Podcasts about Indigenous Australians

Earliest inhabitants of the Australian continent and Torres Strait Islands

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Best podcasts about Indigenous Australians

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Latest podcast episodes about Indigenous Australians

Full Story
Have the Nationals derailed the voice to parliament?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 24:19


This week the National party said they will not support the proposal for an Indigenous voice to parliament, derailing hopes for bipartisan support for a referendum on Indigenous constitutional recognition. In this episode of Full Story, Gabrielle Jackson speaks to Lenore Taylor, Lorena Allam and Mike Ticher about whether the politics is getting in the way of a genuine debate

AM full episode
Closing the Gap: most targets are not on track

AM full episode

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 20:00


The latest "Closing the Gap" report is out, on how governments and Aboriginal groups are improving key measures of disadvantage for Indigenous Australians. Just two of the 17 targets are on track.

AM
Closing the Gap: most targets are not on track

AM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 20:00


The latest "Closing the Gap" report is out, on how governments and Aboriginal groups are improving key measures of disadvantage for Indigenous Australians. Just two of the 17 targets are on track.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ōtepoti museum returns artefacts to Indigenous Australians

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 3:48


An Ōtepoti Dunedin museum has returned cultural artefacts first taken from Indigenous Australians more than a century ago. Stone knives, an adze, and a boomerang belong to the Warumungu people, the traditional custodians of the Tennant Creek region in the Northern Territory.  Tess Brunton was at a special handing over ceremony at the Tūhura Otago Museum today and filed this report.

RNZ: Morning Report
Artefacts returned to Indigenous Australians from Otago

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 4:08


A boomerang and stone knives are among six cultural artefacts being returned to Indigenous Australians from the Otago museum today. The items were taken more than a century ago, and have been part of the Tūhura Otago Museum collection. The artefacts belong to the Warumungu people of the Tennant Creek region in the Northern Territory. Tūhura Otago Museum director of collections and research Robert Morris spoke to Māni Dunlop.  

Composers Datebook
A second wind for Reicha and Ward-Steinman?

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 2:00


Synopsis Take one flute, one oboe, and mix well with one each of a clarinet, bassoon and French horn —and you have the recipe for the traditional wind quintet. In the 19th century, this tasty musical mix was perfected by Europeans like the Czech composer Anton Reicha, who produced 24 wind quintets in his lifetime. In the 20th century, American composers like Samuel Barber, Elliott Carter, and John Harbison have all written one wind quintet each—matching Reicha's in quality, if not in quantity. But other American composers HAVE returned to the wind quintet for a second helping. On today's date in 1993, the Wind Quintet No. 2 of the Californian composer David Ward-Steinman received its premiere in Sacramento by the Arioso Quintet. Ward-Steinman titled his second quintet Night Winds, and asked his five players to occasionally double on some non-traditional instruments such as bamboo or clay flutes, a train-whistle, and even the traditional wind instrument of Indigenous Australians, the didgeridoo—all to create some atmospheric “night-wind” sounds. In addition to wind quintets, David Ward-Steinman composed orchestral works, chamber music and pieces for solo piano. A native of Louisiana, Ward-Steinman studied with Darius Milhaud in Aspen, Milton Babbitt at Tanglewood, and Nadia Boulanger in Paris. Music Played in Today's Program Antonin Reicha (1770-1836) Wind Quintet No. 23 in a No. 23, Op. 100 Albert Schweitzer Quintet CPO 999027 David Ward-Steinman (1936-2015) Woodwind Quintet No. 2 (Night Winds) Arioso Quintet Fleur de Son Classics 57935

Full Story
Remembering Cassius Turvey

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 23:13


Vigils have been held nationwide in memory of 15-year-old Noongar and Yamatji boy Cassius Turvey, who died after he was allegedly attacked while walking home from school with friends in Perth. A 21-year-old man has been charged with murder. Indigenous affairs reporter Sarah Collard speaks to Cassius's mother Mechelle Turvey about the powerful impact her son made on those around him – and the family's pursuit of justice

The Quicky
What Is Sport Willing To Ignore For The Money?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 23:31


Last week there was a lot of conversations around the Diamonds, the Aussie netball team, who pushed back on a sponsorship deal that would see them wear the logo of a company that had a complicated and racist history with Indigenous Australians.  While the outcome saw the diamonds lose $15 million and possibly more, questions were raised about the intersection of sport and politics, about whether athletes should keep quiet and take the money for the sake of the game rather than have an opinion about the deal. Today we look at how clubs select who backs them financially and whether that money should come with a guarantee to not bite the hand that feeds them. Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to:  Dr Ashlee Morgan - Lecturer in Sport Business & Marketing, Edith Cowan University Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Kally Borg Audio Producer: Thom LionBecome a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What Happens Next? Hosted by Dr Susan Carland
Can We Save Endangered Languages?

What Happens Next? Hosted by Dr Susan Carland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 23:33


