler, Walk of Ages: Edward Payson Weston's Extraordinary 1909 Trek Across America, 2015. Kathleen L. Murray, Berlin, 2001. Clark Wissler, The Indians of Greater New York and the Lower Hudson, 1909. Dave Zucker, "Who Was Westchester's Mysterious and Legendary Leatherman?" Westchester Magazine, March 24, 2021. Jon Campbell, "Mystery Man: Will Anyone Ever Know the Real Story Behind the Leatherman?" Village Voice, June 16, 2015. Steven R. Cooper, "Clues to the Past," Central States Archaeological Journal 58:3 (July 2011), 162-163. "Legend in Leather," Hudson Valley Magazine, March 11, 2010. Jim Fitzgerald, "Wanderer From 1800s Gets More Peaceful NY Grave," Associated Press, May 25, 2011. Dan Brechlin, "Leather Man Body May Yield Clues," [Meriden, Ct.] Record Journal, Jan. 3, 2011. "Would Leatherman Be Welcome Today?" New Haven Register, June 6, 2011. Pam McLoughlin, "Mystery Man," New Haven Register, Feb. 13, 2011. "Walker's Unusual Legend Is Told," Hartford Courant, Sept. 12, 2005. Steve Grant, "Final Journey Made to Resting Place of Legendary Wanderer," Hartford Courant, July 18, 1993. Steve Grant, "On the Road, Retracing the Leatherman's Path," Hartford Courant, June 20, 1993. Frances Phipps, "A Man Known by All, and by None," New York Times, Sept. 23, 1984. "The Leather Man," [Meriden, Ct.] Journal, July 19, 1886. "A Leather-Clad Hermit," Burlington [Vt.] Free Press, April 7, 1870. "Search For Clues Only Deepens 'Leatherman' Mystery," Morning Edition, National Public Radio, May 26, 2011. "Leatherman," Perception, WTIC-TV, Feb. 14, 1965. Listener mail: "Orientation of Churches," Wikipedia (accessed Oct. 10, 2021). Patrick Arneitz et al., "Orientation of Churches by Magnetic Compasses?" Geophysical Journal International 198:1 (2014), 1-7. "Brazil Nuts," ORAU Museum of Radiation and Radioactivity (accessed Oct. 10, 2021). "Natural Radioactivity in Food," EPA (accessed Oct. 14, 2021). "Brazil Nut," Wikipedia (accessed Oct. 16, 2021). G.V. Damiano, Hadhuch-Anti Hell-War: Monarchy's Victory; Constitution's Triumph; Tribute's Annihilation, 1922. This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener James Venning. Here's a corroborating link (warning -- this spoils the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

Keen On Democracy
W. Ralph Eubanks on a Journey Through the Literary History of Mississippi

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 36:58


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by W. Ralph Eubanks, the author of “A Place Like Mississippi”, to discuss how the South has produced some of America's most celebrated authors, and no state more so than Mississippi W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of A Place Like Mississippi, which will be released on March 16, 2021 by Timber Press. A Place Like Mississippi takes readers on a complete tour of the real and imagined landscapes that have inspired generations of authors. This is a book that honors and explores the landscape of Mississippi—and the Magnolia State's history—and reveals the many ways this landscape has informed the work of some of America's most treasured authors.  Eubanks is the author of two other books: Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey Into Mississippi's Dark Past (Basic Books) and The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South (HarperCollins). Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley named Ever is a Long Time as one of the best nonfiction books of 2003. Richard Ford wrote that The House at the End of the Road  “finds its truth in between conventional wisdom and sociological presumption, in between lies and faulty history. It is a story of race, of family, of place itself, and it tells us that compassion and the stirring force of individual human endeavor finally mean more than anything.”  Eubanks has contributed articles to the Washington Post Outlook and Style sections, WIRED, The Hedgehog Review,The Wall Street Journal, The American Scholar, The New Yorker, and National Public Radio. A graduate of the University of Mississippi (B.A.) and the University of Michigan (M.A., English Language and Literature), he is a recipient of a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and has been a fellow at the New America Foundation. Ralph lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and three children. From 1995 to 2013 he was director of publishing for the Library of Congress and is the former editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia. Currently he is the Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Louisiana Insider
Episode 58: On Top of the Hill – Journalist Steve Roberts Recalls Career of Wife Cokie Roberts

Louisiana Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:09


Steve Roberts has experienced life from many different angles. He is an accomplished journalist who has written a nationally syndicated political column. He was the husband of the late Cokie Roberts, who reported for ABC News and National Public Radio and wrote several books, some specializing in women's political history. His mother-in-law as the late Lindy Boggs, who was a member of congress from Louisiana and went on to serve as U.S. Ambassador to the Vatican, and his father-in-law was Hale Boggs, a member of Congress who was on the path to become Speaker of the House before disappearing in an Alaskan plane crash in the '70s. Roberts joins Errol Laborde, executive editor of Louisiana Life, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot in a memorable interview to discuss his career and his new book about Cokie Roberts. Oh yes, we'll also hear Cokie Roberts' argument made to her mother about why she should accept the Vatican appointment.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Religion Reporter Jack Jenkins & Con Law Prof Eric Segall Episode 252

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 117:25


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more 27 mins Eric J. Segall graduated from Emory University, Phi Beta Kappa 27  and summa cum laude, and from Vanderbilt Law School, where he was the research editor for the Law Review and member of Order of the Coif. He clerked for the Chief Judge Charles Moye Jr. for the Northern District of Georgia, and Albert J. Henderson of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. After his clerkships, Segall worked for Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and the U.S. Department of Justice, before joining the Georgia State faculty in 1991. Segall teaches federal courts and constitutional law I and II. He is the author of the books Originalism as Faith and Supreme Myths: Why the Supreme Court is not a Court and its Justices are not Judges. His articles on constitutional law have appeared in, among others, the Harvard Law Review Forum, the Stanford Law Review On Line, the UCLA Law Review, the George Washington Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, the Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy, and Constitutional Commentary among many others. Segall's op-eds and essays have appeared in the New York Times, the LA Times, The Atlantic, SLATE, Vox, Salon, and the Daily Beast, among others. He has appeared on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and France 24 and all four of Atlanta's local television stations. He has also appeared on numerous local and national radio shows. 1:14 JACK JENKINS is a national reporter for Religion News Service and a former Senior Religion Reporter for ThinkProgress. His work has also been published in The Atlantic and the Washington Post, and he is cited regularly in the New York Times, The New Yorker, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, MSNBC, and other top media outlets. He is a regular guest on radio shows and podcasts, including ABC, BBC, various NPR affiliates, Sirius XM, Vox.com's Today Explained podcast, and many others. A graduate of Presbyterian College, Jenkins earned his Master of Divinity at Harvard University.   Get His book  American Prophets: The Religious Roots of Progressive Politics and the Ongoing Fight for the Soul of the Country,  Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Steph's Business Bookshelf Podcast
Breath by James Nestor: how we're breathing all wrong (and what to do about it)

Steph's Business Bookshelf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 15:03


Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? A fortnightly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading next. Click here to subscribe. About the author James Nestor is an author and journalist who has written for Scientific American, Outside Magazine, BBC, The New York Times, The Atlantic, National Public Radio, Surfer's Journal, The San Francisco Chronicle, and more. He's spent the last several years working on a book called Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art. It released through Riverhead/Penguin Random House on May 26, 2020 and spent 18 weeks of the New York Times bestseller list in the first year of publication. At home in San Francisco, James runs his 1978 Mercedes-Benz 300D on used cooking oil whenever he can and used to zip around town (correction: breakdown all over town) in a Sebring-Vanguard CitiCar, the first-ever American-made production electric vehicle, which barely ever worked and was later offloaded on some dude with purple suspenders in Eugene, Oregon. Source: https://www.mrjamesnestor.com/about   About the book There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing: take air in, let it out, repeat 25,000 times a day. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences. Journalist James Nestor travels the world to figure out what went wrong and how to fix it. The answers aren't found in pulmonology labs, as we might expect, but in the muddy digs of ancient burial sites, secret Soviet facilities, New Jersey choir schools, and the smoggy streets of Sao Paulo. Nestor tracks down men and women exploring the hidden science behind ancient breathing practices like Pranayama, Sudarshan Kriya, and Tummo and teams up with pulmonary tinkerers to scientifically test long-held beliefs about how we breathe. Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, Breath turns the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function on its head. You will never breathe the same again. Source: https://www.mrjamesnestor.com/#/breath-book/ Big idea #1 —Our changing faces There are over 5,400 known species of mammals, but humans are the only ones with regular misaligned jaws, under and overbites, and snuggled teeth. Evolution isn't always better, it's just change. And we are at a point now, and have been for several thousands of years, where we're passing down these unhealthy and unhelpful deformities to future generations. This change started before homo-sapiens were even sapiens. There's a full timeline in the book, but over the last hundred of thousands of years, our species changed, we ate different food, which made our brains grow much, much bigger, which in turn meant that they needed more space in our skulls. Our brains stole this space from our sinuses, our airways and our mouths, which then shrunk our faces. You can see this in comparing the skulls of modern homo-sapiens to prehistoric sapiens. By processing and cooking food, even in a very primitive way, we started chewing less, which resulted in our jaws were getting looser, weaker, and changed the shape of our face. Learning to speak dropped our larynx and pushed our tongues back, creating too much space at the back of our throat, meaning that we are the only mammals, and the only sapiens that can choke. We even do that in our sleep; through snoring and sleep apnea. As we evolved, those in colder climates developed long, thin noses, which were able to warm up the cold air before it reached out lungs. Those in warm and humid climates had flatter noses, which is much more efficient for processing that humid air ready to hit the lungs. But look at us now. We are not breathing well, we're snoring, we stop breathing altogether as we sleep with sleep apnea, and never mind our teeth. These things are all unique deformities of the human race, rather than something that is prevalent in mammals more generally. So our big old brains haven't been that good for us. Big idea#2 — We're breathing wrong First things first; mouth breathing is very bad.Mouth breathing, it turns out, changes the physical body and transforms airways all for the worse. Inhaling air through the mouth decreases pressure, which causes the soft tissues in the back of the mouth to become loose and flex inward, creating less space and making breathing more difficult. Therefore mouth breathing begets more mouth breathing. Our small mouths cause our teeth overcrowding, and many other issues. Sleeping with an open mouth makes it even worse, because gravity blocks the airways and therefore that's when we get snoring and sleep apnea. In the book, James talks about his experiment (which sounds absolutely horrific) where he had his nose blocked up with padding for 10 days, to test exactly what happens when you can only breathe through your mouth. By the end of the experiment, his snoring was 4,800% worse than it was at the beginning of of the experiment, and he was having 25 apnea episodes a night. Some were so bad that he actually dropped below 90% oxygen, which on an ongoing basis can cause all sorts of issues. Some studies show that sleep apnea and snoring (ie poor breathing / mouth breathing at night) lead to things like bed-wetting, ADHD, diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancers. The Mayo Clinic now says that chronic insomnia is actually a breathing problem, not a psychological one. One Japanese study, showed that mouth breathing reduces oxygen to the prefrontal cortex, which is associated with ADHD. Another bad breathing habit we have is holding our breath, particularly when we're maybe sat at our desks at work and having a bit of a stressful day. There was some really interesting research and studies that have been done of indigenous groups of people who are living in a less modernised way, and some of their practices around breathing. Even though these groups of people are in completely different continents, they all had really similar techniques and ways of breathing, which were much more unfettered by some of the modern ways of living that we have. And their dental structures, facial shapes, and respiratory health are much better for it. James talked about one particular Native American group of people who wouldn't even smile with their mouth open in case some dirty unfiltered air crept into their mouth. They felt so strongly that nose breathing is the clean way to breathe, and mouth breathing was quite a dirty way to breathe because you're not filtering the air.   Big idea #3 — How to breathe better You may have already gathered the breathing better way is through your nose as a starting point.  (Note: all of the following techniques and ideas are covered more thoroughly in the book and here on James' website, this is obviously a very high level overview and NOT medical instruction, so don't do anything silly) At night one option to train yourself to breathe through your nose is to put a little piece of medical tape over your lips, which starts to tease them closed at night. The other thing we can be doing is increasing our lung capacity, there is some quite interesting research into the link between lung capacity and longevity / health. We can increase our lung capacity by taking really long out breaths, and accessing the full lung capacity, rather than just the little, short, shallow breaths. This technique is a used lot by athletes, particularly around better using the exhale. We've also become over breathers. In today's modern age is between 12 and 20 breaths per minute, taking in about half a liter each time, which is almost twice as much as it used to be at the high end of that range. So we can practice slower breathing. Aiming for around 5.5 breaths per minute, practicing fewer inhales and exhales at a smaller volume. Another way of improving our breathing is by chewing more. Now you don't need to go and start eating bark and sticks like some of our prehistoric ancestors did, but even using gum (particularly chewy gum, rather than the soft squishy ones) will help. It can strengthen our facial bones and jaws and help open up the airways. There's also various yoga breathing techniques, for example, alternate nasal breathing, and box breathing, which you may be familiar with from yoga or meditation practice. There's also some quite advanced methods as well, which come with a whole plethora of different warnings and caveats, such as the Wim Hof method, some of which you can not practice if you have heart conditions, are driving, operating heavy machinery, or are anywhere near some water! James's website contains a whole little video section with some of these techniques that you can practice at home and build your breathing repertoire.   Let's connect LinkedIn Instagram See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
American pharmacies face trial in Ohio over role in opioid crisis

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 6:15


A key opioids trial -- the first to go to federal court -- began this week in Ohio. The trial focuses on questions of accountability and responsibility for the opioids crisis, which has been connected directly with the deaths of half a million Americans. William Brangham has the latest with National Public Radio's Brian Mann. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
American pharmacies face trial in Ohio over role in opioid crisis

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 6:15


A key opioids trial -- the first to go to federal court -- began this week in Ohio. The trial focuses on questions of accountability and responsibility for the opioids crisis, which has been connected directly with the deaths of half a million Americans. William Brangham has the latest with National Public Radio's Brian Mann. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Crime Writers of Color
Patricia Raybon--Writer of Faith & Mystery and ALL THAT IS SECRET

Crime Writers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:56


Patricia Raybon—author of ALL THAT IS SECRET—is interviewed by Robert Justice. Patricia Raybon is an award-winning author and novelist who writes at the daring intersection of faith and race. Her books include My First White Friend, winner of the Christopher Award, I Told the Mountain to Move, a prayer memoir about her struggle to learn to pray, that was a Christianity Today Book of the Year finalist, and Undivided: A Muslim Daughter, Her Christian Mother, Their Path to Peace, coauthored with her younger daughter Alana Raybon. Patricia's essays on faith and race have been published in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Newsweek, USA Today, Guideposts, Christianity Today, and other national publications and blogs. Her first fiction is a 1920s murder mystery series about a young Black theologian—a fan of Sherlock Holmes—solving crime and murder in Colorado's dangerous era of the Ku Klux Klan. Its debut title, All That Is Secret, is set to release Oct. 5, 2021, from Tyndale House. Parade Magazine picked All That Is Secret among its Fall 2021 “Mysteries We Love.” Patricia's essays on faith and race have been published in the New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, USA Today, USA Weekend, Country Living Magazine, Chicago Tribune, The Denver Post, Guideposts, In Touch Magazine (In Touch Ministries), Christianity Today, popular blogs including the Washington Post's “Acts of Faith” and aired on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition.  A regular contributor at Our Daily Bread and the (in)courage community at DaySpring, she also teaches and coaches at writing conferences and workshops nationwide.  A lifelong Colorado resident, Patricia lives with her husband Dan, a retired educator. They have two grown daughters, a son-in-law, five grandchildren and a “grand dog” Max. Links Patricia's Website Robert Justice's Website Crime Writers of Color Website Podcast Music Provided by Chris Lang Jazz

