Podcasts about lutheran

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

form of Protestantism commonly associated with the teachings of Martin Luther

  • 1,259PODCASTS
  • 20,628EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
lutheran

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about lutheran

Show all podcasts related to lutheran

Latest podcast episodes about lutheran

A Little Bit Culty
Brazen: Nadia Bolz-Weber on Sex, Shame & Toxic Religion

A Little Bit Culty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 62:17


A Little Culty – She's just about the most rockin' Reverend we've ever met. In this episode, Nadia Bolz-Weber takes us to church on everything from sex-obsessed religious doctrine and toxic positivity to cancel culture. Also, if you've been searching for an episode that will illuminate what St. Augustine's medieval boner issues have to do with purity rings, you are in the right place.More about today's guest: Nadia Bolz-Weber is an ordained Lutheran Pastor, and founder of House for All Sinners & Saints in Denver, Co,, a progressive, queer-inclusive Lutheran congregation. She's written three New York Times bestselling memoirs, including Shameless: A Sexual Reformation, which takes on what she sees as the harmful ideas about sexuality that Christianity has promoted throughout history. She's the creator and host of The Confessional podcast, a pop-up prayer network called The Chapel, and the purveyor of a wildly inspirational Substack called The Corners. Learn all about it on her official website.~The views and opinions expressed on A Little Bit Culty do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the podcast. Any content provided by our guests, bloggers, sponsors or authors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, group, club, organization, business individual, anyone or anything.~A Little Bit Culty is proud to support the #IGOTOUT project, which empowers survivors of cultic abuse to share their stories online as a catalyst for education, prevention, and healing. Learn more at igotout.org~For more information on A Little Bit Culty and co-hosts Sarah Edmondson and Nippy “Anthony” Ames, visit our official website at alittlebitculty.com. Follow us on Instagram & Twitter @alittlebitculty~CREDITS: Executive Producers: Sarah Edmondson & Anthony AmesProduction Partner: Citizens of Sound Producer: Will RetherfordAssociate Producer: Jess TardyTheme Song: “Cultivated” by Jon Bryant co-written with Nygel AsselinAdditional Music Score by Will Retherford See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Endure His Coming – December 6, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 2:56


Does the Christmas season bring a knot to your stomach? Perhaps you become stressed...

WELS - Daily Devotions
A Promise Wrapped in a Name – December 4, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 3:00


The Order of Knight George
Lutheran Hymnal: 114 - See, the Conqueror Mounts in Triumph

The Order of Knight George

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 4:16


1 See, the Conqueror mounts in triumph, See the King in royal state, Riding on the clouds, His chariot, To His heavenly palace gate! Hark! The choirs of angel voices Joyful hallelujahs sing, And the portals high are lifted To receive their heavenly King. 2 Who is this that comes in glory, With the trump of jubilee? Lord of battles, God of armies, He has gained the victory. He who on the cross did suffer, He who from the grave arose, He has vanquished sin and Satan, He by death has spoiled His foes. 3 While He lifts His hands in blessing, He is parted from His friends; While their eager eyes behold Him, He upon the cloud ascends; He who walked with God and pleased Him, Preaching truth and doom to come, He, our Enoch, is translated To His everlasting home. 4 Now our heavenly Aaron enters, With His blood, within the veil' Joshua now is come to Canaan, And the kings before Him quail; Now He plants the tribes of Israel In their promised resting-place; Now our great Elijah offers Double portion of His grace. 5 Thou hast raised our human nature On the clouds to God's right hand; There we sit in heavenly places, There with Thee in glory stand. Jesus reigns, adored by angels, Man with God is on the throne; Mighty Lord, in Thine ascension We by faith behold our own.

The Lutheran Ladies' Lounge from KFUO Radio
#114: Story Time with Sarah: The Walther League!

The Lutheran Ladies' Lounge from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 60:47


From its earliest beginnings in 1893 till its final meeting in 1968, the Walther League was a major force and rite of passage in Lutheran life. This juggernaut youth organization—named for LCMS founding President C.F.W. Walther—brought young adults together for worship, education, service, recreation and fellowship. It also forged new generations of Lutheran leaders and served as the unofficial “marriage bureau” of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, bringing untold numbers of marriage-minded young people together in holy matrimony. In this edition of Story Time with Sarah, Sarah explores the rise and fall of the Walther League, spotlighting the many people and organizations—Walter A. Maier, the We Raise Foundation, and the National Lutheran Outdoor Ministry Association among them—who trace their roots back to this energetic (if occasionally unorthodox) association of Lutheran young people. To learn more, check out Jon Pahl's book Hopes and Dreams of All: The International Walther League and Lutheran Youth in American Culture, 1893-1993. Connect with the Lutheran Ladies on social media in The Lutheran Ladies' Lounge Facebook discussion group (facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge). Follow us on Instagram @lutheranladieslounge, and also follow Sarah (@hymnnerd), Rachel (@rachbomberger), Erin (@erinaltered), and Bri (@grrrzevske).