28.10.22“What Happens Next?”Can We Save Endangered Languages? | 71 Soon after the first British ships arrived in Australia, Indigenous people were removed from their traditional lands and families, and were discouraged – often violently – from dancing, singing, or even speaking in their own languages. In a new episode of Monash University's podcast, “What Happens Next?”, Dr Susan Carland's guests discuss how the languages of the most ancient continual civilisation on Earth are being preserved or revived in the face of tremendous odds. Inala Cooper, Director of Murrup Barak, the Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at the University of Melbourne, discusses the importance of language for young First Nations activists, and the ways new technologies are reintroducing local languages back to Australia. Associate Professor Dr John Bradley, Acting Director of the Monash Indigenous Studies Centre, is a co-creator of Wunungu Awara, an interdisciplinary effort to preserve First Nations stories, songs and cultures. He talks about ownership of languages, and what it means to “grow ears”. Finally, Karen Yin, creator of “Conscious Style Guide”, helps listeners understand how we can create a more inclusive society by listening to the preferences of and boundaries set by marginalised communities. Grow ears and settle in for a new episode of “What Happens Next?”. A full transcript of this episode is available on Monash Lens. Learn more: Wunungu Awara: Celebrating and saving Indigenous Australian stories through film Preserving Indigenous languages Mental health and wellbeing: Listening to young Indigenous people in Narrm  A Voice to Parliament 50 Words Project The free Conscious Language newsletter “What Happens Next?” will be back next week with a new topic. If you're enjoying the show, don't forget to subscribe, or rate or review “What Happens Next?”  to help listeners like yourself discover it.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Full Story
Uncovering the truth of a historic police shooting at Uluru

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 30:04


In 1934, Pitjantjatjara man Yukun was killed in a police shooting at Uluru, with his remains then dug up and kept in museums for decades. After a journey of discovery involving a long-lost diary and a forensic search of hundreds of Aboriginal remains, Yukun has finally been laid to rest by his descendants – nearly 90 years after his death.Indigenous affairs editor Lorena Allam speaks to Yukun's family and historian Mark McKenna about what really happened to Yukun, and the journey to bring him home

What Happens Next? Hosted by Dr Susan Carland
What Do We Lose When Languages Die?

What Happens Next? Hosted by Dr Susan Carland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 21:33


21.10.22What Happens Next?What Do We Lose When Languages Die? | 70 When we travel through Europe, we expect to experience a wide array of culture and customs – in each country, different foods, different views, and different languages. That's not the expectation visitors to Australia have, but perhaps they should. Before British colonisation, this land was home to nearly 300 distinct Indigenous languages. But frontier violence, years of harmful policies, and entrenched, systemic racism against the Traditional Owners of the land stamped many of those languages out entirely, and those remaining have struggled to survive, spoken in secret or kept alive only in the memories of Elders. Today, just 10 Indigenous Australian languages are considered strong. In a new episode of Monash University's podcast, “What Happens Next?”, linguists and Indigenous human rights advocates discuss how we lost these languages, what it means when a language is sleeping, and the lengths communities are going to to wake them up again. Host Dr Susan Carland is joined this week by Associate Professor John Bradley, Acting Deputy Director of Monash University's Indigenous Studies Centre; Associate Professor Alice Gaby, Deputy Chair of the Board of Living Languages; and Monash alumna Inala Cooper, Director of Murrup Barak, the Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development at the University of Melbourne. A full transcript of this episode is available on Monash Lens. Learn more: Saving language: The power of ancient Indigenous oral traditions Our history, our nation: Why the National Archives must be preserved The Uluru Statement from the Heart Directory of language apps “What Happens Next?” will be back next week with part two of this series, “Can We Save Endangered Languages?”. If you're enjoying the show, don't forget to subscribe, or rate or review “What Happens Next?”  to help listeners like yourself discover it.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

History Through Fiction - The Podcast
Season 3, Episode 5 – Julie Janson

History Through Fiction - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 34:23


In Season 3, Episode 5 of History Through Fiction: The Podcast, host Colin Mustful chats with Julie Janson about her newly republished novel Benevolence. In this conversation, Janson talks about a lot of important topics related to Indigenous land rights and history in Australia. As a Burruberongal woman of the Darug Aboriginal Nation she talks about growing up in the Australian Bush and learning about her family history. Finally, she provides readers a list of other Indigenous Australian writers she recommends. Don't miss it!  

SBS World News Radio
The Too Hard Basket: superannuation and Indigenous Australians

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 16:55


In this episode of the Too Hard Basket series we dive into the topic of First Nations people's identification, and how it can limit their access to tens of thousands of dollars of their own money. With multiple birth dates and given names, the gap in financial literacy, and kinship structures not recognised in Western culture, First Nations people face barriers in accessing their own finances. So what can be done to make meaningful change?

Black Magic Woman
Shanell Dargan

Black Magic Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:48


Shanell Dargan pulled on the boxing gloves as a way to find resilience due to the domestic violence she was enduring at home. Now, 10 years later, Shanell plans to become the first Indigenous Australian female world champion boxer. Join us as we have an amazing yarn, overlooking the Darling Harbour, Sydney. Shanell shares her experiences growing up in Campbelltown, her stellar singing career and X factor journey and her new pursuit as a professional boxer.A really deadly and inspiring yarn not to be missed! Photo credit: Jonathan Ng - The Daily TelegraphRecommendations throughout this episode: Shannel's next fight is this Saturday the 8th of October in Newcastle. Get your tickets here - https://premier.ticketek.com.au/shows/show.aspx?sh=NOLIMNEC22&ep=DARGANWebsite: www.blackmagicwoman.com.auFollow us on Instagram - @blackmagicwomanpodcastThe Black Magic Woman Podcast is hosted by Mundanara Bayles and is an uplifting conversational style program featuring mainly Aboriginal guests and explores issues of importance to Aboriginal people and communities. Mundanara is guided by Aboriginal Terms of Reference and focusses more on who people are rather than on what they do.If you enjoyed this episode, please ‘Subscribe' on Apple Podcasts or ‘Follow' on your Spotify app and tell your friends and family about us! If you'd like to contact us, please email, info@blackmagicwoman.com.auSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/black-magic-woman. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

SBS World News Radio
Torres Strait Islanders say UN ruling is 'just the beginning'

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 2:58


Next month world leaders will gather in Egypt for the United Nations climate summit known as COP27. Climate finance is expected to be high on the agenda - a group of Indigenous Australians are leading the fight on that issue.

