Podcasts about russian federation

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Country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia

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Best podcasts about russian federation

Latest podcast episodes about russian federation

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1814: 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety. @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 17:21


Photo:  Vladimir Putin with The Financial Times (2019-06-27)  .. 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016.  Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety. @Batchelorshow https://www.ft.com/content/d43cd586-c396-11e6-9bca-2b93a6856354 .. Permissions: Интервью газете    The Financial Times. This file comes from the website of the President of the Russian Federation and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. In short: you are free to distribute and modify the file as long as you attribute it to www.kremlin.ru. Source:  http://kremlin.ru/events/president/news/60836/photos

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1814: 5/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: Allegedly linked to the GRU and Vladimir Putin on the Guardian front gate, April 1, 2017. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety. @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 19:30


Photo:  Wreath laying ceremony for past GRU agents 5/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: Allegedly linked to the GRU and Vladimir Putin on the Guardian front gate, April 1, 2017. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety. @Batchelorshow https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/31/michael-flynn-new-evidence-spy-chiefs-had-concerns-about-russian-ties .. Permissions:       This file comes from the websites (mil.ru, минобороны.рф) of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation and is copyrighted.      This file is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Licence. In short: you are free to distribute and modify the file as long as you attribute Mil.ru. Министр обороны России генерал армии Сергей Шойгу в Главном разведывательном управлении Генерального штаба Вооруженных Сил в День военного разведчика 5 November 2013, 15:59:49

The Critical Hour
Russia Gate Has No Rock Bottom; House Progressives Outmaneuvered in Negotiations

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 115:18


Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch, joins us to discuss Russiagate. The Russiagate narrative has collapsed to a degree that was previously unimaginable to the handful of investigative journalists who have worked diligently to expose it as both a hoax and a deep state coup attempt. Also, Ray McGovern was a leader in unraveling the dirt behind the intelligence community's involvement in the Russiagate plan and his work should be recognized now that the truth is coming out.Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss intra-party fighting amongst the Democrats. The Progressive Caucus in the US House of Representatives is losing credibility as the right-wing of the party aligned with the GOP to pass a corporate-friendly version of President Biden's infrastructure bill. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi whipped up 13 Republican votes to break the infrastructure bill from the build back better legislation effectively rendering the left flank of her group powerless.Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss the drone program. Scott Ritter has penned an article in which he describes how the Pentagon worked to paper over the murder of ten civilians in a Kabul front attack. Scott argues that "everyone involved, from the President on down, committed a war crime."Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss the Democrat's dropping approval numbers. Recent polls show that the President and Vice President are currently experiencing historically low polling numbers. Also, Democratic strategist James Carville is voicing the opinion of many observers as he lambasts the party for championing the increasingly unpopular social philosophy of "wokeness."Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Middle East. An attack using explosive-laden drones was perpetrated against the prime minister of Iraq. Iraqi leaders are claiming that they know the identity of the people and or groups involved in the conspiracy. Also, Israel has claimed that many Palestinian NGO's are terrorist organizations but have been unable and/or unwilling to provide any evidence to support their claims.Nick Davies, peace activist and author of "Blood on Our Hands: The American Invasion of Iraq," joins us to discuss the latest US arms deal. President Biden claimed that he would no longer support Saudi Arabia in its offensive actions against the impoverished nation of Yemen. Recent approval for the sale of large numbers of military hardware to the Saudi kingdom appears to show that this promise is being broken.Alexander Mercouris, editor in chief at theduran.com and host of "The Duran" on YouTube, joins us to discuss Ukraine and US Russia relations. CIA Chief William Burns recently visited the Russian Federation and international security analysts are working overtime to dissect the meaning of this anomalous action. Also, NATO and the US are claiming that Russian troop movements near Belarus are indicative of a possible intention to take military action against the neo nazi battalions of the Ukrainian military.Wyatt Reed, Sputnik News analyst, joins us to discuss Nicaragua. Sputnik News analyst Wyatt Reed is on the ground in Nicaragua to cover this week's important election. The US is working to interfere with the free elections of the sovereign state in defiance of international law and its own claims.

The Political Life
Demystifying the U.S. Senate and the Budget Reconciliation Process

The Political Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 64:30


Martin B. Gold is a partner with Capitol Counsel, LLC. He has over 40 years of legislative and private practice experience, and is a recognized authority and author on matters of congressional rules and parliamentary strategies, and U.S. policy in Asia. He frequently advises senators and their staff and serves on the adjunct faculty at George Washington University. Before domestic business, professional, and academic audiences, he speaks about Congress as well as political and public policy developments. Gold has been a guest lecturer at Tsinghua University, the Beijing Foreign Studies University, the Beijing International Studies University, Moscow State University, the Moscow State Institute of International Relations, the State Parliament of Ukraine, and the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation. Help us grow! Leave us a rating and review - it's the best way to bring new listeners to the show. Don't forget to subscribe! Have a suggestion, or want to chat with Jim? Email him at Jim@ThePoliticalLife.net  Follow The Political Life on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter for weekly updates.

The Critical Hour
Ethiopian Conflict Intensifies; South Korea Seeks War's End; Ukrainian Government Appoints Neo-Nazi

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 113:59


Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss President Biden and the fallout from the recent elections. US President Joe Biden cited "Trump voters," schools, jobs, and rising fuel prices as reasons for the shocking upset of Virginia democrat Terry Mcauliffe in the reliably blue state. He appeared to imply that the failure of Congress to pass his legislation was a factor, but did not specifically articulate that as a principal reason for the outcome. Bob Schlehuber, host of the Radio Sputnik show "Political Misfits," joins us from the scene for an up-close and personal update to discuss the Ethiopian conflict. Rebel troops in Ethiopia are gathering outside of the capital city of Addis Ababa as the central government calls on citizens to take up arms in defense.Greg Palast, investigative reporter, joins us to discuss Congressional wrangling on Capitol Hill. Democrats are considering killing the filibuster after the GOP blocked a voting rights bill. However, election struggles on Tuesday and the looming possibility of surrendering the upper house to their political rivals in 2022 are giving some members great pause.Wyatt Reed, Sputnik News analyst and producer, joins us to discuss upcoming elections in Nicaragua. The popular government of Daniel Ortega is facing great hardship as the US empire works both above and below the board in a brazen attempt to interfere with their election process. Neoliberal forces in the West, including social media and traditional media outlets, are working hand in glove with the US State Department and the intelligence agencies of the empire.Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss Russia and Eastern Europe. The "former" leader of a Ukrainian neo-Nazi paramilitary group has been appointed to the role of adviser to the commander-in-chief of the armed forces in the far right wing government of Volodymyr Zelensky. Also, troop movements inside the borders of the Russian Federation are being referred to as "concerning" by US media outlets with close ties to the intelligence agencies.Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss social media. Facebook has decided to ditch its use of facial recognition software on the platform. Also, social media and tech giants seem to be working directly for the US empire's regime change machine as they delete numerous pro-government accounts days before the Nicaraguan elections.Dr. Ken Hammond, professor of East Asian and global history at New Mexico State University and activist with Pivot for Peace, joins us to discuss Asia. South Korea is moving to end the decades-long war with its northern sister nation, but is facing pushback from the US empire. Observers suspect that the loss of an excuse for Pentagon spending could be a factor. Also, Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) is introducing a bill that would provide 3 billion dollars in taxpayer dollars per year to the arms industry in exchange for providing weapons to Taiwan.Ricardo Vaz, political analyst and editor at VenezuelAnalysis.com, joins us to discuss Venezuela. In a move that appears to be instigated by the US empire, the International Criminal Court has opened an investigation against the Venezuelan government for crimes against humanity. Ironically, this occurs as the United States causes the deaths of tens of thousands of Venezuelan citizens through the use of illegal sanctions, but faces no similar investigation by the international body.

InSecurity
Greg Crabb: What CISOs can learn from the US Postal Service and… the Russian Security Service?

InSecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 60:10


  Messenger of Sympathy and Love Servant of Parted Friends Consoler of the Lonely Bond of the Scattered Family Enlarger of the Common Life Carrier of News and Knowledge Instrument of Trade and Industry Promoter of Mutual Acquaintance Of Peace and of Goodwill Among Men and Nations  -- Inscription found on the the Smithsonian Institution's National Postal Museum   Победить и вернуться  -- Motto of the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation   Imagine being in charge of securing an enterprise comprised of over 450,000 connected devices spread over 31,000 locations worldwide. The United States Postal Service is a pretty serious organization when it comes to the amount of data that flows through its network. It would take a pretty cool individual to stand up to the daily pressure of an organization that big and that diverse. Imagine cold calling the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation and asking to speak with their head of Information Security in order to share the information you have uncovered regarding tens of thousands of incidents of mail and cyberfraud committed by Russian criminals. They took the call… It would take a pretty cool individual would have to be pretty cool to accept the FSB's invitation to sit face to face in Odessa at FSB headquarters. Now imagine that individual is the same person.   The good news? You don't have to imagine.   On today's No Name Security Podcast, Matt Stephenson welcomes Greg Crabb, founder of TenEight Cyber where he consults with CISOs and organizations needing CISO levels of expertise. With 25 years in law enforcement specializing in mail and cyber fraud as well as 6 years as CISO of the United States Postal Service, Greg has learned some things about security. Want to hear about the time he worked with the Russian FSB on a particularly large fraud case? Stick around…   About Greg Crabb     Greg Crabb is the founder of 10-8, LLC. With more than 25 years of law enforcement and security experience, he specializes in providing consultation to cybersecurity leaders and organizations to help protect their digital assets against evolving cyberthreats. Greg focuses specifically on delivering advisory services to C-suite executives, their boards, and other leaders responsible for securing their organization's operations, products, and services.   For six years as the U.S. Postal Service's chief information security officer, Greg secured the agency's technology and information assets against nation-state threat actors. These efforts helped protect military mail globally and the unprecedented 2020 U.S. elections.   About Matt Stephenson     Matt Stephenson (@packmatt73) leads the Social Media team at Forescout, which puts me in front of people all over the world. Prior to joining Forescout, I hosted podcasts, videos and live events all over the world which put me with experts on every corner of the cybersecurity landscape. The new No Name Security Podcast will continue and expand upon that tradition as we seak out the leading minds in the security industry as well as those may break things every now again. And… just for fun, there will be some wildcard guests as well.   In 10 years in the ecosystem of Data Protection and Cybersecurity I have toured the world extolling the virtues of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning and how, when applied to information security, these technologies can wrong-foot the bad guys. Prior to the COVID shutdown, I was on the road over 100 days a year doing live malware demonstrations for audiences from San Diego to DC to London to Abu Dhabi to Singapore to Sydney. One of the funniest things I've ever been a part of was blowing up a live instance of NotPetya 6 hours after the news broke... in Washington DC... directly across the street from FBI HQ... as soon as we activated it a parade of police cars with sirens blaring roared past the building we were in. I'm pretty sure they weren't there for us, but you never know...   Whether at in person events, live virtual events or podcasting, I get to interview interesting people doing interesting things all over the world of cybersecurity and the extended world of hacking. Sometimes, that means hacking elections or the coffee supply chain... other times that means social manipulation or the sovereign wealth fund of a national economy.   Wherever I go, my job is all about talking with the people who build, manage or wreck the systems that we have put in place to make the world go round...   If you tuned in to any of my previous podcasts, there's great news! The No Name Security Podcast is here! I will be bringing the same kind of energy and array of guests you know and love. Best part? We're still at the same spot. You can find it at Spotify, Apple, Amazon Music & Audible as well as, GooglePlay, Gaana, Himalaya, I Heart Radio and wherever you get your podcasts!   Make sure you Subscribe, Rate and Review!

The John Batchelor Show
1792: #Eurasianism: No need for a Khrushchev "Secret Speech" after the personality cult of Putin. Professor H. J. Mackinder, International Relations. HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 14:29


Photo: Personality cults: here, the Serbian president Aleksandar Vučić pets a dog with Vladimir Putin, president of Russia. Pro-government media in Serbia most often presents Vučić as a powerful person under constant attack who receives messages of support from Putin @Batchelorshow #Eurasianism:  No need for a Khrushchev "Secret Speech" after the personality cult of Putin.  Professor H. J. Mackinder, International Relations. HFN https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Cult_of_Personality_and_Its_Consequences .. Permissions: The President of the Republic of Serbia, Alexander Vucic, presented Vladimir Putin with a Sharplanin puppy.  Президент Республики Сербии Александр Вучич подарил Владимиру Путину щенка шарпланинской овчарки. Date | 17 January 2019 Source | http://www.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/59689 Author | Presidential Press and Information Office This file comes from the website of the President of the Russian Federation and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. In short: you are free to distribute and modify the file as long as you attribute www.kremlin.ru. Note: Works published on site before April 8, 2014 are also licensed under Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 License. The permission letter from the Press Secretary for the President of the Russian Federation is available here. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. | Attribution: Kremlin.ru  /  You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR JAMES LEE CHORON - Life Long Natural Sensitive

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:17


Sensitive - Dr. James L. Choron is a journalist and writer living in Mamontovka, a suburb of Moscow. He has resided in the Russian Federation for more than sixteen years, and is a former senior executive with the Eastman Kodak Company. He is a decorated veteran of the United States Military, a Master Mason, an 32* Scotish Rite Mason and the Presiding Bishop of EGnU (Eclesia Gnostica Universialis) for Mowcow and Western Russia. He is currently owner and Chief Executive Officer of Old Guard Productions, a company dealing in motion picture and television logistics and properties, and American Business Training, a company which deals with sales and customer service training for Russian companies seeking to introduce Western business practices and standards. Born in Dallas, Texas, and raised in the small East Texas town of Center, he holds a bachelor's degree in history from Stephen F. Austin State University and a masters and PhD from Moscow State University in the same subject as well as a graduate degree in optical engineering. A working journalist for slightly more than thirty-five years, he has columns in numerous publications in both Russia and the United States. He has numerous hobbies, primarily related to paranormal and historical research, both of which he has been involved for over twenty years. He has published a number of independent articles on paranormal encounters and activities and on historical topics, and is a staff member on several online publications and forums dealing with history and the paranormal. Dr. Choron is also a lifelong natural "sensitive" who has, since birth, been aware of the presence of Spirit Entities. Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR JAMES LEE CHORON - Life Long Natural Sensitive

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:18


Sensitive - Dr. James L. Choron is a journalist and writer living in Mamontovka, a suburb of Moscow. He has resided in the Russian Federation for more than sixteen years, and is a former senior executive with the Eastman Kodak Company. He is a decorated veteran of the United States Military, a Master Mason, an 32* Scotish Rite Mason and the Presiding Bishop of EGnU (Eclesia Gnostica Universialis) for Mowcow and Western Russia. He is currently owner and Chief Executive Officer of Old Guard Productions, a company dealing in motion picture and television logistics and properties, and American Business Training, a company which deals with sales and customer service training for Russian companies seeking to introduce Western business practices and standards. Born in Dallas, Texas, and raised in the small East Texas town of Center, he holds a bachelor's degree in history from Stephen F. Austin State University and a masters and PhD from Moscow State University in the same subject as well as a graduate degree in optical engineering. A working journalist for slightly more than thirty-five years, he has columns in numerous publications in both Russia and the United States. He has numerous hobbies, primarily related to paranormal and historical research, both of which he has been involved for over twenty years. He has published a number of independent articles on paranormal encounters and activities and on historical topics, and is a staff member on several online publications and forums dealing with history and the paranormal. Dr. Choron is also a lifelong natural "sensitive" who has, since birth, been aware of the presence of Spirit Entities.Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR JAMES LEE CHORON - Life Long Natural Sensitive

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:17


Sensitive - Dr. James L. Choron is a journalist and writer living in Mamontovka, a suburb of Moscow. He has resided in the Russian Federation for more than sixteen years, and is a former senior executive with the Eastman Kodak Company. He is a decorated veteran of the United States Military, a Master Mason, an 32* Scotish Rite Mason and the Presiding Bishop of EGnU (Eclesia Gnostica Universialis) for Mowcow and Western Russia. He is currently owner and Chief Executive Officer of Old Guard Productions, a company dealing in motion picture and television logistics and properties, and American Business Training, a company which deals with sales and customer service training for Russian companies seeking to introduce Western business practices and standards. Born in Dallas, Texas, and raised in the small East Texas town of Center, he holds a bachelor's degree in history from Stephen F. Austin State University and a masters and PhD from Moscow State University in the same subject as well as a graduate degree in optical engineering. A working journalist for slightly more than thirty-five years, he has columns in numerous publications in both Russia and the United States. He has numerous hobbies, primarily related to paranormal and historical research, both of which he has been involved for over twenty years. He has published a number of independent articles on paranormal encounters and activities and on historical topics, and is a staff member on several online publications and forums dealing with history and the paranormal. Dr. Choron is also a lifelong natural "sensitive" who has, since birth, been aware of the presence of Spirit Entities. Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The John Batchelor Show
1771: 5/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: Allegedly linked to the GRU and Vladimir Putin on the Guardian front gate, April 1, 2017. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 21:00


Photo:   The Main Directorate of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, abbreviated G.U., formerly the Main Intelligence Directorate and still commonly known by its previous abbreviation GRU, is the foreign military intelligence agency of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.  Unit 29155 is a Russian (GRU) unit tasked with foreign assassinations and other activities aimed at destabilizing European countries 5/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: Allegedly linked to the GRU and Vladimir Putin on the Guardian front gate, April 1, 2017. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova.