WELS - Daily Devotions
Jesus Humbles Himself to Save Us from Destruction – December 3, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 3:15


WELS - Daily Devotions
Jesus Humbles Himself to Redeem – December 2, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 3:04


WELS - Daily Devotions
Jesus Humbles Himself to Meet Our Needs – December 1, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 2:31


You will never need anything more than what you've already been given...

Rev. Dr. Matthew Richard's Podcast
The Way Of Fools: Denying The Reality Of Death And Unprepared For The End

Rev. Dr. Matthew Richard's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 16:21


Date:  November 21st of 2021 Speaker:  Rev. Dr. Matthew Richard Text:  Matthew 25:1-13 Context:  Sermon at St. Paul's Lutheran of Minot, ND Manuscript: CLICK HERE 

Being Lutheran Podcast
Being Lutheran Podcast Episode #228 – 1 Peter 2:13-17

Being Lutheran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:34


In this episode, Adam, Brett, and Jason conclude their examination of Article 16 of the Augsburg Confession & Apology by doing a Bible study on 1 Peter 2:13-17. We are reminded that the purpose of knowing the truth is to advance Christ’s kingdom, not to win an argument over our idealogical foes.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Jesus Humbles Himself to Tears – November 30, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 2:57


Throughout his ministry on earth, Jesus showed his power to control things...