Utopia is Now
Crisis and Disaster Communication | Prof. Jacqui Ewart, PhD

Utopia is Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 63:25


Professor Jacqui Ewart was a journalist and media manager for more than a decade. She has worked as an academic for the past 25 years. Professor Jacqui Ewart's research focuses on communication across various phases of disasters and the involvement of politicians in disasters. She also researches news media representations of various minority groups including Muslims and Indigenous Australians. Links ___________________ Contact: utopiaisnow2020@gmail.com Jacqui Ewart: https://experts.griffith.edu.au/18772... Jacqui's Twitter: @jacquiewart Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3jkFkD3 Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3A4PPjZ Google Podcast: https://bit.ly/2SwB9Jr Instagram/Twitter/Linkedin: @utopiaisnow Timestamps ___________________ 0:36 - Who is Jacqueline Ewart? 6:53 - What are disasters & the need for effective disaster communication 12:58- What is disaster communication? 16:57 - How do journalists influence good/bad communication 24:02 - How do people respond in disasters? 29:08 - Covid & Climate Change Disaster Communication 37:24 - Merchants of Doubt 44:32 - A Quick Game with Professor Jacquie 50:28 - How do we communicate effectively in an age of misinformation? 55:11 - How does storytelling inform effective communication? 58:52 - What is Jacqui Ewart's Utopia? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/utopia-is-now/message

Drive With Tom Elliott
Significant majority of Australians back Indigenous Voice to Parliament

Drive With Tom Elliott

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:29


Australians are backing the idea of an Indigenous Voice to Parliament, with a survey finding 64 per cent of people are in favour of giving Indigenous Australians a more powerful say in national affairs.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Full Story
Kumanjayi Walker inquest: ‘racist' texts and big questions for Northern Territory police

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 24:55


Extraordinary allegations have been aired in the coronial inquest into the death of Warlpiri teenager Kumanjayi Walker at the hands of Northern Territory police officer Zachary Rolfe. The inquest has unearthed police texts described in court as ‘racist and disgusting', and an allegation that police may have covered up the use of force during multiple arrests. Indigenous affairs editor Lorena Allam steps through what the inquest has uncovered so far, and how it's raised wider issues for the NT and its police force

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
When the world is mourning for the Queen, indigenous Australians mourn their people: Sinhala News 19 Sep - රැජිණගේ අභාවය පිළිබඳව ලොවම ශෝකවන අතරේ ස්වදේශික ඔස්ට්‍ර

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 12:40


Listen to the SBS Sinhala Radio news bulletin on Monday 19 September 2022 - සැප්තැම්බර් 19 වන සඳුදා SBS ගුවන්විදුලි වැඩසටහනේ ප්‍රවෘත්ති ප්‍රකාශයට සවන්දෙන්න.

The Briefing
Indigenous perspectives on the Queen's funeral

The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 20:46


The Queen's funeral is tonight and it's expected to be the most-watched television event of all time. Four billion people are expected to tune in. It will be the end of an era in Australia with King Charles III taking over from his mother. So what will it mean for Indigenous Australians? Our very own Rhianna Patrick, a Torres Strait Islander, tells us about her connection with the Queen and how growing up, she had a fascination with the monarch and royal family. We're also joined by Blak Douglas, an Indigenous artist who won this year's Archibald Prize, who has an entirely different perspective. He says Australia's continued support for the monarchy is salt in the wounds of First Nations people. In this episode of the Briefing, Indigenous perspectives on the Queen's funeral Headlines: - The Queen's funeral tonight- A massive typhoon has made landfall in Japan- Australia's biggest Childcare provider is offering incentives to entice workers- Patrick Cripps takes home the Brownlow medal  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAUTwitter: @TheBriefingAU   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ayana Explains It All
Ayana Explains The Killer Queen Reign of Elizabeth, II

Ayana Explains It All

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 67:10


Don't cry for her Argentina, the truth is, she never loved you...or the Indians, Kenyans, Irish, Indigenous People, Nigerians... Sources used in the making of this episode: Wikipedia entry on Queen Elizabeth, II; Bloody Sunday; Partition (India). "Uncovering the brutal truth about the British empire: The Harvard historian Caroline Elkins stirred controversy with her work on the crushing of the Mau Mau uprising. But it laid the ground for a legal case that has transformed our view of Britain's past." https://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/aug/18/uncovering-truth-british-empire-caroline-elkins-mau-mau. Marc Perry, The Guardian. 8/18/2016. "First Nations Leadership Council calls on King Charles to renounce Doctrine of Discovery as first act." CBC News. 9/10/2022. https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/royal-visit-queen-reconciliation-apology-reparations-1.6454190 "Canada's unmarked graves: How residential schools carried out 'cultural genocide' against indigenous children." Anderson Cooper. CBS News. 2/6/2022. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/canada-residential-schools-unmarked-graves-indigenous-children-60-minutes-2022-02-06/ "Residential school survivors, Indigenous leaders say Queen should apologize next." Olivia Stefanovich. 5/16/2022. CBC News. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/indigenous-communities-bc-monarchy-reconciliation-queens-death-1.6578284 "The Queen leaves a complicated legacy for Indigenous Australians." Bridget Brennan, Dana Morse, Kirstie Wellauer, Jedda Costa. Australia Broadcast News. 9/10/2022. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-09-11/what-does-queens-death-mean-to-indigenous-australians/101422274.

