Podcasts about Columbia

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Best podcasts about Columbia

Show all podcasts related to columbia

Latest podcast episodes about Columbia

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning
The Power of Blended Classrooms with Denise Cruz

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:19


In 2020, Denise Cruz, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia, worked with the CTL through a Provost's Innovative Course Design Grant to transform her large lecture course in Asian American Literature into a blended format. Today, we speak with Denise about the profound impact the new course format has had on student engagement, motivation, and collaboration in her class, and the dead ideas in teaching that she confronted as she designed and taught it. Spoiler alert: the redesign was so successful that Dr. Cruz was awarded both the Presidential Teaching Award and Mark Van Doren Teaching Award. Transcript available at ctl.columbia.edu/podcastResourcesDenise Cruz presents her course redesign project at Columbia's 2021 Celebration of Teaching and Learning Symposium: https://youtu.be/_QA9FdiYNfE

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover
Why You're Constantly Hiding Yourself | Genesis 3

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 32:28


The first pages of Genesis are filled with powerful word imagery. Written more than 3,000 years ago, Genesis remains ahead of our time in its picture of the deepest realities in your life. And Genesis 3 explains so much about why you are constantly feeling the need to hide yourself. Hide yourself from others, from God, and even from yourself. But are you really safe to be vulnerable? Let's talk about it in this episode. Genesis 2:9 NIV The LORD God made all kinds of trees grow out of the ground—trees that were pleasing to the eye and good for food.   Genesis 2:16–17 NIV And the LORD God commanded the man, “You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die.” Genesis 2:25 NIV Adam and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame. Genesis 3:1 NIV Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the LORD God had made. Genesis 3:7 NIV Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves. But Genesis 2:18 NIV The LORD God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone.”   Genesis 3:8 NIV Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the LORD God among the trees of the garden.   Genesis 3:9–10 NIV But the LORD God called to the man, “Where are you?” He answered, “I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid.”   Who can you share this podcast with? If you found this episode helpful, consider sharing it on social media or texting it to a friend you think might benefit from it. Follow Dave Cover on Twitter https://twitter.com/davecover (@davecover) Follow A Bigger Life on Twitter https://twitter.com/abiggerlifepod (@ABiggerLifePod) This podcast is a ministry of https://www.thecrossingchurch.com/ (The Crossing), a church in Columbia, Missouri, a college town where the flagship campus of the University of Missouri is located.

Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren
Dishin' Dirt on Non-Resident Out of State Seller Withholding Taxes. Yuck!

Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 29:36


When a non-resident, Out of State Seller sells their property, it often triggers a requirement for the closing attorney to collect and hold possible state capital gain taxes.  Understanding what the law is pertaining to withholding taxes helps show your client your level of professionalism and knowledge.  In this episode you will learn what is a non-resident seller, how much money is collected from the non-resident seller at closing, how is the amount  calculated, what are capital gains and what are the exceptions to the withholding rules.Also, another installment of As Gary Sees It on the Oregon law suit on "Love Letters" and Gary's Good News Only!I-295 formhttps://dor.sc.gov/forms-site/Forms/I295.pdfI-290 formhttps://dor.sc.gov/forms-site/Forms/I290.pdfEnjoy!Gary

Not Your Normal Murder
The Murder of Tammy Parker and Bryan Capnerhurst

Not Your Normal Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 54:22


Episode #95 // The Murder of Tammy Parker and Bryan Capnerhurst On a Friday afternoon in 2012, in Columbia, South Carolina, 911 is called by a frantic, hysterical man. He tells the operator that his wife has been shot, and told the operator he knew who did it. That the shooter, is business colleague Bryan Capnerhurst, came into their home, and tried to rob them, shooting his wife in the process. But after the scene was assessed, and the police started investigating, they discovered this was anything but an open and shut home invasion gone wrong. Help You Find Me: The safest way to store your private information. Sign up, enter your information into the encrypted spaces, and choose who can access the information, and when. Update your information on the go, including travel plans and photos. National Suicide Hotline # 1800-273-8255 National Domestic Violence Hotline | Get Help Today | 1-800-799-7233 This episode may contain graphic details and strong language and may not be suitable for all listeners. Listener discretion is advised. Disclaimer: Any verbal opinion by the hosts of any person's involvement with a crime who has not been found guilty by a jury of peers is pure speculation and should not be considered as fact. Make sure to comment and leave a review! Check out our Facebook page, Instagram, TikTok and Twitter and let us know what you thought of the episode. Also let us know what cases you would like us to cover in the future! We are proudly part of the Oracl3 Network. Find their website here. Patreon.com/NYNM TikTok: NYNMPod Facebook: @NYNMPodcast Instagram: Not Your Normal Murder Email: Notyournormalmurder@gmail.com Twitter: @NYNMPodcast Youtube:  Not Your Normal Murder For a full list of sources used for this episode please visit here.  This episode was researched, written, and recorded by Mary Kiesewetter and Deirdre Teichman. Editing by Kevin Kiesewetter. Music credits to DanoSongs and Rob Chrisman. All rights reserved. Not Your Normal Murder is partnered with the Oracl3 Network. 

The Pete Kaliner Show
Sean Spicer: Democrats Want DC As A State For The Two Senate Seats

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:51


Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer joins Pete to talk about the rising cost of Thanksgiving, CNN's Chris Cuomo protecting his brother during the NY Governor's sexual misconduct case and the reasons why Democrats want Congressional representation in the District of Columbia.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Growing With Fishes Podcast
2nd Annual Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference: Danielle Maitland of Aqualitas

Growing With Fishes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 57:26


The 2nd Annual Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference is finally here. Be sure not to miss the biggest free educational event of the year! We are happy to bring you this incredible line of up speakers for the 2nd Annual Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference from around the globe. We have a world class line up of speakers from the Australia, United Kingdom, South Africa, Columbia, Switzerland, Sweden, Canada, and across the USA. They will covering topics like sustainable production, DNA analysis of soil microbes, microbial production and inoculation, sustainable production, ferments as nutrient inputs in aquaponics, breeding cannabis in aquaponics, organic certified aquaponic cannabis production in the EU, cannabis cultivar patent and protections, Korean natural farming inputs in aquaponics, soil science for aquaponics, commercial aquaponic considerations, living soil applications in aquaponics, pest management in aquaponics, Aquaponic production in Africa, commercial growers panel, craft/microlicense growers panel, home growers panel, and MUCH MUCH more! Filmed Live November 13th & 14th from 8 am to 10 pm PST Aqualitas Inc @AqualitasInc Want to Support the Conference? Shirts https://jellibomb.com/collections/aquaponic-cannabis-conference-2020?fbclid=IwAR3P2ym57P0OXaAJHXozGLh8lQxxeE_SHwFiDYlLfTgYTW4lHnscLoew_7A Aquaponic Cannabis Master Class www.APMJClass.com