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 14:13


Anthony Fauci is laughing … and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Tuesday, November 23, 2021. Find all our shows at Crosspolitic.com and download the Fight Laugh Feast App at your favorite app store so you don't miss anything. And if you're not yet a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member, let me just encourage you to consider it today. We are seeking to build a Rowdy Christian Network -- news, sports, talk shows, even sitcoms that celebrate the good life and give liberals the proverbial whim-whams. If you'd like to help us do that, join the club. We love our sponsors, but the heartbeat of CrossPolitic is individual members supporting the work. Join today. Fauci & Ted Cruz Spar Play Audio Cruz responded to Fauci's remarks in a series of tweets late on Sunday afternoon, calling Fauci “an unelected technocrat who has distorted science and facts in order to exercise authoritarian control over millions of Americans.” “He lives in a liberal world where his smug ‘I REPRESENT science' attitude is praised,” Cruz said. Cruz then laid out four “facts” related to his call for the DOJ to investigate Fauci: On May 11, Fauci testified before a Senate Committee that “the NIH has not ever and does not now fund gain-of-function research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology.”On October 20, NIH wrote they funded an experiment at the Wuhan lab testing if “spike proteins from naturally occurring bat coronaviruses circulating in China were capable of binding to the human ACE2 receptor in a mouse model.” That is gain of function research.Fauci's statement and the NIH's October 20 letter cannot both be true. The statements are directly contradictory.18 USC 1001 makes it [a] felony, punishable by up to 5 years in prison, to lie to Congress. What does Fauci think of all this? Piers Morgan added his voice to the criticism of Fauci in his column in the Daily Mail: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10254589/PIERS-MORGAN-Faucis-political-point-scoring-shows-hes-interested-promoting-himself.html I've never heard Dr Anthony Fauci's cell phone voicemail greeting, but I imagine it says: 'Yes, I'll come on your show.' For someone whose day job is supposed to be leading America's scientific and medical war against Covid-19, he seems to have an incredible amount of spare time for self-promotional media interviews… The most egregious came on CBS's Face The Nation when Fauci burst out laughing after he was asked about Republican senator Ted Cruz calling for him to be prosecuted over his links to the Wuhan Institute of Virology from where many think the coronavirus outbreak leaked. 'I should be prosecuted?' he chuckled. 'What happened on January 6th, senator?' The interviewer, Margaret Brennan, then asked if he thought he was being used as a scapegoat to deflect attention from President Trump's culpability over the Capitol riots. 'Of course!' Fauci smirked. You have to be asleep not to figure that one out!' 'Well,' pressed Brennan, 'there are a lot of Republican senators taking aim at this.' 'That's okay,' replied Fauci, 'I'm just gonna do my job. I'm gonna be saving lives, and they are gonna be lying.' Brennan then said: 'It seems another level of danger to play politics around matters of life and death.' To which Fauci, without a trace of self-awareness, nodded: 'Exactly. And to me, that's unbelievably bad, because all I want to do is save people's lives.' Right, and the best way to do that is to alienate half the country from listening to you by trading in political point-scoring! It's always a worrying indicator of rampant egomania when a public figure starts talking about themselves in the third person, and sure enough that's what Fauci then did. 'Anybody who's looking at this carefully realizes that there's a distinct anti-science flavor to this,' he said. 'If they get up and criticize science, nobody's going to know what they're talking about. But if they get up and really aim their bullets at Tony Fauci — people could recognize there's a person there, so it's easy to criticize. But they're really criticizing science, because I represent science, and that's dangerous.' Wow. He sounds more like a religious leader berating non-believers than a scientist trying to grapple with a pandemic that has seen more scientific flip-flopping than any global medical crisis in my lifetime. The parallel is apt because the more he's been attacked, the more self-righteous, zealous and preachy Fauci has grown. The problem with Fauci saying he IS the Science is that so often in the pandemic, he's got the science plain wrong. In January 2020, when Covid first erupted in China, Fauci declared the virus was 'not a major threat for the people of the United States and this is not something the citizens of the United States right now should be worried about.' Fauci then said Covid was less concerning than the flu, which again was proven to be total nonsense. In subsequent weeks, Fauci repeatedly said the public shouldn't bother buying masks as they were ineffective. 'If you look at the masks that you buy in a drug store,' he said, 'the leakage around that doesn't really do much to protect you.' He also told 60 Minutes: 'People should not be walking around in masks.' Three months later, he conceded masks do work, and since then has demanded everyone wear them, though his guidance on when and where people should wear them has changed more often than a chameleon having an acid trip. Fauci initially opposed President Trump's China travel ban, then later said it had saved lives. He's also long dismissed the theory that Covid could have leaked from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, insisting it had natural origins. Yet now many top scientists believe the lab leak theory is far more likely. More damagingly for Fauci, it transpired that the Wuhan lab received $600,000 in funding from the NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health and run by Fauci) and emails were revealed showing he was informed early into the pandemic that experts were suspicious of the 'natural origin' theory. Fauci's links to the lab may be even murkier. Republican senators including Ted Cruz and Rand Paul have called for him to be investigated over suggestions that NIH money went towards funding risky 'gain of function' research to modify coronaviruses at the Wuhan lab. Back in May, Fauci testified that the NIH 'has not ever and does not now fund gain of function research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology.' However, he also said during that same hearing that there was no way to know if Chinese scientists working at the lab had lied and conducted gain of function experiments on bat coronaviruses using U.S. tax dollars. 'There's no way of guaranteeing that,' Fauci admitted. Given this response, the gravity of the claims, and the consequences for the whole world, it doesn't seem unreasonable for Fauci to be properly investigated as to exactly what did go down at that Wuhan lab involving US funding. And his furious reaction to any suggestions he's not being entirely transparent about it raises more suspicion than it dampens. Other Fauci pandemic flip-flops include saying he didn't believe in federal vaccine mandates, then recently endorsing some, and telling Americans in October to be wary of gathering for Christmas before performing an immediate U-turn after his comments provoked outrage and telling Americans to have a 'good normal Christmas'. Morgan concludes: And the more he contradicts himself on TV, the more he erodes public trust. If, as he insists, his only interest is in saving lives, then it's time Anthony Fauci put his ego away, stayed off TV and shut the f* up. Werkz: DNB Shan and his team at Werkz specialize in concealed carry holsters for pistols with lights. They believe every defensive pistol should have a light and a holster. They currently offer holsters for 1,274 pistol and light combinations, plus can help outfit your pistol with a light. Use their holster finder at Werkz.com/CrossPolitic and be prepared to defend day and night. EU & Taiwan https://apnews.com/article/europe-china-estonia-taiwan-latvia-de0c6b41ad5a50e9d4089ad9bb2c144d TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Lawmakers from all three Baltic states met with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen on Monday in a sign of further cooperation between European Union nations and Taiwan. It is the first joint visit to Taiwan by members of parliament from Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, Tsai said. She welcomed the lawmakers, who are attending the 2021 Open Parliament Forum, hosted by Taiwan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. China claims Taiwan is its own territory and rejects any attempts by the self-ruled island to participate in international forums or establish diplomatic relations with other countries that would give it international recognition. Tsai noted the values and experiences that Taiwan has in common with the three countries. “Taiwan and the Baltic nations share similar experiences of breaking free of authoritarian rule and fighting for freedom. The democracy we enjoy today was hard earned,” Tsai said. “This is something we all understand most profoundly.” Matas Maldeikis, head of the Lithuanian delegation, said he hopes to see even stronger ties with Taiwan. “We are here to express our solidarity with you. We hope the soon-to-be-open Lithuanian trade office in Taiwan will help to expand the partnership between Taiwan and Lithuania and contribute to a closer relationship with Taiwan and the whole European bloc,” he said. Earlier in November, Taiwan opened a de facto embassy in Lithuania under the name of Taiwanese Representative Office. Lithuania also plans to open a representative office in Taiwan. In response, China reduced its level of diplomatic relations with Lithuania to below ambassador level and also recalled its ambassador. Earlier, China expelled the Lithuanian ambassador from Beijing. Finland Persecuting Christian Pastor https://thefederalist.com/2021/11/23/in-case-with-global-implications-finland-puts-christians-on-trial-for-their-faith/?fbclid=IwAR28pclcdbcX-7Zxa3HzBjsQIL4p6MWPrNi4Pnzyd6CXvfN3XlJ1T8MnxyI Juhana Pohjola This is the man who appears to be the first in the post-Soviet Union West to be brought up on criminal charges for preaching the Christian message as it has been established for thousands of years. Also charged in the case that goes to trial on January 24 is Pohjola's fellow Lutheran and a Finnish member of Parliament, Paivi Rasanen. Rasanen's alleged crimes in a country that claims to guarantee freedom of speech and religion include tweeting a picture of a Bible verse. Potential penalties if they are convicted include fines and up to two years in prison. Rasanen and Pohjola are being charged with “hate speech” for respectively writing and publishing a 24-page 2004 booklet that explains basic Christian theology about sex and marriage, which reserves sex exclusively for within marriage, which can only consist of one man and one woman, for life. The Finnish prosecutor claims centuries-old Christian teachings about sex “incite hatred” and violate legal preferences for government-privileged identity groups. Ghislain Maxwell Trial Beginning https://thehill.com/regulation/court-battles/583301-trial-of-ghislaine-maxwell-alleged-accomplice-of-jeffrey-epstein-set The trial of British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, who is accused of helping her close confidant Jeffrey Epstein recruit and sexually abuse underage girls, is set to begin on Monday, more than two years after the convicted sex offender's sudden death in prison. A jury of 12 individuals and six alternates will be empaneled at the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, where they will hear testimony in what is expected to be a six-week trial, according to The Washington Post. Maxwell, 59, has been charged with six counts for allegedly helping Epstein facilitate a sex trafficking scheme: conspiracy to entice a minor to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, enticing a minor to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, conspiracy to transport a minor with the intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, transporting a minor with the intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, conspiracy to commit sex trafficking of minors and sex trafficking of minors. Maxwell, who has pleaded not guilty to all charges, is facing a maximum of 70 years in prison, according to the Post. This case is of particular interest as many celebrities and politicians have had ties to Epstein and Maxwell over the years, including former presidents Clinton and Trump. Epstein was famously found dead in his jail cell in August 2019. His death was ruled a suicide under very suspicious circumstances, sparking the cultural epitaph “Epstein didn't kill himself.” Psalm of the Day: Psalm 61 by Jamie Soles Play audio: 0:00-1:28 Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. For a limited time, we're offering a Christmas Man Box for new subscribers at the Silver level and above, and if you're already a club member, you can purchase the CrossPolitic Christmas Man Box for just $50 while supplies last. Remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks from Douglas Wilson, Joe Boot, Jeff Durbin, Glenn Sunshine, Nate Wilson, David Bahnsen, Voddie Baucham, Ben Merkle, and many more. Join today and have a great day.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Jesus Humbles Himself to Serve – November 29, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 3:17