Inverse Podcast
"Christians Against Christianity" with Dr. Obery Hendricks

Inverse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:43


"A lifelong social activist, Obery Hendricks is one of the foremost commentators on the intersection of religion and political economy in America. He is the most widely read and perhaps the most influential African American biblical scholar writing today. His recent book, Christians Against Christianity: How Right-Wing Evangelicals Are Destroying Our Nation and Our Faith (Beacon Press, 2021) has gathered wide acclaim. Cornel West calls him “one of the last few grand prophetic intellectuals.” A widely sought lecturer and media spokesperson, Dr. Hendricks’ appearances include CNN, MSNBC, CBS, Fox News, Fox Business News, the Discovery Channel, PBS, BBC, NHK Japan Television, and the Bloomberg Network. He has provided running event commentary for National Public Radio, MSNBC, and the al-Jazeera and Aspire international television networks. Dr. Hendricks has served in the Religion and Foreign Policy Working Group at the U. S. Department of State under Secretaries of State Hillary Clinton and John Kerry; was a member of the Faith Advisory Council of the Democratic National Committee, for whom he delivered the closing benediction at the 2008 Democratic Convention; served on the National Religious Leaders Advisory Committee of the 2008 Democratic Presidential campaign. He is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at The Democracy Collaborative in Washington, DC; has been an Affiliated Scholar at the Center for American Progress; was a Senior Fellow at The Opportunity Agenda social justice communications think tank; is on the Advisory Board of the Institute of Christian Socialism; and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI). Dr. Hendricks has been a frequent contributor to the Huffington Post and Salon.com, a former editorial advisor to the award-winning Tikkun magazine, and a contributing editor to The Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion. The Dictionary of Biblical Interpretation has called his work “the boldest post-colonial writing ever seen in Western biblical studies.” " -Columbia University

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography

Michael Sherwin is an artist currently based in the Appalachian mountains of northern West Virginia. From an early age, he found inspiration in the phenomena of the physical world and has spent most of this life exploring and seeking wild places, including nine years in the American West. Using the mediums of photography, video, and installation, his work reflects on the experience of observing nature through the lenses of science and popular culture.  He has won numerous grants and awards for his work and has exhibited widely, including recent shows at the Clay Center for Arts and Sciences in Charleston, WV, Huntington Museum of Art in Huntington, WV, Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, GA, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, NY and the Atlanta Contemporary Arts Center in Atlanta, GA. Reviews and features of his work have been publicized in The Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Art Papers Magazine, Oxford American Magazine, Prism Magazine, Medium's Vantage, and National Public Radio.  He has lectured extensively about his work at numerous universities and conferences across the nation. Sherwin earned an MFA from the University of Oregon in 2004, and a BFA from The Ohio State University in 1999. Currently, he is an Associate Professor of Art in the School of Art and Design at West Virginia University.  He is also an active and participating member of the Society for Photographic Education and the lead instructor for WVU's Jackson Hole Photography Workshop.   Websites   Sponsors Charcoal Book Club Lensrentals.com Curious Society   Education Resources: Momenta Photographic Workshops Candid Frame Resources Download the free Candid Frame app for your favorite smart device. Click here to download for . Click here to download Support the work we do at The Candid Frame by contributing to our Patreon effort.  You can do this by visiting or visiting the website and clicking on the Patreon button. You can also provide a one-time donation via . You can follow Ibarionex on and .  

Futility Closet
359-Stranded in Shangri-La

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:03


In 1945, a U.S. Army transport plane crashed in New Guinea, leaving three survivors marooned in the island's mountainous interior. Injured, starving, and exhausted, the group seemed beyond the hope of rescue. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the plight of the stranded survivors and the remarkable plan to save them. We'll also reflect on synthetic fingerprints and puzzle over a suspicious notebook. Intro: What's the shortest possible game of Monopoly if each player plays optimally? Omen or crated inkwell. Sources for our feature on the Gremlin Special: Mitchell Zuckoff, Lost in Shangri-La: A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II, 2011. Randy Roughton, "Impossible Rescue," Airman, Jan. 26, 2015. John Cirafici, "Lost in Shangri-La," Air Power History 58:3 (Fall 2011), 65. Sara Hov, "Lost in Shangri-La," Army 61:8 (August 2011), 70. Harrison T. Beardsley, "Harrowing Crash in New Guinea," Aviation History 10:2 (November 1999), 46. David Grann, "Plane Crash Compounded by Cannibals," Washington Post, May 22, 2011. Mitchell Zuckoff, "Escape From the Valley of the Lost," Calgary Herald, May 8, 2011. Mitchell Zuckoff, "In 1945, a U.S. Military Plane Crashed in New Guinea," Vancouver Sun, May 7, 2011. Brian Schofield, "A Tumble in the Jungle," Sunday Times, May 1, 2011. Mitchell Zuckoff, "Return to Shangri-La," Boston Globe, April 24, 2011. "Wartime Plane Crash," Kalgoorlie [W.A.] Miner, Sept. 17, 1947. "Glider Saved Fliers, WAC in Wild Valley," [Hagerstown, Md.] Daily Mail, Aug. 14, 1945. Margaret Hastings, "Shangri-La Diary," Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph, July 22, 1945. Bob Myers, "Rescued Wac Is En Route to Washington," [Binghamton, N.Y.] Press and Sun-Bulletin, July 9, 1945. "3 Crash Survivors Dramatically Rescued From New Guinea Valley by Glider Snatch Pickup," St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 30, 1945. "New Guinea's 'Hidden Valley,'" St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 28, 1945. "Survivors of Mishap in Shangri-La Valley Reach Their Rescuers," Birmingham [Ala.] News, June 20, 1945. "Two Airmen, Wac Await Rescue in Fantastic 'Hidden Valley,'" [Richmond, Va.] Times Dispatch, June 8, 1945. "Plan Rescue of Survivors of Crash in Shangri-La Dutch New Guinea," Del Rio [Texas] News Herald, June 8, 1945. Lynn Neary, "A WWII Survival Epic Unfolds Deep In 'Shangri-La,'" All Things Considered, National Public Radio, April 26, 2011. Listener mail: Sophie Weiner, "These Synthetic Fingerprint Gloves Can Unlock Your Phone," Popular Mechanics, Nov. 12, 2016. "TAPS - Make Touchscreen Gloves Using a Sticker w/ Touch ID," Kickstarter.com (accessed Sept. 23, 2021). Nanotips (last accessed Sept. 23, 2021). Jon Porter, "This Picture of Cheese Helped Send a Man to Prison for 13 Years," The Verge, May 24, 2021. Alex Mistlin, "Feeling Blue: Drug Dealer's 'Love of Stilton' Leads to His Arrest," Guardian, May 24, 2021. Rob Picheta, "Drug Dealer Jailed After Sharing a Photo of Cheese That Included His Fingerprints," CNN, May 25, 2021. Chaim Gartenberg, "WhatsApp Drug Dealer Convicted Using Fingerprints Taken From Photo," The Verge, April 16, 2018. Chris Wood, "WhatsApp Photo Drug Dealer Caught by 'Groundbreaking' Work," BBC News, April 15, 2018. CSChawaii, "CSC Presents Japanese Sign Language - Family" (video), Sept. 25, 2017. Ian Sample, "Copying Keys From Photos Is Child's Play," Guardian, Nov. 14, 2008. Elinor Mills, "Duplicating Keys From a Photograph," CNET, Nov. 19, 2008. "KeyMe: Access & Share Saved Keys" (accessed Sept. 25, 2021). "KeyMe: Access & Share Keys" (accessed Sept. 25, 2021). This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Bill Spencer. Here's a corroborating link (warning -- this spoils the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

A New Angle
Jeff Brandt on the Music of 1971

A New Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:42


This week at MTPR we're celebrating music and stories from 1971 to commemorate 50 years of National Public Radio. To celebrate this history, we're joined today by UM College of Arts and Media professor Jeff Brandt. Perhaps best known for teaching UM's most popular class, The History of Rock and Roll, Jeff lays down why 1971 was a pivotal year for the music industry and its reverb felt throughout America's cultural & political spheres. Transcript here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Xqwy85Y-CShRQ-QZXTvQ0F_R4HE6eP7Fel7eHkysLZA/edit?usp=sharing

Sacred Steps Podcast
S2:E4 A Camino Pilgrim Walks Ireland's Wicklow Way | Natasha Murtagh

Sacred Steps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:14


Irish journalist and author Natasha Murtagh (https://twitter.com/natashamurtagh) shares the heartfelt stories behind her Camino bestseller (Buen Camino: From Croagh Patrick to Santiago de Compostela) and tales from her recent pandemic walk along Ireland's Wicklow Way with author Kevin Donahue (http://www.sacredstepsbook.com). Natasha's passion for storytelling led her to journalism (Ireland's National Public Radio) and helped inspire her newest venture: The Nosey Fox Podcast (https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-nosey-fox/id1561368912). DISCUSSIONS FROM THIS EPISODE:Britain's Pilgrim Places Book GiveawayBOOK: Buen Camino: From Croagh Patrick to Santiago de CompostelaROUTE: The Wicklow WayPODCAST: The Nosey FoxStream the Video Podcast on YouTube Connect on Facebook CONNECT WITH THE SHOW ONLINE:Podcast Homepage - sacredstepspodcast.comSacred Steps: A Pilgrimage JournalStream the Video Podcast on YouTube Connect on FacebookView on Instagram MEET THE HOST:  Kevin DonahueHusband. Father. Backpacker. Pilgrim. Author.In 2019, Kevin Donahue set off from his home in the United States to begin a pilgrimage journey spanning both years and miles, walking across continents to the ancient end of the world, to kneel at the tombs of eight Apostles. Available for Easter 2023, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is Kevin's first-hand account of the people and places found along the way to inspire questions and enlighten answers about faith, hope, and love. BOOK: Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage JournalAvailable from print and digital booksellers for Easter 2023, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is the first-person account of a reluctant pilgrim navigating the eternal questions of faith while walking along the world's revered paths. The book follows one man's journey through Portugal and Spain on the Camino de Santiago, along the coast of the Pacific Ocean connecting California's Missions Trail, across England's ancient Pilgrims' Way, and onward towards Rome via Europe's forgotten footpaths on a journey of soulful discovery. More than a travelogue, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is a first-hand account of a pilgrim's journey and the people and places he finds to inspire questions and enlighten answers about faith, hope, and love.

The Hamilton Review
A Conversation with Dr. Adrienne Youdim: An Internist Specializing in Medical Weight Loss and Nutrition

The Hamilton Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:10


Join us for the latest episode of The Hamilton Review Podcast! In this engaging conversation, Dr. Bob sits down with Dr. Adrienne Youdim, an internist specializing in medical weight loss and nutrition.  Dr. Youdim shares her background and how she got into the field of medicine and then she talks about the important work she is doing to help others lead a healthy lifestyle from a medical perspective.  Don't miss this great conversation! Dr. Youdim's Bio: I am an internist who specializes in medical weight loss and clinical nutrition. My mission is to transform the weight loss narrative to one that is both empowering and compassionate, inspiring people to live more physically and emotionally fulfilling lives. After receiving my medical degree from the University of California San Diego School of Medicine,I completed my residency and fellowship at Cedars-Sinai, where I later served as the medical director for the Center for Weight Loss for nearly a decade. I have board certifications awarded by the American Board of Internal Medicine, the National Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists, and the American Board of Obesity Medicine and am a fellow of the American College of Physicians. I have published in journal articles and book chapters including the Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient, several chapters in The Merck Manual and am the editor of their soon to be released Wellness Section. I am also editor of my own comprehensive textbook, “The Clinician's Guide to the Treatment of Obesity,” and my most recent book, Hungry for More, Stories and Science to Inspire Weight Loss from the Inside Out. I am proud to teach students at UCLA School of Medicine and colleagues locally and around the country and have been featured at numerous news outlets including ABC news, National Public Radio,  Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil and others. How to contact Dr. Youdim: Dr. Adrienne Youdim's website  Dr. Youdim on Instagram  Dr. Youdim on Facebook  How to contact Dr. Bob: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChztMVtPCLJkiXvv7H5tpDQ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drroberthamilton/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bob.hamilton.1656 Seven Secrets Of The Newborn website: https://7secretsofthenewborn.com/ Website: https://roberthamiltonmd.com/ Pacific Ocean Pediatrics: http://www.pacificoceanpediatrics.com/ Share this episode with a friend and leave a rating + review on Apple Podcasts to help others find this content. Thanks so much!

This Is Actually Happening
205: The Long Shadow: What if you processed the remains?