Oral Arguments for the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit
Hulley Enterprises Ltd. v. Russian Federation

Oral Arguments for the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:31


Hulley Enterprises Ltd. v. Russian Federation

The CyberWire
Taking a closer look at UNC1151. [Research Saturday]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 18:11


Matt Stafford, Senior Threat Intelligence Researcher, from Prevailion joins Dave to talk about their work on "Diving Deep into UNC1151's Infrastructure: Ghostwriter and beyond." Prevailion's Adversarial Counterintelligence Team (PACT) used advanced infrastructure hunting techniques and Prevailion's visibility into threat actor infrastructure creation to uncover previously unknown domains associated with UNC1151 and the “Ghostwriter” influence campaign. UNC1151 is likely a state-backed threat actor waging an ongoing and far-reaching influence campaign that has targeted numerous countries across Europe. Their operations typically display messaging in general alignment with the security interests of the Russian Federation; their hallmarks include anti-NATO messaging, intimate knowledge of regional culture and politics, and strategic influence operations (such as hack-and-leak operations used in conjunction with fabricated messaging and/or forged documents). PACT assesses with varying degrees of confidence that there are 81 additional, unreported domains clustered with the activity that FireEye and ThreatConnect detailed in their respective reports. PACT also assesses with High Confidence that UNC1151 has targeted additional European entities outside of the Baltics, Poland, Ukraine and Germany, for which no previous public reporting exists. The research can be found here: Diving Deep into UNC1151's Infrastructure: Ghostwriter and beyond

Research Saturday
Taking a closer look at UNC1151.

Research Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 18:11


Matt Stafford, Senior Threat Intelligence Researcher, from Prevailion joins Dave to talk about their work on "Diving Deep into UNC1151's Infrastructure: Ghostwriter and beyond." Prevailion's Adversarial Counterintelligence Team (PACT) used advanced infrastructure hunting techniques and Prevailion's visibility into threat actor infrastructure creation to uncover previously unknown domains associated with UNC1151 and the “Ghostwriter” influence campaign. UNC1151 is likely a state-backed threat actor waging an ongoing and far-reaching influence campaign that has targeted numerous countries across Europe. Their operations typically display messaging in general alignment with the security interests of the Russian Federation; their hallmarks include anti-NATO messaging, intimate knowledge of regional culture and politics, and strategic influence operations (such as hack-and-leak operations used in conjunction with fabricated messaging and/or forged documents). PACT assesses with varying degrees of confidence that there are 81 additional, unreported domains clustered with the activity that FireEye and ThreatConnect detailed in their respective reports. PACT also assesses with High Confidence that UNC1151 has targeted additional European entities outside of the Baltics, Poland, Ukraine and Germany, for which no previous public reporting exists. The research can be found here: Diving Deep into UNC1151's Infrastructure: Ghostwriter and beyond

Turley Talks
Ep. 668 Russia Threatens to BAN YouTube!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:24


Highlights:  “It's being widely reported that the Russian Federation is threatening to ban YouTube in retaliation for YouTube blocking 2 German-languaged channels managed by the Russia Today broadcast network.”“Ironically just last month, the chief executive of YouTube, Susan Wojcicki, reiterated YouTube's commitment to free speech as its ‘core value of the company' and that their Terms of Service is ‘fully consistent with that value'. Needless to say, Russia is not buying it and as of today the government is threatening to ban YouTube outright unless the channels are reinstated.”“The backlash against Big Tech is real and it's only going to get worse given the polls that have been coming out of late. Gallup's tracking of public sentiment towards BigTech shows that positive views have fallen from 46% in 2019 to just 34% today. Nearly 60% want more government regulation of Big Tech companies, up 9 points from 2019.”Timestamps:[01:33] Why YouTube shutdown 2 German channels owned by Russia Today and how Russia threatens to ban YouTube[02:55] On YouTube's previous disciplinary measures against Sky News Australia[03:40] How this isn't the first time that Russia and YouTube have faced off[06:45] On the growing worldwide trend known as Techlash[08:33] How the backlash against BigTech is only going to get worseResources:Join me in Jacksonville, FL, with Donald Trump Jr on Oct. 8-9!!! This is going to be our biggest event EVER!!! So make sure to click on the link RIGHT NOW: https://conferences.turleytalks.com/aftEp. 663 Why the AZ AUDIT Changes EVERYTHING!!!Ep. 665 AZ AUDIT! British Media Calls November Election a FRAUD!!!Get Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here: https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member and get the first 7 days FREE!!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeFight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without the censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

The John Batchelor Show
1712: The Russian Duma elections and the new Communist Party. Anatol Lieven, @QuincyInst HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 10:25


Photo: State Duma voting device. Устройство для голосования в Государственной думе CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Russian Duma elections and the new Communist Party.  Anatol Lieven, @QuincyInst HFN https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/09/21/statisticians-claim-half-of-pro-kremlin-votes-in-duma-elections-were-false-a75102 .. This file comes from the website of the State Duma of the Russian Federation and is copyrighted. This file is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. In short: you are free to distribute and modify the file as long as you attribute duma.gov.ru

Den of Rich
#271 - Dmitry Ageev and Alexey Stankevich

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 111:08


Dmitry Ageev is Executive Director of SKOLKOVO Wealth Transformation Center established by the initiative of Ruben Vardanyan for the HN-UHNWI community in Russia support and customer development. He is maintaining partnerships with major private banking, luxury products, and services providers, multi/single family offices. His primary focus is research, consultancy, educational efforts, and conferences for HN-UHNWI families on the issues of Wealth Management: Personal Finance, Succession Planning, Family Business, Philanthropy (including social impact projects). Producer of the largest online/offline annual conference platform in Russia for HNWI and infrastructure – Wealth Knowledge Day. Previously in his carrier, Dmitry was holding executive and expert positions at large Russian and multinational companies (ConocoPhillips, RUSAL, Rostelecom, Johnson & Johnson) at strategic human resources and corporate social responsibility.FIND DMITRY ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn========================================Alexey Stankevich is a Managing Director of Phoenix Advisors, a wealth management company established in 2015 in partnership with Ruben Vardanyan. Advisor to the largest Russian capitals in the matters of asset structuring and protection. Until 2015, he was a co-founder and CEO of the investment group Third Rome, which was created in 2009 by top managers of the Renaissance Capital group. From 2004 to 2009, he led the structured solutions group and the multi-family office practice at Renaissance Capital that he created. From 2001 to 2004 Alexey was the head of the Investment Projects Department of the International Industrial Bank, where he managed projects for the acquisition and consolidation of non-banking assets. He created and headed family offices of major Russian entrepreneurs. He worked in the central office of Sberbank of the Russian Federation, Razgulay UkrRos Group. He started his career in 1997 in the Big Four companies in the tax and legal consulting department.FIND ALEXEY ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Duma elections at the Consulate of the Russian Federation in Sydney: interview with an observer - Как проходило голосование на участке в Консульстве РФ в Сиднее - интервью с наблюдате

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 11:05


The State Duma elections took place in Russia from September 17-19. In Australia, the Russian citizens could vote in two cities - Canberra and Sydney. We spoke to Svetlana Asatryan, who was an observer at the Russian Consulate voting centre. - В России завершились первые выборы федерального уровня, проходившие три дня - с 17 по 19 сентября. В Австралии проголосовать можно было 19 сентября в Канберре и Сиднее, и мы поговорили со Светланой Асатрян, которая вчера весь день работала наблюдателем на участке в Консульстве РФ в Сиднее.

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Spies and Traitors: Kim Philby, James Angleton and the Friendship and Betrayal that Would Shape MI6, the CIA and the Cold War by Michael Holzman

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 24:13


Spies and Traitors: Kim Philby, James Angleton and the Friendship and Betrayal that Would Shape MI6, the CIA and the Cold War by Michael Holzman A brilliant exposé of how Kim Philby—the master-spy and notorious double agent—became the mentor, and later, mortal enemy, of James Angleton, who would eventually lead the CIA. Kim Philby's life and career has inspired an entire literary genre: the spy novel of betrayal. Philby was one of the leaders of the British counter-intelligence efforts, first against the Nazis, then against the Soviet Union. He was also the KGB's most valuable double-agent, so highly regarded that his image is on the postage stamps of the Russian Federation even today. Before he was exposed, Philby was the mentor of James Jesus Angleton, one of the central figures in the early years of the CIA who became the long-serving chief of the counter-intelligence staff of the Agency. James Angleton and Kim Philby were friends for six years, or so Angleton thought. Then they were enemies for the rest of their lives. This is the story of their intertwined careers and a betrayal that would have dramatic and irrevocable effects on the Cold War and US-Soviet relations, and have a direct effect on the shape and culture of the CIA in the latter half of the twentieth century. Spanning the globe, from London and Washington DC, to Rome and Istanbul, Spies and Traitors gets to the heart of one of the most important and flawed personal relationships in modern history.