Risen Savior Lutheran Church Sermons
In Advent (and in Lutheran Worship) Our Lord Comes to Save Us - Luke 19:28-40

Risen Savior Lutheran Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Sermon Text: Luke 19:28-40 Sermon Theme: In Advent (and in Lutheran Worship) Our Lord Comes to Save Us

Mount Pleasant Lutheran Church
November 28, 2021 “The Red Pickle Dish and Other Signs You May Have Missed” by Pastor Beth Ann L. Stone

Mount Pleasant Lutheran Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 16:02


Text:  Luke 21:25-36 Description: God's kingdom is coming--DOES come at times--and we can see it, if we're watching for clues.

GSLCVA Podcast
GSLCVA Sunday Sermon 28NOV2021

GSLCVA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 19:53


When preparing for an event or journey, it is commonplace to work hard and prepare with extra intensity, hoping that the extra effort will pay dividends. But would you work just as hard if the outcome was already known? Advent is a known journey where we prepare our hearts and minds to welcome the arrival of God on earth. Join us today as Pastor James discusses Advent, the journey to salvation, and the shining radiance of eternal life. 

Redeemer Lutheran - Fairhope, AL
11-28-2021 Weekly Church Service @ Redeemer Lutheran LCMS

Redeemer Lutheran - Fairhope, AL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 14:50


11-28-2021 Weekly Church Service @ Redeemer Lutheran LCMS

WELS - Daily Devotions
Loved by God – November 28, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 2:55


Filled with God's kind of love, we are moved to love others the way he loves us...