This Is Actually Happening

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 51:11


“The surrealism of the experience just it was hard to fathom…here we were in a clothing store being asked to do these sort of impossible thing.” Producers: Whit MissildineEpisode Summary: In the aftermath of September 11th, 2001 a cardiologist volunteers to help process the body parts from those who lost their lives in a temporary morgue inside a Brooks Brothers department store.Today's episode featured Sandeep Jauhar. Sandeep has written three books. His first book, "Intern: A Doctor's Initiation," "Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician," and his latest book, "Heart: A History," tells the colorful and little-known story of the doctors who risked their careers and the patients who risked their lives to know and heal our most vital organ. A practicing cardiologist, Jauhar is currently a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. He has appeared frequently on National Public Radio, CNN, and MSNBC to discuss issues related to medicine, and his essays have also been published in The Wall Street Journal, Time, and Slate. To learn more about him and his work, visit his website at http://sandeepjauhar.com or follow him on Twitter: @sjauhar.Twenty Years after the attacks of September 11th changed the world as we knew it, this month the This Is Actually Happening podcast dives deep into the stories of four survivors whose jobs brought them face to face with the unthinkable. For those called to manage an impossible tragedy up close, the events of September 11th represented a uniquely horrifying challenge. Among the harrowing details of that day, in the special series, we explore the long shadows of trauma and resilience that continue to inform the looming uncertainties that remain with us today. Social Media: Instagram: @actuallyhappeningWebsite: www.thisisactuallyhappening.com Wondery Plus: All episodes of the show prior to episode #130 are now part of the Wondery Plus premium service. To access the full catalog of episodes, and get all episodes ad free, sign up for Wondery Plus at https://wondery.com/plusContent/Trigger Warnings: terrorism, graphic bodily injury, graphic medical scenarios, explicit languageEpisode Sponsors: DoorDash; Simplisafe: simplisafe.com/actuallySupport the Show: Support The Show on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/happening Engage with the Community: Join the This Is Actually Happening Discussion Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/201783687561039/ Shop at the Store: The This Is Actually Happening online store is now officially open. Follow this link: https://www.thisisactuallyhappening.com/shop to access branded t-shirts, posters, stickers and more from the shop. Intro Music: "Illabye" – TipperMusic and Sound Design by: Marcelino Villalpando ServicesIf you or someone you know is struggling with the effects of trauma or mental illness, please refer to the following resources. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 National Alliance on Mental Illness: 1-800-950-6264National Sexual Assault Hotline (RAINN): 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)Crisis Text Line: Within the US, text HOME to 741741See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Turley Talks
Ep. 661 China Officially Calls Soros ‘GLOBAL TERRORIST' and ‘SON of SATAN'!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 10:58


Highlights:  “NTD News which is a Chinese-American news organization is reporting that the Chinese Communist Party newspaper the Global Times is punching back against George Soros' latest string of criticisms against the Chinese government, in an utterly brutal piece accusing Soros of being ‘the most evil person in the world.” “In an interview with National Public Radio, Soros admitted that the populist movements that had been rising up all over the world - so we're talking Brexit, Trump, Orban in Hungary, Bolsonaro in Brazil, Modi in India - he admitted that these populist movements were effectively breaking up the globalist world order that he has so instrumentally helped to orchestrate.”  Timestamps:[02:38] China labeling George Soros a ‘global terrorist' and ‘the Son of Satan'[03:17] How Soros had been a vocal critic of China[05:20] On the other nations which ban Soros from their country [08:28] How even Soros himself is admitting that the world is decisively turning against himResources:Join me in Jacksonville, FL, with Donald Trump Jr!!! This is going to be our biggest event EVER!!! So make sure to click on the link RIGHT NOW: https://conferences.turleytalks.com/aftGet Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here: https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member and get the first 7 days FREE!!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeFight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without the censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

Precisione: The Healthcast
Understanding The Gut-Immune Connection

Precisione: The Healthcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:43


Guest Name and Bio: Emeran Mayer, MD Dr. Mayer is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Executive Director of the G Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress & Resilience and Founding Director of the UCLA Brain Gut Microbiome Center. He has been one of the pioneers in the science and practice of brain gut microbiome interactions with applications in a wide range of diseases in gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. He has published more than 388 scientific papers and co-edited 3 scientific books. He is the recipient of the 2016 David McLean award from the American Psychosomatic Society and the 2017 Ismar Boas Medal from the German Society of Gastroenterology and Metabolic Disease. His current research interest is focused on the role of brain gut microbiome interactions in human diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, autism spectrum disorders, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition to his academic interests, Mayer has a longstanding interest in ancient healing traditions and affords them a level of respect rarely found in Western Medicine. He has been involved in documentary film productions about the Yanomami people in the Orinoco region of Venezuela, and the Asmat people in Irian Jaya. He has recently co-produced the award winning documentary “In Search of Balance” and is working on a new documentary “Interconnected Planet”. He is a strong believer in Buddhist philosophy, was a member of the UCLA Zen Center for several years, and got married in a Tibetan monastery by Choekyi Nyima Rinpoche in Kathmandu. He regularly pursues meditative practices. He has spoken at UCLA TEDx on the Mysterious Origins of Gut Feelings in 2015 and have been interviewed on National Public Radio, PBS and by many national and international media outlets including the Los Angeles and New York Times, Atlantic magazine and Stern and Spiegel Online. He is the author of the 2016 bestselling book The Mind Gut Connection published by Harper&Collins and translated in 16languages. In his recent book, The Gut Immune Connection, Mayer proposes a radical, unifying concept about the chronic disease epidemic we are finding ourselves in. He discusses how changes in our diet, lifestyle and the way we interact with the world during the last 75 years have led to a profound dysregulation of the community of trillions of microbes living in our gut, resulting in a progressive chronic activation of our immune system. This aberrant immune system activation is emerging as the root cause of our current epidemic of interrelated chronic diseases affecting every part of our body. In addition, it makes us more vulnerable to viral pandemics. He uses the One Health concept to explain the intricate interconnectedness between the microbes living in our gut, in the soil, the health of our plants and our own health. He proposes a solution to the chronic disease epidemic, which emphasizes the implementation of major lifestyle changes, and focuses on a radically different approach not only to our diet but to the world. What you will learn from this episode: 1) How the gut is connected to the immune system 2) How the gut is actually our first brain, not our second brain 3) How changes in the gut microbiome can lead to conditions like Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's disease 4) How the gut microbiome can impact mental health 5) How the serotonin in our gut microbiome can influence our health and how we feel How to learn more about our guest: emeranmayer.com uclacns.org microbiome.ucla.edu Facebook: @emeranamayer IG: #emeranamayer Linkedin: @emeranamayer Please enjoy, share, rate and review our podcast and help us bring the message about precision health care to the world!

The Opperman Report
Guest: Mark Ebner

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 102:58


Church of Scientology "Hollywood, Interrupted" ,"Six Degrees of Paris Hilton"Ain't It Cool?: Kicking Hollywood's Butt New York Times best selling author Mark Ebner is an award winning investigative journalist who has covered all aspects of celebrity and crime culture for Spy, Rolling Stone, Maxim, Details, Los Angeles, Premiere, Salon, Spin, Radar, Angeleno, The Daily Beast.com, Gawker.com, BoingBoing.net and New Times among other national and international and internet publications. He has repeatedly positioned himself in harm's way, conducting dozens of investigations into such subjects as Scientology, Pit Bull fighting in South Central Los Angeles, the Ku Klux Klan in Texas, celebrity stalkers, drug dealers, missing porn stars, sports groupies, mobsters, college suicides and Hepatitis C in Hollywood. Ebner has produced for and/or appeared as a journalist-commentator on NBC, ABC, CBS, MSNBC, A&E, The BBC, Channel 4 (UK), National Public Radio, Court TV, Fox News, FX, VH-1 and E! Entertainment Television. He has been a featured guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Today Show, The Early Show, Inside Edition, The Dylan Ratigan Show, Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn, Fox & Friends, Catherine Crier Live, and a host of other television and radio programs in the US, Canada, the United Kingdom and Asia. In 2000, Ebner hosted his own nationally syndicated radio program, Drastic Radio, and co-authored the New York Times/Los Angeles Times best-seller, "Hollywood, Interrupted" in 2005 with the late Andrew Breitbart of the Drudge Report. He followed that collaboration with the Hollywood true crimer "Six Degrees of Paris Hilton" (Simon and Schuster) in 2008, and 2011 saw publication of "We Have Your Husband" (Berkley Books)with Jayne Garcia Valseca which resulted in a Lifetime Movie adaptation of the same title. 2013 and 2014 bring Being Uncle Charlie (Random House Canada)with former Canadian undercover copper Bob Deasy and Poison Candy with former Florida prosecutor Elizabeth Parker respectively. Ebner consulted on the Emmy-nominated "Trapped In The Closet" episode of South Park for Comedy Central, consulted for NBC/Dateline on the "Paris Hilton Tapes" report, and field produced a one-hour VH1 special on the same topic. He also hosted "Rich and Reckless," a crime show for TruTV, co-starred in I Can't Believe I'm Still Single (Showtime), and blogs when he can at HollywoodInterrupted.com. http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Ebner/e/B0...

The Opperman Report'
Guest: Mark Ebner

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 102:58


Church of Scientology "Hollywood, Interrupted" ,"Six Degrees of Paris Hilton"Ain't It Cool?: Kicking Hollywood's Butt New York Times best selling author Mark Ebner is an award winning investigative journalist who has covered all aspects of celebrity and crime culture for Spy, Rolling Stone, Maxim, Details, Los Angeles, Premiere, Salon, Spin, Radar, Angeleno, The Daily Beast.com, Gawker.com, BoingBoing.net and New Times among other national and international and internet publications. He has repeatedly positioned himself in harm's way, conducting dozens of investigations into such subjects as Scientology, Pit Bull fighting in South Central Los Angeles, the Ku Klux Klan in Texas, celebrity stalkers, drug dealers, missing porn stars, sports groupies, mobsters, college suicides and Hepatitis C in Hollywood. Ebner has produced for and/or appeared as a journalist-commentator on NBC, ABC, CBS, MSNBC, A&E, The BBC, Channel 4 (UK), National Public Radio, Court TV, Fox News, FX, VH-1 and E! Entertainment Television. He has been a featured guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Today Show, The Early Show, Inside Edition, The Dylan Ratigan Show, Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn, Fox & Friends, Catherine Crier Live, and a host of other television and radio programs in the US, Canada, the United Kingdom and Asia. In 2000, Ebner hosted his own nationally syndicated radio program, Drastic Radio, and co-authored the New York Times/Los Angeles Times best-seller, "Hollywood, Interrupted" in 2005 with the late Andrew Breitbart of the Drudge Report. He followed that collaboration with the Hollywood true crimer "Six Degrees of Paris Hilton" (Simon and Schuster) in 2008, and 2011 saw publication of "We Have Your Husband" (Berkley Books)with Jayne Garcia Valseca which resulted in a Lifetime Movie adaptation of the same title. 2013 and 2014 bring Being Uncle Charlie (Random House Canada)with former Canadian undercover copper Bob Deasy and Poison Candy with former Florida prosecutor Elizabeth Parker respectively. Ebner consulted on the Emmy-nominated "Trapped In The Closet" episode of South Park for Comedy Central, consulted for NBC/Dateline on the "Paris Hilton Tapes" report, and field produced a one-hour VH1 special on the same topic. He also hosted "Rich and Reckless," a crime show for TruTV, co-starred in I Can't Believe I'm Still Single (Showtime), and blogs when he can at HollywoodInterrupted.com.http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Ebner/e/B0...

Resource on the Go
Sexual Citizens: A Landmark Study of Sex, Power, and Assault on Campus Part 1

Resource on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 27:41


Content warning: This episode contains a detailed account of a sexual assault. In the first part of a two-part episode, we speak with Dr. Jennifer S. Hirsch and Dr. Shamus Khan, authors of the book Sexual Citizens: A Landmark Study on Sex, Power, and Assault on Campus. Sexual Citizens was named one of National Public Radio's Best Books of 2020. In this episode, we discuss the principles of the book and its key concepts: sexual projects, sexual citizenship, and sexual geographies. For more information and transcripts visit www.nsvrc.org/podcasts

Creative Peacemeal
Jennifer Kloetzel, Cellist PART 2

Creative Peacemeal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 47:06


Cellist and Professor, Jennifer Kloetzel's first appearance on the podcast has garnered her a top episode spot! The inspiring and insightful interview led to a second (this one) and she joins me to continue the conversation.A graduate of The Juilliard School and a Fulbright Scholar, cellist Jennifer Kloetzel has concertized throughout the United States, Europe and Asia as a soloist and chamber musician. A founding member of the San Francisco-based Cypress String Quartet (1996-2016), Ms. Kloetzel has toured the globe and performed at such renowned venues as Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Chautauqua Institute and the Ravinia Festival, the Lobkowicz Palaces in both Vienna and Prague, as well as prominent colleges and conservatories worldwide.Ms. Kloetzel is noted for her elegant playing and her vibrant tone. She is a sought-after recitalist, performing concerts for San Francisco Performances and on WQXR in New York. A fervent champion of new music, she has received the Copland Award for her work with living American composers and has commissioned and premiered over fifty works, including five concertos written specifically for her. In the past few seasons, premieres included a Cello Suite by Daniel Asia, a Cello Concerto, “Cloud Atlas” and unaccompanied cello work “Lift,” which were both written for her by MIT composer Elena Ruehr and a Cello Sonata dedicated to her by Joseph Landers. Ms. Kloetzel has recorded the Ruehr Cello Concerto with the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, which was released to critical acclaim in October 2014. “Lift” is the title track of an all-Ruehr disc, released on the Avie label, and was included on Keith Powers' 13 Best Classical Music Recordings of 2016. Ms. Kloetzel is the featured cellist on a 2019 Albany Records release of music by Richard Aldag, and recently premiered Lee Actor's Cello Concerto, written for her in 2017. In the next few seasons, she will give world premieres of sonatas written for her by Richard Aldag and Elena Ruehr and “Inferno: Double Concerto for Viola, Cello and Chamber Orchestra” by Joel Friedman, as well as six ‘companion' pieces commissioned to go with the six Bach Cello Suites, for a special project entitled “Mission: Bach~ The Road to Inspiration."Ms. Kloetzel has been featured regularly on National Public Radio's “Performance Today” and her performances have been broadcast on radio stations from coast to coast. A passionate recording artist with 36 CD releases to date, recent recordings include the entire cycle of Beethoven Quartets and Brahms Sextets on the Avie label. In 2021, Avie will release her recordings of Beethoven's complete works for cello and piano with Robert Koenig. In 2016, Ms. Kloetzel was invited to join the faculty at University of California Santa Barbara, where she is Professor of Cello and Head of Strings.   To learn more about Jennifer Kloetzel head to her website www.jkcello.comTo listen to more episodes, connect with host, Tammy, or to support the podcast follow these linksWebsite https://tstakaishi.wixsite.com/musicInstagram @creative_peacemeal_podcastFacebook https://www.facebook.com/creativepeacemealpod/

Helga
Deborah Archer

Helga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 37:31


“It was so important to be apart of community. To find strength in each other. To know that on the days when I can't move forward, someone is going to take up the baton and move forward for me. “ Professor, Lawyer and ACLU President Deborah Archer sat down to speak with me about some of her earliest moments and how they shaped her desire to fight for equality.   Deborah N. Archer is a Professor of Clinical Law and Co-Faculty Director of the Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at NYU School of Law. Deborah is also the President of the ACLU and a leading expert in civil rights, civil liberties, and racial justice. She is an award-winning teacher and legal scholar whose articles have appeared in leading law reviews. Deborah has also offered commentary for numerous media outlets, including MSNBC, National Public Radio, CBS, Monocle, The Atlantic, and The New York Times.  Deborah previously worked as an attorney with the ACLU and the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., where she litigated in the areas of voting rights, employment discrimination, and school desegregation. Deborah is also a former chair of the American Association of Law School's Section on Civil Rights and the Section on Minority Groups. She previously served as Chair of the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board, the nation's oldest and largest police oversight agency.

WEMcast
The story of Amanita Phalloides: The Death Cap Mushroom with Anne Pringle

WEMcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 36:50


Host, Stephen Wood and Dr Anne Pringle, a mycologist and botanist, tell the story of the Amanita Phalloides mushroom. This is not a mushroom native to the United States, but it has found its way there in an unsuspecting way, cork trees. These cork trees were imported for use by California wineries but they had a stowaway, the Amanita Phalloides or death cap mushroom. Death caps are toxic mushrooms that kill both humans as well as domestic pets when consumed. These toxic mushrooms resemble several edible species (most notably Caesar's mushroom and the straw mushroom) commonly consumed by humans, increasing the risk of accidental poisoning. Amatoxins, the class of toxins found in these mushrooms, are thermostable: and thus they resist changes due to heat, which means their toxic effects are not reduced by cooking. Signs and symptoms start with an initially self-limiting gastrointestinal illness, that later can result in liver and renal failure and death. The conversation led to a discussion on how to safely collect mushrooms as well as resources to help medical providers and gatherers alike to identify mushrooms. Just as important was a discussion on how we as healthcare providers and environmentalists can prevent invasive species infestations through local action. Mushroom Observer:  https://mushroomobserver.org/ iNat:  https://www.inaturalist.org/ Mushroom Expert:  https://www.mushroomexpert.com/ Guest Bio: Anne Pringle was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and spent her childhood travelling through Southeast Asia and West Africa. After being dragged along on one too many birding expeditions, she abandoned the birds for fungi. She was an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, and then completed a PhD in Botany and Genetics at Duke University. After completing a Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science Fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley, she joined the faculty at Harvard University. She next moved to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she is now Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in the Departments of Botany and Bacteriology. Anne has given over 100 invited talks to academic and popular audiences in countries including China, Colombia, France, Singapore, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. She has been awarded the Alexopoulos Prize for a Distinguished Early Career Mycologist (2010), the Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Harvard University Graduate Student Council (2011), the Fannie Cox Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching from Harvard University (2013), and a Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship (2011-2012). Her research has been featured by the New York Times, National Public Radio, Slate, and the Wisconsin State Journal, among others. In 2019, Anne was elected President of the Mycological Society of America.