The Stacks
Ep. 192 Yo, Is This Racist with Andrew Ti

The Stacks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 59:32


Andrew Ti is the creator and co-host of the Yo, Is This Racist podcast, and a comedy and TV writer. He joins the show today to talk about his journey from a neuroscience major at Columbia to the writers room on mixed-ish. We also talk about his relationship to problematic white authors, his aversion to funny books, and more. You can find links to everything we discuss on today's show on The Stacks' Website: https://thestackspodcast.com/2021/12/01/ep-192-andrew-ti/The Stacks Book Club selection for December is A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance by Hanif Abdurraqib, we will discuss the book on December 29th with Andrew Ti.Connect with Andrew: Twitter | Instagram | WebsiteConnect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Shop | Patreon | Goodreads | SubscribeSUPPORT THE STACKSJoin The Stacks Pack on PatreonLibro.FM - get two audiobooks for the price of one when you use the code THESTACKS at checkout, and you can gift audiobook memberships to someone in your life easily right here!Purchasing books through Bookshop.org or Amazon earns The Stacks a small commission. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Neurosurgery Podcast
Residency Spotlights: UT SW! Spectrum MSU! Columbia!

Neurosurgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 40:50


Conversations with Drs. Nader Pouratian, Paul Mazaris, and Neil Feldstein

The Real News Podcast
Student workers lead rank-and-file revolt at Columbia University

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:38


Back in the spring, we spoke with three graduate student workers at Columbia University who were on strike with the Student Workers of Columbia union, UAW Local 2110. After rank-and-file members rejected the tentative agreement between the university and the bargaining committee, negotiations continued. However, Columbia has still failed to meet key demands, including better wages, dental and vision healthcare coverage, and third-party arbitration for cases involving harassment and discrimination. Now, Student Workers of Columbia are back on strike and have been on the picket line since Nov. 3. In this mini-cast, we talk with three graduate student workers, Joanna Lee, Tamara Hache, and Caroline Smith, about the current strike and how academic workers are an essential part of the labor movement.Additional links/info below...Student Workers of Columbia, UAW Local 2110 website, Facebook page, and Twitter page:https://www.studentworkersofcolumbia.com/https://www.facebook.com/swcuawhttps://twitter.com/SW_ColumbiaHardship Fund for Columbia Student Workers #CUonStrike: https://opencollective.com/student-workers-of-columbia/projects/withheld-stipendsWorking People, "Mini-cast: Columbia Is a Bully (w/ Joanna Lee, Harlan Chambers, & Cameron Foltz)": https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93b3JraW5ncGVvcGxlLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz/episode/NjgwY2MzZmUtZjY5Yy00YjcxLTg2YTMtYmVmMThmMGRkNzRh?sa=X&ved=0CAUQkfYCahcKEwiwxtOpi7_0AhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQCg&hl=enJoanna's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/jjotatoesTamara's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/te_hacheCaroline's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/Caro_lineP2Ashley Wong, The New York Times, "Why Columbia Student Workers Are Back On Strike": https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/24/nyregion/columbia-grad-student-strike.htmlRachel Himes, Jacobin, "Why Columbia Graduate Workers Like Me Are on Strike": https://www.jacobinmag.com/2021/11/columbia-university-graduate-workers-strike-dental-care-higher-wagesBenjamin Stein, Columbia Spectator, “Columbia Endowment Soars Up 32.3 Percent to $14.35 Billion as Markets Recover from COVID-19 Recession”: https://www.columbiaspectator.com/news/2021/10/27/columbia-endowment-soars-up-323-percent-to-1435-billion-as-markets-recover-from-covid-19-recession/Featured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive at freemusicarchive.org):Jules Taylor, "Working People Theme Song"Help us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover
Power Imagery God Gives to Imagine Him | Genesis 2

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 30:34


Too often western culture is reductionistic in our “truth” about reality. And Christians are too influenced by this materialistic reductionism so that it limits our ability to live by the power of our imagination. Are you reducing your faith to just information? But God's word gives you imagination because imagination is far more powerful than mere information to speak life into your desires. Genesis 2 speaks life into our desires by giving us two powerful images to imagine God and imagine all that he is for us in Jesus.  Genesis 2:7–10 NIV Then the LORD God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being. Now the LORD God had planted a garden in the east, in Eden; and there he put the man he had formed. The LORD God made all kinds of trees grow out of the ground—trees that were pleasing to the eye and good for food. In the middle of the garden were the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. A river watering the garden flowed from Eden; from there it was separated into four headwaters. Genesis 2:15 NIV The LORD God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it. Jesus promises in… Revelation 2:7 NIV11 To the one who is victorious, I will give the right to eat from the tree of life, which is in the paradise of God.   All the earth will become an “Eden” when Christ returns… Revelation 22:1–3 NIV11 …The river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, [was] flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, …yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations. No longer will there be any curse. John 7:37–39 NIV On the last and greatest day of the festival, Jesus stood and said in a loud voice, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me and drink. Whoever believes in me, as Scripture has said, rivers of living water will flow from within them.” By this he meant the Spirit, whom those who believed in him were later to receive. Up to that time the Spirit had not been given, since Jesus had not yet been glorified. Who can you share this podcast with? If you found this episode helpful, consider sharing it on social media or texting it to a friend you think might benefit from it. Follow Dave Cover on Twitter https://twitter.com/davecover (@davecover) Follow A Bigger Life on Twitter https://twitter.com/abiggerlifepod (@ABiggerLifePod) This podcast is a ministry of https://www.thecrossingchurch.com/ (The Crossing), a church in Columbia, Missouri, a college town where the flagship campus of the University of Missouri is located.