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference
The Healing Of Thanksgiving

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 59:58


Rittenhouse trial ends with Not Guilty, Arbery trial ends with Guilty, and a Pastor tells husbands to rape their wives. But since it's Thanksgiving, we'll dig in to the meat of the Gospel. Visit Matthew Pancake's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/matthew.pancake Visit Pastor Gary Held's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/garyheld Visit our Website www.RadicalGraceRadio.com Visit Our Youtube Page Risen Savior's Youtube Channel

WELS - Daily Devotions
He Knows What It is Like – November 27, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 3:01


Leadership and the Environment
534: Mom, part 2: Opportunity and oppression: race and religion in my childhood

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 46:00


I recorded my second conversation with my mom about my childhood and before during the pandemic, in the spring of 2020. Shortly after recording our first conversation, which covered race, George Floyd was murdered. You know the rest. I knew we had spent years as white minorities in India and in a black neighborhood in Philadelphia, at least part time.I was curious to learn more of the time she would have remembered better. In this episode we talk about being redlined, being the victim of race-based violence and objectifying, as well as the access to opportunity to resources for our skin color. Also friends who narrowly escaped Hitler, why my mom converted from Lutheran to Judaism, and bringing classes of her black students from Chicago in the 1960s to where she grew up in South Dakota, where the students declared the Native Americans had it worse.I've never understood the world people describe me coming from. I'm curious to hear the white experience from suburbs, never having lived as a minority, little crime or violence, never mugged, or whatever it's like. I presume it's no easier for them than anyone else, but it's foreign to me. I think if I learned it, I'd understand what people see in me.Anyway, my mom took a long time to agree to post this episode. I'm not sure her reasons, but I think America has so polarized talking about race that non-partisan mainstream people fear the consequences from those who benefit from polarizing from even simply sharing their personal experiences. I hope this episode helps defuse. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Church Basement Podcast - Central Lutheran Church

If you want a lighthearted look at the ELCA, this book is for you...

Issues, Etc.
3331. Worship: What I Wish My Non-Lutheran Family Understood About – Pr. Bryan Wolfmueller, 11/26/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:21


Pastor Bryan Wolfmueller of St. Paul Lutheran, Austin, TX Martin Luther's Sermon for Trinity 19 Pr. Wolfmueller's YouTube Channel And Take They Our Life: Martin Luther's Theology of Martyrdom World-Wide Bible Class And Take They Our Life: Martin Luther's Theology of Martyrdom A Martyr's Faith in a Faithless World

PT Military
Advent prayer answered – November 26, 2021

PT Military

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 6:26


Students at one of our area Lutheran high schools had chosen “Come, Lord Jesus!” as the theme for their chapel services...

WELS - Daily Devotions
He is Coming – November 26, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 3:02


GSLCVA Podcast
GSLCVA Thanksgiving Eve Sermon 24NOV2021

GSLCVA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 21:48


Join us as Pastor Johann discusses living a life full of Thanksgiving. God is our master and we should live a life centered on His kingdom and His righteousness. By seeking what God wants, and letting him take care of us, we have no reason to be anxious, fear the future, or worry as He will provide for us, protect us, and take care of us.

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday: Coaching the Engaged Storyism® Method Way

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 2:26


Hello to you listening in Palma de Mallorca, Spain!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday.Our local Lutheran church supports a reader board on its front lawn with sayings changed weekly. This one caught my eye: “Come as you are. Change inside.” A subtle invitation attuned to sensitivities. You are welcome to join our community just as you are; and while you're with us you might experience a sense of belonging you didn't have before.What does this have to do with storytelling? Storytelling is a profession of sensitivities, not appearances. Storytelling is one of the few professions where sensitivity and intuition are valued. The best storytellers are attuned to the  connection between and among the story, the listener, and the teller. Relationship and engagement bring the story to life.Likewise, my Engaged Storyism® Method of coaching relies on deep listening, sensitivities, intuition, skill, experience, and traditional story methods to help guide professional women who are ready to confidently convey their message, project, vision, or story and be seen, heard, understood, and listened to.Practical Tip: If you have a desire to say what you mean, come as you are and change inside Quarter Moon Story Arts.          LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/diane-f-wyzga-QMSA 60 Seconds is your daily dose of hope, imagination, wisdom, stories, practical tips, and general riffing on this and that. This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsStories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

WELS - Daily Devotions
Give Thanks for an Unchanging God – November 25, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 3:20


So we give thanks today for a God who doesn't change, who always loves, always provides, always forgives...

Composers Datebook
Bach's "wake up" call?

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 2:00


Synopsis As a busy church musician Johann Sebastian Bach wrote around 300 sacred cantatas. That seems a high number to us – but consider that his contemporaries Telemann and Graupner composed well over a thousand cantatas each! In what surviving documents we have, Bach himself rarely uses the Italian term “cantata” to describe these pieces, preferring “concertos” or simply “the music” to describe these works intended for Lutheran church services. It was only in the 19th century, as Bach's music was being collected and catalogued, that the term “cantata” would become the official label for this sizeable chunk of Bach's output. On today's date in 1731, the 27th Sunday after Trinity that year, Bach presented what would become one of his most popular cantatas: “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme”, or “Awake, the Voice calls to us.” In that 19th century catalog of Bach's works, this is his Cantata No. 140. The text is based on a Gospel parable recounting the story of the wise and foolish virgins, who are called, ready or not, to participate in a wedding feast. The opening choral melody may have been already familiar to Bach's performers and congregation, but his dramatic setting of it is downright ingenious. Music Played in Today's Program J.S. Bach (1685 – 1750) — Cantata No. 140 (Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme) (Bach Ensemble; Helmuth Rilling, cond.) Laudate 98.857

Sermons from Zion Lutheran Church
AUDIO: Announcements, Readings, Sermon and Choir - Wednesday November 24, 2021

Sermons from Zion Lutheran Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 17:35


Offerings given at our Thanksgiving Eve services will be donated to the Siberian Lutheran Mission Society as they support Lutheran congregations in this remote part of the world. Please give generously as the Lord leads you!View the Bulletin for Wednesday November 24, 2021Service Time: 2:00 p.m., followed by Bible Study at 2:30 p.m.Service Time:7:00 p.m., followed by Bible Study at 7:30 p.m.All are welcome.UPDATED COVID-19 PROTOCOLS - Starting July 1, 2021Visit our YouTube channel — Click the red “subscribe” box, and then click on the “bell” next to that box to receive Live Streaming notifications. You must be logged into YouTube to activate these features.Old Testament Reading – Deuteronomy 8:1-10 “The whole commandment that I command you today you shall be careful to do, that you may live and multiply, and go in and possess the land that the LORD swore to give to your fathers. And you shall remember the whole way that the LORD your God has led you these forty years in the wilderness, that he might humble you, testing you to know what was in your heart, whether you would keep his commandments or not. And he humbled you and let you hunger and fed you with manna, which you did not know, nor did your fathers know, that he might make you know that man does not live by bread alone, but man lives by every word that comes from the mouth of the LORD. Your clothing did not wear out on you and your foot did not swell these forty years. Know then in your heart that, as a man disciplines his son, the LORD your God disciplines you. So you shall keep the commandments of the LORD your God by walking in his ways and by fearing him. For the LORD your God is bringing you into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and springs, flowing out in the valleys and hills, a land of wheat and barley, of vines and fig trees and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and honey, a land in which you will eat bread without scarcity, in which you will lack nothing, a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills you can dig copper. And you shall eat and be full, and you shall bless the LORD your God for the good land he has given you. Epistle Reading – 1 Timothy 2:1-4 First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. Gospel Reading -- Matthew 4:1-4 Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. And after fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry. And the tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written, “‘Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.'” Adult Choir – Come Ye Thankful People Come (7 pm)

Black Educators Matter
Game Changer

Black Educators Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:10


“Black Educators Matter because we have a gift… stay committed to your gift.” Beverly Glinsey Speech Language Pathologist “You have to have a love for research as an educator, and do the research. That knowledge you pass on to the students.” Beverly Glinsey was born and raised on the south side of Chicago - one of eight girls. Throughout public elementary school she had a mixture of Black and White teachers. However, at her Lutheran high school, she experienced covert racism under the guise of Christianity and there were no Black educators. Combining her creativity and love of acting, she was led to pursue Speech Pathology in college. She worked in the private sector for 10 years but always knew she wanted to be a teacher. She applied as a Speech Assistant, got her Masters and became a Speech Pathologist. “It's hard to describe how that child feels when they can do something they weren't able to do. Their countenance changes. When they see me, they're ready to go. It's a game changer. That's our role. That's what we do and I love it.” For the past 16 years Beverly has helped children with communication delays and disorders. The breakthroughs are her highs, when the students are able to make a sound that they couldn't before. Their self esteem and motivation skyrocket. Many parents are in denial, but for those who do actively participate, their children succeed much faster. Beverly believes the state of Black education is suffering because many Black parents are failing their children, not supporting them and sending them to school ill-equipped from the start. She's hopeful that increasingly parents will invest in and advocate for their children. She urges new speech pathologists to stay committed to their gift, keep improving, have compassion and have fun.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Listen to the King – November 24, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:22