Influential SHE Podcast
Leveraging Voice with Angela Jerabek

Influential SHE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 35:53


From school counselor to founder and leader of a national education center, Angie relates how she became the voice and not the echo, thus realizing her dreams for a creative and innovative life.  She shares how to truly mature voice to accelerate influence, “The power of my work has come from honing in to hear others' voices.”   Angie will inspire all to “Be a voice that people can follow, recognizing you're blazing a way for others to have their voices be lifted up.”Angela Jerabek is the founder and executive director of BARR Center.  Jerabek developed the BARR model 20 years ago and has expanded it from one school in the Midwest to more than 180 schools throughout the U.S., serving over 100,000 students. www.barrcenter.orgAngie has published five books and several op-eds and articles in various publications. Often looked to for her expertise, she has been featured in USA Today, National Public Radio, and CNBC. In the fall of 2020, she was a co-panelist with John B. King Jr., the 10th United States Secretary of Education under President Barack Obama. Jerabek has presented at the White House at the “Evidence in Education Roundtable” in 2016 as well as at International Education events.  She was recently awarded the Donald McNeely Center Social Entrepreneur of the Year by the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University. 

Dakota Datebook
Public Radio in North Dakota

Dakota Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 3:03


Prairie Public has been broadcasting original and PBS television programs since 1964, but on this date in 1981, Prairie Public added radio when KCND 90.5 FM in Bismarck began broadcasting. And from the start, it was a member station of National Public Radio, which had been established ten year earlier.

