Podcasts about san diego county

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  • 447PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about san diego county

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Latest podcast episodes about san diego county

Today in San Diego
1,200 People Hospitalized with COVID, Federal Testing Plan, Free National Parks

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 4:57


More than 1,000 People Hospitalized with COVID in San Diego County, Honoring Martin Luther King Jr., Olympic Countdown, Sheena's Monday Morning Forecast See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Today in San Diego
Record COVID Infections for San Diego County, Man Shot and Killed by SDPD, Gov. Newsom's New Budget

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 4:55


"Spreading Like Wildfire" COVID Cases Hit Record Highs Across San Diego, Governor Newsom Rolls Out Plan to Pay for Health Care for Immigrants, Sheena Says Expect a Windy Day See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Calm the Chaos
Ep.101 Rachel Arbuckle, 2000 Paces Photo Organizing

Calm the Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 34:36


Rachel Arbuckle is a Navy Veteran, wife, mom, and founder of 2000 Paces Photo Organizing. After a series of fires forced her family to evacuate and leave behind photo memories that were scattered throughout their home, Rachel was motivated to help others spend less time worrying about organizing and protecting their memories and more time making them. In 2014, a series of fierce fires roared through San Diego County, the largest of which started on the mountain just behind Rachel's home. She had only minutes to grab a few items. Her instinct was to gather all of our photos, but she panicked when she realized her precious memories were all over the home in boxes, picture frames, and albums. She ended up grabbing what she could as her family headed to safety. After many days of worry, she was able to return home to the memories we had to leave behind. Thankfully, her home was spared, but others in our community were not as fortunate. This experience not only solidified her commitment to protecting her family's collection of photos but prompted her to found 2000 Paces Photo Organizing, encouraging people to organize and protect important memories. After the fire, Rachel came back home and followed through on her commitment to getting her family's photo memories organized and then ultimately left corporate America to start her own business. This was an unexpected turn of events and for her at some point was terrifying.  She continued to focus on what she could accomplish for other people!  What are their needs, what solutions do we need to make sure that we care about servicing them the way they need to be.  Then one day after a lot of hard work, she realized that she was creating a successful business!  It was from there that her business began to develop and she needed to learn more about the managing of the business.     We dive into the process of what to do with all these photos that are either in albums or boxes!  Rachel recommends starting by putting everything in one place and taking an inventory of what you have on hand.  Pull everything out of every nook and cranny!  She reminds us that it took years to create all these memories and they are not going to get organized overnight! Take a look and weed out the duplicates and then the photos where you don't know who the people are in the photo! Then ask yourself, What are your goals with your photos? What do I want to accomplish? Rachel shares with us the unique approach her team takes with every client to ensure that your photos are handled with care and they are meeting your goals.  How they may organize your photos may be different from how mine would be organized.  There is a consult and interview process to make sure that you are creating a relationship with the person who will be handling your job.   We discuss some stories about work she has done for other clients over the years and share that a lot of her clients will say, “I wish I had asked my mom about these pictures sooner”  We always think there is more time.  More time to ask, more time to organize, and more time to share.   Rachel gives us permission to throw out those photos where we don't remember who the people are or the event was not significant to us.  ( That's why it's so important to ask questions now while those that are still with us can share about those memories )  All of Rachel's employees are trained through a specific process and handle a mock project prior to taking on a  client.   When you go to engage with them you are assigned a photo manager so there is one person who is rocking on your project through the entire process.   I ask Rachel how leaving corporate America and forming this business has changed her life!  She says it's hard to remember what her life was like before she started her company.   It's something she and her team have created and that she is proud of their accomplishments! For her, it's exciting to be a business owner but at the same time, there is a huge responsibility as people are counting on you. Not only the employees but their families.   Rachel loves mentoring and providing feedback to her team. At some point, we all need to work so why not be working at something we love? She is now working harder than she did in her corporate job but it's something she is passionate about and she is having fun while making an impact!  Resources and Links Connect with Rachel Arbuckle  Connect with Deborah Voll Take The Midlife Quiz Passion and Purpose Digital Workbook Book Your Spot for the Free 60 minute Clarity Session here 

Today in San Diego
CA National Guard to Support COVID-19 Testing, Warnings Against Fake Testing Sites, Weather in SD

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 5:31


On the "Today in San Diego" Podcast, Governor Gavin Newsom announced Friday that he will activate the California National Guard to help local communities amid the COVID-19 surge. With demand for COVID-19 testing skyrocketing, San Diego County health officials are advising people to be aware of potential fake pop-up sites offering free testing. And After a cloudy end to the week, the weekend is also starting off with cooler conditions and partly cloudy skies.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KPBS Midday Edition
San Diego County reports 3,653 COVID cases, most since Jan. 7

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 45:47


Cases of COVID-19 are once again on the rise in San Diego County. On Tuesday, the county reported more than 3,600 new cases, the highest number of new cases in a single day since last winter. Plus, a new energy storage project is rolling out across the county, with the first two sites scheduled to break ground within the next month. Then, earlier this year KPBS met a group of women living at a retirement home in Escondido, who are lightening the pain associated with mastectomy one loving stitch at a time. In July, KPBS reporter John Carroll took us to an animal sanctuary in San Diego County that is trying to bring awareness to the illegal, multi-billion dollar trade in exotic animals. And in current events, Starla Lewis, a professor of Black Studies at Mesa College and SDSU, talks about the meaning of Kwanzaa and its origin. Lastly, KPBS looks back at an interview with Charles McPherson, one of jazz's most prolific saxophonists.

KPBS Midday Edition
More rain heading to San Diego area, but clearing expected by weekend

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 45:10


It's been a rainy week in a rainy December, and tonight another storm is expected to arrive in San Diego County, bringing even more precipitation. Plus, a new investigation by the New York Times took a closer look at the growing network of paid experts, doctors and researchers used to defend police departments when a person dies in police custody. Also, state and local water agencies are moving forward with a massive ground water rescue plan. Then, experts say more parents are reporting declining mental and physical health since the start of the pandemic. Throughout the year, we profile San Diegans making a difference. We revisit a piece about a high school student who is a member of the San Diego Unified School Board. And a piece on a Poway man who relocates rattlesnakes. Lastly, a new book of essays by local writers, "Reclaiming Our Stories in the Time of COVID and Uprising," chronicles how San Diegans' lives have changed due to the pandemic and increased calls for racial justice.