Working People
Columbia Is Still a Bully (w/ Joanna Lee, Tamara Hache, & Caroline Smith)

Working People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:38


Back in the spring, we spoke with three graduate student workers at Columbia University who were on strike with other members of the Student Workers of Columbia union, UAW Local 2110. After rank-and-file members rejected the tentative agreement between the university and the bargaining committee, negotiations continued, but Columbia has still failed to meet key demands, including better wages, dental and vision healthcare coverage, and third-party arbitration for cases involving harassment and discrimination. Now, Student Workers of Columbia are back on strike and have been on the picket line since November 3. In this mini-cast, we talk with three graduate student workers, Joanna Lee, Tamara Hache, and Caroline Smith, about the strike and how academic workers are an essential part of the labor movement.  Additional links/info below... Student Workers of Columbia, UAW Local 2110 website, Facebook page, and Twitter page Hardship Fund for Columbia Student Workers #CUonStrike  Working People, "Mini-cast: Columbia Is a Bully (w/ Joanna Lee, Harlan Chambers, & Cameron Foltz)" Joanna's Twitter page Tamara's Twitter page Caroline's Twitter page Ashley Wong, The New York Times, "Why Columbia Student Workers Are Back On Strike" Rachel Himes, Jacobin, "Why Columbia Graduate Workers Like Me Are on Strike" Permanent links below... Working People Patreon page Leave us a voicemail and we might play it on the show! Labor Radio / Podcast Network website, Facebook page, and Twitter page In These Times website, Facebook page, and Twitter page The Real News Network website, YouTube channel, podcast feeds, Facebook page, and Twitter page Featured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive: freemusicarchive.org) Jules Taylor, "Working People Theme Song"  

The Local Maximum
Ep. 201 - Andrew Gelman, Statistical Insights

The Local Maximum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:51


Max interviews Professor Andrew Gelman of Columbia on Bayesian Inference, Research, Political Prognostication, Descriptive vs Causal work, and areas of computational research. localmaxradio.com/201

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1799: Cyngn and the Autonomous Technology for Industrial Vehicles

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:02


There is a lot of talk around autonomous vehicles and electric cars right now, and I wanted to demystify this world. This path led me to Cyngn, a developer of innovative autonomous driving solutions for industrial and commercial enterprises that recently announced its partnership with Columbia Vehicle Group. Lior Tal shares the story behind the company, the road to the partnership with Columbia, and current trends shaping the market. I also learn more about how Cyngn's autonomous vehicle capabilities are powered by DriveMod, an end-to-end solution that can be integrated with Columbia vehicles – or any vehicle. DriveMod enables vehicles to switch easily between manual, remotely-controlled, and fully autonomous modes. Autonomous vehicle technology brings various benefits to industrial organizations by increasing efficiency, continuity and making it easier for workers to stay focused on their most mission-critical tasks. The pairing of Cyngn's DriveMod with Columbia's fleet of electric utility vehicles means material handling organizations can begin to implement autonomy today.  

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast
Corrosion Inspection Using Robotics, and AI with Masood Naqshbandi, CCO at Abyss Solutions, ep 150

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:14


Welcome to the Oil and Gas Onshore podcast — brought to you by TechnipFMC on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened-to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. In this episode, Justin sits down with Masood Naqshbandi to discuss Abyss Solutions and how their disrupting the corrosion inspection space using robotics and artificial intelligence. LinkedIn profile link: https://www.linkedin.com/in/masoodnaqshbandi/ Website link: http://assetintegrity.abysssolutions.com.au/asset-integrity-1 We'd like to highlight some fascinating technology provided by our sponsor, TechnipFMC. Their new and integrated iComplete™ ecosystem is digitally enabled and delivers efficiency benefits by dramatically reducing components and connections while simultaneously providing real-time data to operators about the #wellpad operations. TechnipFMC is continuing to push the limits in order to achieve full frac automation. To discover more about all the benefits of iComplete™ click the link in the show notes or check them out on linkedin: https://lnkd.in/eeSVvcc TechnipFMC Giveaway https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/pcEvkKz/OGGN Ogio Dome duffle bag Yeti 20 oz purple tumbler Executive power bank Columbia neck gator AcePods 2.0 - True Wireless Stereo (TWS) Bluetooth Ear Buds More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Justin Gauthier LinkedIn

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 214: The Life of Hubert Harrison w/ Jeffrey B Perry

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 81:24


Often time the names of Black historical figures are relegated to the same usual suspects: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, W.E.B Dubois, or Marcus Garvey. This myopic narrative of Black history leaves out figures who often had radical political agendas that challenged institutions traditional figures did not pick up on until later in their lives. One of those neglected figures is Hubert Harrison, who was deemed, "The Father of Harlem Radicalism." On this episode we will ask Jeffry Perry, author of a two volume series on Harrison's life, what distinguished Hubert Harrison from his contemporaries and made him one of the most important Black figures in American history no one knows about.    About Jeffrey B. Perry Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry (Jeff Perry) is an independent, working-class scholar formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia. The recently published, second volume of his Hubert Harrison biography entitled "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927" (Columbia University Press, December 2020) was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. Dr. Perry's work focuses on the role of white supremacy as a retardant to progressive social change and on the centrality of struggle against white supremacy to progressive social change efforts. Get Perry's books and more here: https://www.jeffreybperry.net/   About TIR Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron-only programming, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now: https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, especially YouTube!   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast & www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   Pascal Robert in Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert Read Pascal's Piece in Newsweek Here: https://www.newsweek.com/black-political-elite-serving-corporate-interests-misrepresenting-our-community-opinion-1652384   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/   Follow Djene Bajalan @djenebajalan   Follow Kuba Wrzesniewski @DrKuba2

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
Yale Doctoral Candidate & Author Crystal Harrell

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:18


Crystal grew up the 7th of 10 children in public housing. She didn't dream of attending a top-tier college until she was older, because she didn't think it was possible and didn't know anyone else who was doing it. Share shares her incredible story here about overcoming the odds and getting into a highly competitive PhD program at her dream university, Yale. Check out her book: Crystal ClearYou can also follow her on Instagram at @Crystalharrell_

Deadhead Cannabis Show
Jonah Hill plays Jerry Garcia

Deadhead Cannabis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 49:52


Grateful Dead Live at Boston Music Hall on 12-02-1973   The exciting news that Martin Scorsese will produce a Grateful Dead biopic is being overshadowed by who will play Jerry Garcia. With Jim Marty away,  Larry Mishkin and Rob Hunt share their opinions about Jonah Hill playing the Dead's spiritual leader.   They also talk about adult use coming to the District of Columbia and Larry sparks up some Garcia's Hand Picked Flower and gives his immediate review.Produced by PodConXDeadhead Cannabis Show - https://podconx.com/podcasts/deadhead-cannabis-showLarry Mishkin - https://podconx.com/guests/larry-mishkinJim Marty - https://podconx.com/guests/jim-martyRob Hunt - https://podconx.com/guests/rob-huntDeadhead Cyclist - https://deadheadcyclist.com/Photo courtesy of Jay Blakesberg

Narada Radio Company Audio Drama
OLD-TIME RADIO ESSENTIALS Ep. 26 - Columbia Shakespeare Cycle

Narada Radio Company Audio Drama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 103:22