Free Range with Mike Livermore
Henry Skerritt on Art and Politics

Free Range with Mike Livermore

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 57:32


On this episode of Free Range, UVA Law Professor Mike Livermore speaks with Henry Skerritt, Curator of Indigenous Arts of Australia at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia. Skerritt begins by introducing the Kluge-Rhue and how this collection of over 3,000 works of Indigenous Australian Art ended up at the University of Virginia. He explains that while aboriginal Australian art is the longest continuous artistic tradition in the world, it is also a contemporary movement that was used for political representation in the 20th century (0:49 - 4:50). They discuss the connection between art and politics, explaining how aboriginal art has played a role in asserting property rights for indigenous peoples. Skerritt discusses Milirrpum v Nabalco, the first significant case for indigenous land rights in Australia, which was initiated by the Yirrkala bark petitions in the 1970s. Ultimately, the political movement spurred by the bark petitions led to the Aboriginal Land Rights Act of 1976 and continues to have substantial influence today (4:50 – 11:00) Livermore and Skerritt then discuss an aboriginal painting called “Djambarrpuyŋu Mäna” or “Shark of the Djambarrpuyŋu Clan” by Wilson Manydjarri Ganambarr. Link: https://madayin.kluge-ruhe.org/experience/pieces/djambarrpuynu-mana-shark-of-the-djambarrpuynu-clan/ Skerritt discusses the relationship between the patterns and designs in the work and the cultural stories and traditions that they reference. (11:30 - 16:17). Livermore and Skerritt then discuss the relationship between contemporary Aboriginal Australian art and traditional art practices. (16:20 - 22:51). Skerritt and Livermore then turn to the diversity of cultural traditions that inform Indigenous Australian art. He explains that these paintings have ancestral narratives, called songlines, that serve a deep narrative and cultural function, connecting people from different clans and places. He describes the songlines as the world's most beautiful GPS system that talks about ownership and belonging (22:58 - 26:55). They then analyze a work by Dr. Djambawa Marawili titled “Journey to America.” Link: https://madayin.kluge-ruhe.org/experience/pieces/americalili-marrtji-journey-to-america/ They discuss the main story of Bäru, the crocodile man who brings his ancestral fire into the world. He explains that the overall message of the painting is that if the Aboriginal Australians put their art into the world, it can give them power and political representation (27:00 - 36:10). The question is raised over the relationship between political representation versus appropriation and the difficult challenges this sometimes raises (36:11 - 43:10). They analyze another piece by artist Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, one of the oldest painters working today. https://madayin.kluge-ruhe.org/experience/pieces/baratjala-baratjala-2/ Her works bring up questions of tradition and innovation: it both grabs the attention of the contemporary art world and maintains connection to traditional designs and practices, speaking to two different audiences at the same time (43:12 - 49:30). They discuss how artists today have to engage with a globally connected world, that every great artwork has to speak both to its own place and the world around it. Skerritt discusses how Aboriginal artists do not sacrifice their own unique identity to produce their works and that they insert their identities into larger dialogues of art and politics without giving up power of where they come from (49:31 - 52:13). Skerritt describes the movement as an extraordinary cross-cultural gift that teaches us the lesson that even though we may not all have the same culture or speak the same language, artists can find common ground and communicate in their own unique ways (52:15 - 57:32).

Finding Demo Surf Fishing
Go Fish Australia

Finding Demo Surf Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 70:03


Go fish Australia's senior fishing guide, Cody Edwards comes on to tell us about fishing the east coast of Australia and the amazing adventures that Go Fish Australia has available to experience.  This episode really showed how similar fishing is across the globe and Cody really opened up about how he fishes in his country.  Through this episode, you're going to get great tips that might help you get on more fish in your area and some smart tips about throwing lures in the surf.  How does going on a helicopter to fish an outlying island or fish with an Indigenous Australian man sound, teaching thousands of years of traditional fishing techniques sound?  Yep, that's something you can book with Go Fish Australia!  A later episode is planned to talk with the him about fishing and how he learned it.  With international travel opening back up, a dream trip to Australia is back on the table.  Now, you can add some once in a lifetime fishing adventures to that trip as well.  Take a look at Go Fish Australia and start planning your adventure!  LinksFB: https://www.facebook.com/gofishausIG: https://www.instagram.com/gofishaus/Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/gofishausWEB: https://gofishaustrailia.com.auShow Sponsors:Episode is Sponsored by: Rogue ReelzBait Check: The Sinker GuyBait Check: SORD Fishing ProductsBait Check: Ninja TackleInterested in sponsoring the show or an episode?  Reach out to me at findingdemosurffishing@gmail.com and I'll send you the current rates sheet!  Spots are filling up quickly.  Theme Song: Dirty Rock by TwisteriaMentions:HALCOPiscifunShimano 

The Indigenous Cafe Podcast
Respect of Responsibility; Quotes by Dr. Jackie Huggins