It's Your Life Podcast
Discussing Year End Charitable Giving with Paul Downey and Kimberly Jenks of Serving Seniors

It's Your Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 49:54


Introducing CEO Paul Downey and Philanthropy Director Kimberly Jenks from the non-profit organization Serving Seniors Discuss Paul's article on year-end charitable giving. Learn how the public can research and make informative decisions about the non-profit they donate to year-end Paul Downey is the President and CEO of Serving Seniors. Since being appointed to the role in 1995, Downey has guided the agency's innovative efforts to provide supportive services focused on keeping low-income seniors healthy and independent. Under Downey's leadership, Serving Seniors has grown to serve over 1.7 million nutritious congregate and home delivered meals annually, 365 days per year, across multiple sites in San Diego County. The agency's service provision model – including case management, healthcare, mental healthcare, dental (through collaborative partner), activities and civic engagement -- is a national model for seniors living in poverty. Serving Seniors has provided transitional housing and wraparound case management for unsheltered older adults for more than 20 years and owns/operates 412 units of affordable senior housing with support services. A new 117-unit senior complex is under construction in City Heights and a 174-unit complex in Clairemont will break ground in 2022. Kimberly provides management and oversight of Serving Seniors philanthropic efforts including annual giving, special events, public relations and marketing and communications. She also serves on the organization's COVID-19 emergency taskforce.   More information:   https://servingseniors.org/ Brought to you by J.C. Cooley Foundation "Equipping the Youth of Today for the Challenges of Tomorrow". Support the show: http://www.cooleyfoundation.org/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KPBS Midday Edition
San Diego County sees increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 45:57


COVID-19 cases are once again on the rise in San Diego County, as are hospitalizations. Plus, this past weekend was still one of the busiest for flight travel, but it was met with trip cancellations as the coronavirus spread among flight crews. And, we revisit reporting by KPBS that showed that CalFresh regularly pushes out people who are still eligible for the extra money to help them buy food. Then, the director of UCLA's Bedari Kindness Institute speaks about kindness and the impulse to be kind. Later, former North County Times journalist Brian Gushue discusses his new book about achieving his goal of attending 500 NFL games across the country. Also, KPBS arts reporter Beth Accomando spoke with Chad Patton, managing director of Material Things, which created the “NUNO: The Language of Textiles” exhibit at the Japanese Friendship Garden's Inamori Pavilion.

KPBS Midday Edition
San Diego gains new majority Latino congressional district

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 44:42


New congressional districts map approved by the Citizens Redistricting Commission made a big change to San Diego County — a majority Latino district, one of 16 in California. Plus, Pfizer is considering increasing the doses for its children COVID-19 vaccine to three after a two-dose trial shows disappointing results. And, a closer look at renting in the San Diego area and the growing housing rights movement in the wake of the pandemic. Finally, a preview of Mystery Science Theater 3000's Live Time Bubble Tour coming to the Balboa Theatre.

Tacos and Tech Podcast
Bringing Empathy to Healthcare with PatientPartner

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 27:27


Listen on Apple, Google, Spotify, and other platforms.  Many patients go through stressful medical experiences due to a lack of support or understanding of their procedure and treatment, experts say. George Kramb and Patrick Frank saw this issue and created PatientPartner, a community platform for new and prospective patients to come and engage with past patient mentors for support and empathy. The co-founders built a network of doctors and patients to share their experience and expertise with those who need it. George and Patrick were both born and raised in San Diego County. George started his career in medical device sales, working in operating rooms and helping surgeons properly use the products. During that time, he would listen to patients and doctors, learning about their experience and what brought them to the hospital. He noticed a gap in the patient-doctor relationship, where many patients were in need of resources and support throughout the surgical process that doctors couldn't provide. He began connecting pre-op patients with post-op patients and saw the potential in creating a network of relatability and support. He then contacted Patrick who was involved in consumer technology and scaling out platforms and bringing them to the market. Together, they built up PatientPartner and brought value to the healthcare industry by focusing on patients.  PatientPartner went through multiple changes, helping them realize that the best solution is to connect patients to individuals who went through similar treatments and knew the experience firsthand. Empowering patients with resources improves their medical experience, helping them and other patients in the long run as well, they discovered. Listen to Neal chat with George and Patrick about the company's impact on the healthcare industry and their goals for the future.  Their favorite local tacos: George: Ramiro's Taco Shop in Pacific Beach The Taco Stand in La Jolla Patrick: Maritza's Mexican Food Restaurant in Clairemont    Connect with them: George Kramb Patrick Frank Learn more about PatientPartner: Website: https://www.patientpartner.com/  Facebook: @PatientPartner1 Twitter: @patientpartner1 Instagram: @patient_partner LinkedIn  Thanks to our partners at Cox Business & Cox Edge for their support in enabling us to grow the San Diego ecosystem.

San Diego News Fix
Here's how San Diego County's voting districts changed

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 9:59


San Diego County has approved new voting districts. The districts are redrawn every 10 years after the census is taken, with the goal of improving representation for residents. Reporter Deborah Sullivan Brennan has more.

San Marcos Chamber Podcast
Jim Desmond, San Diego County Board of Supervisors, District 5

San Marcos Chamber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 20:58


Mentioned in Episode:Supervisor Jim DesmondSan Diego County Board of Supervisors If you enjoyed this episode, would you consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds and helps to make a difference in getting important news out to our community. ADVERTISE WITH USInterested in advertising your business on the podcast? Email Rick at rick@sanmarcoschamber.com. GET THE LATEST NEWSSign up for the San Marcos Chamber's Business newsletterDiscover the benefits of membership with the Chamber: sanmarcoschamber.com CONNECT WITH USInstagram: instagram.com/SanMarcosChamberFacebook: facebook.com/sanmarcoschamberYouTube: youtube.com/sanmarcoschamberTwitter: twitter.com/SMChamberCALinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/san-marcos-chamber-of-commerce 

KPBS Midday Edition
San Diego finalizes new city council, county supervisor districts

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 46:15


The San Diego area has new maps that determine who gets to run for which seat in government and which neighborhoods are grouped together. We'll fill you in on the political implications of the new maps. Plus, the Alcohol Policy Panel of San Diego County is hosting its annual meeting Friday, to discuss the impacts of alcohol outlet density in San Diego. Also, California public schools will soon offer free transitional kindergarten for all four-year-olds, which will be a big help to working parents, but it may have unintended consequences for childcare providers. And, residents of Barrio Logan are hoping that a newly minted community plan will help address long standing issues that have plagued the area for decades. Then, actor Tom Steward turns his SD Fringe one-man show of all James Bond films into a musical for Coronado Playhouse this weekend.