MoneyBall Medicine
Kevin Davies on the CRISPR Revolution and Genome Editing

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 66:51


This week Harry is joined by Kevin Davies, author of the 2020 book Editing Humanity: The CRISPR Revolution and the New Era of Genome Editing. CRISPR—an acronym for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats—consists of DNA sequences that evolved to help bacteria recognize and defend against viral invaders, as a kind of primitive immune system. Thanks to its ability to precisely detect and cut other DNA sequences, CRISPR has spread to labs across the world in the nine years since Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuel Charpentier published a groundbreaking 2012 Science paper describing how the process works. The Nobel Prize committee recognized the two scientists for the achievement in 2020, one day after Davies' book came out. The book explains how CRISPR was discovered, how it was turned into an easily programmable tool for cutting and pasting stretches of DNA, how most of the early pioneers in the field have now formed competing biotech companies, and how the technology is being used to help patients today—and in at least one famous case, misused. Today's interview covers all of that ground and more.Davies is a PhD geneticist who has spent most of his career in life sciences publishing. After his postdoc with Harvey Lodish at the Whitehead Institute, Davies worked as an assistant editor at Nature, the founding editor of Nature Genetics (Nature's first spinoff journal), editor-in-chief at Cell Press, founding editor-in-chief of the Boston-based publication Bio-IT World, and publisher of Chemical & Engineering News. In 2018 he helped to launch The CRISPR Journal, where he is the executive editor. Davies' previous books include Breakthrough (1995) about the race to understand the BRCA1 breast cancer gene, Cracking the Genome (2001) about the Human Genome Project, The $1,000 Genome (2010) about next-generation sequencing companies, and DNA (2017), an updated version of James Watson's 2004 book, co-authored with Watson and Andrew Berry.Please rate and review MoneyBall Medicine on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to the page of the MoneyBall Medicine podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3.Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4.Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5.Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6.Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7.Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8.If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9.After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is MoneyBall Medicine, the interview podcast where we meet researchers, entrepreneurs, and physicians who are using the power of data to improve patient health and make healthcare delivery more efficient. You can think of each episode as a new chapter in the never-ending audio version of my 2017 book, “MoneyBall Medicine: Thriving in the New Data-Driven Healthcare Market.” If you like the show, please do us a favor and leave a rating and review at Apple Podcasts.Harry Glorikian: We talk a lot on the show about how computation and data are changing the way we develop new medicines and the way we deliver healthcare. Some executives in the drug discovery business speak of the computing and software side of the business as the “dry lab” —to set it apart from the “wet labs” where scientists get their hands dirty working with actual cells, tissues, and reagents.But the thing is, recent progress on the wet lab side of biotech has been just as amazing as progress in areas like machine learning. And this week, my friend Kevin Davies is here to talk about the most powerful tool to come along in the last decade, namely, precise gene editing using CRISPR.Of course, CRISPR-based gene editing has been all over the news since Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuel Charpentier published a groundbreaking Science paper in 2012 describing how the process works in the lab. That work earned them a Nobel Prize in medicine just eight years later, in 2020.But what's not as well-known is the story of how CRISPR was discovered, how it was turned into an easily programmable tool for cutting and pasting stretches of DNA, how most of the early pioneers in the field have now formed competing biotech companies, and how the technology is being used to help patients today—and in at least one famous case, misused.Kevin put that whole fascinating story together in his 2020 book Editing Humanity. And as the executive editor of The CRISPR Journal, the former editor-in-chief of Bio-IT World, the founding editor at Nature Genetics, and the author of several other important books about genomics, Kevin is one of the best-placed people in the world to tell that story. Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Kevin, welcome to the show. Kevin Davies: Great to see you again, Harry. Thanks for having me on.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, I mean, I seem to be saying this a lot lately, it's been such a long time since, because of this whole pandemic, nobody's really seeing anybody on a regular basis. I want to give everybody a chance to hear about, you had written this book called Editing Humanity, which is, you know, beautifully placed behind you for, for product placement here. But I want to hear, can you give everybody sort of an overview of the book and why you feel that this fairly technical laboratory tool called CRISPR is so important that you needed to write a book about it?Kevin Davies: Thank you. Yes. As you may know, from some of my previous “bestsellers” or not, I've written about big stories in genetics because that's the only thing I'm remotely qualified to write about. I trained as a human geneticist in London and came over to do actually a pair of post-docs in the Boston area before realizing my talents, whatever they might be, certainly weren't as a bench researcher. So I had to find another way to stay in science but get away from the bench and hang up the lab coats.So moving into science publishing and getting a job with Nature and then launching Nature Genetics was the route for me. And over the last 30 years, I've written four or five books that have all been about, a) something big happening in genomics, b) something really big that will have both medical and societal significance, like the mapping and discovery of the BRCA1 breast cancer gene in the mid-90s, the Human Genome Project at the turn of the century, and then the birth and the dawn of consumer genetics and personalized medicine with The $1,000 Genome. And the third ingredient I really look for if I'm trying to reach a moderately, significantly large audience is for the human elements. Who are they, the heroes and the anti heroes to propel the story? Where is the human drama? Because, you know, we all love a good juicy, gossipy piece of story and rating the good guys and the bad guys. And CRISPR, when it first really took off in 2012, 2013 as a gene editing tool a lot of scientists knew about this. I mean, these papers are being published in Science in particular, not exactly a specialized journal, but I was off doing other things and really missed the initial excitement, I'm embarrassed to say. It was only a couple of years later, working on a sequel to Jim Watson's DNA, where I was tasked with trying to find and summarize the big advances in genomic technology over the previous decade or whatever, that I thought, well, this CRISPR thing seems to be taking off and the Doudnas and the Charpentiers are, you know, winning Breakthrough Prizes and being feted by celebrities. And it's going on 60 Minutes. They're going to make a film with the Rock, Dwayne Johnson. What the heck is going on. And it took very little time after that, for me to think, you know, this is such an exciting, game-changing disruptive technology that I've got to do two things. I've gotta, a) write a book and b) launch a journal, and that's what I did. And started planning at any rate in sort of 2016 and 17. We launched the CRISPR Journal at the beginning of 2018. And the book Editing Humanity came out towards the end of 2020. So 2020, literally one day before the Nobel Prize—how about that for timing?—for Doudna and Charpentier for chemistry last year. Harry Glorikian: When I think about it, I remember working with different companies that had different types of gene editing technology you know, working with some particularly in the sort of agriculture space, cause it a little bit easier to run faster than in the human space. And you could see what was happening, but CRISPR now is still very new. But from the news and different advances that are happening, especially here in the Boston area, you know, it's having some real world impacts. If you had to point to the best or the most exciting example of CRISPR technology helping an actual patient, would you say, and I've heard you say it, Victoria Gray, I think, would be the person that comes to mind. I've even, I think in one of your last interviews, you said something about her being, you know, her name will go down in history. Can you explain the technology that is helping her and what some of the similar uses of CRISPR might be?Kevin Davies: So the first half of Editing Humanity is about the heroes of CRISPR, how we, how scientists turned it from this bizarre under-appreciated bacterial antiviral defense system and leveraged it and got to grips with it, and then figured out ways to turn it into a programmable gene editing technology. And within a year or two of that happening that the classic Doudna-Charpentier paper came out in the summer of 2012. Of course the first wave of biotech companies were launched by some of the big names, indeed most of the big names in CRISPR gene editing hierarchies. So Emmanuel Charpentier, Nobel Laureate, launched CRISPR Therapeutics, Jennifer Doudna co-founded Editas Medicine with several other luminaries. That didn't go well for, for reasons of intellectual property. So she withdrew from Editas and became a co-founder of Intellia Therapeutics as well as her own company, Caribou, which just went public, and Feng Zhang and others launched Editas Medicine. So we had this sort of three-way race, if you will, by three CRISPR empowered gene editing companies who all went public within the next two or three years and all set their sights on various different genetic Mendelian disorders with a view to trying to produce clinical success for this very powerful gene editing tool. And so, yes, Victoria Gray is the first patient, the first American patient with sickle cell anemia in a trial that is being run by CRISPR Therapeutics in close association with Vertex Pharmaceuticals. And that breakthrough paper, as I think many of your listeners will know, came out right at the end of 2020 published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Doesn't get much more prestigious than that. And in the first handful of patients that CRISPR Therapeutics have edited with a view to raising the levels of fetal hemoglobin, fetal globin, to compensate for the defective beta globin that these patients have inherited, the results were truly spectacular.And if we fast forward now to about two years after the initial administration, the initial procedures for Victoria Gray and some of her other volunteer patients, the results still look as spectacular. Earlier this year CRISPR Therapeutics put out of sort of an update where they are saying that the first 20 or 24 patients that they have dosed with sickle cell and beta thallasemia are all doing well. There've been little or no adverse events. And the idea of this being a once and done therapy appears very well founded. Now it's not a trivial therapy. This is ex-vivo gene editing as obviously rounds of chemotherapy to provide the room for the gene edited stem cells to be reimplanted into the patient. So this is not an easily scalable or affordable or ideal system, but when did we, when will we ever able to say we've pretty much got a cure for sickle cell disease? This is an absolutely spectacular moment, not just for CRISPR, but for medicine, I think, overall. And Victoria Gray, who's been brilliantly profiled in a long running series on National Public Radio, led by the science broadcaster Rob Stein, she is, you know, we, we can call her Queen Victoria, we can call it many things, but I really hope that ,it's not just my idea, that she will be one of those names like Louise Brown and other heroes of modern medicine, that we look and celebrate for decades to come.So the sickle cell results have been great, and then much more recently, also in the New England Journal, we have work led by Intellia Therapeutics, one of the other three companies that I named, where they've been also using CRISPR gene editing, but they've been looking at a rare liver disease, a form of amyloidosis where a toxic protein builds up and looking to find ways to knock out the production of that abnormal gene.And so they've been doing in vivo gene editing, really using CRISPR for the first time. It's been attempted using other gene editing platforms like zinc fingers, but this is the first time that I think we can really say and the New England Journal results prove it. In the first six patients that have been reported remarkable reductions in the level of this toxic protein far, not far better, but certainly better than any approved drugs that are currently on the market. So again, this is a very, very exciting proof of principle for in vivo gene editing, which is important, not just for patients with this rare liver disorder, but it really gives I think the whole field and the whole industry enormous confidence that CRISPR is safe and can be used for a growing list of Mendelian disorders, it's 6,000 or 7,000 diseases about which we know the root genetic cause, and we're not going to tackle all of them anytime soon, but there's a list of ones that now are within reach. And more and more companies are being launched all the time to try and get at some of these diseases.So as we stand here in the summer of 2021, it's a really exciting time. The future looks very bright, but there's so much more to be done. Harry Glorikian: No, we're just at the beginning. I mean, I remember when I first saw this, my first question was off target effects, right? How are we going to manage that? How are they going to get it to that place that they need to get it to, to have it to that cell at that time, in the right way to get it to do what it needs to do. And you know, all these sorts of technical questions, but at the same time, I remember I'm going to, trying to explain this to my friends. I'm like, “You don't understand, this can change everything.” And now a high school student, I say this to people and they look at me strangely, a high school student can order it and it shows up at your house.Kevin Davies: Yeah, well, this is why I think, and this is why one reason why CRISPR has become such an exciting story and receives the Nobel Prize eight years after the sort of launch publication or the first demonstration of it as a gene editing tool. It is so relatively easy to get to work. It's truly become a democratized or democratizing technology. You don't need a million-dollar Illumina sequencer or anything. And so labs literally all around the world can do basic CRISPR experiments. Not everyone is going to be able to launch a clinical trial. But the technology is so universally used, and that means that advances in our understanding of the mechanisms, new tools for the CRISPR toolbox new pathways, new targets, new oftware, new programs, they're all coming from all corners of the globe to help not just medicine, but many other applications of CRISPR as well.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I always joke about like, there, there are things going on in high school biology classes now that weren't, available, when I was in college and even when we were in industry and now what used to take an entire room, you can do on a corner of a lab bench.Kevin Davies: Yeah. Yeah. As far as the industry goes we mentioned three companies. But you know, today there's probably a dozen or more CRISPR based or gene editing based biotech companies. More undoubtedly are going to be launched before the end of this year. I'm sure we'll spend a bit of time talking about CRISPR 2.0, it seems too soon to be even thinking about a new and improved version of CRISPR, but I think there's a lot of excitement around also two other Boston-based companies, Beam Therapeutics in Cambridge and Verve Therapeutics both of which are launching or commercializing base editing. So base editing is a tool developed from the lab of David Lu of the Broad Institute [of MIT and Harvard]. And the early signs, again, this technology is only five or six years old, but the early signs of this are incredibly promising. David's team, academic team, had a paper in Nature earlier this year, really reporting successful base editing treatment of sickle cell disease in an animal model, not by raising the fetal globin levels, which was sort of a more indirect method that is working very well in the clinic, but by going right at the point mutation that results in sickle cell disease and using given the chemical repertoire of base editing.Base editing is able to make specific single base changes. It can't do the full repertoire of single base changes. So there are some limitations on researchers' flexibility. So they were unable to flip the sickle cell variant back to the quote unquote wild type variants, but the change they were able to make is one that they can live with, we can live with because it's a known benign variant, a very rare variant that has been observed in other, in rare people around the world. So that's completely fine. It's the next best thing. And so that looks very promising. Beam Therapeutics, which is the company that David founded or co-founded is trying a related approach, also going right at the sickle cell mutation. And there are other companies, including one that Matthew Porteus has recently founded and has gone public called Graphite Bio.So this is an exciting time for a disease sickle cell disease that has been woefully neglected, I think you would agree, both in terms of basic research, funding, medical prioritization, and medical education. Now we have many, many shots on goal and it doesn't really, it's not a matter of one's going to win and the others are going to fall by the wayside. Just like we have many COVID vaccines. We'll hopefully have many strategies for tackling sickle cell disease, but they are going to be expensive. And I think you know the economics better than I do. But I think that is the worry, that by analogy with gene therapies that have been recently approved, it's all, it's really exciting that we can now see the first quote, unquote cures in the clinic. That's amazingly exciting. But if the price tag is going to be $1 million or $2 million when these things are finally approved, if and when, that's going to be a rather deflating moment. But given the extraordinary research resources that the CRISPRs and Intellias and Beams and Graphites are pouring into this research, obviously they've got to get some return back on their investment so that they can plow it back into the company to develop the next wave of of gene editing therapies. So you know, it's a predicament Harry Glorikian: One of these days maybe I have to have a show based on the financial parts of it. Because there's a number of different ways to look at it. But just for the benefit of the listeners, right, who may not be experts, how would you explain CRISPR is different from say traditional gene therapies. And is CRISPR going to replace older methods of, of gene therapy or, or will they both have their place? Kevin Davies: No, I think they'll both have their place. CRISPR and, and these newer gene editing tools, base editing and another one called prime editing, which has a company behind it now called Prime Medicine, are able to affect specific DNA changes in the human genome.So if you can target CRISPR, which is an enzyme that cuts DNA together with a little program, the GPS signal is provided in the form of a short RNA molecule that tells the enzyme where to go, where to go in the genome. And then you have a couple of strategies. You can either cut the DNA at the appropriate target site, because you want to inactivate that gene, or you just want to scramble the sequence because you want to completely squash the expression of that gene. Or particularly using the newer forms of gene editing, like base editing, you can make a specific, a more nuanced, specific precision edit without, with one big potential advantage in the safety profile, which is, you're not completely cutting the DNA, you're just making a nick and then coaxing the cell's natural repair systems to make the change that you sort of you're able to prime.So there are many diseases where this is the way you want to go, but that does not in any way invalidate the great progress that we're making in traditional gene therapy. So for example today earlier today I was recording an interview or for one of my own programs with Laurence Reid, the CEO of Decibel Therapeutics, which is looking at therapies for hearing loss both genetic and other, other types of hearing disorders.And I pushed him on this. Aren't you actually joinomg with the gene editing wave? And he was very circumspect and said, no, we're very pleased, very happy with the results that we're getting using old fashioned gene replacement therapy. These are recessive loss of function disorders. And all we need to do is get the expression of some of the gene back. So you don't necessarily need the fancy gene editing tools. If you can just use a an AAV vector and put the healthy gene back into the key cells in the inner ear. So they're complimentary approaches which is great.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, in, in this podcast, I try to have a central theme when I'm talking to people. The relationships of big data, computation, advances in new drugs, and other ways to keep people healthy. So, you know, like question-wise, there's no question in my mind that the whole genomics revolution that started in the ‘90s, and I was happy to be at Applied Biosystems when we were doing that, would have been impossible in the absence of the advances in computing speed and storage in the last three decades. I think computing was the thing that held up the whole human genome, which gave us the book of life that CRISPR is now allowing us to really edit. But I wonder if you could bring us sort of up-to-date and talk about the way CRISPR and computation are intertwined. What happens when you combine precision of an editing tool like CRISPR with the power of machine learning and AI tools to find meaning and patterns in that huge genetic ball? Kevin Davies: Yeah. Well, yeah. I'm got to tread carefully here, but I think we are seeing papers from some really brilliant labs that are using some of the tools that you mentioned. AI and machine learning with a view to better understanding and characterizing some of the properties and selection criteria of some of these gene editing tools. So you mentioned earlier Harry, the need to look out for safety and minimize the concern of off-target effects. So I think by using some of these some algorithms and AI tools, researchers have made enormous strides in being able to design the programmable parts of the gene editing constructs in such a way that you increase the chances that they're going to go to the site that you want them to go to, and nnot get hung up latching onto a very similar sequence that's just randomly cropped up on the dark side of the genome, across the nucleus over there. You don't want that to happen. And I don't know that anybody would claim that they have a failsafe way to guarantee that that could never happen. But the you know, the clinical results that we've seen and all the preclinical results are showing in more and more diseases that we've got the tools and learned enough now to almost completely minimize these safety concerns. But I think everyone, I think while they're excited and they're moving as fast as they can, they're also doing this responsibly. I mean, they, they have to because no field, gene therapy or gene editing really wants to revisit the Jesse Gelsinger tragedy in 1999, when a teenage volunteer died in volunteering for a gene therapy trial at Penn of, with somebody with a rare liver disease. And of course that, that setback set back the, entire field of gene therapy for a decade. And it's really remarkable that you know, many of the sort of pioneers in the field refuse to throw in the towel, they realized that they had to kind of go back to the drawing board, look at the vectors again, and throw it out. Not completely but most, a lot of the work with adenoviruses has now gone by the wayside. AAV is the new virus that we hear about. It's got a much better safety profile. It's got a smaller cargo hold, so that's one drawback, but there are ways around that. And the, the explosion of gene therapy trials that we're seeing now largely on the back of AAV and now increasingly with, with non-viral delivery systems as well is, is very, very gratifying. And it's really delivery. I think that is now the pain point. Digressing from your question a little bit, but delivery, I think is now the big challenge. It's one thing to contemplate a gene therapy for the eye for rare hereditary form of blindness or the ear. Indeed those are very attractive sites and targets for some of these early trials because of the quantities that you need to produce. And the localization, the, the physical localization, those are good things. Those help you hit the target that you want to. But if you're contemplating trying something for Duchenne muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy, or some of the diseases of the brain, then you're going to need much higher quantities particularly for muscular disorders where, you run into now other challenges, including, production and manufacturing, challenges, and potentially safeguarding and making sure that there isn't an immune response as well. That's another, another issue that is always percolating in the background.But given where we were a few years ago and the clinical progress that we've talked about earlier on in the show it, I think you can safely assume that we've collectively made enormous progress in, in negating most, if not all of these potential safety issues.Harry Glorikian: No, you know, it's funny, I know that people will say like, you know, there was a problem in this and that. And I look at like, we're going into uncharted territories and it has to be expected that you just…you've got people that knew what they were doing. All of these people are new at what they are doing. And so you have to expect that along the way everything's not going to go perfectly. But I don't look at it as a negative. I look at it as, they're the new graduating class that's going to go on and understand what they did right. Or wrong, and then be able to modify it and make an improvement. And, you know, that's what we do in science. Kevin Davies: Well, and forget gene editing—in any area of drug development and, and pharmaceutical delivery, things don't always go according to plan. I'm sure many guests on Moneyball Medicine who have had to deal with clinical trial failures and withdrawing drugs that they had all kinds of high hopes for because we didn't understand the biology or there was some other reaction within, we didn't understand the dosing. You can't just extrapolate from an animal model to humans and on and on and on. And so gene editing, I don't think, necessarily, should be held to any higher standard. I think the CRISPR field has already in terms of the sort of market performance, some of the companies that we've mentioned, oh my God, it's been a real roller coaster surprisingly, because every time there's been a paper published in a prominent journal that says, oh my God, there's, there's a deletion pattern that we're seeing that we didn't anticipate, or we're seeing some immune responses or we're seeing unusual off target effects, or we're seeing P53 activation and you know, those are at least four off the top of my head. I'm sure there've been others. And all had big transient impact on the financial health of these companies. But I think that was to be expected. And the companies knew that this was just an overreaction. They've worked and demonstrated through peer review publications and preclinical and other reports that these challenges have been identified, when known about, pretty much completely have been overcome or are in the process of being overcome.So, you know, and we're still seeing in just traditional gene therapy technologies that have been around for 15, 20 years. We're still seeing reports of adverse events on some of those trials. So for gene editing to have come as far as it's common, to be able to look at these two big New England Journal success stories in sickle cell and ATTR amyloidosis, I don't think any very few, except the most ardent evangelists would have predicted we'd be where we are just a few years ago. [musical transition]Harry Glorikian: I want to pause the conversation for a minute to make a quick request. If you're a fan of MoneyBall Medicine, you know that we've published dozens of interviews with leading scientists and entrepreneurs exploring the boundaries of data-driven healthcare and research. And you can listen to all of those episodes for free at Apple Podcasts, or at my website glorikian.com, or wherever you get your podcasts.There's one small thing you can do in return, and that's to leave a rating and a review of the show on Apple Podcasts. It's one of the best ways to help other listeners find and follow the show.If you've never posted a review or a rating, it's easy. All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for MoneyBall Medicine, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but it'll help us out immensely. Thank you! And now back to the show.[musical transition]Harry Glorikian:One of your previous books was called The $1,000 Genome. And when you published that back in 2010, it was still pretty much science fiction that it might be possible to sequence someone's entire genome for $1,000. But companies like Illumina blew past that barrier pretty quickly, and now people are talking about sequencing individual genome for just a few hundred dollars or less. My question is, how did computing contribute to the exponential trends here. And do you wish you'd called your book The $100 Genome?Kevin Davies: I've thought about putting out a sequel to the book, scratching out the 0's and hoping nobody would notice. Computing was yes, of course, a massive [deal] for the very first human genome. Remember the struggle to put that first assembly together. It's not just about the wet lab and pulling the DNA sequences off the machines, but then you know, the rapid growth of the data exposure and the ability to store and share and send across to collaborators and put the assemblies together has been critical, absolutely critical to the development of genomics.I remember people were expressing shock at the $1,000 genome. I called the book that because I heard Craig Venter use that phrase in public for the first time in 2002. And I had just recently published Cracking the Genome. And we were all still recoiling at the billions of dollars it took to put that first reference genome sequence together. And then here's Craig Venter, chairing a scientific conference in Boston saying what we need is the $1,000 genome. And I almost fell off my chair. “what are you? What are you must you're in, you're on Fantasy Island. This is, there's no way we're going to get, we're still doing automated Sanger sequencing. God bless Fred Sanger. But how on earth are you going to take that technology and go from billions of dollars to a couple of thousand dollars. This is insanity.” And that session we had in 2002 in Boston. He had a local, a little episode of America's Got Talent and he invited half a dozen scientists to come up and show what they had. And George Church was one of them. I think Applied Biosystems may have given some sort of talk during that session. And then a guy, a young British guy from a company we'd never heard of called Celexa showed up and showed a couple of pretty PowerPoint slides with colored beads, representing the budding DNA sequence on some sort of chip. I don't know that he showed any data. It was all very pretty and all very fanciful. Well guess what? They had the last laugh. Illumina bought that company in 2006. And as you said, Harry you know, I think when, when they first professed to have cracked the $1,000 dollar genome barrier, a few people felt they needed a pinch of salt to go along with that. But I think now, yeah, we're, we're, we're well past that. And there are definitely outfits like BGI, the Beijing Genomics Institute being one of them, that are touting new technologies that can get us down to a couple of hundred. And those were such fun times because for a while there Illumina had enormous competition from companies like 454 and Helicose and PacBio. And those were fun heady times with lots and lots of competition. And in a way, Illumina's had it a little easy, I think over the last few years, but with PacBio and Oxford Nanopore gaining maturity both, both in terms of the technology platforms and their business strategy and growth, I think Illumina' gonna start to feel a little bit more competition in the long read sequence space. And one is always hearing whispers of new companies that may potentially disrupt next-gen sequencing. And that would be exciting because then we'd have an excuse to write another book. Harry Glorikian: Well, Kevin, start writing because I actually think we're there. I think there are a number of things there and you're right, I think Illumina has not had to bring the price down as quickly because there hasn't been competition. And you know, when I think about the space is, if you could do a $60 genome, right, it starts to become a rounding error. Like what other business models and opportunities now come alive? And those are the things that excite me. All right. But so, but you have a unique position as editor of the journal of CRISPR and the former editor of a lot of prominent, you know, publications, Nature Genetics, Bio-IT World, Chemical & Engineering News. Do you think that there's adequate coverage of the biological versus the computing side of it? Because I, I have this feeling that the computing side still gets a little overlooked and underappreciated. Kevin Davies: I think you're right. I mean I think at my own company Genetic Engineering News, we still have such deep roots in the wet lab vision and version of biotechnology that it takes a conscious effort to look and say, you know, that's not where all the innovation is happening. Bio-IT World, which you mentioned is interesting because we launched that in 2002. It was launched by the publisher IDG, best-known from MacWorld and ComputerWorld and this, this whole family of high-tech publications.And we launched in 2002 was a very thick glossy print magazine. And ironically, you know, we just couldn't find the advertising to sustain that effort, at least in the way that we'd envisioned it. And in 2006 and 2007, your friend and mine Phillips Kuhl, the proprietor of Cambridge Healthtech Institute, kind of put us out of our misery and said, you know what I'll, take the franchise because IDG just didn't know what to do with it anymore. But what he really wanted was the trade show, the production. And even though at the magazine eventually we fell on our sword and eventually put it out of its misery, the trade show went from strength to strength and it'll be back in Boston very soon because he had the vision to realize there is a big need here as sort of supercomputing for life sciences.And it's not just about the raw high-performance computing, but it's about the software, the software tools and data sharing and management. And it's great to go back to that show and see the, you know, the Googles and Amazons and yeah, all the big household names. They're all looking at this because genome technology, as we've discussed earlier has been one of the big growth boom areas for, for their services and their products.Harry Glorikian: Right. I mean, well, if you look at companies like Tempus, right. When I talked to Joel Dudley over there on the show it's, they want to be the Amazon AWS piping for all things genomic analysis. Right. So instead of creating it on your own and building a, just use their platform, basically, so it's definitely a growth area. And at some point, if you have certain disease states, I don't see how you don't get you know, genomic sequencing done, how a physician even today in oncology, how anybody can truly prescribe with all the drugs that are being approved that have, you know, genomic biomarkers associated with them and not use that data.Kevin Davies: On a much lower, lo-fi scale, as I've been doing a lot of reading about sickle cell disease lately, it's clear that a lot of patients who are, of course, as you, as you know, as your listeners know, are mostly African-American because the disease arose in Africa and the carrier status gives carriers a huge health advantage in warding off malaria. So the gene continues to stay, stay high in in frequency. Many African-American patients would benefit from some generic drugs that are available in this country that provide some relief, but aren't aware of it and maybe their physicians aren't completely aware of it either. Which is very sad. And we've neglected the funding of this disease over many decades, whereas a disease like cystic fibrosis, which affects primarily white people of Northern European descent that receives far more funding per capita, per head, than than a disease like sickle cell does. But hopefully that will begin to change as we see the, the potential of some of these more advanced therapies.I think as far as your previous comment. I think one of the big challenges now is how we tackle common diseases. I think we're making so much progress in treating rare Mendelian diseases and we know thousands of them. But it's mental illness and asthma and diabetes you know, diseases that affect millions of people, which have a much more complicated genetic and in part environmental basis.And what can we learn, to your point about having a full genome sequence, what can we glean from that that will help the medical establishment diagnose and treat much more common diseases, not quite as simple as just treating a rare Mendelian version of those diseases? So that's, I think going to be an important frontier over the next decade.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. It's complicated. I think you're going to see as we get more real-world data that's organized and managed well, along with genomic data, I think you'll be able to make more sense of it. But some of these diseases are quite complicated. It's not going to be find one gene, and it's going to give you that answer.But I want to go back to, you can't really talk about CRISPR without talking about this specter of germline editing. And a big part of your book is about this firestorm of criticism and condemnation around, you know, the 2018 when the Chinese researcher He Jankui, I think I said it correctly.Yep.Kevin Davies: He Jankui is how I say it. Close. Harry Glorikian: He announced that he had created twin baby girls with edits to their genomes that were intended to make them immune to HIV, which sort of like—that already made me go, what? But the experiment was, it seems, unauthorized. It seems that, from what I remember, the edits were sloppy and the case spurred a huge global discussion about the ethics of using CRISPR to make edits that would be inherited by future generations. Now, where are we in that debate now? I mean, I know the National Academy of Sciences published a list of criteria, which said, don't do that. Kevin Davies: It was a little more nuanced than that. It wasn't don't do that. It was, there is a very small window through which we could move through if a whole raft of criteria are met. So they, they refuse to say hereditary genome editing should be banned or there should be a moratorium. But they said it should not proceed until we do many things. One was to make sure it is safe. We can't run before we can walk. And by that, I mean, we've got to first demonstrate—because shockingly, this hasn't been done yet—that genome editing can be done safely in human embryos. And in the last 18 months there've been at least three groups, arguably the three leading groups in terms of looking at genetic changes in early human embryos, Kathy Niakan in London, Shoukhrat Mitalipov in Oregon, and Dieter Egli in New York, who all at roughly the same time published and reports that said, or posted preprints at least that said, when we attempt to do CRISPR editing experiments in very early human embryos, we're seeing a mess. We're seeing a slew of off-target and even on-target undesirable edits.And I think that says to me, we don't completely understand the molecular biology of DNA repair in the early human embryo. It may be that there are other factors that are used in embryogenesis that are not used after we're born. That's speculation on my part. I may be wrong. But the point is we still have a lot to do to understand, even if we wanted to.And even if everybody said, “Here's a good case where we should pursue germline editing,” we've gotta be convinced that we can do it safely. And at the moment, I don't think anybody can say that. So that's a huge red flag.But let's assume, because I believe in the power of research, let's assume that we're going to figure out ways to do this safely, or maybe we say CRISPR isn't the right tool for human embryos, but other tools such as those that we've touched on earlier in the show base editing or prime editing, or maybe CRISPR 3.0 or whatever that is right now to be published somewhere. [Let's say ] those are more safe, more precise tools. Then we've got to figure out well, under what circumstances would we even want to go down this road? And the pushback was quite rightly that, well, we already have technologies that can safeguard against families having children with genetic diseases. It's called IVF and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. So we can select from a pool of IVF embryos. The embryos that we can see by biopsy are safe and can therefore be transplanted back into the mother, taken to term and you know, a healthy baby will emerge.So why talk about gene editing when we have that proven technology? And I think that's a very strong case, but there are a small number of circumstances in which pre-implantation genetic diagnosis will simply not work. And those are those rare instances where a couple who want to have a biological child, but have both of them have a serious recessive genetic disease. Sickle cell would be an obvious case in point. So two sickle cell patients who by definition carry two copies of the sickle cell gene, once I have a healthy biological child preimplantation genetic diagnosis, it's not going to help them because there are no healthy embryos from whatever pool that they produce that they can select. So gene editing would be their only hope in that circumstance. Now the National Academy's report that you cited, Harry, did say for serious diseases, such as sickle cell and maybe a few others they could down the road potentially see and condone the use of germline gene editing in those rare cases.But they're going to be very rare, I think. It's not impossible that in an authorized approved setting that we will see the return of genome editing, but that's okay. Of course you can can issue no end of blue ribbon reports from all the world's experts, and that's not going to necessarily prevent some entrepreneur whose ethical values don't align with yours or mine to say, “You know what, there's big money to be made here. I'm going offshore and I'm going to launch a CRISPR clinic and you know, who's going to stop me because I'll be out of the clutches of the authorities.” And I think a lot of people are potentially worried that that scenario might happen. Although if anyone did try to do that, the scientific establishment would come down on them like a ton of bricks. And there'll be a lot of pressure brought to bear, I think, to make sure that they didn't cause any harm.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. It's funny. I would like to not call them entrepreneurs. I like entrepreneurs. I'd like to call them a rogue scientist. Kevin Davies: So as you say, there's the third section of four in Editing Humanity was all about the He Jankui debacle or saga. I had flown to Hong Kong. It's a funny story. I had a little bit of money left in my travel budget and there were two conferences, one in Hong Kong and one in China coming up in the last quarter of 2018. So I thought, well, okay, I'll go to one of them. And I just narrowed, almost a flip of a coin, I think. Okay, let's go to the Hong Kong meeting.It's a bioethics conference since I don't expect it to be wildly exciting, but there are some big speakers and this is an important field for the CRISPR Journal to monitor. So I flew there literally, you know, trying to get some sleep on the long flights from New York and then on landing, turn on the phone, wait for the new wireless signal provider to kick in. And then Twitter just explode on my feed as this very, very astute journalists at MIT Technology Review, Antonio Regalado, had really got the scoop of the century by identifying a registration on a Chinese clinical trial website that he and only he had the foresight and intelligence to sort of see. He had met He Jankui in an off the record meeting, as I described in the book, about a month earlier. A spider sense was tingling. He knew something was up and this was the final clue. He didn't know at that time that the Lulu and Nana, the CRISPR babies that you mentioned, had actually been born, but he knew that there was a pregnancy, at least one pregnancy, from some of the records that he'd seen attached to this registration document. So it was a brilliant piece of sleuthing. And what he didn't know is that the Asociated Press chief medical writer Marilynm Marchion had confidentially been alerted to the potential upcoming birth of these twins by an American PR professional who was working with He Jankui in Shenzhen. So she had been working on an embargoed big feature story that He Jankui and his associates hoped would be the definitive story that would tell the world, we did this quote unquote, “responsibly and accurately, and this is the story that you can believe.” So that story was posted within hours.And of course the famous YouTube videos that He Jankui had recorded announcing with some paternal pride that he had ushered into the world these two gene edited, children, screaming and crying into the world as beautiful babies I think was [the phrase]. And he thought that he was going to become famous and celebrated and lauded by not just the Chinese scientific community, but by the world community for having the ability and the bravery to go ahead and do this work after Chinese researchers spent the previous few years editing human embryos. And he was persuaded that he had to present his work in Hong Kong, because he'd set off such a such an extraordinary firestorm. And I think you've all seen now you're the clips of the videos of him nervously walking onto stage the muffled, the silence, or the only sound in the front row, the only sound in the big auditorium at Hong Kong university—[which] was absolutely packed to the rim, one side of the auditorium was packed with press photographers, hundreds of journalists and cameras clicking—and the shutters clattering was the only, that was the applause that he got as he walked on stage.And to his credit, he tried to answer the questions directly in the face of great skepticism from the audience. The first question, which was posed by David Liu, who had traveled all the way there, who just asked him simply, “What was the unmet medical need that you are trying to solve with this reckless experiment? There are medical steps that you can do, even if the couple that you're trying to help has HIV and you're trying to prevent this from being passed on. There are techniques that you can use sperm washing being one of them. That is a key element of the IVF process to ensure that the no HIV is transmitted.”But he was unable to answer the question in terms of I'm trying to help a family. He'd already moved out and was thinking far, far bigger. Right? And his naiveté was shown in the manuscript that he'd written up and by that point submitted to Nature, excerpts of which were leaked out sometime later.So he went back to Shenzhen and he was put under house arrest after he gave that talk in Hong Kong. And about a year later was sentenced to three years in jail. And so he's, to the best of my knowledge that's where he is. But I often get asked what about the children? As far as we know, there was a third child born about six months later, also gene-edited. We don't even know a name for that child, let alone anything about their health. So one hopes that somebody in the Chinese medical establishment is looking after these kids and monitoring them and doing appropriate tests. The editing, as you said, was very shoddily performed. He knocked out the gene in question, but he did not mimic the natural 32-base deletion in this gene CCR5 that exists in many members of the population that confers, essentially, HIV resistance. So Lulu and Nana on the third child are walking human experiments, sad to say. This should never have been done. Never should have been attempted. And so we hope that he hasn't condemned them to a life of, you know, cancer checkups and that there were no off-target effects. They'll be able to live, hopefully, with this inactivated CCR5 gene, but it's been inactivated in a way that I don't think any, no other humans have ever been recorded with such modifications. So we, we really hope and pray that no other damage has been done. Harry Glorikian: So before we end, I'd love to give you the chance to speculate on the future of medicine in light of CRISPR. Easy, fast, inexpensive genome sequencing, give us access to everybody's genetic code, if they so choose. Machine learning and other forms of AI are helping understand the code and trace interactions between our 20,000 genes. And now CRISPR gives us a way to modify it. So, you know, it feels like [we have] almost everything we need to create, you know, precise, targeted, custom cures for people with genetic conditions. What might be possible soon, in your view? What remaining problems need to be solved to get to this new area of medicine? Kevin Davies: If you know the sequence that has been mutated to give rise to a particular disease then in principle, we can devise a, some sort of gene edit to repair that sequence. It may be flipping the actual base or bases directly, or maybe as we saw with the first sickle cell trial, it's because we understand the bigger genetic pathway. We don't have to necessarily go after the gene mutation directly, but there may be other ways that we can compensate boost the level of a compensating gene.But I think we, we should be careful not to get too carried away. As excited as I am—and hopefully my excitement comes through in Editing Humanity—but for every company that we've just mentioned, you know, you can go on their website and look at their pipeline. And so Editas might have maybe 10 diseases in its cross hairs. And CRISPR [Therapeutics] might have 12 diseases. And Intellia might have 14 diseases and Graphite has got maybe a couple. And Beam Therapeutics has got maybe 10 or 12. And Prime Medicine will hasn't listed any yet, but we'll hopefully have a few announced soon. And so I just reeled off 50, 60, less than a hundred. And some of these are gonna work really, really well. And some are going to be either proven, ineffective or unviable economically because the patient pool is too small. And we've got, how many did we say, 6,000 known genetic diseases. So one of the companies that is particularly interesting, although they would admit they're in very early days yet, is Verve Therapeutics. I touched on them earlier because they're looking at to modify a gene called PCSK9 that is relevant to heart disease and could be a gene modification that many people might undergo because the PCSK9 gene may be perfectly fine and the sequence could be perfectly normal, but we know that if we re remove this gene, levels of the bad cholesterol plummet, and that's usually a good thing as far as heart management goes. So that's an interesting, very interesting study case study, I think, to monitor over the coming years, because there's a company looking at a much larger patient pool potentially than just some of these rare syndromes with unpronounceable names. So the future of CRISPR and gene editing is very bright. I think one of the lessons I took away from CRISPR in Editing Humanity is, looking at the full story, is how this technology, this game-changing gene-editing technology, developed because 25 years ago, a handful of European microbiologists got really interested in why certain microbes were thriving in a salt lake in Southeastern Spain. This is not exactly high-profile, NIH-must-fund-this research. There was a biological question that they wanted to answer. And the CRISPR repeats and the function of those repeats fell out of that pure curiosity, just science for science's sake. And so it's the value of basic investigator-driven, hypothesis-driven research that led to CRISPR being described and then the function of the repeats.And then the story shifted to a yogurt company in Europe that was able to experimentally show how having the right sequence within the CRISPR array could safeguard their cultures against viral infection. And then five years of work people in various groups started to see, were drawn to this like moths to a flame. Jennifer Doudna was intrigued by this from a tip-off from a coffee morning discussion with a Berkeley faculty colleagues, Jill Banfield, a brilliant microbiologist in her own. And then she met meets Emmanuelle Charpentier in Puerto Rico at a conference, and they struck up a friendship and collaboration over the course of an afternoon. And that, why should that have worked? Well, it did, because a year later they're publishing in Science. So it's serendipity and basic research. And if that can work for CRISPR, then I know that there's another technology beginning to emerge from somewhere that may, yet trump CRISPR.And I think the beauty of CRISPR is its universal appeal. And the fact is, it's drawn in so many people, it could be in Japan or China or South Korea or parts of Europe or Canada or the U.S. or South America. Somebody is taking the elements of CRISPR and thinking well, how can we improve it? How can we tweak it?And so this CRISPR toolbox is being expanded and modified and updated all the time. So there's a hugely exciting future for genome medicine. And you know, whether it's a new form of sequencing or a new form of synthetic biology, you know, hopefully your show is going to be filled for many years to come with cool, talented, young energetic entrepreneurs who've developed more cool gadgets to work with our genome and other genomes as well. We haven't even had time to talk about what this could do for rescuing the wooly mammoth from extinction. So fun things, but maybe, maybe another time. Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, great to have you on the show. Really appreciate the time. I hope everybody got a flavor for the enormous impact this technology can have. Like you said, we talked about human genome, but there's so many other genomic applications of CRISPR that we didn't even touch. Kevin Davies: Yup. Yup. So you have to read the book. Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I will look forward to the next book. So, great. Thank you so much. Kevin Davies: Thanks for having me on the show, Harry. All the best.Harry Glorikian: Take care.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's show. You can find past episodes of MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab “Podcast.” And you can follow me on Twitter at hglorikian.  Thanks for listening, and we'll be back soon with our next interview.