Den of Rich
#259 - Anatoly Shalyto

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 157:40


Anatoly Shalyto is a Russian scientist, Doctor of Science, Professor of computer science, and the Head of the Department of Programming Technologies at ITMO University. In 2008, he was awarded by the Government of the Russian Federation for achievements in the field of education. Also, by the Decree of the President of the Russian Federation of March 15, 2018, Anatoly was awarded a state award - the badge of distinction "For mentoring". This honorary award, established by Vladimir Putin's decree of March 2, 2018, was awarded for the first time to three people in the country, including Anatoly. This award recognizes services in the professional development and mentoring of young professionals.Since 1991, ITMO University has created a powerful school for training the world's best programmers according to ICPC (ITMO University is the only seven-time champion of this championship in the world). Anatoly has been teaching at ITMO University since 1998 at the Departments of Computer Technology and Programming Technologies. Through the efforts of the organizers of this direction, Vladimir Vasiliev and Vladimir Parfenov, with the active participation of Anatoly and his colleagues in the university have grown a group of outstanding software developers who have created the world's first 4G communicator (Yota by Skartel), the Kotlin programming language (the second official programming language for Android applications) and cryptocurrency software Cardano. Thanks to the scientific school they created, ITMO University ranked 56th in the Times Higher Education ranking in computer science in 2016, 76th in 2017, 71st in 2018, 74th in 2019, and 74th in 2021 in this nomination according to the QS World University Ranking.However, Professor Shalyto considers his main achievement to be his initiative to retain the most talented students at the university after graduation. Now at ITMO University, next to Parfenov and Shalyto, five champions and two prize-winners of the ICPC world programming championships are constantly working, as well as a large number of other young and talented scientists who successfully carry out research in such areas as bioinformatics and systems biology, machine learning, evolutionary computation, discrete optimization, programming technologies, including Automata-Based Programming.FIND ANATOLY ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | Facebook | VKontakte================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

Den of Rich
#253 - Alisa Melnikova

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 98:18


Alisa Melnikova is in charge of development, implementation, maintenance and operation of IT services and systems, digitalization of processes, advanced analytics, industry 4.0, corporate data management at SIBUR, the largest integrated petrochemicals company in Russia. SIBUR purchases hydrocarbons and processes them into plastics, rubbers and other high value added products.Alisa was appointed as CDIO of SIBUR on May 20, 2019, and engaged in the digitalization of production, management, client and other processes of the company. In April 2020, in order to achieve maximum results from the transformation program, all SIBUR's competencies of IT and digitalization were consolidated into SIBUR Digital with Alisa as a CEO. In 2020 was included in top-3 CIO of top-1000 Russian managers.Before joining SIBUR, Alisa was the leader of financial technologies of the Central Bank of the Russian Federation, previously for 4 years was the General Director of SberTech, where she was responsible for the projects of development and implementation of software in the interests of Sberbank, improving the quality and reliability the IT landscape of the company.================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

Den of Rich
#251 - Natalia Galkina

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 111:49


Natalia Galkina is a technology entrepreneur, neurophysiologist, economist. She is a Founder and CEO of Neurotrend - the first Russian neuromarketing company, the leader of the neuromarketing market in Russia with offices in Moscow and Singapore, the only Russian company-member of the world neuromarketing association NMSBA (Neuromarketing Science & Business Association).Natalia is one of the leading Russian entrepreneurs in the field of neurotechnology with a business turnover in 2019 of more than 300 million rubles. The only female leader of the segment in the Neuronet industry union: she is the head of the Neurocommunication and Marketing Department of the Neuronet Roadmap of the National Technology Initiative.Founder and CEO of NeuroChat, a company that has developed the world's first consumer-class neurocommunication system for people with speech and movement impairments, working in 6 languages. In addition to the opportunity to return to the world of communication, the system provides Internet access for people with disabilities, opportunities for neuro-training, inclusive education, and feasible work. NeuroChat held the world's first intercontinental session of neuro-communication between Russia and America, entered the 100 best inventions of the Russian Federation in 2017 according to Rospatent, became the winner of the CES Asia Innovation Awards 2018 in the Health category, "Hope for Technologies" of the Ministry of Industry and Trade of Russia, a finalist of the European Neuro Convention Innovation Of The Year Award 2019, finalist of Bayer Patents power 2019, winner of the Mayor's award "Innovator of Moscow 2020" in the nomination "Changing reality", etc.Both projects are residents of Skolkovo, NeuroChat also became a member of the Moscow Innovation Cluster and entered the list of innovative products of the Moscow Innovation Agency.Natalia is the owner of such prestigious personal awards as "Business Woman" and "Entrepreneur of the Year" EY 2017 in the High Technologies nomination, Neuronet Leader of the Year, BIZZ award - awards for business excellence from the World Business Confederation and the Global Technological Leadership award.Natalia is engaged in educational activities, being the author and teacher of neuromarketing and behavioral economics courses at Lomonosov Moscow State University and MGIMO, the initiator and co-author of the Neuromarketing training course standard. Natalia's research interests are brain-computer interface technologies and neuromarketing technologies.FIND NATALIA ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

All Things Policy
The Bear's Space Power

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 38:58


During the Cold War, the USSR was a pioneering space power, and its successor state the Russian Federation has inherited much of its grandeur and capabilities. In the early twenty-first century, the use of space has become vital for economies and militaries. To discuss the various strategic dimensions of Russian space power, Aditya Pareek joins Dmitry Stefanovich, a Research Fellow at the Center for International Security, Primakov Institute of World Economy and International Relations.Stefanovich is also an expert with the Russian International Affairs Council and a non-resident Fellow with IFSH Hamburg. He is a leading international expert on global security, strategic stability, nuclear weapons, and the military applications of emerging technologies.Follow Dmitry Stefanovich on Twitter - https://twitter.com/KomissarWhiplaFollow Aditya Pareek on Twitter - https://twitter.com/CabinMarineYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios You can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com

Den of Rich
#250 - Roman Buzunov

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 121:00


Roman Buzunov is the President of the Russian Society of Somnologists, Honored Doctor of the Russian Federation, Professor, Doctor of Medicine. Head of the Sleep Medicine Center at the Rehabilitation Clinic in Khamovniki. Leading Russian expert on insomnia, snoring and sleep apnea. Sleep wellness, sleep and bedroom hygiene specialist. He has many years of experience in advising and treating senior officials of the Russian Federation, prominent figures in science, art and sports, and well-known businessmen.Author of books “How to overcome insomnia? Healthy sleep in 6 weeks” (bestseller in 2020 and 2021 according to the websites OZON and LITRES), “Tips for healthy sleep 3.0”, “How to treat snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome”. The author of the program of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, which allows you to cure chronic insomnia in most patients in 6 weeks without sleeping pills.FIND ROMAN ON SOCIAL MEDIAFacebook | Instagram | YouTube================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

The John Batchelor Show
1634: 7/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor. Read by John Batchelor.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 5:13


Photo:  ZiL —Special escort-car of the President of the Russian Federation - ZIL-41072 «Scorpion».  [About as comfortable as a good Chevy. —ed] @Batchelorshow 7/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor.  Read by John Batchelor. https://www.amazon.com/Gordon-Liddy-Muse-Calvin-Batchelor/dp/0671690787 Permissions: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. |Attribution: Kremlin. [Moscow Kreml] This file comes from the website of the President of the Russian Federation and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. In short: you are free to distribute and modify the file as long as you attribute www.kremlin.ru. Note: Works published on site before April 8, 2014 are also licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. The permission letter from the Press Secretary for the President of the Russian Federation is available here.

Ukrainian Unleashed
30 years of Ukrainian independence: EP experts‘ summary

Ukrainian Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 10:30


In three decades, Ukraine has experienced more crises than neighbouring countries including a temporary loss of part of the territories in 2014-2015. For almost the entire first decade of independence, real GDP declined together with the incomes of all Ukrainians. In the mid-2000s, this trend broke, but not for long, as the prosperity of the Ukrainian economy was hampered by global economic shocks and military aggression by the Russian Federation. How did Ukraine survive these blows and was it able to surpass the economic figures of 1991? Let's find out.

The Critical Hour
US out to Destroy the Afghan Economy; Judge Questions DOJ Media Policy

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 116:34


Jonathan Kuttab, human rights lawyer, joins us to discuss Afghanistan. The Biden administration has moved to freeze assets of the Afghanistan government, and seems poised to enact harsh sanctions in an economic war on the Eurasian nation. Also, the US media is blaming corrupt Afghans rather than the elite ruling class of the US empire.Daniel Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "The Velvet Coup," joins us to discuss Ukraine. Ukraine is holding a summit called the "Crimea Platform" pledging to reclaim Crimea from the Russian Federation. Meanwhile, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov slams the summit as an empty endeavor with no prospects.Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch, and the author of "The American Farce Unravels: Shreds of January 6th," joins us to discuss a judge's ruling regarding prosecutions in the January 6th protest. A federal judge has questioned the Department of Justice regarding adherence to an internal policy on prosecuting journalists.Caleb Maupin, journalist and political analyst, joins us to discuss the US media's reaction to military adventurism. The media is parading an endless number of ultra-war hawks in front of viewers in an unambiguous move to push a pro-war narrative. Also, the media is pushing the CIA's previously revealed plot to use women's rights to drum up support for the furtherance of military aggression in Afghanistan.K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss Kamala Harris. Vice President Kamala Harris is on a mission to Asia to drum up support for aggression against China. Her attempts to woo Vietnam in this misadventure seem to be falling on deaf ears.Dan Kovalik, writer, author, and lawyer, joins us to discuss the Global South. The US media is once again involved in a misinformation campaign in support of imperialist intervention and regime change in Nicaragua. Also, a 471-page report by the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts for Bolivia (GIEI-Bolivia) confirms systematic torture and summary executions during the US-backed coup in 2019.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, Lebanon, joins us to discuss Israel. Despite recent calls for retribution after scantily substantiated accusations that Iran attacked an Israeli-linked merchant ship, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett is making the case for an extended covert war against the Islamic Republic. Also, Israel is planning more aggressive actions against the citizens of Gaza.Dr. Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss the economy. The House of Representatives has passed the 3.5 trillion dollar budget, and is planning on voting on the lesser infrastructure bill in September.