DR J’S
Evictions in a Pandemic, Part 1: As Protections End, Who Stays Housed

DR J’S

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 24:27


The pandemic inspired a slate of local, state and national eviction bans, and other protections for homeowners and renters to keep people housed. But those protections are going away, leaving renters especially vulnerable to eviction as the San Diego rental market heats up. In Part 1 of a 2 part series, KPBS Race and Equity reporter Cristina Kim looks at the efforts to keep people housed here in San Diego County. We talk about what worked, and who fell through the cracks, and what's next for the region's renters and landlords as housing becomes increasingly more expensive and protections evaporate. We also learn about the toll that the threat of evictions places on families and children.

San Diego News Fix
California's mask mandate starts Wednesday. Here's what you need to know.

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 7:07


Masks haven't been required in San Diego County for some time now. As California's statewide mask mandate begins on Wednesday, that will change.

Tacos and Tech Podcast
Finding Meaningful Life in Action with the City of Carlsbad and RoleCall

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 40:13


Listen on Apple, Google, Spotify, and other platforms.  An estimated 56% of Americans plan to move by the end of 2021, showing how many people are interested in remote work opportunities and/or finding communities they would want to live in, according to The Neighbor 2020 – 2021 American Migration Report. Carlsbad is a city actively attracting strong talent to lead its industries and technological developments, boasting its beautiful beaches and connected community. Local leaders from all over San Diego County are actively coming together to work toward city innovation and talent development. In this week's podcast, David Graham, Chief Innovation Officer at City of Carlsbad, Matt Sanford, Economic Development Manager at City of Carlsbad, and Tim Carty and Winona Dimeo-Ediger, co-founders of RoleCall, share how they've built a pipeline of talent for the Carlsbad business community. The City of Carlsbad has developed its own homegrown talent attraction campaign, Life in Action, to share how people can manage a meaningful career and great quality of life in the city. They emphasize the importance of work-life balance, and how the city's ecosystem is growing in the business landscape with industry disruptors to ambitious startups, showing a diverse community. RoleCall, a talent attraction agency and consultancy, works with cities like Carlsbad to help attract talent to their city through their customized programs and marketing strategies. A recent trend being observed is people choosing where they want to work first, and then selecting from companies in that area as viable options.  A common factor among these leaders is that they all recognized that local government can have a massive impact in one's immediate community. David enjoys the manifestation of his work that he can see as he drives down the street, and states that talent powers the future. Matt believes that providing economic strategies can help cities successfully attract talent. Tim is passionate about bringing smart and likeminded talent to help the community, and Winona recognizes the importance of people choosing to work at a place they like, and how cities can cater towards that. Listen to this latest podcast to hear from leaders from the City of Carlsbad and RoleCall to learn how they are committing themselves to a purposeful life and meaningful work in Carlsbad.  Their favorite local tacos: David: Tacos La Glorieta in TJ, Lola 55 in San Diego Matt: Oscars Mexican Seafood in La Jolla Tim: La Regia Taqueria in Iowa City Winona: Tacos Y Mariscos El Amigo in Nashville   Connect with them: David Graham Matt Sanford Tim Carty Winona Dimeo-Ediger   Learn more about Life in Action and RoleCall: Life in Action Website: https://carlsbadlifeinaction.com/  Facebook: @Carlsbadbiz  Twitter: @Carlsbadbiz Instagram: @carlsbadbiz LinkedIn   RoleCall Website: https://www.rolecall.pro/  LinkedIn Thanks to our partners at Cox Business & Cox Edge for their support in enabling us to grow the San Diego ecosystem.

KPBS Midday Edition
Storm headed to San Diego County

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 45:03


San Diego is preparing for a major storm to hit the region late Monday, bringing with it much needed rain and snow, but also high winds and possibly lightning. Plus, SANDAG recently approved a $160 billion regional transportation plan, but it still faces hurdles as voters will need to approve sales tax increases to fund some of the projects. Also, California regulators could dramatically change the state's biggest-in-the nation solar marketplace next year. And in an excerpt of the Port of Entry podcast, meet Mexican artist Michelle Guerrero. The artist's career is taking off, but, like a lot of artists, Guerrero had to go through a lot to get to where she is today. Finally, the Oceanside Museum of Art opens its fifth Artist Alliance Biennial this Saturday. The juried exhibit was conceived to elevate the voices of Southern California artists and celebrate the best work from the museum's Artist Alliance.

The SDLP Podcast
Math, SANDAG, and Reality

The SDLP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 46:54


New law could affect San Diego street vendors (msn.com) San Diego's regional bike-lane expansion again faces delays, cost overruns - The San Diego Union-Tribune (sandiegouniontribune.com) Opinion: SANDAG has fooled San Diego County too many times. Enough is enough. (msn.com) California's proposed woke math curriculum alarms mathematicians, scientists | Fox News Detached from reality: AOC thinks rising theft rates in San Francisco are a myth (washingtonexaminer.com)

San Diego News Fix
Two Omicron cases detected in San Diego County

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 11:17


Two cases of coronavirus caused by the Omicron variant have been detected in San Diego County. Reporter Jonathan Wosen discusses the cases and what we know of the variant so far.

San Diego News Matters
Costly transportation plan

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 24:28


San Diego's regional planning agency has drafted a regional transportation plan for the future that seeks to shift San Diego County away from cars by building massive improvements to public transit infrastructure. But critics say the plan is unrealistic and too expensive. Meanwhile, advocates say Chula Vista is now one of the most surveilled cities in the country. Plus, the U.S. surgeon general warns about a looming mental health crisis among children.