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
[Top Agency Series] Unbundling Agency Life with Katie Wagner, President and CEO of KWSM

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 44:44


Katie Wagner is the President and CEO of KWSM, a full-service digital marketing agency made up of journalists. They specialize in website development and SEO, social media strategy and management, content creation, PR and influencer marketing, and digital advertising.  Katie spent more than 15 years as a journalist and spent a decade as a television radio news anchor. She worked at CBS, ABC, Fox, CNN, and National Public Radio. In 2010, Katie realized that she could use those skills she learned in the newsroom to help business owners connect with their clients online — so she opened KWSM. Katie is also an active member of various organizations, including the Young Entrepreneurs Council, ProVisors, and Vistage.  In this episode… Agency life is hard. There are many moving processes with different people and brands involved, and we don't share enough about what that life truly is. From client inquiry to results, Katie Wagner of KWSM unbundles the agency lifestyle and shares how she and her team stay on top of their work while being present in their personal lives.  If you've been looking for a better way to train your team, make them more productive, and achieve healthy work-life integration, Katie shares a few hacks that truly makes agency life easier. There's so much to unpack, from the no-emails after work structure to the 9-80 policies and best-self management tips — Katie explains it all! In this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast, Dr. Jeremy Weisz chats with Katie Wagner, President and CEO of KWSM, about navigating the digital agency life. She shares how she got into the agency business, the caliber of clients they serve, how she gets the best from her team, manages processes, and gets work done efficiently. Stay tuned. 