The Indigenous Cafe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 62:17


Roman Orona takes you on a journey around the world of Indigenous Music. Indigenous Cafe brings you music, conversation and inspiration from the Indigenous People of North America and the Indigenous People from all over the world. On this weeks journey, we are traveling with a show titled, “Respect of Responsibility; Quotes by Jackie Huggins” Dr. Jacqueline Gail “Jackie” Huggins was born in Queensland, Australia on August 19, 1956. Dr. Huggins, is a Bidjara/Pitjara, Birri Gubba and Juru Aboriginal Woman. She is an aboriginal author, historian, academic, and advocate for the rights of Indigenous Australians. Dr. Jackie, has won numerous awards for her literature work and has held many positions in the Australian Government as an advocate for Aboriginal Affairs. Artist's you will hear in the order they are played on this weeks show: THE INDIGENOUS CAFE PODCAST INTRO (00:00:00-00:02:21) “We must respect each other's right to choose a collective destiny, and the opportunity to develop the legal and political rights for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples so that we may enjoy the right to maintain our culture, our heritage and our land, as a united Australia.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 1. Yothu Yindi - “Yirrmala” (Healing Stone) (00:02:21-00:06:58) 2. Alexis Holland & Dashmesh Khalsa - “Wings of a Condor” (A Voice for the Voiceless) (00:06:58-00:11:02) PROGRAM BREAK (00:11:02-00:11:37) “It's a very Aboriginal thing to do, to give younger people greater responsibilities within the community as they become able to take those responsibilities on. It is a culturally appropriate transfer of roles that involves respect in both directions… from the younger to the older and the older to the younger.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins  3. Nancy Sanchez  ft. Cuñao- “Sanando Heridas” (La Gran Civilización) (00:11:37-00:14:43) 4. Julian Taylor - “Ola, Lets Dance” (The Ridge) (00:14:43-00:17:33) 5. Grant-Lee Phillips - “Moccasin Creek” (The Narrows) (00:17:33-00:20:04) Roman Orona (Host) (00:20:04-00:21:08) “Citizenship has not delivered Indigenous Australians the same quality of life other Australians expect. Basic human rights involve health, housing, education, employment, economic opportunity, and equality before the law, and respect for cultural identity and cultural diversity. These human rights must be capable of being enjoyed otherwise they are empty gestures.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 6. Chontay Standing Rock. - “Straight 2” (Sing It) (00:21:08-00:25:07)  7. Fred Kaydahzinne - “Social Back and Forth 3” (Sacred White Mountain) (00:25:07-00:29:03) 8. Anthony Benally - “NAC Set Four, Pt. 4” (Azee Diyin) (00:29:03-00:30:59)  PROGRAM BREAK (00:30:59-00:31:38) “We have reached a pivotal time in Indigenous affairs when for the first time, national attention is being paid to the horror of Indigenous family violence in this country. For the first time, an Australian Prime Minister has held a summit in the national capital to listen to concerns and ideas on this issue from a group of Indigenous leaders.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 9. Cozad - “Intertribal Two” (California Pow Wow Live) (00:31:38-00:36:10) 10. Eastern Eagle - “Kekunit” (It Gives Us Life: Pow Wow) (00:36:10-00:39:44) Roman Orona (Host) (00:39:44-00:40:45) “The true essence of reconciliation is more than making friends with non-indigenous people. Our motto is united Australia, one that respects the land and the heritage of its indigenous peoples and provides justice and equity for all. I think reconciliation is about changing the structures that govern us and trying to influence opinion leaders in whatever way we can.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 11. Arouna & Biko - “Champion” (Badanaya Sira) (00:40:45-00:44:54)  12. ODUCHU - “Surguul” (The Healer) (00:44:54-00:48:00) PROGRAM BREAK (00:48:00-00:48:18) “For Indigenous Australians, equal rights and citizenship have not always translated into full participation in Australian society…” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 13. Cheevers Toopah - “Diné (Navajo)” (True Melodies) (00:48:18-00:53:33) 14. Tudjaat - “Qiugaviit” (Putumayo A Native American Odyssey) (00:53:33-00:55:00)  Roman Orona (Host) (00:55:00 -00:57:26) “To my mind, you cannot speak about the need for leadership within our communities without being prepared to take on responsibility yourself. It's not enough to point the finger at those who have let us down and to expect others to come forward and fix our problems. Nor can anyone afford to call themselves a leader unless they truly have the interests of our community at heart. Too many people like to think they are leaders and too many are identified by the media as leaders who are not really leaders at all.” -Dr. Jackie Huggins 15. The Blue Stone Project - “John Doe” (Blue Stone) (00:57:26-01:02:00) DONATION ADVERTISEMENT (01:02:00-01:02:16) The Indigenous Cafe Podcast is hosted by Roman Orona and brought to you by iamHUMAN Media. iamHUMAN Media is a non-profit 501(c)(3) focused on raising the awareness of social discourse to all humans through development of programs and artistic ventures (music, movies, stage performances, books, workshops, concerts, film festivals, community outreach, community building, panel discussions, etc.)  to  foster and promote unity in diversity and community fellowship acknowledging that all HUMANs are related simply by being HUMAN. Below are ways to help us continue our programming or to learn more about us: https://paypal.me/iamHUMANmedia?locale.x=en_US Website: www.iamHUMANmedia.com Email: indigenouscafe1@gmail.com

The Lentil Intervention Podcast
Thomas Tothill - From Oil Rigs To Reefs And Indigenous Knowledge Systems For Research

The Lentil Intervention Podcast

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 51:51


Thomas Tothill is a passionate environmental consultant, research technician and PhD candidate with Marine Futures Lab at the University of Western Australia. With a diverse background in marine and environmental sciences, Thomas is now undertaking his PhD where he is working in collaborative partnership with the Esperance Tjaltjraak Native Title Aboriginal Corporation, pairing indigenous cultural values and marine research to understand Sea Country in the Recherche Archipelago.Thomas has previously studied the ecology and potential biodiversity benefits of offshore oil and gas platforms. Surprisingly some offshore platforms are amongst the most ecologically productive ecosystems and with more than 12,000 rigs worldwide, many soon reaching their end-of-life, there is a myriad of considerations for decommissioning these structures with minimal harm to the marine environment.Here we have a fascinating discussion about both topics:Thomas's background and his passion for research and the environmentHis Masters Thesis concerning offshore oil and gas rigs and their potential biodiversity benefitsThe complexities of decommissioning these rigs once they reach their end-of-lifeThe need to assess decommissioning considerations on a case-by-case basisTranslating knowledge about oil and gas rig marine ecology to renewable offshore structures such as windfarmsThomas's PhD research identifies sites and species of cultural importance in the Recherche ArchipelagoThe benefits of a yarning approach for engaging with Indigenous Australians in researchThe western approach to science vs Indigenous knowledge systems and the importance of a paired approachThe unfortunate ‘publish or perish' mentality in research and the need to make space for alternative knowledge systems and world viewsThe importance of ongoing collaborative partnerships and cultural leadership models If you'd like to take a deeper dive into some of the important topics covered by Thomas in this episode, here are some further resources recommended by Thom that complement our discussion:Offshore platforms as novel ecosystems (from the Marine Futures Lab):Yarning methodologyTwo-eyed seeingKarparti approach Decolonising methodologies (with a strong Aotearoa perspective)To view all the links to the websites and documents, visit the show notes on our website. Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast, leave us a review and share this episode with your friends and family.Please support our work and enable us to deliver more content by buying us a coffee.

SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ
SBS News in Ukrainian - 19/08/2022 - Бюлетень SBS новин українською - 19/08/2022

SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 13:17


19/08/2022. Torres Strait Islander women have shared their ideas with Anthony Albanese on how the Indigenous Voice could work to improve the wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. The head of the United Nations has joined the leaders of Turkey and Ukraine to discuss methods for ending Russia's invasion after months of fighting. No agreement reached between Serbia and Kosovo after crisis talks in Brussels. More News: SBS SBS Ukrainian - 19/08/2022. Найважливіше про події в Австралії, Україні та світі. Прем'єр-міністр А. Альбанізі зустрічається з жінками-лідерами корінних народів на другий день перебування у Торресовій протоці. Глава Організації Об'єднаних Націй приєднався до лідерів Туреччини та України, щоб обговорити методи припинення військового вторгнення Росії в Україну після кількох місяців бойових дій. Між Сербією та Косово не досягнуто домовленостей після кризових переговорів у Брюсселі.

Building Better Humans Project
Special Forces v Indigenous Australians

Building Better Humans Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 6:06


I heard a story of a race between Special Forces Soldiers and Indigenous Australians and thought there was a lesson there for all of us.  Programs, Mentoring, Coaching, Youth Development and more ....  LINKS TO CONNECT WITH GLENN LINKS TO CONNECT WITH GLENN LINKS TO CONNECT WITH GLENN LINKS TO CONNECT WITH GLENN LINKS TO CONNECT WITH GLENNSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Briefing
Will a Native American technique help save Australian Indigenous languages?

The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 19:49


Native Americans have been teaching Indigenous Australians how to strengthen their languages at a conference in Alice Springs. The Master-Apprentice method was developed by small Indigenous language communities in California and has proven to be the most effective method for endangered language communities with few resources. We're joined by Dr Richard Grounds - Executive Director of the Yuchi Language Project in Oklahoma who has been in Australia; and Leon Yeatman CEO of Batchelor Institute in the Northern Territory, who tells us about programs to save indigenous languages in Australia. With many Indigenous languages under threat in Australia, will this new approach help? Today's Headlines: - Bali bomb-maker to walk free early- Unemployment rate falls to record low- Scomo apologises to former Home Affairs minister- Covid cases drop 24% globally Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAUTwitter: @TheBriefingAU See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Religion and Ethics Report - Separate stories podcast
How to have courageous conversations about race

The Religion and Ethics Report - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 13:49


How can we begin a conversation about race? It can be awkward, confronting for white people, and for people of colour, it can be traumatic.

SBS News Updates
PM bulletin 16 August 2022

SBS News Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 6:55


An apology from Scott Morrison, amid calls for him to resign from Parliament over secretly held portfolio's, Victoria to establish an independent ombudsman to oversee a treaty between the state government and Indigenous Australians, and leadership issues befall the Newcastle Knights.

SBS NITV Radio
Native Americans and Indigenous Australians share knowledge on revitalising endangered languages

SBS NITV Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 14:29


"Language is centrepiece to Indigenous identity and the status in Australia was one where the prevailing view was: the languages themselves proceeding along the natural path of extinction," Leon Yeatman CEO · Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education

Full Story
Is an Indigenous voice to parliament achievable?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 23:14


Last week, during a historic speech at the Garma festival, Anthony Albanese made a promise to push forward with a referendum, asking Australians a simple question: Do you support a constitutionally enshrined Indigenous voice to parliament? In this episode of Full Story, Gabrielle Jackson talks to Lenore Taylor and Lorena Allam about the long road to recognition

Squiz Shortcuts
Your Shortcut to... a referendum on an Indigenous Voice to Parliament

Squiz Shortcuts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 14:27


▲ The Albanese government said it would deliver the Uluru Statement from the Heart in full, and we've now heard of plans to hold a referendum to establish a constitutionally enshrined Indigenous Voice to Parliament within the next couple of years. So in this Squiz Shortcut, we take a look at how a referendum works, what a Voice to Parliament is, and the hurdles it's likely to come across in the process.Squiz recommends:The Uluru Statement from the Heart full textPM Anthony Albanese's annotated Garma Festival speech - The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Uluru Statement from the Heart - Squiz ShortcutsTook the Children Away - Archie Roach

Not So PG
"Naarmcore" Ain't It Babe

Not So PG

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:27


Naarmcore is a term popping off on TikTok that feels a little too "let's be woke as a trend" masquerading as "cultural appreciation" for our vibe. Plus the Manly Sea Eagles Pride Jersey Saga is finally over and it's nice to see homophobia still exists yay. But don't go getting racist when you talk about it, cause there's a touch of nuance to the situation. And Brooke and Matty reflect on their weeks, and how mental health vibes seem to be popping off. Nova Entertainment acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land on which we recorded this podcast, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation and the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation. We pay our respect to Elders past and present.  LINKS Follow @clothingthegaps on TikTok and Instagram . Watch Clothing_The_Gap's Tiktok on "Naarmcore" here https://bit.ly/3zKiIUy . Buy tickets to see Matty in Top Coat at Sydney Theatre Company  Pre order Brooke's Book 'Big Love: Reclaiming myself, my people, my country' via Harper Collins  Follow @itsmattymills on Instagram Follow @brooke.blurton on Instagram  Follow @novapodcastsofficial on Instagram   CREDITSHosts: Brooke Blurton and Matty MillsExecutive Producer & Editor: Elise CooperEditor: Adrian WaltonVideo Producer: Ali Nooriafshar Listen to more great podcasts at novapodcasts.com.au   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS News Updates
PM bulletin 1 August 2022

SBS News Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 5:54


The Minister for Indigenous Australians says now is the time to act on an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice to Parliament; COVID cases in aged care expected to keep rising and Fremantle veteran David Mundy announces his retirement.