KPBS Midday Edition
Health officials continue to monitor omicron variant

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 45:04


As health officials continue to learn more about omicron's emergence, how it will affect the course of the pandemic remains to be seen. Plus, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy issued a health advisory on children's mental health to highlight an increased rate of depression and anxiety being diagnosed in children, mainly stemming from pandemic stress. Also, a look at the rise in catalytic converters thefts in San Diego County. And, holiday shoppers have a unique opportunity this weekend to page through new and used books at the North Park Book Fair Holiday Edition. Finally, five songs to listen to for December.

San Diego News Matters
A rise in catalytic converter thefts

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 17:30


Thousands of catalytic converters have been reported stolen in San Diego County in the past year. Meanwhile, Barrio Logan, the heart of San Diego's Chicano and Latino community, could soon adopt and implement a new community plan. It would be the first update to the community's growth and development plan in 43 years. Plus, the National Guard are being asked to do many, many different things from responding to protests to driving school buses, and critics say it's putting a strain on the guard.

KPBS Midday Edition
Surprise shakeup in San Diego City Council leadership

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 46:04


Yesterday, San Diego City Council unexpectedly ousted Councilmember Jennifer Campbell as president and elected Councilmember Sean Elo-Rivera as her replacement. Plus, the city of San Diego is once again gauging whether the old Central Library could be repurposed as a homeless shelter. Also, fentanyl overdoses have more than quadrupled in San Diego County since 2018, highlighting the challenge public health officials face. And, the pandemic has been particularly hard on renters and a growing number of California cities are moving to ban landlords from using aggressive practices to push tenants out. Finally, at 67 years old, Godzilla is not ready to retire, if former San Diegan Chris Mowry has anything to say about it.

Freeman's Construction Inc
EP 60: Building Cost and Lumber Pricing Update for Custom Homes and ADUs

Freeman's Construction Inc

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:10


Today we cover what the current costs are for building custom homes and ADU's as well as lumber prices in San Diego County. -- Resources: How to Buy Land Guide | https://www.tfgonline.com/how-to-buy-land-guide-san-diego-county/ Custom Home Building Cost Guide | https://tfgonline.com/custom-home-bui… Custom Home Floor Plans | https://tfgonline.com/popular-custom-... ADU Building Cost Guide | https://www.tfgonline.com/accessory-dwelling-unit-adu-building-costs-guide-san-diego-county-ca/ ADU Floor Plans | https://www.tfgonline.com/accessory-dwelling-unit-floor-plans/ Home Remodeling Cost Guide | https://www.tfgonline.com/san-diego-ca-home-remodeling-cost-guide/

KPBS Midday Edition
Supreme Court hears challenge to Mississippi's abortion ban

KPBS Midday Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 44:15


Mississippi state law banning abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy is the biggest threat to legal abortion in decades, many legal experts say. Could the case have implications here in California? Plus, a review of death certificates in San Diego County show the wide disparities in who died from COVID-19 in the first year of the pandemic. Also, when police officers shoot a suspect, those officers are often questioned more leniently than the people they shoot, a KPBS investigation found. Meanwhile, a San Diego case is the first to test a state law banning discrimination of hairstyles associated with race in the workplace. And, some insults, disputed statistics and bad feelings have surrounded a redistricting controversy in Torrey Hills and Mira Mesa. Finally, from the archive, elephants have a multi step greeting ritual. What can we take away from knowing about animal rituals like this one?

San Diego News Matters
Shooting at moving targets

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 20:33


An examination of local police records shows that from 2012 through 2019, officers from San Diego County police agencies shot at people in moving cars 20 times. That's despite the fact that police training experts say it is one of the most hazardous things a cop can do. Meanwhile, the injunction against vaccine mandates for the San Diego Unified School District will be short lived, according to legal experts. Plus, during the pandemic many universities stopped requiring standardized test scores for admissions and then racial and ethnic diversity increased on campus.

Freeman's Construction Inc
EP 59: Can You Get a Septic Permit Before a Building Permit in San Diego County

Freeman's Construction Inc

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 4:47


Today we talk about if the County of San Diego will issue a septic permit before you have a building permit. We also cover the steps you need to take to get a septic permit.

Captain&Morgan
The Murder of Donna Gentile

Captain&Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 69:21


On June 23, 1985, a body was discovered off of Sunrise Highway 30 in Mt. Laguna, California, along the eastern edge of the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County. The female victim was found nude, beaten and strangled. How she ended up discarded on the side of the road is a mystery, but the story leading up to her untimely death is one that was heavily entangled in police corruption. Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/crimepedia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

San Diego News Matters
San Diego's racial covenants

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:46


Buried in the deeds of homes and subdivisions across San Diego County are racially restrictive covenants that serve as stark reminders of the region's racist past. Meanwhile, parents are suing the California Department of Education to allow distance learning to support their medically fragile children. Plus, Broadway San Diego returned to live performances last night with a production of Hairspray.

Labor History
The Fire Last Time: Accounts of the San Diego County Strike of 1994

Labor History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:18


Leslie Masland (vice article: https://www.vice.com/en/article/g5gzz4/our-future-is-not-for-sale-america-is-witnessing-the-biggest-strike-wave-in-a-generation) Alex Wells on the environment leading up to and surrounding the strike. Luz Villafana, San Diego County Employee during the strike(narrated) Dee Myers, San Diego County Employee during the strike Linda Correa, San Diego County Employee during the strike This session of Labor History Talks was recorded on October 19, 2021.