Season Three of Old-Time Radio Essentials is here! It's our premiere, and Pete's pick -- and he's bringing us a thrilling episode of The Columbia Shakespeare Cycle for us to enjoy and discuss. And since we're on the subject of discussion, we hope to determine whether this entry meets the following criteria: 1. Is it truly representative of that series? (Can anyone point to it and say, "Yes, that is what [NAME OF SERIES] was all about.") 2. Is it an episode worthy of inclusion in any and every OTR aficionado's private collection? So with this in mind, we three bring you, as our twenty-sixth number (but 1st official episode of S3), this episode of The Columbia Shakespeare Cycle - Twelfth Night, from 1937. We'll introduce the show, play it in its entirety, then discuss it at length. Thanks for joining us, and we hope you enjoy it!  Please show your support of the podcast by doing any of the following! To comment on how we might improve OTR-E, or give suggestions for future discussions, please write to us at f6point3@gmail.com . Put the word "Essentials" in the subject line. Your feedback means a lot to us! A review at iTunes or at your usual podcatcher would be appreciated. Next Month: Our 3rd Annual Christmas Special, featuring an episode of Rocky Fortune, starring Frank Sinatra! FIND THIS SHOW PLUS HUNDREDS OF OTHER WONDERFUL AUDIO DRAMAS AT www.mutualaudionetwork.com !

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church
A Thanksgiving Promise

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Sermon Recording Sermon OutlineSpeaker: Tim CooperJohn 5:19-24 (ESV)19 So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise. 20 For the Father loves the Son and shows him all that he himself is doing. And greater works than these will he show him, so that you may marvel. 21 For as the Father raises the dead and gives them life, so also the Son gives life to whom he will. 22 For the Father judges no one, but has given all judgment to the Son, 23 that all may honor the Son, just as they honor the Father. Whoever does not honor the Son does not honor the Father who sent him. 24 Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life. He does not come into judgment, but has passed from death to life.

Talking Ball Y'all
Poplarville Vs Columbia South State Postgame

Talking Ball Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 8:45


Talking Ball Y'all presents Poplarville vs Columbia Postgame hosted by: Jason Baker, Clay Sweet, and Donnie Pascal

Bleav in Clemson Football
Bleav in Clemson Football S2 E66: Clemson at South Carolina preview

Bleav in Clemson Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 78:47


Clemson legend Levon Kirkland and co-host Will Vandervort preview Saturday's regular season finale, as the Tigers head to Columbia to battle rival South Carolina. They give their predictions and more.

Gamecock Central Radio
South Carolina vs. Clemson Preview

Gamecock Central Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 60:32


GamecockCentral.com's Wes Mitchell and Chris Clark provide thoughts and analysis in their preview of South Carolina vs. Clemson. They'll be joined by TigerIllustrated.com's Paul Strelow to provide insight on the Tigers. Today's show is live from Market on Main at 1320 Main. St., Columbia. https://www.marketonmain.com/ GC Live is presented by Clint Hammond of Mortgage Network: https://www.mortgagenetwork.com/clint-hammond Clint is the branch manager for the Columbia Mortgage Network. Contact Clint for all of your mortgage needs: chammond@MortgageNetwork.com Phone: 803-771-6933 Mobile: 803-422-6797 Fax: 866-741-1723 As an experienced mortgage professional Clint is available to provide knowledgeable information for all your home financing goals. Let Clint help you identify the financing solution that best meets your specific needs. Links to GamecockCentral Live! will be found on GamecockCentral.com's web platform and discussion forums and will stream live on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, in addition to being hosted on the GamecockCentral.com podcast network. Subscribing (for free) to the GamecockCentral YouTube channel and clicking the "bell" icon next to the subscribe button will turn on your notifications, which means you will be notified each time GamecockCentral Live! drops a new show. #SouthCarolinaFootball #Gamecocks

Mike Drop
Episode 78: SEAL Teams to Orange County Cop with Travis Kennedy

Mike Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 159:00


Shop https://www.mikeritlandco.com for Performance Dog Food, Treats, Apparel & more! Travis Kennedy has a lot of great stories to tell; he has 3 deployments with the Navy SEALS, two to Afghanistan and one to Columbia, and is a cop in southern California. Travis walks through what it was like to be a SEAL, from enlisting and BUDS training, to deploying in one of the most dangerous places in the world. Kennedy then talks about how he transitioned out, became a true entrepreneur, starting Kennedy Defensive Solutions, and finally how he became an orange county cop. Hope you enjoy it! Sponsored by @jockofuel and @teamdog.pet. ---------- Table of Timestamps: 0:00 - Introduction 1:40 - Breaking the Ice 6:12 - Morning Routine 10:31 - Growing Up 15:41 - Military Decision 20:37 - BUDS and Education 31:00 - 1st Deployment to Afghanistan 39:40 - Close Calls 49:17 - Dogs On Deployment 55:47 - Post 1st Deployment 57:13 - 2nd Deployment to Afghanistan 1:35:21 - Post 2nd Deployment and BUDS Instructing 1:44:40 - 3rd Deployment to Columbia 1:55:51 - Transitioning Out and Post Military 1:57:59 - Kennedy Defensive Solutions 2:01:07 - Police Academy 2:03:20 Policing in California 2:11:50 - Domestic Abuse 2:21:27 - Stereotyping in Police 2:31:00 - Proactive Policing 2:37:48 - Outro ---------- Support Travis Kennedy: Kennedy Defensive Solutions https://www.kennedydefensivesolutions.com/ Instagram @traviskennedy267 ---------- Support Mike Drop on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mikedrop --- Support our sponsors: Origin Labs | www.originmaine.com/origin-labs | @ORIGIN USA Fueled by TeamDog | www.mikeritlandco.com | @Teamdog.pet --- ALL THINGS MIKE RITLAND: SHOP for Fueled By Team Dog Performance Dog Food, Treats, Apparel, Accessories, and Protection dogs - https://MikeRitlandCo.com Team Dog Online dog training - https://TeamDog.pet Support Mike Drop on Patreon https://Patreon.com/mikedrop

Marketing with Purpose
Artfully Organized and Growing a Year End Giving Campaign Year After Year - Celebrating the Columbia Art League with Guest Kesley Hammond

Marketing with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:26


A thermometer in the shape of CAL, social post templates for volunteers, pre-written & prescheduled newsletters, redefining success, and never losing sight of what matters most… These are some of the ways Kelsey Hammond organizes giving campaigns for Columbia Art League and grows them a little more each year. And she wants you to know; regardless of your organization’s cause, size or experience level, you can grow your giving campaign a little more every year just like she does - and it doesn’t have to be difficult! Here this and other podcasts geared towards nonprofit marketing and fundraising on our website: https://mayecreate.com/blog/podcast/artfully-organized-and-growing/