Den of Rich
#227 - Vladislav Sherstoboev

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 129:06


Vladislav Sherstoboev is a CEO and Member of the Board of Directors of Expert Group (federal network of medical centers), Doctor of Business Administration (DBA). Vladislav is a professional manager, since 2001 he has been working as a top manager in various businesses (FMCG, manufacturing, healthcare).Higher economic education (1991-1996), graduated from Executive Education on the topic "Leadership" (Moscow School of Management "Skolkovo", Moscow, 2007-2008) and MBA (International Institute of Management LINK, 2009), Doctor of Business Administration (DBA ) Higher School of Management, National Research University Higher School of Economics. He is constantly improving his knowledge, which is confirmed by certificates and diplomas of additional education:Kingston University, Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Certificate in Healthcare Management for Visiting Healthcare Professionals, November 7-24, 2014, London;Certificate under the program “Efficient management of reproduction clinic. The UK experience”, July 7, 2013, London;Course "Project Management", AFW (Germany) and International Academy of Coaching (Moscow), 2011;Program "Management of the educational process: the basics of a tutor", MIM LINK (Moscow), 2009;Vladislav has practical experience of working in large Russian companies. He is an expert in creating a vision and implementing a company's development strategy, carrying out organizational changes, creating leadership teams.Since 2009, he has taught at the MBA program (marketing, finance), leads author's training, seminars, and masterclasses. Vladislav has a blog sherstoboev.ruHas practical experience in project implementation:Creation of a new business line from scratch;Closing an unprofitable business;Opening branches in various cities of the Russian Federation (Krasnoyarsk, Ulyanovsk, Orenburg, Penza, Kazan);Purchase of businesses and their further adaptation to the current structure and culture of the buyer's company.Vladislav is a laureate of the 2014 "General Director" magazine award in the "Idea and Its Implementation" nomination, and according to the General Director magazine, in 2013 he entered the TOP - 250 General Directors of the Russian Federation. The ideological inspirer of the business club "TOP manager who creates the future" is a business community that unites professionals and business owners top-man.ruProfessional principles:“There are no subordinates in the team, there are EMPLOYEES. People cooperate rather than obey.""No one needs to be persuaded to work, it is necessary to create conditions under which it is not profitable for people not to do work.""Encourage initiative, and create conditions for the development of emotional intelligence and professional potential of people."“You can do everything you believe in!"FIND VLADISLAV ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube================================PODCAST INFO:Podcast website: https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcastApple podcast: https://apple.co/3kqOA7QSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2UOtE1AGoogle podcast: https://bit.ly/3jmA7ulSUPPORT & CONNECT:Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrichTwitter: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/denofrich/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich

Two Angry Immigrants Podcast
CBD in the ROC. (Or, Nyet, Panda Bear.)

Two Angry Immigrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 36:03


WE'RE BACK!   Davey fights through a terrible cold (not Covid, promise) and Moon pulls himself away from his TV for up-to-date Olympics coverage to discuss the Russian Federation, Simone Biles and the thirsty media coverage of her mental health, the USA's dominance at sports where their dominance should really just be a foregone conclusion, Dwayne Johnson's burgeoning political career, and why Davey will be heavily featured the next Rocky and Bullwinkle reboot.  

The John Batchelor Show
1549: The firefighters of Yakutia. @Felix_Light @CBSNews @MoscowTimes

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 12:21


Photo:  Yakut elder, early 20th century. The Yakuts, or the Sakha (Yakut: саха, sakha; plural: сахалар, sakhalar), are a Turkic ethnic group who mainly live in the Republic of Sakha in the Russian Federation, with some extending to the Amur, Magadan, Sakhalin regions, and the Taymyr and Evenk Districts of the Krasnoyarsk region. The Yakut language belongs to the Siberian branch of the Turkic languages. The Russian word yakut was taken from Evenk yokō. The Yakuts call themselves Sakha, or Urangai Sakha in some old chronicles. [Note proximity to the island Sakhalin. —ed.]             The ancestors of Yakuts were Kurykans who migrated from Yenisey river to Lake Baikal and were subject to a certain Mongolian admixture prior to migration in the 7th century. The Yakuts originally lived around Olkhon and the region of Lake Baikal. Beginning in the 13th century they migrated to the basins of the Middle Lena, the Aldan and Vilyuy rivers under the pressure of the rising Mongols. The northern Yakuts were largely hunters, fishermen and reindeer herders, while the southern Yakuts raised cattle and horses CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The firefighters of Yakutia. @Felix_Light @CBSNews @MoscowTimes https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/07/29/we-need-more-people-exhausted-firefighters-battle-siberia-blazes-a74643

Den of Rich
#218 - Alexandra Sukhareva

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 107:47


Alexandra Sukhareva is the TechLab Lead at PepsiCo Russia. Since June 2019, Alexandra has been responsible for development technological innovation and working with startups in PepsiCo Russia. Alexandra has 14 years of experience in FMCG, 7 of which are at PepsiCo. Having gained experience in digital and product marketing of large European companies, Alexandra joined PepsiCo in 2014 and took up the trend marketing of beverage and juice categories on the AFH channel, after which she moved to innovation management. Alexandra graduated with honors from the Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation with a degree in Finance and Credit. She also completed an online programme "Innovation in the Age of Disruption" at the INSEAD Business School.FIND ALEXANDRA ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | FacebookVisit the podcast page for additional content https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcast

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
Russia, The Enigma

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 22:56


Russia and Malaysia have had diplomatic ties since the 1960s, yet bilateral trade values remain low. How can this be improved and is the production of Sputnik V vaccines in this country be part of that? We speak to H.E. Nail Latypov, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to Malaysia to find out.

Diplomatic Immunity
Bonus: The Ambassadorial Series with Ambassador Tom Pickering and Jill Dougherty

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 61:40


A bonus episode on U.S.-Russia relations from The Ambassadorial Series at the Monterey Initiative in Russian Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. Ambassador Tom Pickering, Chair of the ISD Board of Advisers and a seven-time U.S. ambassador, discusses his experiences as ambassador to the Russian Federation from 1993 to 1996 with Georgetown University's Jill Dougherty.  Watch all eight video conversations: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLiPyUMZMRG090RRIITQCS4gBdaVOH_p99 Learn more about the series: https://www.middlebury.edu/institute/academics/centers-initiatives/monterey-initiative-russian-studies/ambassadorial-series Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

The Tommy Show
Dr. Ovi on Ice, Air and Space is Opening Back Up, New Coach at the Wizards, Trade Rumors

The Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 17:18


Smithsonian announced that visitors no longer need to reserve a timed-entry pass to check out most of the Smithsonian museums starting on Tuesday, July 20, except for the National Zoo and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which required free tickets prior to the pandemic. The Olympic Rings will be open to the public from 10AM to 6PM on Tuesday, July 20th on the grounds of the Washington Monument. Jazz in the Garden is now Concerts in the Garden, the series returns this month with four performances of different genres, including mariachi, brass, and classical music. ​​Russian Machine blog is reporting that Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin is about to be “Dr. Ovi”. The Federal Science Center of Sports and Culture at the Sports Ministry of the Russian Federation approved Ovechkin for the discussion and defense of his PhD dissertation. The topic: “Comparative Analysis of Professional Hockey Training Methods in North America and Russia.” Wizards welcome their new coach back to DC today, Wes Unseld, Jr a DMV-native and son of Bullets coach Wes Unseld Sr. Links: Ovi Getting his PhD Little Fox Talks Taking the Perfect Panda Selfie From Real.Fun.DC. “The Tommy and Kelly Show” is produced in Washington, DC providing news, culture, playful conversation, positive energy, and a dose of morning fun any time. Download the Real.Fun.DC. APP to check out our wide array of programming Follow Kelly Collis Twitter: @CityShopGirl

The John Batchelor Show
1513: #PodcastExtra: #TheGreatMigration: In Vilnius, the Lithuanians engage in an escalating information war with the Russian Federation. Michael Yon, Locals.com/YON #FriendsoftheHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 12:04


Photo: Office of War Information poster (OWI). Poster distributed by the OWI to manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, banks, liquor stores, taprooms, hotels, bars, beauty parlors, barber shops, war plants, American Legion posts, railways, bus and airline terminals, and government agencies. . @Batchelorshow #PodcastExtra: #TheGreatMigration: In Vilnius, the Lithuanians engage in an escalating information war with the Russian Federation. Michael Yon, Locals.com/YON #FriendsoftheHistoryDebatingSociety

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Mania by George Artem

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 23:08


Mania by George Artem Born in the Soviet Union in 1987, Artom George Katkoff immigrated to the United States with his immediate family in 1991 during the collapse of the Eastern Bloc. His paternal grandfather, Vladimir Katkoff, and great-grandmother had been living in Seattle since the 1970s, where Vladimir worked as an engineer at Boeing. Artom's father, George Katkoff, subsequently returned to what is now the Russian Federation, a few years after his divorce from Nataly Kacherovsky, a research scientist at the University of Washington and Artom's mother. Artom graduated from the University of Washington with an undergraduate degree in business administration and went on to work in Seattle's software industry, starting several businesses of his own and later completing a master of science in information systems from the Foster School of Business. In 2014, Artom was charged with attempted kidnapping in the second degree after showing concern for two young girls playing alone in his hometown park. He was held without arraignment for nearly eight weeks in solitary confinement at the King County Correctional Facility and suffered from a manic episode while he was incarcerated. In 2016, now George Artem, he sued King County as a pro se party on the grounds that his due process rights were violated, that solitary confinement was deliberately indifferent to the needs of a manic-depressive, and that he and others in solitary confinement were not offered equal treatment under the Americans with Disabilities Act. After years of litigation, his petition for writ of certiorari was finally denied by the United States Supreme Court in 2020. This text was originally written shortly after his release from solitary confinement and reflects the time he spent living in a halfway home, his struggle with addiction, the consequences of using drugs and alcohol, and the muse that is his manic-depressive condition.

World on Drugs with Steve Furey
The Cannibal Family Of Kransodar & The Russian Government That Tried To Cover It Up

World on Drugs with Steve Furey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 79:53


* episode starts at min 20*. From war lords, to drug kingpins, Cartels, criminals, gangs, serial killers, and ever day psychos, World on Drugs with Steve Furey deep dives into subjects and people other wont. We analyze it through the lens of comedy, to try and see how and why these people/event went down the wrong road. So come join me, Steve Furey and my funny friends to learn about some of the people who stay in the shadows. This week we got my buddy Ehsan Ahmad (@ehsanjahamd on Ig, Dangerous Brown Podcast) in the studio studio! Honestly one of my fav eps so far, we have a real hoot poking fun at these psychos, Dmitry and Natalia Baksheev ! If you love a creepy couple who ate humans and a Russian Government who tried to cover it up, you'll love this episode! sources “Russian Man Sentenced to More than 12 Years in Krasnodar Cannibal Case.” Radio Free Europe. 28 June 2019. https://www.rferl.org/a/russian-man-sentenced-to-more-than-12-years-in-krasnodar-cannibals-ca se/30026331.html. “Russian Woman Sentenced to 10 Years in Krasnodar Cannibal Case.” Radio Free Europe. 28 February 2019. https://www.rferl.org/a/russian-woman-sentenced-to-10-years-in-krasnodar-cannibals-case/2979 5713.html Wootson, Cleve R. “Russian Cannibal Couple May Have Drugged, Killed and Eaten as Many as 30 People.” Washington Post. 27 September 2017. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/09/26/russian-cannibal-couple-mayhave-drugged-killed-and-eaten-as-many-as-30-people-police-say/ Stewart, Will. “Notorious ‘Devil' Cannibal Dies in Jail, Leaving Mystery Over Dozens of Victims.” The Mirror. 18 February 2020. https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/notorious-devil-cannibal-dies-jail-21519380 “The TFR Did Not Find Confirmation That a Family of Cannibal Killers Operated in Krasnodar.” Interfax. 28 September 2017. https://www.interfax-russia.ru/south-and-north-caucasus/news/skr-ne-nashel-podtverzhdeniya-c hto-v-krasnodare-deystvovala-semya-ubiyc-kannibalov “In Krasnodar, Investigators Establish the Circumstances of the Murder of a Woman and the Dismemberment of Her Body.” Investigative Department of the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation for Krasnodar Territory. 25 September 2017. https://kuban.sledcom.ru/news/item/1166808 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
What did Hillary Clinton know about Fauci's role in Wuhan lab?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 99:23


Today on TruNews, the West continues its infuriation of Vladimir Putin and the Russian Federation, as threats of nuclear response are tossed back and forth by both sides. John McAfee's death by hanging in a secure Barcelona cell is questioned. Biden's nomination for Bureau of Land Management is more interested in population control. Finally, Hillary Clinton's State Department was fully aware of the bioweapon threat from China's Wuhan lab as far back as 2009. Rick Wiles, Edward Szall, Doc Burkhart. Airdate (6/25/21)

Den of Rich
#181 - Gennady Konstantinov

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 116:11


Gennady Konstantinov is a Doctor of Physics and Mathematics, an ordinary professor at the Higher School of Economics, Honored Worker of Higher School of the Russian Federation, a member of the committee for maintaining the National Register of Independent Directors at the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP), an arbitrator of the Joint Commission on Corporate Ethics of the RSPP, an independent member of the Board of Directors STiM, Belarus. Co-founder of the consulting company Sintegra-SM. Consulting projects in the development of personal and corporate strategies, design, and moderation of strategic sessions.Basic information. In 1974 Gennady graduated from Irkutsk State University with a degree in applied mathematics. In 1974-1975 he studied in full-time postgraduate studies, then in 1975-1978 in correspondence postgraduate studies at Irkutsk State University. In 1979 he defended his Ph.D. thesis on the topic “Normalization of effects on dynamic systems” at the Ural State University. In 1989 he defended his doctoral dissertation on the topic “Reachable sets and their external estimates in the problems of normalization of influences on dynamical systems” at the Computing Center of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. Author of over 140 scientific and educational works.From 1976 to 1990 Assistant, Senior Lecturer, Associate Professor of the Department of Systems Theory of ISU. From 1990 to 1992 - Head of the Department of Systems Theory, Irkutsk State University. In 1991-1992, he took an active part in the creation of the Siberian-American Faculty of Management. 1992-1999 - Professor at the Faculty of Management, Academic Director of the Management Program, implemented jointly with the University of Maryland. From 2000 to the present - Professor of the Research University - Higher School of Economics. From 2000 to 2007 he took part in educational programs of the World Bank Institute, the Joint Vienna Institute. In 2001-2006, he was Academic Director of the Russian-Canadian Program on Corporate Governance, carried out by the Higher School of Economics in cooperation with the Schulich School of Business at York University. From 2012 to 2016, a member of the Board of Directors of JSC RZDstroy.Teaching activity at the present time. The main courses in the MBA, ЕхМВА, and DBA programs are Strategic Thinking, Strategic Management, Systems Thinking, Corporate Governance, Strategic Modeling of the Future. Author of textbooks “Strategic management. Concepts "(2009, 2013)," Strategic Thinking "(2015, 2019).FIND GENNADY ON SOCIAL MEDIALinkedIn | YouTubeVisit the podcast page for additional content https://www.uhnwidata.com/podcast

The Critical Hour
Iran Elects Conservative President; More Russia Sanctions; EU Leaders Cold to US Anti-China Push

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 117:07


Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, Lebanon, joins us to discuss Iran. Iran's new president, Ebrahim Raisi, is known as a conservative hardliner with close ties to the Islamic Republic's Supreme Leader. Described by outside observers as a hardliner, Raisi has already stated that he does not intend to sign off on a nuclear deal unless it serves the interests of Iran.Ted Rall, political cartoonist and syndicated columnist, joins us to discuss the media. An enlightening Washington Post article featured a picture of newspaper owner Jeff Bezos and argues that it is wrong to raise taxes on billionaires. Also, Robert Reich argues that the US's biggest enemy is not China, but the drift towards proto-fascism. Reich also explores the US history of blaming outside entities for our own shortcomings. Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to talk about Russia. The US is preparing another list of sanctions against Russia, this time regarding a convicted embezzler named Alexei Navalny. Also, US civil rights observers are arguing that the focus on Navalny should be ditched and refocused on the many people who are languishing in prison in the US for minor drug crimes. Currently, a Louisiana father of seven is serving over 13 years in jail for approximately one gram of marijuana. Ray McGovern, former CIA analyst and co-founder of the Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, joins us to discuss his latest article about US-Russia relations. Ray argues that President Biden's foreign policy team is woefully misinformed in their quest to break the strategic partnership between Russia and China. Also, Ray discusses President Putin's comment regarding lightning flashes of trust between him and the US president. William J. Astore, retired lieutenant USAF colonel and a senior fellow at the Eisenhower Media Network, joins us to discuss his latest article. Lieutenant Astore discusses the myriad of military failures experienced by the United States over the last several decades, and warns that a continuance of the current foreign policy track will guarantee similar outcomes in future endeavors.KJ, Noh, writer and peace activist, joins us to discuss China. Armin Laschet, the current frontrunner to succeed German Chancellor Angela Merkel, has stated that he opposes a cold war against China. Mr. Laschet also called for western states to cool tensions with Russia, insisting they must “establish a sensible relationship” with Moscow.Danny Shaw, professor of Latin studies, joins us to discuss Venezuela. President Biden has rejected calls for stopping the draconian sanctions against Venezuela. Also, a bilateral meeting has been scheduled for Tuesday, June 22, between the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Jorge Arreaza Montserrat, and his counterpart from the Russian Federation, Foreign Affairs Minister Sergey Lavrov.Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss NATO. Quincy Institute president Andrew Bacevich's new book, "After the Apocalypse,'' argues that the US needs to make several radical foreign policy changes, starting with ending all involvement with NATO. Also, Jeremy Kuzmarov argues that President Biden's current foreign policy plans to increase military spending in NATO will increase the odds of war.