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

los angeles japanese russian bay university long beach chinese california american project mexico natural surfing north world war ii state utah congress money nasa energy california department professor pacific dc meaning democratic alaska federal washington presidential gulf oil act birds places gas school southern california san francisco bay new mexico carlsbad fish deepwater horizon police journal beach businesses miami wyoming donations interior airbnb safety americas san diego fishing us open patch american history currents cambria eis orange county commission crude wall street journal north dakota apache amplify joe biden investigations beta holley bureau tom fowler hogan importantly heal cunningham coast guard santa barbara dolphin midway hwy barrels san clemente infrastructure tot protecting maintain san diego county california state senate summerland deep water rio grande emeritus music alley treaty sarahs oceanside regulations marine science busan alessi offshore refugio aro surfboards fisheries subcommittee michael h encinitas colorado river huntington beach newport beach laguna beach pacific ocean queen mary david l maryland center vhf wahoo aros santa barbara channel captain dave del mar seal beach cosco keystone pipeline ocean health executive orders ocs gao oversight veterinary medicine decommissioning elkind cancellations mileage offshore oil bsee dana point endangered species act oil drilling wing lam congressional dish international energy agency mineral resources boem ocean energy management offshore drilling government accountability office kern county business alliance newport harbor noble energy government oversight cover art design biological diversity heritage site best technology david ippolito crestview
John Riley Project
Poway School Board Death Threats, JRP0259

John Riley Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 99:11


Death threats directed at Poway Unified School Board trustees. Protesters showing up at school board members' private homes with a manifesto filled with demands. What in the heck is going on here? We break down this whole story and then explore the nationwide heated rhetoric at school board meetings, the VA gubernatorial election, and school choice. Then we have a wonderful time discussing San Diego State Aztec punter Matt Araiza. Matt is a graduate of Rancho Bernardo high school and has become a national sensation for his incredible bionic leg breaking NCAA punting records. We discuss his backstory and his own pursuit of happiness. We also break down the season opening wins for UCSD and SDSU basketball. I share my own joy as a UCSD graduate finally experiencing my school having success at the Division 1 level. Then we discuss a range of San Diego news topics including housing development in Rancho Penasquitos along the I-15 freeway, the Aztec football stadium, and the record setting prices of homes in 3 zip codes in San Diego County. We also go down the rabbit hole discussing redistricting in the City of Poway and Poway Unified School District as we prepare for the 2022 election cycle. #PowaySchools #PUSD #MattAraiza #UCSD #SDSU Get proven and easy-to-implement strategies to build your business and pursue your happiness. Sign up now. It's FREE! https://johnrileyproject.com/ Be sure to share this video with a friend! ☆☆    STAY CONNECTED    ☆☆ SUBSCRIBE for more reactions, upcoming shows and more! ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJJSzeIW2A-AeT7gwonglMA FACEBOOK ➡ https://www.facebook.com/johnrileyproject/ TWITTER ➡ https://twitter.com/JohnRileyPoway INSTAGRAM ➡  https://www.instagram.com/johnrileypoway/ Sponsorship Inquiries https://johnrileyproject.com/sponsorship/ Music https://www.purple-planet.com Referenced Links: Poway Unified to keep next board meeting virtual after reports that trustees received death threats https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/education/story/2021-11-10/poway-unified-decides-to-keep-board-meetings-virtual-after-trustees-receive-death-threats Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Son Pleads Guilty to Stabbing Orange County Neighbor Over Dispute About Trash Cans https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2021/11/09/kareem-abdul-jabbar-son-pleads-guilty-to-stabbing-orange-county-neighbor-over-dispute-about-trash-cans/ Why college football's must-see attraction is a punter from San Diego State https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/32591242/why-college-football-see-attraction-punter-san-diego-state   San Diego Boasts 3 of the 100 Most Expensive Residential Zip Codes in the United States https://timesofsandiego.com/business/2021/11/09/san-diego-boasts-3-of-the-100-most-expensive-residential-zip-codes-in-the-united-states/

Homeless in San Diego
Beverly's Story

Homeless in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 22:44


Host Greg Anglea, CEO of Interfaith Community Services, welcomes you to the Homeless in San Diego Podcast. Joining us today is Beverly. Her story highlights the shortage of shelter beds in San Diego County, the reality that many people experiencing homelessness are employed, and the positive impact of our Homeless Outreach Team.  “Thanks to Interfaith and all the people who really backed me up and never gave up hope on me. They saw the value in me. I am feeling stronger and good about reaching my goals.”  

The Solution a Real Estate Podcast
Three Things You Can Do To Go From 24 to 800 Transactions

The Solution a Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 55:22


Last week we had special guest Mark Pattison, team lead of PorchLight Realty in San Diego, on the podcast. He went from 24 to 800 transactions in a 6-year span and in this episode, he'll share exactly how he did it. Three things you'll learn from this episode: Number 1: How having systems and processes in place ensures a smooth, and consistent agent onboarding process. From the new agent interview to graduation from PorchLight University, he breaks down his exact process in finding (and keeping) agents. Number 2: The importance of setting new agent expectations for production and agent accountability. Number 3: How leveraging and empowering your team and using the right tools will help your business grow. Mark's Bio: Mark Pattison is the founder and owner of https://www.porchlightsocal.com/ (PorchLight Realty Team) brokered by eXp Realty. His team has closed 2,000+ transactions and a billion dollars in volume and ranks among the top teams in San Diego County. Reputations are not made overnight, they are cultivated over time and Mark has carefully hand-selected his servicing team that supports his efforts to give the best experience to his clients. With over 800+ 5 star reviews on Zillow, Mark is constantly striving to empower others around him. To find out more about Mark, visit: https://www.instagram.com/markpattisonshow/ (https://www.instagram.com/markpattisonshow/) https://www.instagram.com/porchlightrealtyteam/ (https://www.instagram.com/porchlightrealtyteam/) The Solution is a Real Estate Podcast sponsored by LEOPARD. Jeff Sibbach and Phil Sexton share what they see happening in the industry, ways to put the consumer first, and how we can collectively change the industry for the better. Learn more about Real Estate Agents for Consumers