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Is Dairy Good For Us? | This episode is brought to you by ButcherBoxWe have no biological requirement for dairy, and yet, we've been told over and over again that this food is a great source of calcium and that milk makes healthy bones and we should drink it daily. However, the research shows that none of this is true. In fact, close to 70 percent of the world's population is genetically unable to properly digest milk and other dairy products—a problem known as lactose intolerance. But even if you aren't lactose intolerant, consuming dairy can lead to weight gain, bloating, acne, gas, allergies, eczema, brittle bones, and sometimes even cancer.In this mini-episode, Dr. Hyman discusses why he often works with patients to eliminate dairy in conversations with his colleagues Lisa Dreher and Dr. Elizabeth Boham. He also speaks with Dr. David Ludwig about his recent research on milk and dairy products.Lisa Dreher is a registered dietitian who got her undergraduate nutrition degree at the Rochester Institute of Technology and completed a dietetic internship through Cornell University. Lisa first worked in the acute care hospital setting and became a Clinical Nutrition Specialist working in Pediatric Gastroenterology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. At the same time, she pursued her Masters degree in Nutrition and Integrative Health from the Maryland University of Integrative Health and started practicing integrative and functional nutrition in private practice before joining UWC in 2015. She has since received additional training through the Institute for Functional Medicine. Over the past 10 years, Lisa has delivered several public health lectures on the role of food as medicine and her work has been showcased in Reader's Digest, on National Public Radio, and she was featured in the Broken Brain 2 series. She also developed the Digestive Health and Gut Microbiome training module for the Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine practice group through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Elizabeth Boham is a physician and nutritionist who practices Functional Medicine at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Through her practice and lecturing she has helped thousands of people achieve their goals of optimum health and wellness. She witnesses the power of nutrition every day in her practice and is committed to training other physicians to utilize nutrition in healing. Dr. Boham has contributed to many articles and wrote the latest chapter on Obesity for the Rankel Textbook of Family Medicine. She is part of the faculty of the Institute for Functional Medicine and has been featured on the Dr. Oz show and in a variety of publications and media including Huffington Post, The Chalkboard Magazine, and Experience Life. Her DVD Breast Wellness: Tools to Prevent and Heal from Breast Cancer explores the Functional Medicine approach to keeping your breasts and whole body well.David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is co-director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center and founder of the Optimal Weight for Life program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight, and risk for chronic disease. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been a Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and The BMJ. He has written 3 books for the general public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox. Right now ButcherBox has a special offer for new members. If you sign up today you'll get 2 ribeye steaks free in your first box plus $10 off by going to butcherbox.com/farmacy.Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Lisa Dreher, “A Simple Diet Experiment That May Solve Most Of Your Health Issues” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/FeJHNRJ3 Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Boham, “Acne, Weight Gain, Facial Hair, Hair Loss, Infertility: Is PCOS The Cause?” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/68G64S1YFind Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. David Ludwig, “Why Most Everything We Were Told About Dairy Is Wrong” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/DrDavidLudwig See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

BEYOND BARRIERS
Episode 177: How Latinas Can Lean In with Anna Dapelo-Garcia

BEYOND BARRIERS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 45:06


When it comes to your career progression, are you actively “leaning in” to create impact and making a difference or are you passively leaning back in your seat, letting opportunities slip passed you? You may be familiar with Sheryl Sandberg's book, “Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead”, where she shares her perspective on what women need to do to move up in the business world, which is: to press ahead, to project confidence, to "sit at the table" and physically lean in to make herself heard. Meet Anna Dapelo-Garcia, Founder & President of Lean In Latinas, who shares her story of wanting to pass on the lessons she learned to the younger generation of Latina women. After visiting the Lean In Organization's website, she decided to click and create a “Circle”. And that is the beginning of Lean in Latinas and Anna's journey of paying it forward. Anna Dapelo-Garcia is an Inclusion, Diversity and Health Equity Leader at Stanford Health Care. She is also the Founder and President of Lean In Latinas. Anna has received numerous awards over the years and in 2015, she became the Founder of Lean In Latinas and was appointed as a Regional Program Leader by LeanIn.Org. Anna was featured in The New York Times for her role in creating Lean In Latinas, now a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Anna has also been featured in Forbes, National Public Radio (NPR) and the Wall Street Journal. In this episode, Anna shares her story of bringing Lean in Latinas to life, why you should never turn down an opportunity, the importance of your personal brand, and the benefits of having diversity in mentorship. Visit https://www.iambeyondbarriers.com where you will find show notes and links to all the resources in this episode, including the best way to get in touch with Anna. Highlights: [02:54] Bringing Lean In Latinas to life [10:13] Never turn down an opportunity [13:22] Gaining clarity on your strengths [19:14] The importance of your personal brand [26:14] Seeking out feedback [32:13] Benefits of having diversity in mentorship [37:55] Anna's advice to women on accelerating success Quotes: “Every day you have an opportunity to determine your brand and how you want to be remembered.” – Anna Dapelo-Garcia “Be loud and proud of who you are and how you contribute to the world.” – Anna Dapelo-Garcia “Constructive feedback is a great opportunity to hone in on your skills.” - Anna Dapelo-Garcia “Mentors are critical at every stage of your career, whether you are an emerging professional or a CEO.” - Anna Dapelo-Garcia “Confidence is a game changer. Once you get it, it's like the sun came up.” - Anna Dapelo-Garcia About Anna Dapelo-Garcia: Anna Dapelo-Garcia is an Inclusion, Diversity and Health Equity Leader at Stanford Health Care. She is also the Founder and President of Lean In Latinas. Anna acquired a Master of Public Administration from the University of San Francisco and a Bachelor of Arts degree in management from Saint Mary's College. In 2013 she was named as a Silicon Valley Business Journal Woman of Influence and graduated from the Hispanas Organized for Political Equality (HOPE) Leadership Institute program. In 2017, she was named as the Woman of the Year by the Women's Health Care Executives. She also served as a State Commissioner with the California State Senate for Cost Control in State Government. She was vice chair and board member for the Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley and is currently serving as vice chair and board member for the University of San Francisco. In 2015, she became the Founder of Lean In Latinas and was appointed as a Regional Program Leader by LeanIn.Org. Anna was featured in The New York Times for her role in creating Lean In Latinas, now a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. In 2018, she received a Top Latino Leaders Award by the National Diversity Council in Los Angeles. In 2019, Anna was appointed by the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to the Women's Equality 2020 Leadership Council and in 2021 she was appointed to the Santa Clara County Hate Crimes Task Force. In March 2019, she was chosen by the Silicon Valley Business Journal for a Latino Leadership award. Anna has also been featured in Forbes, National Public Radio (NPR) and the Wall Street Journal. Links: Website: https://leaninlatinas.org/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anna-dapelo-garcia-927baa5/  

Awakin Call
Marilyn Turkovich -- A Teacher of Compassion and a Builder of Compassionate Communities

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021


As a 12-year-old Croatian-American girl in the anti-Soviet climate of the 1960s, Marilyn Turkovich boldly subscribed to the magazine ‘Soviet Life’ without her parents’ knowledge. Postal deliveries weren’t covered in brown paper at the time, which meant that the magazine was no secret to the postal delivery person as well as the neighbors. Upon learning of the subscription, her parents worried what neighbors might interpret of the family’s political allegiance. But their daughter reasoned that she wasn’t defying anyone but simply acting on the premise that one must appreciate and learn from other people’s perspectives, however diverse their origin – and that this practice grows from the intimate spaces of our homes and neighborhood. This was one of Marilyn Turkovich’s early acts of courage in her journey to becoming a teacher and organizer for compassion. Turkovich has dedicated herself to cultivating appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures, faiths and ways of life that exist around the world. She has worked since 2013 with the International Charter for Compassion (CFC), an organization founded to support the movement initiated by Karen Armstrong’s Charter of Compassion, and founded on “the fundamental principles of universal justice and respect” underlying the world’s religions and wisdom traditions. CFC aims to provide an umbrella for people to engage in collaborative partnerships worldwide designed to bring to life through concrete, practical action in a myriad of sectors the principles articulated in the Charter for Compassion. Stepping into a diversity of roles – from educator, instruction and curriculum designer, facilitator, author and advocate, Turkovich presently is the Executive Director for CFC. She has helped bring 114 cities as signatories of the Charter, with about 300 more displaying readiness to plunge in. The Charter puts the golden rule – do unto others as you would to yourself – into practice through local communities around the world working across faiths, colors and ethnicities. For Marilyn, “compassion is acting in solidarity with other people. And when you act in solidarity with others, you take the lead from them, don’t you? You don’t come in and say, ‘I have the solution!’ Rather, you explore collectively what that solution might be.” She says that oftentimes “our own personal wisdom gets in the way of really being effective,” since compassionate action often flows from compassionate questioning and compassionate listening to those most proximate to an issue. Speaking from her home in Washington state at an International Inter-faith Peace Conference, she remarks on the subtle differences between empathy and compassion, “Empathy is defined as the feeling that arises within you when you are faced with another person’s suffering (hunger for instance), and you feel motivated to relieve that suffering. But compassion is not the same as empathy. Though the concepts are very much related. Empathy is our ability to feel the emotions of another person. Compassion is when those feeling and thoughts include the desire to help but more than that you do help. Research shows that when we feel compassion our heart rates slow down, we secrete the bonding hormone oxytocin, parts of our brain which get us to care for others light up. We care more for others – animals, people and environment. And as importantly ourselves.” Marilyn bases her work on building compassion in communities on scientific assessment that reckons that compassion may even be vital to the survival of our species. Communities with compassionate members will more likely thrive. Bit by bit over the course of last very many decades she has designed hundreds of curricula, training materials, and workshops custom-made to instill compassion rooted in the local needs and knowledge. Marilyn’s hyphenated existence as a Croatian-American in an immigrant neighborhood of Pennsylvania gave her a first-hand understanding of making of a community, melding differences and caring for each other. Her grandparents’ way of life made a formidable mark in teaching her how to interact with others, how the boundaries between personal and civic responsibility blend, how to share responsibilities in a community – all of which predisposed her for linking community building and compassion in her later life. In her own journey into appreciating otherness, she has spent extensive time in India and Mexico, beginning during her Fulbright scholarship days. Professionally, Marilyn has worked with Independent Broadcasting Associates on National Public Radio, the BBC and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and in organizational development, specializing in instructional design work, strategic planning and leadership. She has especially focused on developing training content on race and social justice initiatives. Join us in conversation with this builder of compassionate communities.

Awakin Call
Marilyn Turkovich -- A Teacher of Compassion and a Builder of Compassionate Communities

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021


As a 12-year-old Croatian-American girl in the anti-Soviet climate of the 1960s, Marilyn Turkovich boldly subscribed to the magazine ‘Soviet Life’ without her parents’ knowledge. Postal deliveries weren’t covered in brown paper at the time, which meant that the magazine was no secret to the postal delivery person as well as the neighbors. Upon learning of the subscription, her parents worried what neighbors might interpret of the family’s political allegiance. But their daughter reasoned that she wasn’t defying anyone but simply acting on the premise that one must appreciate and learn from other people’s perspectives, however diverse their origin – and that this practice grows from the intimate spaces of our homes and neighborhood. This was one of Marilyn Turkovich’s early acts of courage in her journey to becoming a teacher and organizer for compassion. Turkovich has dedicated herself to cultivating appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures, faiths and ways of life that exist around the world. She has worked since 2013 with the International Charter for Compassion (CFC), an organization founded to support the movement initiated by Karen Armstrong’s Charter of Compassion, and founded on “the fundamental principles of universal justice and respect” underlying the world’s religions and wisdom traditions. CFC aims to provide an umbrella for people to engage in collaborative partnerships worldwide designed to bring to life through concrete, practical action in a myriad of sectors the principles articulated in the Charter for Compassion. Stepping into a diversity of roles – from educator, instruction and curriculum designer, facilitator, author and advocate, Turkovich presently is the Executive Director for CFC. She has helped bring 114 cities as signatories of the Charter, with about 300 more displaying readiness to plunge in. The Charter puts the golden rule – do unto others as you would to yourself – into practice through local communities around the world working across faiths, colors and ethnicities. For Marilyn, “compassion is acting in solidarity with other people. And when you act in solidarity with others, you take the lead from them, don’t you? You don’t come in and say, ‘I have the solution!’ Rather, you explore collectively what that solution might be.” She says that oftentimes “our own personal wisdom gets in the way of really being effective,” since compassionate action often flows from compassionate questioning and compassionate listening to those most proximate to an issue. Speaking from her home in Washington state at an International Inter-faith Peace Conference, she remarks on the subtle differences between empathy and compassion, “Empathy is defined as the feeling that arises within you when you are faced with another person’s suffering (hunger for instance), and you feel motivated to relieve that suffering. But compassion is not the same as empathy. Though the concepts are very much related. Empathy is our ability to feel the emotions of another person. Compassion is when those feeling and thoughts include the desire to help but more than that you do help. Research shows that when we feel compassion our heart rates slow down, we secrete the bonding hormone oxytocin, parts of our brain which get us to care for others light up. We care more for others – animals, people and environment. And as importantly ourselves.” Marilyn bases her work on building compassion in communities on scientific assessment that reckons that compassion may even be vital to the survival of our species. Communities with compassionate members will more likely thrive. Bit by bit over the course of last very many decades she has designed hundreds of curricula, training materials, and workshops custom-made to instill compassion rooted in the local needs and knowledge. Marilyn’s hyphenated existence as a Croatian-American in an immigrant neighborhood of Pennsylvania gave her a first-hand understanding of making of a community, melding differences and caring for each other. Her grandparents’ way of life made a formidable mark in teaching her how to interact with others, how the boundaries between personal and civic responsibility blend, how to share responsibilities in a community – all of which predisposed her for linking community building and compassion in her later life. In her own journey into appreciating otherness, she has spent extensive time in India and Mexico, beginning during her Fulbright scholarship days. Professionally, Marilyn has worked with Independent Broadcasting Associates on National Public Radio, the BBC and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and in organizational development, specializing in instructional design work, strategic planning and leadership. She has especially focused on developing training content on race and social justice initiatives. Join us in conversation with this builder of compassionate communities.