Other Voices
Pastor Eric Reimer — Build relationships and spread love

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:26


Eric Reimer is a pastor who tweets.He is the new pastor at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Altamont. “The word of God …,” said Reimer, “needs to be proclaimed wherever people are. The Lutheran movement itself exists largely because of changes in the way people communicate.”Martin Luther's ideas in the 1500s had been expressed before by other theologians, but Luther was able to print them and distribute them quickly before they could be repressed, said Reimer, leading to the Protestant Reformation.“And then once his ideas were out there, he took advantage of things like using woodcuts to make interesting illustrations to accompany his catechism, so Christian teachings and instructions would hold people's attention,” Reimer said.Luther was also an advocate of translating the scriptures from Latin into languages people spoke and could easily understand.Whether it's on Twitter or Facebook, Reimer said, the church should be where “God's people are.” He went on, “And so whenever there are ways to advocate for peace or to care for one another or to love our neighbor, the church should show up and proclaim that.”In his job as a pastor, Reimer says on this week's Enterprise podcast, “A lot of what I do is creative.” This includes writing sermons and inventing fresh approaches to Bible study. His job also involves relationships, providing spiritual care in homes and hospitals. This has been complicated by COVID-19 restrictions, Reimer said, and some of his congregants he has met only through screens.As a teenager, Reimer worked at a Lutheran summer camp — and continued to work there for seven summers. One of the things that attracted him to Altamont was its proximity to the Adirondacks. He floundered when he first went to college, Reimer said, but was grounded by his desire to return to work at the Lutheran summer camp. “Being there for others … was what I was called to do,” he said.He discerned his call to the ministry at the camp, Reimer said, as he likened being a pastor to being a counselor for life. He described his work as a lifelong cycle of sharing joys and sorrows with a group of people.The outdoor aspects of the camp, like hiking on the Appalachian Trail, he added, reinforced the importance of working together and caused intense bonding.Being there for others, as Reimer put it, sometimes involves people you don't even know. As the Thanksgiving holiday approaches, Reimer closed with a challenge.“It's always appropriate to give thanks,” he said. “And whether you're a Christian or not, I think we can all benefit from the act of actively giving thanks and looking for things to be thankful for.”Reimer challenged podcast listeners “to spend the week looking for different reasons to be thankful … to have gratitude. And I will then challenge you to find new ways to express that gratitude to others. And to help build relationships and spread love.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Issues, Etc.
3304. A Lutheran View of Transgenderism – Pr. Hans Fiene, 11/23/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 41:48


Pr. Hans Fiene of Lutheran Satire A Lutheran View of Transgenderism Lutheran Satire

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Advent and Christmas at Peace Lutheran St. Louis

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:35


Burnell Hackman, Director of Music Ministry at Peace Lutheran Church in St. Louis, Missouri, which is KFUO Radio's Church of the Week, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about the many music opportunities at Peace during Advent and Christmas, the traditions like the Christmas Tree Lot that are happening this year, and the support that the community at Peace gives to all of these great opportunities. Learn more about concerts, worship services, and the tree lot at PeaceLutheranSTL.org.

Being Lutheran Podcast
Being Lutheran Podcast Episode #227 – 1 Samuel 8:1-9

Being Lutheran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:10


In this episode, Adam, Brett, and Jason continue their examination of Article 16 of the Augsburg Confession and Apology by doing a Bible study on 1 Sam. 8:1-9.

Playmaker's Corner
Playmaker's Corner Episode 85: Week 13 Recap and 1A/2A Championship Picks

Playmaker's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 148:15


Kodey, Mazen, and Simon work together to get you the recap you deserve as the Colorado football season inches closer and closer to an end with so many tantalizingly close games and great matchups staring us down this weekend including state championships on the 1A and 2A level! Time Stamps: 0:00-0:00:22 Intro 0:00:22-3:30 Cherry Creek vs. Regis Jesuit 3:31-6:27 Valor Christian vs. Columbine 6:28-11:57 A Valor Record Falls and a Legacy is Remembered 11:58-24:39 Grandview vs. Ralston Valley 24:40-39:55 Legend vs. Arapahoe 39:56-42:56 Valor vs. Grandview Picks 42:57-45:15 Cherry Creek vs. Legend 45:25-47:08 Montrose vs. Fountain Fort-Carson 47:09-51:34 Dakota Ridge vs. Chatfield 51:35-1:03:25 Pine Creek vs. Loveland 1:03:26-1:15:02 Palmer Ridge vs. Erie 1:15:03-1:16:33 Montrose vs. Erie Picks 1:16:34-1:18:43 Chatfield vs. Pine Creek Picks 1:18:54-1:22:49 Mead vs. Durango 1:22:50-1:25:47 Fort Morgan vs. Fredrick 1:25:48-1:28:37 Roosevelt vs. Holy Family 1:28:38-1:29:53 Lutheran vs. Palisade 1:29:54-1:31:39 Lutheran vs. Fort Morgan Picks 1:31:40-1:33:47 Roosevelt vs Mead Picks 1:34:00-1:58:10 Eaton vs. University 1:58:11-2:00:48 Brush vs. Severance 2:00:49-2:03:35 2A Championship Predictions 2:03:45-2:13:12 Limon vs. Wray 2:13:13-2:18:33 Centauri vs. Buena Vista 2:18:34-2:23:55 1A Championship Preview and Predictions 2:23:56-2:27:57 Playmakers of the Week and Outro https://linktr.ee/PlaymakersCorner Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlaymakerCorner Tik Tok: Playmakers Corner Instagram: https:https://www.instagram.com/playmakerscorner/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PlaymakerCorner Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUEcv0BIfXT78kNEtk1pbxQ/featured Listen to us on: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4rkM8hKtf8eqDPy2xqOPqr Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cycle-365/id1484493484?uo=4 Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-cycle-365 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9mODg4MWYwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz

Becker’s Healthcare - Clinical Leadership Podcast
James Keller, Chief Medical Officer at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare - Clinical Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:10


This episode features James Keller, Chief Medical Officer at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital. Here, he discusses how to deal with compassion fatigue, technological advancements that he is excited about, and more.