Oddity Files
I‘m done, I quit, BYE

Oddity Files

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 82:48


And we're back!  This week's paranormal in the news tells us all about a cursed doll who has it out for fisherman, and apparently only fisherman. Kitsie heads down to Columbia to tell you all about the crazy happenings at the Hotel Del Santo Nick, gets to the bottom of the hauntings at Lake Lanier. And this listener story about a paranormal flurry is kinda nuts!   Send in your paranormal stories to oddityfilescrew@gmail.com and check out all things Oddity Files at flow.page/oddityfiles    

Behind The Screen
'Encanto' - Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jared Bush, Byron Howard & Charise Castro Smith

Behind The Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:52


Lin-Manuel Miranda, the directors, and co-drirector join Carolyn to talk about Disney's new animated musical feature, 'Encanto'. Together they share how they travelled to Columbia and used that inspiration to bring the film and music to life. 'In this podcast series, Carolyn Giardina, Tech Editor for The Hollywood Reporter, extends her coverage of the filmmaking crafts. She will be talking with the cinematographers, editors, production designers, composers, visual effects supervisors, and other leading artists that bring the magic of motion pictures to theaters. Subscribe now to receive episodes of this inspired new series that shines a light on the artists that spend most of their time behind the screen. Hosted by: Carolyn Giardina Produced by: Matthew Whitehurst Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Working class struggle continues to spread across New York City and the rest of the country. Wirecutter workers at the New York Times have launched their strike, joining the 3,000 Columbia academic workers on the picket line. 14,000 Kroger workers in Houston have authorized a strike while 24,000 academic workers at the University of California have done the same. Rank-n-file reform slate Teamsters United won a sea-changing victory in leadership elections. New leadership has promised more labor militancy and committed the 1.3 million member union to organizing Amazon facilities and drivers across the country. Earlier this month the New York Taxi Workers Alliance declared victory after a hunger strike forced the city government to acquiesce to their demand to cancel millions in debt and restructure their loan. We're joined by Jaslin Kaur and Augustine to hear about this fight and what it means for working class New Yorkers. Last week a Wisconsin court allowed Kyle Rittenhouse to walk free despite the fact that he shot, wounded, and killed protesters in Kenosha. We'll play you sounds from the streets as protesters reacted to this injustice here in Brooklyn.

Fan Effect
“Encanto” means both charm and charming and that is exactly what this new Disney film is

Fan Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 49:13


“Encanto” is the latest Disney animated family-friendly film, but will it become another gem in Disney's crown? Producer KellieAnn Halvorsen is joined by Natalie Mollinet from the Pop Knowlege Blog to dive into the magic of the new movie. After all, “Encanto” means both charm and charming and that is exactly what this story is as it's poised to bring families together this Thanksgiving. As usual, the first segment of this episode is spoiler-free.  Beyond Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Gaming and Tech, the brains behind Fan Effect are connoisseurs of categories surpassing the nerdy. Brilliant opinions and commentary on all things geek, but surprising knowledge and witty arguments over pop culture, Star Trek, MARVEL vs DC, and a wide range of movies, TV shows, and more. Formerly known as SLC Fanboys, the show is hosted byAndy Farnsworth andKellieAnn Halvorsen, who are joined by guest experts. Based in the beautiful beehive state, Fan Effect celebrates Utah's unique fan-culture as it has been declared The Nerdiest State in America by TIME.    Listen regularly on your favorite platform, at kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL App.Join the conversation on Facebook @FanEffectShow, Instagram @FanEffectShow, and Twitter @FanEffectShow. Fan Effect is sponsored byMegaplex Theatres, Utah's premiere movie entertainment company.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pete's Percussion Podcast - Pete Zambito
Pete's Percussion Podcast: Episode 269 - Alexandros Fragiskatos, 2021

Pete's Percussion Podcast - Pete Zambito

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Columbia (MO) based Percussion Performer, Educator, Adjudicator and Arranger Alexandros Fragiskatos returns to talk about his performance for solo voice and percussion at PASIC 2021 (06:40), job transitions in Missouri after Covid issues, and new opportunities availing themselves at Central Methodist University (MO) and elsewhere (24:40), going back to Cincinnati Conservatory of Music to present his music and research as an alum (40:50), substitute teaching in Columbia (a position Pete also once held) (48:00), and he does some extra Random Ass Questions to add onto the ones he did in 2019 (54:25).Finishing with a Rave on the 2021 film The French Dispatch (01:05:20).Links:Alexandros Fragiskatos' website Alexandros Fragiskatos' PASIC pageAlexandros Fragiskatos' 2019 appearance on the podcast“Unspoken Dialogue” - Alexandros FragiskatosPercussion Group Cincinnati“Oh Darling!” - Beatles“Yesterday” - Beatles“My Friend's Over You” - New Found GloryPulp Fiction trailerThe OfficeGilmore GirlsBob ThalhuberBougatsaRaves:The French Dispatch trailer

Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren
Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren SPECIAL ABBREVIATED THANKSGIVING EDITION

Dishin' Dirt with Gary Pickren

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 5:54


This week I have a really abbreviated edition for you. I wanted to share a valuable FREE resource that will assist you with seller disclosure issues.  The resource is FREE, FREE, FREE and can be shared with other agents as well as your sellers.I hope everyone has a safe and Happy Thanksgiving! Gary

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover
The Power of Knowing the Right Script | Genesis 1:26-28

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:17


Genesis 1:26-28 is a kind of thesis statement for the entire rest of the Bible's story. You can't fully understand the gospel's bigger story if you miss what Genesis 1:26-28 means. This is God's blueprint for humanity and the whole world. Everything else in the Bible is the unfolding of these 3 verses. And when you understand it that way, it becomes a powerful script for your life right now. 2 Corinthians 3:18 NIV And we all, who … contemplate the Lord's glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit. Genesis 1:26–28 NIV Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.” So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; maleand female he created them. God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” James 3:9-10 NIV With the tongue … we curse human beings, who have been made in God's likeness. …My brothers and sisters, this should not be. Galatians 5:22–23 NIV But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. C.S. Lewis (“The Problem of Pain,” chp 10)… He talks about God creating each of us with his signature written upon our soul— “This signature on each soul may be a product of heredity and environment, but that only means that heredity and environment are among the instruments whereby God creates a soul.  I am considering not how, but why, He makes each soul unique. If He had no use for all these differences, I do not see why He should have created more souls than one.    Be sure that the ins and outs of your individuality are no mystery to Him; and one day they will no longer be a mystery to you.   …For it is not humanity in the abstract that is to be saved, but you. …All that you are, sins apart, is destined, if you will let God have His good way, to utter satisfaction.”   Then Lewis cites Jesus' promise to his people Revelation 2:17— “To those who are victorious, …I will also give each of them a white stone with a new name written on it, known only to the one who receives it.”    Lewis continues… “Why else were individuals created, but that God, loving all infinitely, should love each differently?” Who can you share this podcast with? If you found this episode helpful, consider sharing it on social media or texting it to a friend you think might benefit from it. Follow Dave Cover on Twitter https://twitter.com/davecover (@davecover) Follow A Bigger Life on Twitter https://twitter.com/abiggerlifepod (@ABiggerLifePod) This podcast is a ministry of https://www.thecrossingchurch.com/ (The Crossing), a church in Columbia, Missouri, a college town where the flagship campus of the University of Missouri is located. 