Global Security
Biden and Putin both place a ‘high priority' on cybersecurity, says presidential adviser after Geneva summit

Global Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021


US President Joe Biden met face-to-face with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday in Geneva.Earlier this week, Biden called Putin a "worthy adversary." Biden has also called Putin a "killer," to which Putin responded, "It takes one to know one."Related: Alexei Navalny's top strategist talks about his current situationDespite tensions in the lead-up to the summit, however, the two leaders were overly cordial in their remarks following their meeting in Geneva on Wednesday. Speaking through an interpreter, Putin stressed there was no hostility between the two leaders. Related: Russia's vote at UN could cut off humanitarian aid to northwest Syria"This was a productive meeting. It was fruitful. It was to the point. And it took place in an atmosphere that was actually enabling," Putin said. Putin repeatedly mentioned how the US and Russia face the same threats from cyberattacks to climate change.Related: Biden at NATO: Ready to talk China, Russia and soothe alliesNeither side made any threats, Biden said. And while they have their clear differences, the two leaders laid the groundwork for future cooperation. "This is not a kumbaya moment, as we used to say back in the '60s in the United States, like 'let's hug and love each other.' But, it's clearly not in anybody's interest — your country or mine — for us to be in a situation where we're in a new Cold War," Biden said. Rose Gottemoeller, lead US negotiator for the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) joined The World's host Marco Werman to offer insight into the meeting between the two presidents. She was on the team that briefed Biden for his meeting with Putin. Related: How Joe Biden could increase pressure on Vladimir PutinMarco Werman: So, you heard the two press conferences that both men gave. Did both leaders get what they came for? Rose Gottemoeller: It sounds like it, frankly, although, you know, the stance of the two was so different. You know, Putin was definitely being the master propagandist that he is and throwing everything back at the United States, everything wrong in Russia was the fault of the United States. And frankly, you know, I'm used to that. His Soviet predecessors did the same, but that was not the kind of thing we were hearing from Biden. What I liked about Biden was the way in which he subtly, you know, he didn't issue any threats, just as you said a moment ago.But he's subtly indicated that there are some things that Putin ought to think about. He said, "I just made some simple assertions," such as does he really want a Cold War with us when he's facing a 1,200-mile border with China and China is surging economically and militarily? Now, of course, Putin would never admit that he's concerned about China or Xi Jinping, but, you know, maybe that got him thinking. So, in other words, I thought there was a certain subtlety in Biden's approach, certainly as conveyed during his press conference compared to what we were hearing from Mr. Putin.I'm curious, what advice did you give President Biden? Did you see any of your advice come into play today? Well, I don't want to, as they say, in any way, endanger the confidentiality of those exchanges. But I will say that Biden seemed to me, even going into that meeting, very well prepared. He'd known about Putin's behavior for a long time. He'd met with them in the Kremlin when he was vice president. And furthermore, his negotiating skills were well-honed in all his years in the Senate. So, I think he was he was well-prepared for the meeting, but it was good as far as I was concerned. He was very interested in the strategic stability agenda. And so, I talked to him about that. And it was very good that, to me, it was front and center again in the remarks that both Putin and Biden made about what had transpired.There are so many disagreements and areas of confrontation between Russia and the US. Did Biden make any headway on human rights, for example, the case of Russian political prisoner Alexei Navalny? Not seemingly. I mean, again, all the remarks of Putin were not taking any blame whatsoever for human rights violations in the Russian Federation or in any way indicating he was ready to make anything right. But I liked the way Biden put it. He said, you really have to just understand that what I was trying to do was get across three things. I identify our practical work areas, remark directly, comment directly on issues that are important to us and make very clear the priorities and values that the United States and those last two really get to the issues of human rights, and Alexei Navalny.And I think he left Putin in no uncertain terms as to what the US views are of the Navalny case. And, you know, the remarks about, "Well, what would happen if Navalny died in jail? You need to think about that, President Putin, if you want your country to be in any way able to work with the rest of the world." Another area of confrontation is cybersecurity. The US alleges that Russia was behind several ransomware attacks on the US. From what you heard today, is this an area where the US and Russia can make progress? I hope so. The fact that they are going to really get down to substantive discussions, we have had working groups working on issues like, you know, cyberconfidence-building and so forth for many years. So, the two communities — the technical communities — know each other in the United States and Russia. I do think there's a potential to make progress here. Evidently, according to Biden, we handed over a list of our particular no-go zones where we would like to see a kind of sanctuary established for not attacking with cyberweapons in both countries.And I think that's important. That has to do with protecting critical infrastructure, which, again, is something that Putin should be concerned about in the Russian Federation. So, I think we've got the technical wherewithal. We've got the right people now. Can we make progress on the specifics? And both men seem to indicate it was a high priority. They wanted to see progress in this area. From what we've seen today, is President Putin a leader that Biden in the US can actually work with?I think that it will be necessary to work with him on areas where we have a mutual interest. And again, I think that Biden has it right when he said it's not about trust, but it's about our self-interest — the US self-interest. And he got that point across very squarely, I thought, in his press conference. I'm sure it's the same point that he made to Putin directly. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

New Books Network
Larry E. Holmes, "Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917" (Indiana UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 57:27


The clash between scholarship and politics—between truth and propaganda— had always been a conflict of great importance. In the 1920s the Commission for the Collection, Study, and Publication of Materials on the October Revolution and History of the Communist Party (Istpart, in abbreviated Russian) was formed. Istpart’s historians were tasked with preserving the documentary record, compiling memoirs, and upholding ideological conformism within the national narrative of the 1917 revolution. In Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917 (Indiana UP, 2021), Larry E. Holmes focuses on the work of Istpart’s main office in Moscow and of its branch in Viatka. Istpart initially hoped to abide by the demands of both scholarship and politics when formulating the principles of historical research and when writing about the 1917 revolution. In that effort, Istpart in Moscow and its affiliate in Viatka acted sometimes in concert but often in conflict. Istpart’s initial faith in a symbiosis of scholarship and politics eroded, slowly at first, then rapidly. However, they quickly realized that the party rejected any version of history that suggested nonideological or nonpolitical sources of truth. By 1928, Istpart had largely abandoned its mission to promote scholarly work on the 1917 revolution and instead advanced the party's master narrative. Revising the Revolution explores the battle for the Russian national narrative and the ways in which history can be used to centralize power. This book addresses two issues of relevance to today’s Russian Federation. Once again the center’s politicians demand of professional historians a useful and not necessarily objective rendition of the past. Yet this authoritarian state with its power-vertical, as Vladimir Putin likes to call it, cannot always get its way without resistance from below. As recent events in Ekaterinburg and Khabarovsk indicate, people in Russia’s provinces, as in Viatka earlier in Istpart’s history, act on their own interests and, in the case of officials, in the interests of the institutions and the region they represent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Larry E. Holmes, "Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917" (Indiana UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 57:27


The clash between scholarship and politics—between truth and propaganda— had always been a conflict of great importance. In the 1920s the Commission for the Collection, Study, and Publication of Materials on the October Revolution and History of the Communist Party (Istpart, in abbreviated Russian) was formed. Istpart’s historians were tasked with preserving the documentary record, compiling memoirs, and upholding ideological conformism within the national narrative of the 1917 revolution. In Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917 (Indiana UP, 2021), Larry E. Holmes focuses on the work of Istpart’s main office in Moscow and of its branch in Viatka. Istpart initially hoped to abide by the demands of both scholarship and politics when formulating the principles of historical research and when writing about the 1917 revolution. In that effort, Istpart in Moscow and its affiliate in Viatka acted sometimes in concert but often in conflict. Istpart’s initial faith in a symbiosis of scholarship and politics eroded, slowly at first, then rapidly. However, they quickly realized that the party rejected any version of history that suggested nonideological or nonpolitical sources of truth. By 1928, Istpart had largely abandoned its mission to promote scholarly work on the 1917 revolution and instead advanced the party's master narrative. Revising the Revolution explores the battle for the Russian national narrative and the ways in which history can be used to centralize power. This book addresses two issues of relevance to today’s Russian Federation. Once again the center’s politicians demand of professional historians a useful and not necessarily objective rendition of the past. Yet this authoritarian state with its power-vertical, as Vladimir Putin likes to call it, cannot always get its way without resistance from below. As recent events in Ekaterinburg and Khabarovsk indicate, people in Russia’s provinces, as in Viatka earlier in Istpart’s history, act on their own interests and, in the case of officials, in the interests of the institutions and the region they represent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Larry E. Holmes, "Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917" (Indiana UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 57:27