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 171: What is the Revolutionary Capacity of the Black Church w/ Nikol Alexander Floyd

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 81:44


From the earliest period of Black American history the Black Church has had an integral role in shaping the social fabric of Black life. Throughout various periods of that long history the Black church has also been crucial in Black political action and institution building. In this current moment when Black electoral politics is rooted in the right wing corporate flank of the Democratic Party with many White progressives to the left, is there any potential for the Black church to be anything more than a vehicle of political and social control used by the Black political class? Is there potential for the Black church to be radicalized to embrace an agenda that fights the egregious nature of American capitalism and imperialism?   Do phenomena like prosperity ministries relegate the Black church to being a vehicle for promoting conspicuous consumption and Black capitalism, or is a more radical vision possible?   We will ask these questions and more on this episode of THIS IS REVOLUTION.   About Dr. Floyd: Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd is Associate Professor Political Science at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. A lawyer and political scientist, Dr. Alexander-Floyd has been actively engaged in a wide range of political and legal issues. Dr. Alexander-Floyd has been a featured speaker at fora and symposia at a number of colleges and universities, including Bryn Mawr College, CUNY Graduate Center, Northwestern University, Prairieview A&M University, Princeton University, and Syracuse University, among others. A strong advocate for minorities in general and women of color in particular, she co-founded the Association for the Study of Black Women in Politics (www.asbwp.org), an organization dedicated to promoting the development of Black women's and gender studies and supporting the professionalization of Black women political scientists. As a legal theorist and activist, she has produced scholarship and provided commentary on some of the cutting edge legal cases of our time, including the important Hopwood case in Texas; her involvement and leadership around Hopwood led to guest appearances and interviews on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and National Public Radio.   An award-winning educator, she teaches a range of courses on Black feminist theory, Black women's political activism, and race, gender, media, and the law. Dr. Alexander-Floyd is the author of Gender, Race, and Nationalism in Contemporary Black Politics (Palgrave Macmillan 2007), and her articles have appeared in leading journals such as Feminist Formations, The International Journal of Africana Studies, Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies, Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, The National Political Science Review, Politics & Gender, PS: Political Science & Politics, and Signs. She is a past Co-Chair of the Annual Meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, and past Chair of the American Political Science Association's Committee on the Status of Women and the Profession. Her latest book, Liminal Subjects: Black Women, Melodrama, and Post-Feminism in the New Millennium (forthcoming NYU Press, 2020), investigates the political implications of post-feminist, post-civil rights ideology.   Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron only programing, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents?   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, (specially YouTube!)   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   The Dispatch on Zero Books (video essay series): https://youtu.be/nSTpCvIoRgw   Medium: https://jasonmyles.medium.com/kill-the-poor-f9d8c10bc33d   Pascal Robert's Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com

Design Better Podcast
Scott Berkun: How design makes the world

Design Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 49:05


Do you have a colleague who just doesn't get what design is all about? Or maybe you've tried explaining it to your parents, but they just respond by asking you to fix their printer. If that's the case, then Scott Berkun has written a book for you, to give to them. It's called How Design Makes the World, and it's a great beginner's guide to how design shapes just about everything we interact with in modern society, for better or for worse.  It is also a good refresher for those of us who are more well-versed in design. Scott—who has written other bestselling books like The Myths of Innovation and Making Things Happen—does a great job of distilling design concepts down into everyday examples that are accessible and engaging. In our conversation, we chat with Scott about the differences in thinking between designers and engineers, what UX design has to do with deep-sea anglerfish, and how good design is often shaped by understanding the constraints on a product. Bio   Scott Berkun is a bestselling author and popular speaker on creativity, leading projects, public speaking, design and many other subjects. He's the author of eight books, including  How Design Makes The World, The Myths of Innovation, Confessions of a Public Speaker, and The Year Without Pants. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, The Guardian, Wired magazine, USA Today, Fast Company, National Public Radio, CNN, NPR, MSNBC and other media. His popular blog is at scottberkun.com and he tweets at @berkun.

The Wired Educator Podcast
WEP 206: Crazy Good Stuff About Teaching an Interview with Rick Wormeli

The Wired Educator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 73:07


In this episode of The Wired Educator Podcast, I have the privilege of interviewing one of my all-time educational heroes, Rick Wormeli. He's the Mick Jagger of Education. He tackles the big questions in education and explores every strategy and method and puts it to the test. He will make you laugh. He will make you think. He will challenge the way teach. He'll inspire you in so many ways! Rick isn't just a legend, he's one of the most authentic voices in education. We dive in so many areas including assessments, grading, rubrics, literacy, preparing for the new year, starting new initiatives and more.  I think think this may be the greatest interview with Rick ever recorded but I am biased. Buckle up. Click here to listen to this interview with Rick Wormeli on The Wired Educator Podcast.  One of the first Nationally Board Certified teachers in America, Rick brings innovation, energy, validity and high standards to both his presentations and his instructional practice, which include 39 years teaching math, science, English, physical education, health, and history, as well as coaching teachers and principals. Rick's work has been reported in numerous media, including ABC's Good Morning America, Hardball with Chris Matthews, National Geographic and Good Housekeeping magazines, What Matters Most: Teaching for the 21st Century, and the Washington Post. He is a columnist for AMLE Magazine and a frequent contributor to ASCD's Education Leadership magazine. He is the author of the award-winning book Meet Me in the Middle as well as the best-selling books Day One and Beyond, Fair Isn't Always Equal: Assessment and Grading in the Differentiated Classroom (Second Edition), Differentiation: From Planning to Practice and Metaphors & Analogies: Power Tools for Teaching any Subject, all five from Stenhouse Publishers, as well as Summarization in any Subject: 60 Innovative and Tech-Infused Strategies for Deeper Student Learning (releasing in fall 2018) published by ASCD.  His book, The Collected Writings (So Far) of Rick Wormeli: Crazy Good Stuff I Learned about Teaching Along the Way, is collection of his published articles, guest blogs and more through 2013. His classroom practice is a showcase for ASCD's best-selling series, At Work in the Differentiated Classroom. With his substantive presentations, sense of humor and unconventional approaches, he has been asked to present to teachers and administrators in all 50 states, Canada, China, Europe, Thailand, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, Australia the Middle East, and at the White House. He is a seasoned veteran of many international webcasts, and he is Disney's American Teacher Awards 1996 Outstanding English Teacher of the Nation. He won the 2008 James P. Garvin award from the New England League of Middle Schools for Teaching Excellence, Service and Leadership, and he has been a consultant for National Public Radio, USA Today, Court TV and the Smithsonian Institution's Natural Partners Program and their search for the giant squid. Rick lives in Herndon, Virginia, with his wife, Kelly, and both are proud of recently launching the last of their children into adulthood. With the kids' college years now behind them, Rick and Kelly are now eagerly spending their childrens' inheritance while Rick works on his first young adult fiction novel and a new book on changing the culture of a school for ethical grading practices. Mentioned in this episode: Please support our sponsor: www.PlanBook.com Rick's website: www.rockwormeli.com Some of my favorite Rick Wormeli book: Fair Isn't Always Equal: Assessment and Grading in the Differentiated Classroom The Collected Writings (so far): Crazy Good Stuff I've Learned About Teaching Along the Way of Rick Wormeli A Big Thank-You to our sponsor www.Planbook.com - Enter code "Wired" at sign-up Planbook has been the established leader in online lesson planning since 2010, offering collaborative lesson sharing, flexible administrator access, and even student view tools for just $15 a year. Using Planbook, educators can build customized school years, classes, and lessons 100% online, directly inputting class materials and up-to-date standards from all over the world. Enter code "Wired" at sign-up to join over 800,000 Planbook teachers today and get your first year for only $5! ------------------   Invite Kelly to be your opening day speaker at your school, lead a leadership workshop, or share his What Everyone Needs to Know About Bullying presentation here. www.kellycroy.com This link will take you to ALL of Kelly's social media: https://linktr.ee/kellycroy Sign-up for Kelly's newsletter here. Kelly Croy is an author, speaker, and educator. If you'd like to learn more about Kelly or invite him to your school or conference to speak please send him an email.  Subscribe to The Wired Educator Podcast with 206 episodes of interviews and professional development. • Visit Kelly's website at www.KellyCroy.com. • Looking for a dynamic speaker for your school's opening day? • Consider Kelly Croy at www.KellyCroy.com • Order Kelly's books, Along Came a Leaderand Unthink Before Bed: A Children's Book on Mindfulness for your personal library. • Follow Kelly Croy on Facebook.  • Follow Kelly Croy on Twitter.  •  Follow Kelly Croy on Instagram     

The Leadership Locker
155. How a Team of VAs Will Transform Your Business (And Give You Time Back) with Dennis Yu

The Leadership Locker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 61:53


“The bigger your audience becomes, the more you have to delegate to other people.” – Dennis Yu On this episode of The Leadership Locker, Rich talks with digital marketing and personal brand expert Dennis Yu about how outsourcing can help take your business to the next level. Listen in as Rich and Dennis discuss finding help overseas, task libraries, and apprenticeship. They also discuss delegating your social media, and Dennis' Dollar-a-Day Facebook Ad strategy. Dennis Yu is the Chief Technology Officer of BlitzMetrics, a digital marketing company which partners with schools to train young adults.  He's an internationally recognized lecturer in Facebook Marketing and has spoken in 17 countries, spanning 5 continents, including keynotes at L2E, Gultaggen, and Marketo Summit. Dennis has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, LA Times, National Public Radio, TechCrunch, Fox News, CBS Evening News and is co-author of Facebook Nation – a textbook taught in over 700 colleges and universities. He's a regular contributor for Adweek's SocialTimes column and has published in Social Media Examiner, Social Media Club, Tweak Your Biz, B2C, Social Fresh, and Heyo. He held leadership positions at Yahoo! and American Airlines and studied Finance and Economics at Southern Methodist University as well as London School of Economics. ----- https://richcardonamedia.com/personal-branding/ (Personal Branding | Rich Cardona Media) ----- 00:09 – Introduction 04:20 – Outsourcing overseas 08:59 – Dennis' task library and checklists 13:01 – Documenting your processes 14:59 – Handing off minor tasks to a VA so that you can focus on the important stuff 26:48 – The value of creating reusable social media content 28:25 – Delegation and apprenticeship 31:53 – Delegating your social media 37:05 – Facebook ads 51:54 – YouTube Shorts and other short-form content 57:19 – Where to find Dennis online ----- How to connect with Dennis: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dennisyu/ (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/dennis.yu/?hl=en (Instagram) https://www.facebook.com/getfound/ (Facebook) https://dennis-yu.com/ (Website) ----- Connect with Rich: http://www.richcardonamedia.com/ (Website) https://www.linkedin.com/in/richcardona/ (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/richcardona_/ (Instagram) https://www.facebook.com/richcardonamedia/ (Facebook) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBEz_sleZ4_PtqTwmMIj7Fw (YouTube) ----- https://rocketstation.com/ (Rocket Station) brooks@rocketstation.com

Pop Culture Happy Hour
What's Making Us Happy: 1971 Edition

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 23:08


Back in 1971, Richard Nixon was president, the Beatles were newly broken up. But also, a new network called National Public Radio broadcast for the first time. In honor of the anniversary of NPR's first broadcast, this special edition of What's Making Us Happy This Week offers recommendations from 50 years ago.

Post Reports
The dream of a Black utopia

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 62:43


In 1983, the U.S. invaded the small Caribbean nation of Grenada. Forty years later, many Americans have no idea why — or that it happened at all. Today, in collaboration with “Throughline,” we tell a story of revolution, conquest, and dreams of a Black utopia.Read more:For host Martine Powers, this historical deep-dive has a personal connection. Growing up in a Caribbean American family offered a different perspective on the 1983 invasion — a moment that isn't just about President Ronald Reagan or Cold War machinations. Instead, this era in Grenada's history is also the story of people and ideas that became symbols of Black freedom around the world — and a direct inspiration for Black Americans.“This was a Black country with people making their own success and failure,” says Dessima Williams, Grenada's former ambassador to the U.S. “We didn't have White people over us. And I think that itself was revolutionary at the psychic level.”This story was produced in collaboration with “Throughline,” a podcast about history from National Public Radio. Here are a few other episodes that you'll want to check out: “Palestine,” about the region's history of settlements and displacement; “Five Fingers Crush The Land,” on the history and culture of China's Uyghur people; and the unexpectedly dark story of American imperialism, in “Reframing History: Bananas.”

The_C.O.W.S.
The C.O.W.S. w/ Angie Schmitt: Black Pedestrians and White Supremacy #RoadRacism

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021


The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Angie Schmitt. An author and expert on sustainable transporation, Schmitt has been published in the New York Times, The Atlantic and National Public Radio. She's the founder and principal of 3MPH Planning and Consulting, a firm focused on pedestrian safety. We'll discuss her 2020 publication, Right of Way: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America. The book discusses the startlingly high number of pedestrian fatalities in the U.S. and the reasons why non-white male foot-travelers are disproportionately likely to be killed by a motor vehicle. Like most other elements of White Supremacy, words are crucially important to understanding the history of road development and the laws governing motorists and pedestrians. This includes concepts like "jaywalking" or the pattern of describing a person being hit by a multi-ton vehicle as an "accident." #RoadRacism #DerylDedmon INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

The Shameless Mom Academy
565: Colleen Echohawk: The First Indigenous Woman Running for Mayor in a Major City

The Shameless Mom Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 51:50


Over the past two decades, Colleen Echohawk has served the most marginalized people living in the Greater Seattle community. As the head of Chief Seattle Club, a non-profit dedicated to the rapid re-housing of urban Natives, Colleen led the effort to create nearly $100 million in new affordable housing in Seattle. Under Colleen's leadership, Chief Seattle Club has received recognition from the Puget Sound Sage Visionary for Justice Award (2018), the Neighborhood Builder Award (2017), and the Municipal League of King County's Organization of the Year (2016). Colleen is an enrolled member of the Kithehaki Band of the Pawnee Nation and a member of the Upper Athabascan people of Mentasta Lake. Colleen and her family have been proud to call Seattle home for over two decades. In her spare time, she loves to read, sing karaoke, take her dog Rizzo for a walk, listen to National Public Radio, and cook delicious food for her friends and family. She has been recognized by numerous organizations, including the 21 Leaders to watch in 2021 by Seattle Magazine, the King County Martin Luther King Jr. Medal of Distinguished Service (2020), Seattle's most influential people by Seattle Magazine (November 2019), and many more.  I got to hear Colleen speak a couple months ago and I immediately knew I wanted to ask her to be a guest on the show.  I was so delighted and honored when she said yes.  We could have spoken for hours.  She is a powerhouse of a woman and leader and her mayoral platform is extraordinary.  I know you will be so inspired by Colleen's stories and leadership. Listen in to hear Colleen share: The cost of leadership when you're a mom Her role as the first Indigenous women running for mayor in a major city The identities she carries as a mayoral candidate, Indigenous woman, eldest sister of 7 siblings, and Shameless Mom How she is using her mayoral platform to protect Seattle's most vulnerable citizens How being an Indigenous women informs her leadership and deep desire to be a public servant The evolution of Native identity in leadership The intersection of motherhood and leadership and how her kids help her keep boundaries Her background serving Native people experiencing homelessness and how it's the foundation for her mayoral campaign How she wants to see change and evolution in policing in Seattle Her focus on providing the city of Seattle an equitable recovery from COVID Her advice to other women who might be considering running for office Links mentioned: Join my free workshop, 5 Ways to Shine Like a Mother Echohawk For Seattle Colleen on Instagram Colleen on Facebook Colleen on Twitter

Throughline
Who is NPR (For)?

Throughline

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 38:19


Who is the media meant to serve? And why does it matter today, arguably, more than ever? 50 years ago, National Public Radio began as a small, scrappy news organization with big ideals and a very small footprint. Over the subsequent years of coverage and programming, NPR has grown and evolved into a mainstream media outlet, with a mission of serving audiences that reflect America. This week, Michel Martin, host of Weekend All Things Considered, talks to us about her time at NPR and the importance of representing all voices in news.