The Space Above Us
147 - STS-73 - Seventh's Time's the Charm (USML-2)

The Space Above Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:06


Columbia is back from the shop and is sporting some new upgrades, but seems reluctant to leave Earth on its 18th voyage. Once on orbit, we'll do some science, learn why TV is good, and perform some magic tricks!   http://thespaceabove.us http://twitter.com/SpaceAboveUs http://patreon.com/TheSpaceAboveUs

RockyTalkiePodcast
Episode 55 - Once More, With Feeling

RockyTalkiePodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 50:35


Aaron, Nicki, & Jon learn about the life and career of photographer Mick Rock, spotlight community artist Cartoon A'La Rocky Horror, and play a musical gameshow with Jacob! Global News: Learn more about Mick Rock's life here: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/20/arts/music/mick-rock-dead.html Listen to New Fury Media's interview with Barry Bostwick: https://www.spreaker.com/user/15677020/2021-11-17-barry-bostwick-interview Read about Once More With Feeling's 20th birthday here: https://bloody-disgusting.com/editorials/3692863/wacky-broadway-nightmare-buffy-vampire-slayers-feeling-turns-20/ Community News: Check out Brandon Sutrina's guest post on Columbia's Closet here: https://columbiascloset.blogspot.com/2021/11/guest-post-franks-patches-by-brandon.html Check out Cartoon A La Rocky Horror here: https://www.patreon.com/cartoonalarockyhorror https://www.redbubble.com/people/cartoonrhps/shop?asc=u https://www.facebook.com/cartoonalarockyhorror/ Learn more about RHPS Buffalo's holiday show on December 11th here: https://www.facebook.com/events/630553514793761/?ref=newsfeed Learn more about NYCRHPS's show at Caveat NYC on December 4th here: https://www.facebook.com/events/630553514793761/?ref=newsfeed JAAQing Gameshow: Check out the Rocky Horror International Album on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/album/6XbI1OUVAiW9bklN4ixWyL Music: - Intro/Outro - Jupiter's Smile by The 126ers - Stings - Library at freesound.org Script by Aaron Tidwell, Jacob Roger-Gordon and Meg Fierro Produced and edited by Aaron Tidwell and Meg Fierro Rocky Talkie is an Audiogasmic LLC Production

BetterHealthGuy Blogcasts
Episode #157: The Survival Paradox with Dr. Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc

BetterHealthGuy Blogcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 95:38


Why You Should Listen: In this episode, you will learn about “The Survival Paradox: Reversing the Hidden Cause of Aging and Chronic Disease”. About My Guest: My guest for this episode is Dr. Isaac Eliaz. Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc is a recognized expert in the field of integrative medicine, focusing on cancer and complex conditions. He is a respected clinician, researcher, author, educator, and mind-body practitioner. Dr. Eliaz partners with leading research institutes, including Harvard, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Columbia to co-author scientific studies on today's most serious conditions. He has spent decades studying meditation with an emphasis on healing and deepening the mind-body connection. Dr. Eliaz is the founder and medical director of Amitabha Medical Clinic & Healing Center in Santa Rosa, California. Key Takeaways: How is the body's ability to survive often a major contributor to a state of poor health? How can we learn to breathe deeply in the midst of fear, anxiety, and panic? How does feeling safe lead to lower levels of oxygen and create an environment for infections and even cancer? Can limbic system retraining shift one from a state of survival to a state of harmony? What is the "architect of the survival response"? Can galectin-3 be tested for with traditional labs? What is the role of galectin-3 in the formation of biofilms? Can targeting galectin-3 flip the inflammation switch to the off position? How does an individual survival focus make us sick? How can galectin-3 be reduced with modified citrus pectin (MCP)? How might MCP act as a prebiotic and support the microbiome? How important is exploring and resolving trauma in order to improve health? How might therapeutic apheresis be a tool for reducing galectin-3? What is the role of galectin-3 in kidney and liver health? Is galectin-3 involved in hypercoagulation or hyperviscosity? Does galectin-3 play a role in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, or ALS? Can a focus on mental and emotional health improve our detoxification capacity on a physical level? Does the body detoxify more efficiently when inflammation is reduced? Connect With My Guest: https://SurvivalParadox.com Interview Date: November 23, 2021 Transcript: To review a transcript of this show, visit https://BetterHealthGuy.com/Episode157. Additional Information: To learn more, visit https://BetterHealthGuy.com. Disclaimer: The content of this show is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any illness or medical condition. Nothing in today's discussion is meant to serve as medical advice or as information to facilitate self-treatment. As always, please discuss any potential health-related decisions with your own personal medical authority.

The Greatest Games Podcast
Episode 138 - Corbin Landers - Camden Military Academy Varsity AND JV Boys Basketball Coach

The Greatest Games Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 27:54


Corbin Landers, the head JV and Varsity Boys Basketball coach at Camden Military Academy, joins us for this week's episode of The Greatest Games Podcast.  Coach Landers has a wide variety of experiences in basketball at a young age and has now landed his first head coaching opportunity in Camden, SC.  Hear his heart for his players and learn more about his “why” in this episode in addition to an incredible game between Charleston Southern and High Point from the mid 2010s.   Before going any further, please make a donation here to Coach Tacauma Lettsome's GoFundMe page and help this former basketball coach in his fight against ALS:   https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-tacauma-fight-als/donate  You can learn more about ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) here at ALS.org.  Hear more about Coach Lettsome's story in this link from WLTX TV in Columbia, SC.   Visit TeachHoops.com/816basketball for incredible basketball coaching content and resources from Coach Steve Collins.  Sign up for the two week free trial, learn and grow as a coach and support the show all at the same time.   Share, subscribe and leave us a 5 star review if you enjoy. Follow us on Twitter at @816Basketball.