The clash between scholarship and politics—between truth and propaganda— had always been a conflict of great importance. In the 1920s the Commission for the Collection, Study, and Publication of Materials on the October Revolution and History of the Communist Party (Istpart, in abbreviated Russian) was formed. Istpart’s historians were tasked with preserving the documentary record, compiling memoirs, and upholding ideological conformism within the national narrative of the 1917 revolution. In Revising the Revolution: The Unmaking of Russia's Official History of 1917 (Indiana UP, 2021), Larry E. Holmes focuses on the work of Istpart’s main office in Moscow and of its branch in Viatka. Istpart initially hoped to abide by the demands of both scholarship and politics when formulating the principles of historical research and when writing about the 1917 revolution. In that effort, Istpart in Moscow and its affiliate in Viatka acted sometimes in concert but often in conflict. Istpart’s initial faith in a symbiosis of scholarship and politics eroded, slowly at first, then rapidly. However, they quickly realized that the party rejected any version of history that suggested nonideological or nonpolitical sources of truth. By 1928, Istpart had largely abandoned its mission to promote scholarly work on the 1917 revolution and instead advanced the party's master narrative. Revising the Revolution explores the battle for the Russian national narrative and the ways in which history can be used to centralize power. This book addresses two issues of relevance to today’s Russian Federation. Once again the center’s politicians demand of professional historians a useful and not necessarily objective rendition of the past. Yet this authoritarian state with its power-vertical, as Vladimir Putin likes to call it, cannot always get its way without resistance from below. As recent events in Ekaterinburg and Khabarovsk indicate, people in Russia’s provinces, as in Viatka earlier in Istpart’s history, act on their own interests and, in the case of officials, in the interests of the institutions and the region they represent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

World on Drugs with Steve Furey
Russia's Worst Serial Killers, The Academy Maniacs and Alexander Pichushkin

World on Drugs with Steve Furey

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 112:45


From war lords, to drug kingpins, Cartels, criminals, gangs, serial killers, and ever day psychos, World on Drugs with Steve Furey deep dives into subjects and people other wont. We analyze it through the lens of comedy, to try and see how and why these people/event went down the wrong road. So come join me, Steve Furey and my funny friends to learn about some of the people who stay in the shadows. This week we got my buddy Daouud Naimyar (@daouud_Naimyar) is on the show! We both started stand up together in Northern ca, and he's one of my best comedy buds. This episode is equally terrifying as it is hilarious. Daouud and i take it to places, most people wouldnt. Alot like these two psychos Anouvfriev and Lytkin. They murdered 15+ people in the matter of 6 months in Russia. They also loved, and looked up to Alexandre Pichushkin who murdered 40+ people in a park he played chess in every day, so we do a lil, Inception episode. An episode inside of an episode. 2 for the price of one! Enjoy! and please share and comment! Sources Criminalminds.com Blog Rosfinmonitoring. Federal Financial Monitoring Service of the Russian Federation. List of Terrorists and Extremists. http://fedsfm.ru/documents/terrorists.html Official Russian site for the financial monitoring of terrorist and extremist activities in Russia. Much of the data is on current, rather than historical, criminals, but much of the biographical information on Anoufriev and Lytkin come from this site, which in turn used data and information collected by police authorities during the investigation and trial. Nikita, Mogutin. “Medical Maniac Begs His Victims for Forgiveness.” Life Magazine Russia. 9 June 2011. An overview of the case, published shortly after their arrest, during a pre-trial interview. Covers much of the timeline and basics of the case, but published before their trial and well before their sentencing. Includes an interview with Anoufriev. “Hammers Who Attacked Passerby's Sentenced.” Interfax Russia. 2 April 2013. An overview of the case published during sentencing, with much of the common background found on other Russian news sites. Includes a list of the specific criminal codes charged against Anoufriev and Lytkin. “The Supreme Court of the Russian Federation "by a quarter" reduced the term of one of the "Academician hammers" who killed 6 people.” NEWS Ru. Crime. 8 October 2013. An overview of the case, updated for the resentencing of Lytkin. Covers family developments during the period immediately following the arrest of the two men. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Northstar Unplugged
#050. Crist Inman PhD: conservation-focused tourism in Costa Rica and beyond

Northstar Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 49:39


Crist began his career in restaurant and hotel operations, followed by graduate studies at Cornell University. His doctoral dissertation provided a foundation for the entrepreneurial conservation work he has been involved in ever since. In 1995 he was invited to lead the Tourism Competitiveness & Sustainable Development project, facilitating innovation in Latin America’s emerging “green” destinations. Starting in Costa Rica he worked with public and private sector leaders to ensure a coherent national strategy with conservation commitments as a key selling point. He continued this work over the next several years in the other Central American countries, followed by the Andean region, the Galapagos Islands, and Chile’s Patagonia region. In 1999 he founded a management company to serve conservation-focused investors in this niche: La Paz Group has focused on developing and managing brands in the private sector dedicated to the entrepreneurial conservation of natural and cultural patrimony. This practice has included the planning, start-up and ongoing operations management of conservation-focused resorts such as Lapa Rios in Costa Rica, and Chan Chich Lodge in Belize, and expanding Xandari from a single resort in Costa Rica to a multi-property brand in Kerala, India. From 2000-2010 Crist also taught courses in social enterprise for ESSEC in France, Instituto de Empresa in Spain, as well as Columbia University and Cornell University in the USA. For Cornell his course offered graduate students the opportunity to participate in semester-long field work on sustainable development projects in Senegal; Costa Rica; Croatia; Kerala, India; the Siberia region of the Russian Federation; and the Patagonia region of Chile. In 2019 Crist co-founded Organikos, a company that works with entrepreneurs in the artisanal food sector to commercialize “taste of place” products, and Authentica, a retail business focused on locally produced design-forward handicrafts.Resources:La Paz GroupOrganikosOrganikos blog“Beans, Birds, and Business Savvy” (Carol Latter)- Seasons MagazineProfessor Crist Inman on Sustainability, CBS Master Class, and beavers!-  3 minutes from/about the last course Crist taughtPatagonia Expedition RaceCrist’s book recommendations: April Morning  (Howard Fast)Zorba The Greek (Nikos Kazantzakis)Travels In Hyperreality (Umberto Eco)

The John Batchelor Show
1387: The unnamed Biden policy toward the predictably hostile Pyongyang. @JoshRogin

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 12:20


Photo:  Triumphal arch, Pyongyang.  "Joint issue of the Russian Federation and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Korea."   Postage stamp.The New John Batchelor ShowCBS Audio Network@BatchelorshowThe unnamed Biden policy toward the predictably hostile Pyongyang. @JoshRoginhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/05/05/bidens-north-korea-strategy-hurry-up-wait/

By Any Means Necessary
Mortal Kombat, Lesser Evil: How Dems Use GOP To Keep The Base In Line

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 113:58


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Mitchell Plitnick, political analyst and co-author of the new book “Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics,” to discuss President Joe Biden's address before a joint session of Congress, the fawning response to the speech by mainstream media, and why Biden's proposals appear aimed towards countering China rather than improving the lives of working people in the US.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Jon Jeter, award-winning journalist and foreign correspondent, radio and television producer, Bluesologist and Decolonizer, and author of the book “Flat Broke in the Free Market: How Globalization Fleeced Working People,” to continue to discuss President Biden's speech as well as Biden's increasingly aggressive rhetoric towards both the Russian Federation and the People's Republic of China.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Atlanta-based activist Monica Johnson to discuss the hate crimes and murder charges filed against the men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery, the historical significance of the apparent vigilante slaying which preceded the police murder of George Floyd, and the latest wave of police killings being denounced by protesters across the country.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Brandon Sutton, host of The Discourse podcast, to discuss the release of the long-awaited Mortal Kombat movie, South Carolina Senator Tim Scott's insistence that “America is not a racist country,” and why the Democratic and Republican parties actually ‘complement' one another.

The John Batchelor Show
1364: #JerusalemReport: Expanding levels of Iranian activity in Morocco. @IlanBerman, American Foreign Policy Council; Malcolm Hoenlein, @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 11:00


Photo: The Sultan of Morocco on his way to worship in the Kutubia mosque in his capital at Fez..The New John Batchelor ShowCBS Audio Network@Batchelorshow#JerusalemReport: Expanding levels of Iranian activity in Morocco. @IlanBerman American Foreign Policy Council Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1Ilan Berman is Senior Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington, DC. An expert on regional security in the Middle East, Central Asia, and the Russian Federation, he has consulted for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency as well as the U.S. Departments of State and Defense, and has also provided assistance on foreign policy and national security issues to a range of governmental agencies and congressional offices. He has been called one of America's "leading experts on the Middle East and Iran" by CNN. Related articles: https://www.timesofisrael.com/iran-saudi-arabia-said-holding-direct-talks-to-mend-regional-rift/ https://www.newsweek.com/moment-truth-morocco-opinion-1583026 https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2021/04/16/diplomatic-arson-in-the-middle-east/