Recover Yourself
True Love Over Tough Love Every Time

Recover Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 54:26


Harm reduction has been a huge focus of mine recently and I am happy to be conversing with Gretchen for this episode. I have to admit, I am a fan of toughness. That is not to say I am a fan of tough love, many people see my approach as one that stems from tough love but that's not the case. Love, deep love, when we have it for ourselves and can offer it to others can very quickly look tough as it relates to the tough love movement, but it is what motivates those actions that are the measure. Love can at times look quite tough but there are a lot of things that cannot be explained along the journey of love looking like what we expect, and it looks tough. The “Tough Love” idea is a simple one, get tough and you'll see results, but that has rarely been the case and like the disease model never was backed by research. However, that never stopped anyone from making the statement that it was backed by research. I have no problem with love looking tough but when we take steps to be tough alone we are only doing more harm. Gretchen Burns Bergman is the Executive Director and a Co-Founder of A New PATH (Parents for Addiction Treatment & Healing), a 22-year-old non-profit organization that works to reduce the stigma associated with substance use disorders through education and compassionate support while advocating for therapeutic rather than punitive drug policies. She served as California State Chairperson for Proposition 36 in 2000 (treatment instead of incarceration), and she was one of the three signers of Prop 64 in 2016 to legalize marijuana. She is the lead organizer of the Moms United to End the War on Drugs international campaign. Her articles on therapeutic justice and harm reduction strategies have been published nationwide, and she has spoken before countless audiences. Since 2014, A New PATH has been providing overdose prevention training and Narcan distribution in San Diego County. Currently, over 9000 individuals have been trained and 2040 lives are reported saved. She is also a fashion show producer and has two grown sons who are in long-term recovery from heroin addiction. • Websites: www.anewpath.org and www.momsunited.net • Facebook: facebook.com/anewpathsite • Youtube: https://youtube.com/user/PATHMomsUnited • To support our work: https://www.anewpath.org/support-usTeasers As my work suggests I am always looking to recover myself completely and my aim is to help others recover themselves. I see a client for a total of 4 sessions which is designed to launch self-directed lives and separate us from the constant draw of codependency. This starts with my doing a portrait of my client. The portrait is an intimate experience, these open a vocabulary to trauma and are healing. This process is not for everyone and if you are not ready, I will not work with you. It is important that you are ready to step into yourself and stop playing a victim cursed by things around you. If you are interested in working together reach out at https://www.martinjon.com/ o Patreon https://www.patreon.com/RecoverYourself o Instagram https://www.instagram.com/martinjon/ o Facebook https://www.facebook.com/MartinJonRecoveryMentor o LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/martinjonarts/ o Anchor https://anchor.fm/martinjon o Pandora https://www.pandora.com/podcast/description/recover-yourself/PC:29611 o .Apple Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/recover-yourself/id1465440178 o Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/93c9f241-bbaa-45ff-80ea-7e6d6cc6f2b2/Recover-Yourself o Link Tree https://linktr.ee/martinjon o Venmo: MartinJon_Garcia --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/martinjon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/martinjon/support

San Diego News Matters
A shortage in substitute teachers

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 18:11


The COVID-19 pandemic and the continuing uncertain job market has left many San Diego County school districts scrambling for teachers. That means good money for those willing and qualified to work as a substitute. Meanwhile, ports of entry at the U.S.-Mexico border are gearing up for lifting travel restrictions on November 8th. And, as vaccines for children 5 to 11 get emergency authorization, how many parents will actually choose to get their kids vaccinated?

The WTF California Podcast
Where Do You Rank Buster Posey in Baseballs Greatest Catchers? Attorney General Officially an Activist

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 47:23


On this episode of WTF California Podcast, we debate where San Francisco Giant Buster Posey ranks as an all-time Major League Baseball Catcher--it may surprise many of you. We get into other items around the state including our Attorney General Rob Bonta who officially is now an activist. Report: San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey plans to retire Thursday Where Buster Posey stands among the all-time great catchers Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan dies after struck by car while walking dog Attorney General Bonta puts focus on affordable housing Oakland Tech students protest sex assaults Student Caught With Loaded Gun On Franklin High School Campus In Stockton After Decades Of Waiting, New Housing Units Taking Shape On San Francisco's Treasure Island A Bay Area School District Needs Funding. It's Unusual Plan: 1,100 units of Housing on campus Oakland to allow RVs, mobile homes on private property under new ordinances Food delivery driver shot while trying to fill order in La Mirada area Council passes gender-inclusive language policy for city documents San Diego County will create regional film office to boost economy, support artists Rare Apple-1 Computer To Go Up For Auction Tuesday In Rancho Cucamonga K-9 hero stabbed multiple times while taking down 2 suspects wanted for kidnapping, torture of woman

San Diego News Matters
Contact tracing in San Diego county

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 17:36


The county hired nearly 1,000 people and spent millions on contract tracing, but the program aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19 was too small to actually meet that goal. Still, experts say contact tracing can and will be effective in dealing with flare-ups of the disease. Meanwhile, local researchers are both hopeful and apprehensive about the climate conference underway in Scotland. Plus, for those getting out of jail or addiction recovery centers, transitioning back into society can be a tough journey. Reintegration works to help people find housing and employment.

Right Now with Lou
Will There Be a GOP Upset in Virginia?

Right Now with Lou

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 29:50


All eyes are on the state of Virginia. Lou has the latest in what looks to be a GOP upset, but win or lose in today's Virginia Governor's race, Glenn Youngkin has created a new template for Republican candidates running in competitive races in the Trump era. Lou talks with Ron Nehring, former San Diego County and State GOP Chairman about how we can duplicate what's happening in Virginia here in San Diego.

Nature Unplugged Podcast
Episode 064: Mental Health and Suicide Prevention with Yeni Palomino and Lora Cayanan

Nature Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:13


Here at Nature Unplugged, we are hugely passionate about the importance of mental health. That's a big reason why we do what we do. While our focus is more on the preventative (upstream) side of things we know how important it is to be prepared and to know what to do in a mental health crises. Our guests today are from the San Diego Suicide Prevention Council. Yeni Palomino and Lora Cayanan are here to share about the importance of suicide prevention, provide some tips and tools for how to be prepared in a mental health crisis, and more about the amazing work they do. SHOW NOTES: - Community Health Improvement Partners: https://www.sdchip.org/ - Suicide Prevention Council: https://www.sdchip.org/initiatives/suicide-prevention-council/ - National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 - San Diego Access and Crisis Line: 888-724-7240 BIOS: Yeni Palomino Yeni Linqui Palomino is Vice President of Community Health and Engagement at Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP). Palomino has extensive work experience dating back to 2003 in addressing the issues of environmental justice and public health in underrepresented and underserved populations in San Diego. In a previous work capacity, Palomino served as a Bilingual Program Coordinator and Organizer of the Healthy Homes Project in National City. Upon assuming her role at CHIP in 2010, Palomino embarked on a 2-year program development journey to inspire sustainable, grassroots leadership on public health issues which led to the creation of the CHIP / Resident Leadership Academy program – a curriculum-based, public health leadership and advocacy program that provides residents from underserved communities with the tools and skills necessary to become lifelong health advocates addressing issues such as public safety, healthy food access and the quality of physical activity opportunities. Palomino has worked on issues relating to behavioral health since 2014, and currently serves as lead facilitator of San Diego County's Suicide Prevention Council, which focuses on implementation of its 2018 published Action Plan based on the Institute of Medicine's Environmental Prevention Model --- a health equity framework. Lora Cayanan, MPH Lora Cayanan is the Program Manager for Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP) and the San Diego County Suicide Prevention Council (SPC). Lora has spent the past 6 years working at CHIP previously serving as a Program Coordinator, Program Assistant and Intern. She became a Certified Question Persuade and Refer or QPR Trainer in 2015 and oversees the training program for San Diego County with over 22,000 individuals trained since 2011. She is also an Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training or ASIST instructor. Lora received her Bachelors in Biological Sciences from UC Irvine and her Master's of Public Health from National University. CREDITS: Intro and Outro Song: The Soft Pack - Mexico

Today in San Diego
Flight Delays Continue, Investigation into Deadly Racing Crash, Celebrating Día de los Muertos

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 4:34


Problems Continue for American Airlines and Travelers, SDPD Investigate Deadly Racing Crash, Celebrations for Día de los Muertos across San Diego County, Sheena has your Back To Work WeatherSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SDCBA's Meet and Confer
Time to Meet and Confer! (E20) – Catching Up with San Diego La Raza Lawyers Association

SDCBA's Meet and Confer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Our hosts, Renee Stackhouse and Adriana Linares talk with the leadership of San Diego La Raza Lawyers Association (SDLRLA) and the SDLRLA Scholarship Fund. Formed in 1979, with a handful of Latino attorneys, SDLRLA has grown to represent over three hundred Latino and Latina lawyers practicing in San Diego County. Learn more about SDLRLA, their advocacy, and their scholarship fund in this episode. Our guests are: Brenda LopezBen AguilarGeorge Rios Related links: San Diego La Raza Lawyers AssociationSDLRLA Scholarship FundNovember 2021 Gala Info SDCBA's “Meet & Confer” is a podcast hosted by SDCBA President, Renee Stackhouse and Adriana Linares, the SDCBA's Technology and Practice Management Advisor. It's a podcast for, and about, the unique San Diego legal community. Let us know what you'd like to hear about on future episodes by sending an email to bar@sdcba.org. Members! Don't forget – Adriana is here to help you. As our “human member benefit”, she is available to meet with your and answer your technology or practice management questions. Simply make an appointment to meet via remote (member login required).

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore
840: Trademarks 101 with David Lizerbram

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 87:25


David Lizerbram is an attorney in private practice. He is also the host of Products of the Mind, a podcast about the intersection of business + creativity. Products of the Mind is produced by Mana Monzavi. David was born in Philadelphia and raised in North County San Diego, California. After graduating from the University of Southern California School of Cinema-Television (now the School of Cinematic Arts) and USC's Marshall School of Business, he received his J.D. from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. David speaks regularly about legal matters, and has presented on a legal education panel at San Diego Comic-Con every year since 2008. In 2011, David was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown to the Board of Directors of the 22nd District Agricultural Association, which is responsible for oversight of the Del Mar Fairgrounds. He served in that position until the conclusion of his term in 2015. He also served on the Board of Directors of the San Diego Music Foundation and was a co-founder of the Craft Beer Association of San Diego, a think tank focused on promoting San Diego County's dynamic craft beer industry. David lives in North Park, San Diego with his wife, Mana Monzavi and their son, Miles. David Lizerbram & Associates was founded in 2005 in San Diego, California with the goal of providing high-quality legal services to entrepreneurs both locally and nationwide. Since the firm's creation, David has assisted with a large variety of business matters. His clients have varied in size from solo entrepreneurs to publicly traded companies. David has provided legal guidance on multimillion-dollar rounds of fundraising, negotiated strategic partnerships with nationwide businesses and nonprofits, managed international intellectual property portfolios, and advised many innovative startups. Show notes… Calls to ACTION!!! Join Restaurant Unstoppable Network and connect with my past guest and a community of superfans. Subscribe to the Restaurant Unstoppable YouTube Channel Join the private Unstoppable Facebook Group Join the email list! (Scroll Down to get the Vendor List!) Favorite success quote or mantra: "What you don't know CAN hurt you, BUT, knowledge is power." In today's workshop with David Lizerbram we will discuss: All things trademarks. Listen for the full breakdown! Today's sponsor: Meez One platform to organize, cost, scale, and share your recipes. With a built in database of thousands of ingredient yields and unit conversions for laser accurate costs.  Train your teams with step by step video and image slideshows that live right alongside the recipe.  Build ops guides and SOPs, create and upload content in seconds.  Never let anyone make the wrong outdated recipe again, all the while keeping your IP safe and secure. 7shifts is a modern labor management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. Effectively labor management is more important than ever to ensure profitability and restaurant success. Trusted by over 400,000 restaurant professionals, 7shifts gives you the tools you need to streamline labor operations, communicate with your team, and retain your talent. Best of all 7shifts integrates with the POS and Payroll systems you already use and trust (like Toast!) turning labor into a competitive advantage for your business. Restaurant Unstoppable members get 3 months, absolutely free. At Popmenu, we know that in today's world, a great hospitality experience usually begins online. Keeping the conversation with guests going beyond the meal also requires simple, powerful, fun technology capable of expression through all kinds of channels. Our team takes pride in helping restaurants put their best foot forward digitally so they can focus on what they do best. We think PDF menus are super boring, we believe 3rd party platforms have had too much say in how consumers find their next dining experience and we deeply feel that sharing your beautiful menu doesn't have to be so difficult, time-consuming and expensive. As a listener of the Restaurant Unstoppable, you'll receive $100 off your first month of Popmenu! Contact info: www.lizerbramlaw.com Twitter: @davidlizerbram Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for joining today! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, please leave an honest review for the Restaurant Unstoppable Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. Huge thanks to David Lizerbram for joining me for another awesome episode. Until next time!   Restaurant Unstoppable is a free podcast. One of the ways I'm able to make it free is by earning a commission when sharing certain products with you. I've made it a core value to only share tools, resources, and services my guest mentors have recommend, first. If you're finding value in my podcast, please use my links!

Lead With Your Brand!™
S2E41 : Branding the Story, Liberty Zabala, Reporter & Weather Anchor, FOX 5 San Diego

Lead With Your Brand!™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:36


Jayzen is excited to welcome Liberty Zabala to the show. As a seasoned reporter and television anchor, Liberty brings her amazing personal brand to every story. From interviewing Oprah to covering mass tragedies, Liberty has an incredible career story that has earned her four Emmy awards. Liberty is a graduate of the "FBI Citizens Academy" at the FBI San Diego Field Office during Spring 2019. Liberty is currently on the Dean's List at American Military University while pursuing her Master of Arts in Homeland Security with a concentration in Counterterrorism. Guest Bio Liberty Zabala Reporter & Weather Anchor, FOX 5 San Diego Liberty Zabala is a 4x Emmy-winning Reporter & Weather Anchor for FOX 5 San Diego. She was awarded the Vada and Colonel Barney Oldfield National Security Reporting Fellowship by the Radio Television Digital News Foundation for her work covering Marines, sailors, active duty service members and veterans in the nation's largest military town, San Diego. Some of her most memorable stories include leading breaking news coverage of the Central American immigration crisis, covering devastating firestorms that burned across San Diego County, covering the San Bernardino terrorist attacks and most recently, the Las Vegas mass shooting. Her coverage also earned two San Diego Press Club awards. In November 2016, Liberty was honored as one of 100 Comcast NBCUniversal employees selected from across the country to take part in (Morning Joe) Mika Brzezinski's "Know Your Value" program in association with MSNBC. Prior to that, she was one of four reporter trainees selected from across the country for the NBC Reporter Development Program. Under the program, she went through intensive multimedia training workshops alongside NBCUniversal's top media executives, talent and coaches at NBC 5 Dallas, NBC 10 Philadelphia, and NBC 4 New York under the direction of The Poynter Institute's Al Tompkins. She has conducted several high profile interviews including presidential candidates Rand Paul, Ron Paul & Newt Gingrich, Senator Kamala Harris, 37th Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert B. Neller, world champion boxer Manny Pacquiao, comic creator Stan Lee and media mogul Oprah. She is a graduate of California State University, Northridge with a degree in journalism and collateral in political science with an emphasis in international relations. She is a dedicated member of Asian American Journalists Association where she served as a board director for the Los Angeles chapter and currently serves the San Diego chapter as president. Liberty is a graduate of the "FBI Citizens Academy" at the FBI San Diego Field Office during Spring 2019. Liberty is currently on the Dean's List at American Military University while pursuing her Master of Arts in Homeland Security with a concentration in Counterterrorism. Links To learn more about Lead With Your Brand and the Career Breakthrough Mentoring program, please visit: LeadWithyYourBrand.com To book Jayzen for a speaking engagement or workshop at your company, visit: JayzenPatria.com

Today in San Diego
Rain Coming, Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Road Closures, Dia de los Muertos Celebrations

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 5:13


Rain showers are expected across San Diego County by Monday afternoon. NBC 7's Brooke Martell has the details. The Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon is back after being postponed last year due to the pandemic and it's causing some road closures around the county. And some Dia de los Muertos celebrations. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tacos and Tech Podcast
San Diego Tech News Weekly – October 22, 2021

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 26:03


This Week in SD Tech: San Diego scientists are working on a vaccine against all coronaviruses. Yes, all of them Shares in this Encinitas-based biotech jump 31 percent in first day of trading San Diego County to expand its renewable energy sources Flock Freight gets $215 million as it remakes truck shipping UCSD won $1M grant to fund accelerator for under represented entrepreneurs 

Today in San Diego
Gas Prices Rise, Two Killed in San Diego Apartment, Ready for Your Booster?

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 4:47


Gas Prices Nearing Record Highs in San Diego County, San Diego Police Investigating Double Homicide in East Village Apartment, Next Steps for Vaccine Booster Approval, Brian James is Tracking Rain for Sunday and Monday See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

San Diego News Fix
San Diego County is changing the way people vote in person

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 5:30


The San Diego County Board of Supervisors Tuesday voted to permanently change the way San Diegans go to vote.

Value Add With K&K
#135: Jason Lee: Build and Maximize YOUR Wealth Through Real Estate

Value Add With K&K

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 66:20


Joining us on the Get in the Cashflow Game with K&K Podcast is Jason Lee. Jason Lee has sold nearly 100 million dollars worth of real estate in the last few years and owns several properties totaling 30+ units throughout San Diego County. He has his very own podcast, The Multifamily Millionaire, where Jason shares his own expertise as a Commercial Real Estate Agent and Principal to show you how to best create passive income through real estate investing. On this podcast we go over: His humble beginnings The drive you need to become successful HOW you can become successful at an early age Generational Wealth You can find more about Jason at: Website: https://www.jlmrealestateinc.com Podcast: https://c-suitenetwork.com/radio/shows/the-multifamily-millionaire-real-income-from-real-estate/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jasonjosephlee/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWNrpNXpGuujHMVZJWmBLsw You can check out Get in the Cashflow Game at:  Website: https://getinthecashflowgame.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/getinthecashflowgame/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKCq8ChflxF7qWPfV395eag Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/getinthecashflowgame You can find more information about Kenny Simpson at:  Website: https://www.simpsonmortgage.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kennybsimpson/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Kenny-Simpson-111871733890408 You can find more information about Krystle Moore at:  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/krystlerosemoore/ Website: www.pacificshorecapital.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pacificshorecapital/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Krystle-Moore-273576823172681 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PacificShoreCapital Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - 'Tech Tuesday' with Rich DeMuro and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:38


Bill Handel hosts KTLA 5's Rich DeMuro for this week's edition of 'Tech Tuesday'! The pair discuss the best options for televisions, as Handel's in the market for an upgrade. Also, Amazon has introduced a new payment method at their stores, and Rich gave it a try. Chris Little joins Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News. Windy weather continues to pummel Southern California, leaving trees down and power out for thousands, repeated warnings were issued to the pilot who crashed a plan into a home in San Diego County, killing two, and an Asian-American victim of an assault in Koreatown is terrified after the suspect was released within hours of their arrest.