Growing With Fishes Podcast
Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference: Commercial Cultivation Panel

Growing With Fishes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:17


The 2nd Annual Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference is finally here. Be sure not to miss the biggest free educational event of the year! We are happy to bring you this incredible line of up speakers for the 2nd Annual Virtual Aquaponic Cannabis Conference from around the globe. We have a world class line up of speakers from the Australia, Vietnam, South Africa, Columbia, Switzerland, Sweden, Canada, and across the USA. They will covering topics like sustainable production, DNA analysis of soil microbes, microbial production and inoculation, sustainable production, ferments as nutrient inputs in aquaponics, breeding cannabis in aquaponics, organic certified aquaponic cannabis production in the EU, cannabis cultivar patent and protections, Korean natural farming inputs in aquaponics, soil science for aquaponics, commercial aquaponic considerations, living soil applications in aquaponics, pest management in aquaponics, Aquaponic production in Africa, commercial growers panel, craft/microlicense growers panel, home growers panel, and MUCH MUCH more! Live November 13th & 14th from 8 am to 10 pm PST Heavy Dayze @The_Pot_Cast Vertica @VerticaFarmsOK Aqualitas @Aqualitasinc Thumb Genetics @ThumbGenetics https://jellibomb.com/collections/aquaponic-cannabis-conference-2020?fbclid=IwAR3P2ym57P0OXaAJHXozGLh8lQxxeE_SHwFiDYlLfTgYTW4lHnscLoew_7A

The Future of Healthcare: Live With Intent
The Patient Perspective (part 2) with Christine Von Raesfeld (USA), Kristof Vanfraechem (Belgium), and Carolina Consuegra (Columbia)

The Future of Healthcare: Live With Intent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:58


This is part two of our special episode "The Patient Perspective".  Justin Tomlinson and guest host Kristof Vanfraechem (founder and CEO of People for Data) guide the discussion with guests Christine Von Raesfeld (founder and CEO of People with Empathy) and Carolina Consuegra (expert in healthcare communications and co-founder of Science to People).  Christine, Kristoph, and Carolina are actively shaping the future of health care. Their impact is far-reaching, giving patients tools and hope and helping companies tap into the power of data and efficiency of true patient centricity.

The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland!
Bonus | Dogsgiving & Native Heritage Month: Grateful for Every Plateful!

The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:25


We're taking a little break this week, but we still put together this bonus episode to share fun jokes & ridiculous food puns as well as some more fun music from Hank's Granny, aka Jeanie Murphy. We also share a bit more about the famous Dogland saying, “We are all connected at our roots, and rooted in our connection.” It feels perfect to talk about connection at this time. We round out the episode with a talk about Native American Heritage Month and share a trailer from one of our favorite shows and a special song from their incredible composer. Stay past the jokes to hear the trailer for Coin Trick, https://www.cointrick.net/, a narrative series that follows 12-year-old Cassidy and the flute-playing mischief-maker Kokopelli on their adventures through a fantasy world based in Native American mythology. Coin Trick is a fellow member of Kids Listen- a great place to find wonderful family shows. We are blown away, honored, and excited to share a song gifted to us from Coin Trick's composer, Shelley Morningsong, https://shelleymorningsongonline.com/. Shelley has also written a gorgeous children's book, and it includes a free audio download that we are loving in our house. This resource from IllumiNative called "How to Center and Be a Good Ally to Indigenous People this Thanksgiving" is an excellent read. https://bit.ly/3FIELv2 We really enjoyed this article from PBS about finding ways to honor the real history of this time in the US : https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/thanksgiving-practicing-gratitude-and-honoring-the-real-story We are really impressed by this coverage in Teen Vogue: Land Acknowledgements: https://www.teenvogue.com/story/indigenous-land-acknowledgement-explained We create this show in the ancestral lands of the Multnomah, Wasco, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Cowlitz, bands of Chinook, Tualatin Kalapuya, Molalla, and many other Tribes of the first people who made their homes along the rivers here in what is now called “Portland, Oregon.” These groups created communities and summer encampments along the Columbia and Willamette rivers and harvested and used the plentiful natural resources of the area for thousands of years. Today, the Native community of Portland is the 9th largest urban population in the USA. We've made a donation to an organization called the NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH AND FAMILY CENTER (NAYA) https://nayapdx.org/support-us/ Other wonderful organizations to support are IllumiNative, https://illuminatives.org/about-us/ and The American Indian College Fund, https://collegefund.org/ You can find out more and send us jokes at www.powerdogadventures.com This podcast was made possible, in part, by a grant from The Regional Arts & Culture Council in Portland, OR. https://racc.org/ It was made more possible by listeners like you! Thank you for your support! Support the show: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/powerdog https://www.patreon.com/powerdogadventures https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures/support

One of Us
Highly Suspect Reviews: Encanto

One of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 22:23


ENCANTO MOVIE REVIEW A large family named the Madrigals live in a secluded valley in Columbia inside of a magical house that grants a special power (and an TARDIS-physics bedroom) to every child as they come of age…except one. Poor Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz), whose door disappeared on her when she reached for it. Still, the… Read More »Highly Suspect Reviews: Encanto

Texas Tales
Tragedy Over Texas - The Columbia Explosion and Response

Texas Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:05


In this episode we break down the Columbia space shuttle explosion over Texas and the incredible response by our fellow Texans. This was truly a tragic event, but really brought the best out in everyone.  Hats off to NASA and hats off to all ya'll!

Columbia Energy Exchange
What's Next After COP26?

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 56:17


COP26 is behind us, but the work is just getting started.  The world leaders who convened in Glasgow, Scotland, negotiated an agreement with positive, meaningful steps toward global climate action. But many onlookers are calling for more ambitious timelines.  What comes next? For a deep dive into how the conference unfolded and what it means for the future of climate progress, Host Jason Bordoff spoke with economist Nat Keohane. Dr. Keohane was recently named President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions. Before that, Nat was the Senior Vice President for Climate with the Environmental Defense Fund. The pair spoke about the successes of the conference, including the final details of the so-called “Paris rulebook.” They also discussed the challenges that will carry over to next year's conference and beyond.

The Opperman Report
White House Call Girl: The Real Watergate Story

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 116:53


Ex-stripper Heidi Rikan was working for the mob in Washington, DC. White House Call Girl tells how a call girl operation she was running at the time led to the Watergate break-in, which brought down Tricky Dick Nixon himself. Needless to say, this is not part of the usual Watergate story that has come down to us over the decades. It is also only fair to point out that this version of the story might be dismissed out of hand as being dangerous "revisionist" history. If you're not careful, you might end up being called a conspiracy theorist. You can also be called crazy—which is what happened to a young lawyer named Phillip Bailley, one of the principal witnesses to this ignored bit of American history. When he was foolish enough to blow the whistle on Rikan and her call girl ring, he was locked up at St. Elizabeth's, the District of Columbia's mental hospital, in the ward for the criminally insane. For forty years we've only heard the Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein perspective on Watergate. Now we've got the photographs for the revisionist model. What's more, we've got Heidi's little black book. White House Call Girl was published last season in an eBook edition only. The paperback edition includes new information on the murder of call girl—and playmate of Vice President Spiro Agnew—Pat Adams. With the help of newly-released FBI documents, we fill in more of the blanks in this long-suppressed story. about 1 year ago #white house call girl: the rea