The Order of Knight George
Lutheran Hymnal: 113 - Crown Him with Many Crowns

The Order of Knight George

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 3:59


1 Crown Him with many crowns, The Lamb upon His throne; Hark! How the heavenly anthem drowns All music but its own; Awake, my soul, and sing Of Him who died for thee, And hail Him as thy matchless King Through all eternity. 2 Crown Him the Son of God Before the world began; And ye, who tread where He hath trod, Crown Him the Son of man, Who every grief hath known that wrings the human breast, And takes and bears them for His own, That all in Him may rest. 3 Crown Him, the Lord of love; Behold His hands and side, Those wounds yet visible above In beauty glorified: All hail, Redeemer, Hail! For Thou hast died for me; Thy praise shall never, never fail Throughout eternity. 4 Crown Him the Lord of life, Who triumphed o'er the grave, And rose victorious in the strife For those He came to save: His glories now we sing Who died and rose on high, Who died eternal life to bring, And lives that death may die. 5 Crown Him the Lord of heaven, Enthroned in worlds above; Crown Him the King to whom is given The wondrous name of Love: Crown Him with many crowns As thrones before Him fall; Crown Him, ye kings, with many crowns, For He is King of all.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Not of This World – November 23, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 2:59


Every four years, American citizens get to elect a President who will lead the country...

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

WELS - Daily Devotions
King Jesus Lives – November 22, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 3:10


Divine Savior Church-Sienna Plantation
We Strive to Be More Like Jesus | Get Used to Different

Divine Savior Church-Sienna Plantation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:24


The Roman world was full of many temptations just like ours is today. Casual sex was a way of life for many. Finding a Christian spouse was difficult. Being lazy and freeloading off of others was commonplace. It wasn't easy to live a sanctified life pleasing to the Lord. But that didn't stop the Thessalonians from trying. More and more with God's help they learned what God's will is and through the power of the Holy Spirit living in them they found the strength to strive after holiness. With God's help we too strive to be more like Jesus in all that we do even when this sometimes looks so different from the rest of the world. But we know the Lord who calls us is faithful, and he will do it (1 Thess. 5:24).Support the show (https://pushpay.com/pay/divinesaviorchurchsienna/)

Pastors4Pastors
The Prodigal Children in Our Churches

Pastors4Pastors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 45:13


The conversation you are about to hear is one of the most important we have had on this podcast because it is about one of the most prevalent and difficult issues folks face in every one of our congregations, but also one of the most ignored by our congregations. I'm talking about addiction. Dr. Ed Treat is a Lutheran pastor and the director of the Center of Addiction and Faith. You're going to hear the moving story of his journey from addiction to recovery and one of the saddest parts of his story is how little support he received from the churches, pastors, and even seminary he attended. Ed has some very convicting words about the lack of understanding and pastoral care most pastors and churches exhibit toward those struggling with addiction - including the families of addicts. But, he also has some words of hope about how we can begin to include these hurting people in our circles of care and prayer.

Concordia Sermons
Grumbling to Gratitude (Week 2)

Concordia Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:30


Contentment is great! Gratitude is even better, for gratitude is not only happy with what it has – as nine of the lepers healed by Jesus were – but actively thankful for what it has. In this way, gratitude blesses others because gratitude is an expression of contentment and fulfillment.

WELS - Daily Devotions
Prayers of Intensity – November 21, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 3:15


WELS - Daily Devotions
Victory – November 20, 2021

WELS - Daily Devotions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 2:44


We may have felt like losers that day. The reality was we were huge winners...

Issues, Etc.
3262. How Lutheran Preaching Changed in the 20th Century – Dr. Adam Koontz, 11/19/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 40:00


Dr. Adam Koontz of Concordia Theological Seminary Fort Wayne, IN Concordia Theological Seminary Fort Wayne, IN

John Solomon Reports
Congressman says security exemptions for illegal aliens, creating situation ‘worse since 9/11'

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:51


Congressman Lance Gooden (R-TX) discusses his recent unearthing of documents that show that Lutheran, Catholic, and Jewish Charities by way of ‘corporate and Federal sponsors' are trafficking illegal migrants from the Southern border to interior states in the US. The Congressman commented that he is working on legislation now to to outlaw ‘corporate, Federal sponsors' from receiving tax breaks for trafficking of illegals by way of NGO donations. He comments that the border ‘is a disaster', and ‘the fact that someone could actually get a tax break for helping someone who has broken the law by entering our nation' is ‘stunning'. Gooden goes on to say, a message needs to be sent ‘to these charities that if they're going to engage in illegal actions, then they no longer need to be in the business of providing charity.'See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.