SBS World News Radio
Mixed reaction to the Prime Minister's speech proposing an Indigenous voice to parliament

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 3:29


A prominent Northern Territory Aboriginal leader has labelled the Prime Minister's plans for constitutional change as unsuitable for Indigenous Australians

PM full episode
What's wrong with government debt?

PM full episode

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 30:00


The Garma Festival in Arnhem Land gets underway, with Indigenous Australians hoping for clarity on the government's plan for an Indigenous voice to parliament.

Full Story
The Covid fines that should never have been issued

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 22:55


Thousands of fines for breaching Covid rules have been issued to children in NSW, with some placed in an unpaid work program to pay off their debt. Legal organisations say these fines should be scrapped, and a separate NSW supreme court case could also see many more ruled invalid.Reporter Christopher Knaus explores the controversial enforcement of Covid fines for vulnerable groups, and the fight to have these fines erased

Moment of Um
How do boomerangs return?

Moment of Um

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 5:37 Very Popular


A boomerang is a specially curved wooden throwing stick that was originally used as a hunting tool by Indigenous Australians. Nowadays, you can find toy versions along with the real thing, and if you throw them just right, they'll curve around in the air and head right back to you. At least…it works for some people. So how exactly does a boomerang fly? We asked boomerang champion Logan Broadbent to help us find the answer. Got a question that keeps coming back to you? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we'll booma-wrangle some answers for you.

VBAC Birth Stories
54 | Amielia's VBAC at 42 weeks and 6 days following an emergency caesarean after induction at 41 weeks and 5 days; Indigenous Australian, 'FTP' at 2cm, Group B Strep, VBAC with shorter birth-interval, Meconium stained waters, Special care

VBAC Birth Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 97:46


Amielia is a 21 year old Djab Wurrung woman and this week we would like to share her birth stories in celebration of NAIDOC week.Amielia only found out about the details of her indigenous ancestry when she was 12 and who her family were related to. She grew up learning about her cultural practices and a part of the disappointment in her first birth was the disconnect between these practices and the public hospital system. Later she would learn there was a program dedicated to indigenous women that she would seek to be a part of in her next pregnancy.When she first fell pregnant it was unexpected but despite this her partner vowed to support her no matter which path she took. She speaks about the lack of knowledge she had going into the pregnancy and how it felt going through her first pregnancy amid Covid lockdowns in Victoria.At 41 and 5 days, doctors suggested an induction which she agreed to. She had tested positive for Group B Strep. After what was deemed ‘failure to progress' at 2cm dilation Amielia felt powerless and agreed to an emergency caesarean after her baby's heart rate started to show signs of distress.After this experience Amielia did not want to be induced again. She hired a student doula and ended up experiencing the vaginal birth she always wanted at almost 43 weeks. Due to her baby passing meconium in her womb she agreed to have her baby tested for infection and tells us how her baby ended up staying in hospital for 5 days and what that experience was like for her.Thank you Amielia for sharing your VBAC journey with us. NAIDOC week: https://www.naidoc.org.au~ PATREON ~Please consider joining our Patreon if you are enjoying the podcast and would like to help support us by making a donation:https://www.patreon.com/vbacbirthstories~ AFFILIATES ~Access discounts with our amazing affiliates:Birth Time film:USE DISCOUNT CODE: CICADA20https://www.birthtime.world/a/2147503775/Eb2KfvxtPartum Panties:USE DISCOUNT CODE: Vbacbirthstorieshttps://www.partumpanties.com.auThe Birth Store:USE DISCOUNT CODE: VBAChttps://thebirthstore.com.au~ Notes ~Doula: Courtneyhttps://beyondbirthcollective.com.auInstagram of womb specialist: @rosewomb_xVBAC Australia Support Group (Facebook):https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=vbac%20australia%20support%20groupPerinatal Depression & Post Natal Depression/Anxiety support: If you or anyone you know is affected by PND symptoms please don't hesitate to contact the following support networks.The Gidget Foundationhttps://gidgetfoundation.org.au/get-support/,PANDAhttps://www.panda.org.au/info-support/pandas-national-perinatal-anxiety-depression-helplineBeyond Bluehttps://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/get-immediate-supportCopehttps://www.cope.org.au**VBAC Birth Stories features women's lived experiences. It is not intended to replace medical advice. Should you have any concerns during your pregnancy please always consult your healthcare provider.Please connect with us on Facebook or Instagram: @vbacbirthstories

Regenerative Skills
Byron Joel on the fascinating coevolution of humans and oak trees

Regenerative Skills

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 63:15 Very Popular


Welcome to a special episode edition of this ongoing series focusing on tree planting and agroforestry. So far I've had a lot of interviews talking about tree and perennial systems and we've mostly looked at things from a macro perspective. Today we'll take a closer look at one of the most incredible families of plants that are present in the majority of temperate ecologies around the world, the family Quercus, more commonly known as oaks.  Here to give us a window into the undervalued world of oak trees as well as a glimpse into how humans have formed relationships and uses for this incredible plant that have shaped our own cultures and evolutionary trajectory is Byron Joel an internationally recognised author, media presenter and leader in the field of Ecological-Agriculture. For over 15 years he has worked, consulted, designed and taught across four continents. In 2011 he was resident Manager of Horticulture at the PERMACULTURE RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA and in 2012 transitioned to the same position at the sister institute in New Zealand. He has over 1000 hours teaching and presenting on regenerative agriculture in Australia, the USA, Africa and New Zealand. Byron acts as managing consultant for Oak Tree Designs, assisting in the greater eco-agricultural movement as systems designer and consultant, focussing on the Mediterranean regions of his home nation, Australia, where he advocates for a greater recognition, honoring and implementation of Indigenous Australian land stewarding practices. This is a special episode, much the same as last week, because it comes from one of my favorite episodes from one of my favorite podcasts, The Plant Report with my dear friend Jill Cloutier. The Plant Report is an educational podcast about plants, herbal medicine, ethnobotany and the human-plant relationship highlighting the fact that every plant has a story.  Jill has such a wealth of knowledge and love for plants herself that when she gets together with others to talk about the wonderful world of vegetative life you can count on podcast magic. Since I can hardly hope to improve on Jill's exceptional interviewing style from her two shows, The Plant Report and Sustainable World Radio, I reached out to ask if she would allow me to rebroadcast her session with Byron and she generously agreed.  Jill and I, along with our friend and colleague Scott Mann from The Permaculture Podcast have teamed up to form the Regenerative Media Alliance, a union of independent media producers working to broadcast regenerative solutions across the world. If you're interested in learning from seasoned pros in independent regenerative media production, be sure to stick around until the end where I'll share more information about this alliance and give you the early signup information for the RMA's professional development conference.  Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community Links: https://oaktreedesigns.com.au/ https://www.instagram.com/oak_tree_designs/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=3&v=AWIx9kc7Hw4&feature=emb_imp_woyt https://www.williambryantlogan.com/oak https://oaktreedesigns.com.au/dehesa-australis/ https://theplantreport.libsyn.com/

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
Centuries of Friend Cultural Event on NAIDOC Week 2022 - Acara Budaya Centuries of Friendship pada Minggu NAIDOC

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 12:40


A collaborative event between the Indonesian community and Indigenous Australians to celebrate NAIDOC week. This event is called Centuris of Friendship which describes the relationship between Indigenous Australians and Makassar people for centuries before modern Australia. - Sebuah acara kolaborasi antara kpomunitas Indoneisa dan warga Pribumi Australia dalam rangka merayakan NAIDOC week. Acara ini disebut Centuries of Friendship yang menggambarkan hubungan antara penduduk Pribumi Australia dengan warga Makassar selama berabad-abad sebelum jaman Australia modern.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Mick Gooda on the push for treaty in Queensland

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 7:30


As many states begin the process towards treaty, the Queensland Government says it will reveal the next stage of its Path to Treaty in the coming weeks. Community leaders have closely followed the Victorian experience, but are they happy with how the treaty process is progressing?

SBS World News Radio
Indigenous Australians honoured at the 2022 NAIDOC Awards

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 3:41


Ash Barty, Jack Charles and Buddy Franklin were among those recognised in the annual celebration of Indigenous culture, contribution and achievement.

Full Story
The legal battle to prevent Aboriginal people from being deported

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 26:14


The Albanese government is under pressure to end a legal fight over whether the Australian government should have the power to deport Aboriginal non-citizens. The high court appeal - launched by the Morrison government - could see at least a dozen Aboriginal people face detention or deportation, if they are not granted a visa. Laura Murphy-Oates speaks to political reporter Paul Karp about the Aboriginal people caught in our immigration system, and why this is the high court's most significant constitutional decision in recent years

New Books in Sports
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books Network
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Hack
This town's rich in mining but kids are still dying

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 30:00


There are only six mental health beds in the Goldfields for a population of 60,000 — and none of them are for minors. The community is begging for a youth mental health ward ASAP to prevent any further loss. Plus, our native ingredients industry is thriving, but without proper regulation, a lot of Indigenous Australians are worried it's woven with cultural insensitivity and exploitation. And, a government report card for the environment does not read well, and we've got work to do. Or, the new government has work to do. Live guests:  Dr Skye Kinder  Pat Torres, Mayi Harvests Native Foods  Kelly O'Shanassy, Australian Conservation Foundation 

Full Story
The funeral fund accused of targeting vulnerable Aboriginal communities

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 32:30


For 30 years a company called Youpla sold low-value funeral insurance in Aboriginal communities, until it collapsed earlier this year – leaving thousands of people on low incomes unable to pay for funerals. The Australian corporate regulator is now suing the company for misleading conduct, and according to a report to creditors, the company's liquidator is investigating whether some of its directors may have committed offences under the Corporations Act. Indigenous affairs editor, Lorena Allam, and senior business reporter, Ben Butler, detail how this company operated, and whether Aboriginal families can recover the millions of dollars they paid into this fund

Hack
What are your rights in a mouldy rental?

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 30:00


The persistent rain has allowed mould to flourish from the Queensland coast and all the way down to Melbourne. So what are your rights in a rental? Plus, the Liberal and National parties chose new leaders today, so what do these new kids on the block have ahead of them? And what does the massive change mean for the future of the Coalition? And, 'Be Brave, Make Change.' It's a powerful message for all Australians, and it's the theme of this Reconciliation Week. So, what does Reconciliation mean to young Indigenous Australians? Live guests; Holly Jones, University of Melbourne Mike Tomalaris, former SBS World cycling commentator