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover
Becoming a Glorious Image of God Now | Genesis 1:26-27

A Bigger Life Prayer and Bible Devotionals with Pastor Dave Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 33:16


Genesis 1:26-27 is the intellectually consistent basis to why human dignity and human rights are real. Genesis 1:26-27 explains Jesus's radical value of women, children, the poor and the weak. And the more you can understand Genesis 1:26-27, the more you will become a glorious, embodied image of God in your relationships and our world. 2 Corinthians 3:18 NIV And we all, who … contemplate the Lord's glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit. Genesis 1:26-27 NIV Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.  Romans 8:18–19 NIV I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. For the creation waits in eager expectation for the children of God to be revealed.   Romans 8:29–30 NIV For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified. James 3:9-10 NIV With the tongue … we curse human beings, who have been made in God's likeness. …My brothers and sisters, this should not be.   Who can you share this podcast with? If you found this episode helpful, consider sharing it on social media or texting it to a friend you think might benefit from it. Follow Dave Cover on Twitter https://twitter.com/davecover (@davecover) Follow A Bigger Life on Twitter https://twitter.com/abiggerlifepod (@ABiggerLifePod) This podcast is a ministry of https://www.thecrossingchurch.com/ (The Crossing), a church in Columbia, Missouri, a college town where the flagship campus of the University of Missouri is located. 

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

AU Wishbone: Auburn Football
23 Nov 2021: Covid, Bama, and the Revenge of Chick-Fil-A

AU Wishbone: Auburn Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 78:36


Van is back from the dead! He and John sift through the ashes of the barbecue chicken fire at Columbia, South Carolina, where the chickens came home to roost, before turning their attention to the 2021 Iron Bowl and what the Tigers need to do to be competitive in it. Plus the usual other great features! Our new AU Football book! Nearly 500 pages including full-page player & coach illustrations! WE BELIEVED: A LIFETIME OF AUBURN FOOTBALL is now on sale at www.auwishbone.com Order direct from Amazon here! Be a part of the AU Wishbone Family by becoming a patron of the shows:  https://www.patreon.com/vanallenplexico A proud member of the War Eagle Reader family. Brought to you by White Rocket Entertainment. www.auwishbone.com www.plexico.net Join us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3IQGWpVOTQEpUW4JbSDvOw

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast
Thanksgiving with OGGN, ep 149

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:38


Welcome to the Oil and Gas Onshore podcast — brought to you by TechnipFMC on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened-to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. Justin takes a break while Mark and Michael fill in with a special holiday episode. We'd like to highlight some fascinating technology provided by our sponsor, TechnipFMC. Their new and integrated iComplete™ ecosystem is digitally enabled and delivers efficiency benefits by dramatically reducing components and connections while simultaneously providing real-time data to operators about the #wellpad operations. TechnipFMC is continuing to push the limits in order to achieve full frac automation. To discover more about all the benefits of iComplete™ click the link in the show notes or check them out on linkedin: https://lnkd.in/eeSVvcc TechnipFMC Giveaway https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/pcEvkKz/OGGN Ogio Dome duffle bag Yeti 20 oz purple tumbler Executive power bank Columbia neck gator AcePods 2.0 - True Wireless Stereo (TWS) Bluetooth Ear Buds More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Justin Gauthier LinkedIn

The Belonging Co Podcast
Fresh Voices // Columbia Location - 11AM | The Belonging Co

The Belonging Co Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:33


November 14, 2021 We are so excited to share our sermon series, Fresh Voices, where you get to hear three different sermons from leaders at The Belonging Co. Speakers - Bethany Davis, John Winkler, Tori Hein "I Said Yes To Jesus" - Click Here! The Belonging Cø • Nashville, TN USA For the latest on what's happening at church, visit thebelonging.co Watch live services here, or on our Facebook page or the TBCØ App! Follow us: Instagram • Facebook • Twitter

The Auburn Undercover Podcast
Reacting to Auburn's 21-17 loss at South Carolina

The Auburn Undercover Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 20:57


Nathan King and Jason Caldwell react to yet another Auburn loss, as the Tigers fell 21-17 in Columbia, despite rushing for nearly 200 yards and playing a turnover-free game. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Dan In Real Life. Dan Petroski's Massican Mission to Create Meaningful Impact in the World

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 91:54


MJ's guest is a winemaker and the founder of Massican Wines, Dan Petroski. Born and raised in Brooklyn, NY where he went on to play football at Columbia. He went on to work for Time Inc. while also studying for his MBA at NYU, both ingredients for a promising future in magazine publishing. Dan began his wine education literally winning and dining clients around Manhattan's best restaurants. He set off for Sicily, where he interned at Valle dell'Acate for a year. Dan originally intended to return to NYC to sell wine, but later received a harvest invitation in 2006 in Napa Valley. Not long after that, Petroski was hired as cellar master, ultimately claiming the Larkmead winemaker title in 2012. In 2009, Dan launched his own wine business called Massican, which specializes in Italian inspired white wines. Massican is a one-man operation where Dan manages all winemaking, sales and marketing. In July of 2020 Dan went back to his digital media roots launching Massican Magazine online. Petroski's approach and ability to craft wines as diverse as Cabernet Sauvignon and Tocai Friulano has earned him the recognition as San Francisco Chronicle's Winemaker of the Year in 2017On this episode, MJ and Dan enjoy a beautiful bottle of Fiorano Boncampagni Ludovisi, while discussing Dan's unlikely start to a decorated and fulfilling career in wine, his once in a lifetime winemaking education in Sicily, his time at Larkmead, starting his own business at Massican, and fighting climate change on the front lines! Period. Cheers! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Vox's The Weeds
Taxing Back Better

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:28


Dylan talks to Chye-Ching Huang, the executive director of the Tax Law Center at NYU Law, about the many, many, many tax provisions in Democrats' Build Back Better package. First they dive into the new tax benefits in the bill, from the expanded child tax credit to the $7,500 credit for electric cars. Then they talk about how the bill raises money through taxes, especially through higher taxes on high-income people and corporations. Then they talk about the future of taxes, like what will happen when most of the Trump tax cuts expire at the end of 2025.  References: A breakdown of the components of the House Build Back Better bill Whose taxes Build Back Better would raise and cut Huang's testimony to Congress on Build Back Better UChicago and Columbia researchers on the Child Tax Credit and employment The health care tax credit provisions of Build Back Better, explained The clean energy tax credits would help cut emissions by 40-50 percent The bill's minimum corporate tax plan and millionaire surtax, explained How rebuilding the IRS would boost tax compliance Host: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices