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Term used for Indigenous peoples in Canada

  • 2,065PODCASTS
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  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST
First Nations

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    Best podcasts about First Nations

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    Latest podcast episodes about First Nations

    Talking with Painters
    Ep 129: Daniel Boyd

    Talking with Painters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 21:42


    Most artists remember their first show. Maybe they were lucky enough to sell a few works, usually to family and friends. Daniel Boyd remembers his. It was in the year he graduated from university, 2005, but family and friends didn't stand a chance. The entire exhibition was bought by the National Gallery of Australia.  Daniel describes himself in those university days in Canberra as ‘a shy young First Nations man from Far North Queensland'. That reserved nature still comes through even though I was speaking with him at the exhibition 'Treasure Island' which celebrates his career with over 80 works in one of Australia's most important art institutions, the Art Gallery of NSW. Daniel's First Nations heritage is central to his work. His ancestors were part of the Stolen Generation. Forced to let go of their culture and language, they lived in fear that if they shared it with their children they would be taken away from them. In an interview in the Gallery's Look magazine Daniel said that that forced  withholding of culture meant that he always felt there was something missing and it was at university that he tried to make sense of that. One of the striking aspects of Daniel's work is the way he both reveals and obscures his subject. Using a pointillist technique, he places a multitude of translucent dots over the image creating a series of convex lenses, as he refers to them, and while you can see the image through these lenses the rest of the image is painted out. Although this creates a visually alluring effect, there's more to this technique than just the physical use of the material. There are concepts behind it which relate to ways of seeing and perception and which are interestingly explored in the book accompanying the exhibition (see link below). The show has been curated by Isobel Parker Philip, Senior Curator of Contemporary Australian Art and Erin Vink, curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art, both at the Art Gallery of NSW. Daniel has exhibited in over 30 solo shows, has won the Bulgari Award amongst others, and his work is held in many other public institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and the Natural History Museum in London. Click play beneath the above feature photo to hear the podcast episode. Current exhibition 'Treasure Island', Art Gallery of NSW, current to 29 January 2023 Links Daniel Boyd on Instagram Daniel Boyd at Roslyn Oxley9 GalleryEdouard GlissantDaniel Boyd: 'Treasure Island', (book accompanying the exhibition) at the Art Gallery bookshop also available through many other online booksellers Untitled 2014 , oil, pastel, archival glue on canvas 315 x 224 cm Collection Art Gallery of New South Wales Winner of the Bulgari Art Award 2014 Photo: AGNSW 'Untitled (FS)' 2016, 215.0 x 343.0 cmoil, charcoal and archival glue on linenCollection: Art Gallery of NSW 'Untitled (PI3)' 2013 Oil and archival glue on linen 214 x 300 cm Private Collection 'We Call them Pirates Out Here' 2006 oil on canvas 226 H x 276 W x 3.5 D cm Museum of Contemporary Art Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the Coe and Mordant families, 2006 Daniel Boyd Untitled (WWDTCG) 2020 Oil, charcoal, pastel and archival glue on canvas 87 x 87 cm Collection of Anthony Medich, Sydney Installation view of the Daniel Boyd: Treasure Island exhibition on display at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 4 June 2022 – January 2023, photo © AGNSW, Jenni Carter.

    I Can't Believe That Happened History Podcast for Kids
    Mercy Otis Warren: Playwright, Historian, and Whistleblower July 4

    I Can't Believe That Happened History Podcast for Kids

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 8:57


    Mercy Otis Warren: Revolutionary Playwright, Historian, and Whistleblower July 4 EpisodeIn researching the revolution so many names came up that even with my decades of love of history I had never heard. Mercy Otis is one. Which is surprising given how much she did during and after the revolution and the president's who held her views in high regard. She not only wrote to presidents )who wrote back) but she published plays, pamphlets, and the first history of the revolution published by and American. Though the presidents admired (or mostly admired) her work she did have some critiques on them. She was anti slavery believing that such horrors were undermining to what the country was based on. She was angry at the treatments of the First Nations people and as you may expect was angered that there was no place for women in the new laws. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program
    Canadians wrote the book on Replacement Theory (ep 294)

    MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 30:08


    For our eleventh 'MINI' INDIGENA of the season, we try something a little different this time ‘round: a face-to-face-to-face discussion recorded Friday, June 24 in Winnipeg! Joining host/producer Rick Harp this episode are MI regular Kim TallBear (University of Alberta professor in the Faculty of Native Studies) plus special guest Tasha Hubbard (Associate Professor, U of A Faculty of Native Studies, writer and filmmaker), as they discuss: • a recent poll which claims “millions” of Canadians believe in 'White Replacement Theory' • the struggle to stay focused, present and attentive against the constant pull of our digital devices • how ribbon skirts have apparently become mandatory for women • monthly Patreon podcast supporter Veronica asks what we think of the B.C. government suspending a $789 million rebuild of the Royal B.C. Museum after First Nations complained it's failed to repatriate items from its collection. >> CREDITS: ‘Bahn Song,' ‘What,' and ‘Tic Tac' by PCxTC (CC BY 4.0)    

    Big Ideas - ABC RN
    What do Australian books and plays tell us about our national identity?

    Big Ideas - ABC RN

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:53


    Australian national ‘identity' has long been contested, as has the narrative of the foundation of Australia. What does the history of Australian literature and theatre tell us about who we are, and how we have changed? Are we now ready to put the history and culture ‘wars' behind us? This discussion brings together the authors of three books - all of which delve into our cultural history, and our shifting notions of identity and nationhood.

    The Pipeline
    Triggered with Cory Morgan. Tamara Lich jailed while murderers get second chances

    The Pipeline

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 75:47


    Cory rants about the latest jailing of Tamara Lich while the state takes a soft-on-crime approach to violent crimes.  Tom Flanagan joins the show to talk about First Nations funding and how it hasn't led to positive outcomes. 

    Blackburn News Chatham
    Morning News for Tuesday, June 28, 2022

    Blackburn News Chatham

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:16


    First Nations officials will hold a ceremony on the Ambassador Bridge this morning to mark the Jay Treaty, Conagra Brands is celebrating 75 years of tomato processing in Chatham-Kent, and one of the key organizers of last winter's convoy protest in Ottawa has been arrested again.

    Blackburn News Windsor
    Morning News for Tuesday, June 28 2022

    Blackburn News Windsor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:17


    Windsor's mayor defends an insert in last week's tax bill that some call inappropriate and a First Nations ceremony on the Ambassador Bridge will halt traffic temporarily this morning.  These stories, and more, are in your morning news on the go.

    Indigenous 150+
    Walking The Red Road: Ep 1 - Safety & Security

    Indigenous 150+

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:16


    Walking the Red Road is a podcast that explores the world of wellness and healing modalities with leaders and warriors drawing on both lived experience and academic perspectives.  Episode 1: Safety & Security Trauma therapist Kenndey Lewis, speaks to host Michelle Jarvis about the fundamental need for safety and security for individuals who have experienced trauma, sharing some of the techniques she uses along the way for cultivating wellness and recovery. Please note this episode refers to trauma and abuse so please take care while listening. If you need support don't hesitate to contact the First Nations and Inuit Hotline at 1 855 242 3310 Michelle is Anishnaabekwe with Polish and Bulgarian heritage. She has always resonated with the “Indigenous worldview” even before she had the words to frame it. Michelle has always wanted to help people and the world. Though this was present in her life before the upheavals, many traumas led to Michelle running away and living on and off the streets of Toronto from the ages of 12 to 16.  Michelle managed to get herself off the streets, get clean, and began the lifelong journey of healing and self-discovery. She has completed a diploma from U of T and has spent the last two years in the non-profit sector helping those walking in the shoes she once occupied.   Walking The Red Road was developed in Good Influence Films' Advanced Digital Storytelling and Podcast Training Program. It was created and produced by Michelle Jarvis.  The music in this episode is Strong Woman Song by Lisa Muswagon and Raven Hart-Bellecourt. To listen to the next episode of Walking The Red Road you can follow Michelle on Instagram @ miishiikwe. 

    SBS News Updates
    PM bulletin 28 June 2022

    SBS News Updates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 5:26


    Authorities in the US state of Texas say the bodies of migrants found in a truck were 'hot to the touch', New census data reveals Australia is more diverse than ever, but under-reporting remains an issue among First Nations communities, A Japanese referee set to make history as the first female to umpire a game at the World Cup.

    Jessup Think
    Season 3 Finale

    Jessup Think

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 52:23


    Mark and Rex are joined by their award winning student associate producer, Matthew Todd, to recap the highlights of season 3. TRANSCRIPT 0:01 Everyone welcome to Jessup think I'm your host Mark Moore 0:04 and your co-host Rex Gurney and resident minion, Matthew, Todd, 0:07 and Rex and Matthew, we are excited today. This is Season Three finales. And this is our final one before we go into summer reruns. And we're just going to look back at the show, and we're going to introduce you maybe more to the minion in the room. Mr. Matthew, just show you the reach 0:25 of Jessup Think. Actually, I connected with one of my former seminary friends is living outside of DC and they've been there forever. And I mentioned that you have podcasts and so he listened to all season three backwards, he said, 0:39 Oh, there we go. Well, we hope you enjoy the season three finale. 0:43 Yeah. Well, if you're listening then and I can, I can spread it to my new place, too. 0:48 So where's your new place? So here 0:50 what we have, we have to have a break for them to and then we'll start the episode. You know what I'm saying? Like that was the intro. So we can tailor if you're listening after the enjoy season three finale, you can you can go into the music and then 1:08 oh, yeah, okay. 1:10 I forgot we're pros here. 1:11 Yeah, we just 1:13 so Pro that we gave him extra content to work with 1:15 just more content. So now we'll start the podcast portion of the show. 1:29 Rex and Matt, so glad to have you. That might be the first time I've ever called you, man in my life. 1:35 I feel like one of those things that you wipe your feet on when you come into someone's house. 1:39 That's true. Do you prefer Matthew? I do. 1:42 However, I think you know, being Matt is sort of biblical, because you're supposed to be humble and let everybody walk. 1:51 In a sense, doormats, right, they wash your feet, and when one manner of speaking if you kind of wipe your shoes on it, you know, and that's that's what Jesus would do. 1:59 And you know, that is why Matthew Todd our associate, slash minion, hear the podcast was one of the most distinguished Jessup graduates when one of our highest award he was you can just see there's just Biblical stuff dripping all over him. Right, 2:16 right. Yeah, that's right. He's an award winning graduate of Jessup for this last year. And the reason he's on the show for the last year, he's been our kind of associate producer, helping helping the show helping us with social media. Amen. 2:31 Amen. And finally, being the spur that we needed to actually get T shirts and we made the two years after he made the T shirts happen, 2:39 you can probably hear it, but I'm wearing it right now. Let me just give you a little sound a little sneak preview. 2:43 We heard that T shirt in the wind. Well, yeah, so you graduated. And where? Where are you going? What's life after Jessup? 2:53 So I got my degree in biology, and I am going to start pharmacy school in the fall and the University of Florida at their Orlando campus. So very excited about that. I'll be leaving in less than two months. 3:07 There you go. See, look at look what can happen with a Jessup grand now here on the West Coast, get a biology degree 3:15 and then go directly to what second string Promised Land Texas is first string but but Florida is pretty close. 3:24 Now I had to go I had to rank the promised lands, you know? 3:27 Yeah. Great. University of Florida pharmacy school. 3:32 That sounds good. Yeah. 30 minutes from Disney World, basically. Hey, there you go. Yeah, dealing drugs, 3:37 you're gonna have to be an official drug dealer. 3:41 But for my street cred for the for the podcast. I have to mention, I also graduated with a Bible minor. Very much like every single other exact transfer of Jessup, who graduates but so 3:53 I mean, you did win the award a graduation, you won our highest male Graduate Award, I 3:59 believe, right. Yeah. That's called the founder award, the founder or which means I'm, I guess that means I'm like William Jessup, but I've never met him. So hopefully, that's like a good thing. 4:09 You do get your name on a plaque somewhere. I think 4:13 it has John Jackson's thumbprint on it. Okay. I think I can maybe save that and sell it or something. Yeah, get 4:18 a piece of tape. You know, St. Peter's asking for that. I've heard at the pearly gates. 4:22 So I know he's like, Well, 4:25 like here, I'm a Founders Award. Because you embody the spirit of Bill Jessen. 4:30 Oh, wow. Yeah. I never even knew him. Did you guys ever meet the founder? No, no, I didn't assume 4:36 more. Yeah, it was son, his grandson, actually. Yeah. Yeah. So when you were hired here, Mark was was Bryce still president? Yeah. 4:45 It was it was his last year 2010 Wow. 4:49 I remember when I was first hired. I was walking across the old campus with Bryce Jessup and he said he was really I don't know if I should be saying this on the podcast, but he cuz I was really glad I was at Jessup because he wanted me to try to set some people theologically straight on campus. 5:06 Oh, there we go. He's talking about but coming in as the Enforcer, I 5:11 guess. 5:12 Yeah. And we'll assume that you did that, you know, I don't know. I believe it set him right. Or maybe they're gone now. And they've never been heard from again. Exactly. That is kind of enforcement. That's how it works. And I Bryce gave them kind of a wink. And then Rex is like, Alright, I'm gonna figure out what that means. Well, we 5:29 actually have some brutal faculty meetings back in the day, as far as professors yelling at each other about whether we were an Arminian or a Calvinist school. Oh, I remember of theology professor almost jumping up on a table and just screaming and everybody, because there was a little bit of Calvinists talk that he was very uncomfortable with. Oh, that was years ago, though. Yeah, the good thing is we don't do that. And I've 5:52 repented of that. 5:55 An earlier version. The bad thing is that, you know, maybe we don't take theology seriously enough to jump on tables and screaming at each other anymore. I've lost something. 6:05 Yeah, we've lost a little bit of the passion. Yeah, a little bit of the passion 6:08 and even read those stories, because supposedly, that's a pretty common thing with theology like meetings, they can get really heated about their, what they're talking about, there was someone talking about how the serpent would have moved before it slid on its belly, and somebody got mad, and at the accusation that supposedly it could bounce like a pogo stick, and they were getting really, really angry, and irate. And it's like, recorded somebody, like, typed down all the things they said, quote, 6:34 I got transcripts. 6:35 I did not know that. I didn't know the full knowledge that I had never happened. Yeah, definitely. Good. We 6:41 have. So as a snake could pogo stick before? Before the temptation? Yeah, 6:48 because the curse was that he now had this. 6:50 Yeah, maybe that's maybe that's what made him so intriguing to Adam and Eve that he just didn't. Yeah, you're like, Wait, what is this snake doing? Amazing. See theology? Well, I'm one of the purposes of the podcast is to help make theology a little bit, you know, more accessible, more accessible part of the conversation. So you're learning stuff. And just, you know, we did have a pretty amazing season, you know, looking back on the guests we were able to, to get, and it was our first season having an associate producer, student producer. So thank you, Maddie Todd, for all of your work. But even starting out at the gates, cause our seasons go from September to the end of June. And then July and August are always reruns. So we'll pull some of our best shows from season three. And we'll play him as reruns this summer sort of greatest? Yeah, exactly. And we were able to, we kind of started off season three with Caitlin shez, who's author of the liturgy of politics. And I think on that one I was, you were out of town. So I was able to actually, it was excellent. I think it's gonna be one of our one of our reruns, because she just had an amazing way of talking about that. For one, everything in our lives is political. So when you try to say like, No, I'm not trying, I'm not political. Almost every decision we make has, has some type of political ramification or, you know, and so it's like, hey, instead of distancing ourselves saying, okay, life is political. What does that mean? What does that mean to be a faithful Christian in in politics? And not not just in she kind of strays away from like, partisan politics, but just in politics? What does it mean to be a Christian and to be faithful in that, so really helpful. Went from Caitlin chest to Priscilla Pope Leveson, who we had her husband, Jack Lovcen on in her book, models of Revelation, our models, how we say that models revelation, because that's the Avery Dulles that she based it on models of evangelism. And I thought that was it was really helpful book because I had not thought of the different ways of evangelism in that way. And the categorization was good, and it also made me I am pretty skeptical of kind of the cold calling evangelism. Oh, yes. 9:31 I remember in seminary, we actually, we actually had to go to the beach and annoy people. I remember doing that. I think, yeah, I did it. I did it. And I did it. I did it. Yeah. We used to walk around basically, you know, with a question if I mean, you know, you know, the question, this is a nice goal, right? Yes. Like if, if you were to be run over by a bus Do you know? Like, that's the best question we can come up with 10:00 You have the best starter, 10:01 and I did in like summer camp, we would ask what what do you think happens when you die? And I remember specifically, someone just was like, my ashes are gonna be spread across the world. And that's the end of it and they just like walked away. I was like, well, at least he saw of it. Yeah. 10:15 He's confident. 10:18 However, we can demystify evangelism, because that's just one. 10:22 I think that's important. Yeah, she had a chapter on that. And, and it was kind of like, yeah, the, you know, I think because of my fear of kind of the cold calling, it also plays itself out in me maybe not bringing up Yeah, yeah, God enough when I could, you know, obviously, you know, with our professions, Rex, it kind of comes up. I mean, I guess you can be like, I teach history. Rama was like, Hey, I teach and they're like, Oh, what do you teach theology? You know, and they're like, Oh, okay. 10:53 Well, you know, depending on whether I want to have a conversation or not, with a seat meet on a plane, I can actually when the dreaded question comes up, what do you do? I can say two different things and be truthful, saying both things. I can say I'm a college professor, and that has implications but I can also say, I'm an ordained Southern Baptist pastor. Oh, yeah, that's usually that if you want to start a conversation stopper right there almost every time 11:18 you're like, I'm gonna put my headphones back in. 11:20 Oh, you got like the select for you that that's like a conversation starter that they like, suddenly just get into it, you know? 11:26 Yeah. Yeah. But it was, for me. Yeah. The chapter was was helpful. Like, hey, there's there is a place right. And there are I mean, here's the reason why. Why not only a Christian do many Mormons do it. I mean, I agree. You're, you're out there. So I thought that was yeah, I'd never really thought of evangelism. And it was always kind of nervous about this over evangelism, I guess. Yeah. And the way she broke it down and the models I thought, were really helpful to bring them back in. Then we had Terry Wildman on the show with the First Nations version translation of the New Testament that was so cool, which I've been doing my kind of devotion, sorry, devotion, flex, they're out of it. And it's just 12:13 they've been doing the same amazing, in fact, this morning, and I hadn't thought about that, that connection, but it's providential. Apparently, I actually finished the last chapter of John. And so the copy that I have of the First Nations version that he's that he's responsible for, is just the Gospels and acts and Ephesians. And so I just finished it up today. It's been really helpful for me, in fact, I actually have the Lord's Prayer in the First Nations version on my wall in my office here. That's great love how I love how he have this translated. 12:52 Yeah, it is because it talks about the corn and in the Buffalo maybe. Yeah, brings in like it brings in Yeah, marry 13:03 the good row cultural. Yeah. 13:04 Good road. wanna 13:05 walk the good. 13:07 Fun fact about Terry Wildman? He has a he has a connection with Sacramento. He was actually just in Sacramento a couple of weeks ago, staying at one of the board members at our churches. Oh, wow. She's She's worked for university for 30 Some years and he was doing a retreat. And he said he's going to be back in the Sacramento region doing maybe we can get him on the show again. Yeah, we could have him live on the live on the show. That would be that'd be great. We went from Terry Wildman. I mean, this is we went Kailyn shez Priscilla Pope Levison tear Wildman with the First Nations version to Dr. Lauren haarsma from Calvin College, Calvin University, in his book, which was very theological winded sin begin. It's interesting that you brought up the snake. Yeah, and the pogo stick the snake and the pogo stick. But it was really helpful to, you know, because in this conversation of theology and, or faith and science, you know, especially in terms of a doctrine of creation, is it's hard to understand and theologically, right, like some of the things that we're seeing in the fossil record and in, you know, in actual scientific data, like, I think he was helpful to say, we can't be afraid of that. And it's not that that shapes our, you know, or molds, our theology, but our theology should understand that and it's kind of like they can dialogue together 14:48 right now, one thing I really appreciate about this book and I actually went out and bought it after the after the pot because I really wanted to not just skim it, but you know, take a deep dive into it is I Think you probably remember me saying because actually, Matthew was in my Christian perspective classes last semester. So I might have said, I'm a broken record, I say the same thing over and over again, but haven't got same stick, same stick every time. Try to modify it if it doesn't work. But anyway, my ears. I probably said something like, there's some class. But, you know, with the science and faith thing, there's very few kind of bullet proof positions that you can have if you want to take both the biblical witness and the scientific consensus seriously, right. Yeah. And so you know, with them with age of the earth and that kind of thing. You do have certain questions that have to be answered about the first chapter of Genesis. But the second and third, is something that theistic evolutionists have to deal with too, because how do you actually get the fall into this? And how does that make sense from an older standpoint? Right. Right. There's no easy solutions to those things. Yeah. 15:58 Yeah. And that's what he's really kind of tackling that. Yeah. In the book tackling Okay, where does the fall right in right? Did it have to? Like, did Adam and Eve have to be the very first actually humans or hominids? Or were they in alignment, he gave a couple of different options that I think fit with the biblical text and also fit with current scientific research, which I thought was really helpful. Because it's, it's, it's unfortunate, and especially in terms of theology, where we could take a position as a church that then forces people when they go to a biology class, especially at just a state school or anywhere else, right. That means 16:46 we're gonna see at the University of Florida, yeah. 16:47 And we received Florida this no Christ in anywhere in that time, 16:50 right? Not at all. That we put them in a position to where they have to be either reject what they're hearing in class or reject the Bible. And it's like, and I think Dr. Aardsma did a good job of being like, hey, there's we don't have to reject these two. Can Yeah, yes. And we can learn what's the what is the theological principle that's being taught in Scripture? And, and how does that then help us approach things we see in the scientific data? Also noting that not just our scientific data isn't concrete, right. And there's still mystery and question and theory involved? Yeah. 17:34 And the landscape changes so rapidly. I mean, like things that we believe now we probably didn't believe 100 years ago, right. And we're not gonna maybe believe 100 years from now. Right? Should the Lord always growing upon what we 17:45 have to say that for the Lord, millennials, 17:49 for in terms of science and mean, as well, I love that actually, in that Christian perspective, class, there were so many questions. You had discussion questions about the intersection of faith and science, because I was like, This is my thing. And most people are like, Oh, I don't really know anything about science. Like I know all. 18:06 I know, we just defer to our resident expert, Matthew Todd. 18:08 Yeah. So Matthew, in your biology class, 18:12 you think about this. And so I got up my pulpit was like, Well, guys, I'm just kidding. Yeah. 18:17 Well, in that yeah, so that one might, that one might make a comeback on the on the summer reruns. We got four episodes that we do summer reruns, and we have 18:26 so many wonderful podcasts to choose from. 18:28 I know we really do. Think we are. We are getting close to 100 episodes. Wow. It's season four. We'll get we'll reach 100 episodes. So any plans for when that happens? I know we're sound effects. Fireworks. Yeah. 18:45 Well let the Patreon people decide. And if you haven't heard of Patreon, just you'll hear about at some point. Okay, 18:54 ah, oh, yeah, you will hear about Patreon at some point. 18:57 I mean, yeah, maybe they'll do something wild. Who knows? Yeah, it will be well, I'm expecting some jumping on tables and shouting, just like we kind of previewed at the beginning of the episode. 19:07 Okay. Yeah, shouting each other with your Patreon. Yeah, it's happening. Moved from that we did kind of a pretty good stretch of of having outside guests on. We had Hillary McBride on after that, and a psychologist and talking about the wisdom of your body, listen to your body. And I think it's so important, so important to to understand the embodied nature of human beings and that our actual physical bodies while it's not the totality of who we are, it is a part of who we are. 19:49 And it's really necessary to reclaim that phrase. Yeah, popular music, because right is listening to their bodies in ways that perhaps are not helpful. 19:57 Right. And that's very true and hips dome All right, so yeah, 20:01 it's like we have this fun, we have an interesting designation between, like, you know, we consider to be like the flesh that you can listen to, but it's also the body that we were given, you know, God came, or Jesus came to earth and a body. Yeah. And so for a reason, right? We're not meant to just hate it and just wish that we were just little souls like, in our movie soul that just float around. 20:21 Right, yeah, we are embodied. And, and we have to listen to what our body is saying in terms of health. And in terms of mental health, all that. I mean, like body doesn't just mean Yeah, I think sometimes in the church we talked about body has just like flesh, flesh versus spirit, right? Yeah. Flesh is bad. And we kind of, even if we don't explicitly say that, I think people catch that in church, right? And so they they end up, I was just listening to the songs sung from back in the 90s. That was kind of like an under underground song. But one of the lines said, I grew up. I was told when I was young, not to trust in my body. Oh, 21:07 that's from Bruce Cockburn. Yeah. And I actually love that song. Sort of last night, an amazing song. It is, hey, yeah, I knew Rex and 21:20 interesting thing about Bruce Kapur and you know, so he had moved to San Francisco. And started for the first time in a long time, he's always self identified as a Christian, but kind of doesn't want to have anything to do with the institutional church. Yeah. But um, started going to church with his wife in San Francisco. And they had some issues with getting musicians for their praise band. And yeah, nobody knew who he was. You know? Because if you don't know, you don't know. And the guy's kind of older now. So yeah, he's like, Well, you know, I'll play guitar with you. Yeah. And they didn't realize that a guy that's playing guitar in their praise band is like this famous singer songwriter. Right. So, you know, 21:59 that's amazing. Yeah, that's just, that's really cool. Well, I knew I could tell from the song that it was. And even that mine, that he had had some type of relationship with a church trying, you know, grew up learning not to trust my body. And then the next line is I've carried that burden all my life. And I thought, wow, that's really interesting. And we have to be careful about that in the church. Now, like what you were saying, Rex, like, there are, like listening to your body doesn't mean and I think Hillary did a good job of this doesn't mean you listen to whatever it says, right? You know, I mean, especially when we're talking about kind of what we would I'm doing air quotes here. Like, fleshly, you know, desires. But that's not necessarily like, body related. I mean, I think we have to make that distinction of our actual physical body versus what Paul would be talking about as flesh. 22:51 Right? Exactly. Yeah. Cuz your body is made of flesh. And so it's confusing in our English language. 22:57 Right? Right. Yeah, it is. And it's, and it is confusing, because the Greek that Paul's using literally just means flesh. So and we have to kind of, you know, we go back and forth. Okay, do we, you know, the NIV I think calls it sinful nature. But then we're like, Hey, that's not what the Greek word so then it's like, well, flesh, but flesh doesn't really help us. Because it's not literally the pink stuff, you know, underneath your skin that Paul's talking about. So I thought that was that was really helpful. And I think particularly, her book was helpful. I feel like there is a big focus on the body in culture. And some good some bad, right? But I think it's, it's a focus of, hey, we have to, we have to learn how to live in our bodies in your bodies. And I think it's also helpful. As you get older, I'm getting older and you have to listen to your body right body can't do the same things you could do when you were 20. So what 23:54 is the gray your beard sustained? Yeah, 23:56 exactly. The beard. You know, the gray. What's that? Like, guys? I don't even now it's just more wisdom. 24:04 Just more of any, 24:05 I'm one step closer to playing Santa Claus. That is my life goal, My life goal. We move from there and did a little bit of the advent calendar. I think we're always you know, one of the things Rex and I love to do is bring in kind of church calendar and liturgical practices. I'm really, really drawn to that. We were also able to have one of our we actually over the course of this season, we had two of our psychology profs on and on, but we started with Melanie Trowbridge. And we just talked about kind of mental health in the church and how the church doesn't always approach mental health in a gentle way, in an empathetic way. And just really important, especially I mean, more and more news reports coming out me know of a Just the amount of kind of a mental health crisis among college students among younger but also among adults, I mean, adults are not immune in any way. And what's it like 25:13 over half of folks are going to have at some point in life, a verifiable mental, right health episode of some sort, right? Nice is ubiquitous. 25:24 And it seems like maybe on the church side, it goes back to the body thing, sometimes we, we deny the physical or neurological part of that. And if we focus only on the spiritual, I think, obviously, I'm a pastor as well, focusing on the spiritual is important. But we also have to focus on the physical and the neurological, I was just reading an article that said, you know, it was talking about the, the hidden cause you're not cause but like, a hidden problem with mental health, especially among high school students. And it was sleep. 26:02 Oh, totally. It was totally my wife's a nurse practitioner. And that's her mom's mantra right now. It's just like, you know, it's how many hours of sleep do you get? Especially when she's dealing with high school students? Because, you know, apparently, until you're 21, you still like go to pediatrics. But anyway, yeah. Um, it's like, you know, so how many hours you know, right, when you get right, it's just an issue. Yeah, it's an issue. 26:26 It's crazy how like, so whenever someone especially like Trowbridge, I've been in summer classes, she's amazing. And that one of the biggest things you can do to kind of help your general health is just sleep, diet and exercise, and how people will buckle those and sleep honestly, it seems like it's almost like, you don't get the choice as much, because you're just forced to work late, you're forced to wake up early to go do other things. And so that one, it seems hard. And diet sometimes can be like, you know, money restrictive, and things like that. But it's, it's funny, because relatively speaking, those are somewhat simple. So the thing is just, you know, closing your eyes and going, right, right and exercises, it can be something like going on a walk and but it can be so difficult sometimes. Yeah, to get all three of 27:08 those. Yeah, it's interesting. I think that's a good picture of life, often the best thing for you is the simple thing. And the simple thing is often the hardest thing to do exactly. I think it's, it's we would rather like no, I'm gonna go to the gym for four hours. And it's like, why don't you just take a 15 minute walk? Just start there. Start there. And you know, take your phone out of your bedroom, turn your computer off and be able to go sleep I mean, 27:38 park in the last space in the parking lot, right yourself have to actually walk a few extra steps. Yeah, here's the things Yeah. 27:45 And diet. Yeah, I don't know. Just saying like something like diet can be financially restrictive. But also when you look at it there are from pretty affordable fruits and vegetables. 27:57 Vegetables live in a food desert, though, and there's all sorts of issues with that. Yeah, nope, an error. Yes, 28:02 very true. 28:04 Very true. In the same way what you were talking about, there's like a difference between going all the way paleo or something like that only go into like extremes Yeah, and just cutting out some sugar like maybe you eat like seven candy bars a day eat like five or four or one or none? That's a good that's a really good good there's smaller things you can do you know, each seven candy bar confession time. The truth is out there not really bars, but Reese's are, are my weakness. 28:34 And when they're only little cups, thing, for those no problem, they're fine. We also had sociologists malicious song on the show from West marsh and Professor Westmark talking about the role of technology and the role of devices. And, and part of that was, you know, the devices that keep us from sleep that can actually keep us from health, you know, now, and I thought it was yeah, really helpful book I keep going back to it when I find myself staring at a screen too long or being caught in this kind of triple screen prison of TV, your phone and, and, and not and what I liked about her approach was it wasn't a hey, you need to throw all these things. Go it's kind of that extreme mood that I had she had it is a like, have habit play a proper role in your life. But also be aware of maybe how you're using it to distract yourself, how you're using it, where it actually is impeding you from maybe being healthy and things like that, you know, so I thought it's we're only going to have to talk about that more and more as as all of our lives are more automated. Now that's not to say that there weren't problems in the 1800s. Right? I mean, I think that's the kopien. Future. Yeah. Like that's the that's my always beef with kind of a technology thing is that yeah, if you just go Luddite doesn't solve all your problems. And, and technology can be used really helpful. I mean, I listened to a ton of audiobooks every year. 30:20 Yeah, it's podcast. There's a Jessup thing. I love listening to it. It's yeah, 30:24 see, you could listen to this podcast. couldn't do that. 30:27 While you take exercise and become healthier. Yeah, actually, yeah. Which will help you sleep better actually, 30:33 literally listen to while you're exercising, wasn't to read for you go to bed. We are the solution. We are the solution, 30:43 we'll have a line of pajamas in a while. 30:47 Oh, hey, all right, we've got a few more few more to go through, we're gonna have another one of our own professors on he's in our leadership and division part of my school, Derek Zond, with his book, looking at how to be Christian and not be a jerk, which is sad that we would have to have a book on that, but it is so true. And it was a helpful, like, Hey, you can be faithful to Scripture, you can be faithful Christian. And, and in fact, I would maybe even go as far to say, if you are a faithful Christian, you shouldn't be a jerk like that would exclude being a jerk. Right? Like, like if you were taking on the characteristics of Christ. And gentleness, humbleness, love, joy, peace, all of those. You wouldn't, but yet we struggle with that. 31:43 Yeah, I find it encouraging because sometimes, I don't know why. Maybe it's just something about some people have hung around who aren't Christians, you get this feeling sometimes that inherently by being Christian, maybe you're being a jerk. There's something about Christianity. And that's not the case. Nothing about like sharing, just saying that you're a Christian is like, in any way rude to people. There's nothing about our faith that is like jerky. It's just the way that you can kind of act and you can be vindictive in certain ways. It's a more behavior. So something like inherently about Christ, that then means that well, if I'm going to serve you this, I gotta be a little bit of a jerk to people. Like, that's not required. 32:16 I think some people will think that though. Okay, everything's in as a guy, 32:23 which is why it's good to have like that book as a reminder, I thought, 32:26 yeah. Yeah. So good. So helpful. After that we were able to have I'm gonna call them a good friend, since you've been on the show a couple times. But Kelly Capek theologian from Georgia, and his book was also on body, right? You're only human how your limits reflect God's design and why that's good news. And I've probably used more from that book in my classes right away than maybe some of all of the books from from this season, I thought it was just, again, really helpful for helping us understand what it means to be human. I've told the maybe partly because it's a little awkward. And so sometimes it's good in class to throw an awkward story in there to wake people up, right, because they're like, Wait, what is happening? But the whole, like, I think I leave out what Kelly Capek, how he starts it, but the whole stare at your belly button. And what does that teach you? Right? Like, like, what does that teach you about you? That means you you were connected to someone else at some point? Like you did not create yourself? You did not, you know, the thought, Wow, that's so. So, so good. And so simple is right there on your own body be like, Wow, I was connected. Meaning we're connected as humans, and he goes into kind of body and the role of the body and listening to the body as well, which, which I really appreciate. I really appreciate it. A lot of what Colin Kaepernick has written and good that we can call him a friend of the show. 34:06 Yeah, I was kind of like all sad that he ended up ditching the former name, which was the theology of navel gazing. For that, yeah, 34:14 he Well, I think, editors sometimes the title committee got rid of that. They were like, No, we're not doing a theology of navel gazing. Yeah, but that will be my upcoming book. Oh, great. Yeah, I'm excited. Yeah, might as well take that multiple you can get Yeah, exactly. Now that we now that we have it, then we had our scholar who did our, the annual theology spring lecture, Dr. Thomas Reynolds. Up from Canada, he actually wasn't able to then come on campus. But he was able to do that remotely and then obviously join us remotely looking at disability theology of disability and and the church and how the church and when at gained from that one from working in a church. I've thought so much about that, and how, how it's not just we are being accommodating to those with disabilities, but rather how we are including them as as a vital and just normal part of our community is not like, oh, we'll put up or we'll make no, you are a part of our community. And, and that's so important that involves architecture that involves setting things up, but also just involves like, hey, like we are a family together and and we want to embrace that. And I feel like that conversation is, is rising more and more of hey, the church and disability what does that look like? And and how can the church be better at at reaching out? Then we were we had Dr. Aaron Ambrose on to kind of highlight and we did this kind of a two parter. We had Matt on later, Matthew Gatchell to look at, we did we started with toxic masculinity. And, and in some ways, that wasn't necessarily the, what we went into maybe the podcasts that I bought, but that kind of was what emerged because it is looking at, hey, how is the church? And how is culture highlighted masculinity? And how has that? How's that influenced the church and how we talk about what it means to be a man, what it means to be a woman? And what are some things we need to change and when were in the church has been rocking, you know, over this last year, we just had more and more stories and more and more continue to come out of where a an incorrect view of, of masculinity has gotten church leaders in trouble and we look at the Maurice Hill and all of that, and a lot of it is built on this. This incorrect idea of what it means to be a man and and so we were able to follow that one up. I thought Dr. Ambrose did an amazing job. 37:20 One more thing that Dr. Ambrose, we actually went to that conversation, as Mark just mentioned, wants to talk a little bit about something else. But as soon as she spent a couple of minutes with two men here suddenly the whole conversation ended up with toxic man basket. Yeah, 37:35 yeah. Do satisfy other who were probably. Well, I do What are you gonna say? You gotta say, we're probably. I'm just saying we're not. 37:48 You guys are men. We are man. 37:51 We have the beer session. Yeah, we have beards. I don't even feel like that's true. Sorry. Sorry, guys. Sorry, man. No, we had Dr. Brad Harper from Multnomah University, which I thought was one Yeah, one of our more powerful podcasts of the season, looking at his book space at the table. Conversation between an evangelical theologian and his gay son in sight, it was just so helpful way to frame this conversation. I mean, the conversation on human sexuality within the church can be so heated, and so divisive. That I thought it was helpful to say, hey, let's let's talk about the other elements of this story, not just well, how does God define human sexuality? And Brad holds a traditional view of human sexuality, and a traditional view of marriage. He also wrestled with, okay with those views, how do I love my son? How am I in my son's life? And I thought the book just sort of did a good job of balancing that, that there's more, there's more questions involved. And and you can answer the question of maybe what does the Bible say about human sexuality? But you also have to answer the question, what does the Bible say about loving others, as you love yourself, loving your neighbor reaching out? Right? Like, it's not one or the other? It has to be both. And I think Ben Harper did a great job of really helping us helping us there. Then we had a local local pastor Kevin Adams, talking about baptism. And, and again, like, in some ways, this book on baptism was similar to the book on evangelism when I went into it being like, okay, yeah, baptism, part, it's part within these get in the book, and I think as Kevin described it, I was like, Oh, wow, like, I just saw the greater importance not that it wasn't. I mean, it's an important sacrament in our church and it's, but just seeing kind of kind of just a greater focus and what role it can play in someone's spiritual Life I think is really a great book and a really important realization. And that one was able to that one came right on the heels of me having a couple of like interesting baptism stories in my own life that I had to do. And baptizing neighbor and she ended up passing away two weeks after baptizer baptized her with a red solo cup on her couch because she couldn't get underwater. She was stage four, cancer and was passing away. But she'd never been baptized and wanted to be baptized. And then on Easter Sunday, so this would have happened after the episode. On Easter Sunday, actually Easter Saturday. Guy from who was kind of connected to our church, he's struggled with addiction and been in and out. He called me up and wanted to meet at the church. So I was like, alright, you know, and Friday are good Friday service. We filled the baptismal because we were gonna do baptisms on Sunday, even though no one had signed up. But after our good Friday service, we were just like, You know what, take them off. That's yeah, let's fill this, I think, you know, our Lead Pastor Richard was like, I feel like God's name was filler. And so it filled it. And then I met him, and I met this guy and our sanctuary on Saturday. And he was just talking about wanting to change, you know, wanting and wanting to be baptized. And, but he was, he was a little bit skeptical and nervous about coming on Sunday in front of, you know, big Easter crowd. And I was like, hey, it's full right now. And so him and I just him and I in our sanctuary, in our ice cold. We didn't turn the heater on yet. So it was ice cold baptismal. Just did a baptism right there. Yeah, it was just Yeah, it was just really cool. Really cool experience. And I think, probably having read Kevin's book leading up to that made me think about that differently than I would have in the past, 42:04 when I was pastoring. I just grew up in a church where, you know, baptism was obviously important, but we wanted to stray so far away from any sort of sacramental theology surrounding that in our sort of free church tradition Baptist Church, that it was literally just something you tack on to the end of the service, and there was just, you know, not much going on there. Right. And I really felt when I was pastoring, that this is such an important thing without embracing necessarily full full on sacramental ism. It's still just really, really important. And so we would always have the whole service basically. It'll be based on what was happening in baptism, the whole thing? 42:49 Yeah, that's, that's so good. I mean, it's helpful and I think particularly helpful for evangelical communities. Who kind of post reformation and most that have been Yeah, so nervous of anything that strikes of sacramental ism, that it's a this is an important part of of the journey. And the symbolism is so important to symbolism. So important. We were then able to have in this book has still been coming back to my mind. Sociologist George Yancey from Baylor 43:23 and interesting thing about Georgia MC, it's not often that Jessup thinks actually gets a leg up on Christianity today, but we scooped them. Oh, we am on our podcast talking about his book about a couple of months before Christine today actually reviewed it 43:37 every go take that. JT and CT. Yeah, maybe maybe they listened to the episode. And we're like, we need to get that book could be almost. But it was, I feel like it's been a helpful addition to this conversation on race in the church. And, and I think Georgia does a good job of, and I'm a sucker for the Middle Way, right? Or the third way. This this idea of, hey, conversations to the extremes of race on both sides have not been helpful and have not produced reconciliation. So why how do we all come to the table? We all have a voice. And we can know what is good. And we can also say like, Hey, that maybe takes it too far, one way or the other. And I just, it was a helpful, I think a book that and that I think the church could really use because I think sometimes particularly in the evangelical church, a lot of times in the white Evangelical Church, anything that talks about race is being you know, labeled as something that it's not and it's been rejected. And it's like why we have to have a conversation and we have to be in this conversation. And I think Nancy's book is a is a good way to move beyond. That's kind of his title beyond racial division. And to in that moving beyond, right, it's not a moving beyond that, that denies racism or denies that this is happening. What is the book that that understands that it's happening, but it's like how do we move to conversation? How do we move to reconciliation part of moving to it is recognizing that it is happening, right? And, and kind of the repent and lament elements. We were able rounding this off. As we finish up our season finale, we had Cameron Wilson, our English professor on the show, talking about the importance of literature, check that one out, then we were able to have as Guinness right show as well, during the great quest, which that was, I was amazing. I've been reading knives for a lot, large part of my life. And so it was amazing to have a conversation with him. Particularly to hear his life he had such an amazing life story. That that I think was helpful, especially as he frames this book on the meaning of life. What does that look like? And I think we're all there in our lives. Sometimes we go back to it several times, especially when you get to midlife. Or a second stage of life. You're like what is the meaning? You know, I thought I knew it when I was 20. 46:24 I obviously have it down. I'm never gonna change my mind. Clearly. You pretty much know everything. I'm gonna know. Right? Yeah, I just finished. So yeah. 46:31 Yeah, right. Nothing else learn till you hit 40. Then it all changes. Now we had Cynthia shape rally it on the show for a final time as a William Jessup University professor, but possibly not the final, but not the final never, never the never final time we'll be able to, we'll be able to get a hold of her at Baylor. But we're really proud of her and happy for her. She goes to Baylor goes to the big leagues of biblical research. Yeah. And we can we'll be able to tell people we knew her one day. Yeah, we had her in the studio. And 47:07 her best work, of course, was done when she was at Jessup. And so yes, it's gonna be anti climactic. 47:13 Exactly. Just kidding. 47:16 And, and then we had Maddie Gotcha. I've kind of references to Amanda Gatchell on to kind of do a follow up of the toxic masculinity be like, Okay, what is biblical masculinity? You know, and especially, and I think what I have wrestled with and wrestle on the show is like, what are elements in Scripture that are gender specific? And what are not because I think there's so much that is not gender specific, just all of us as Christians need to. And actually, I think if we focus there, that helps us become better men and women. Rather than just trying to be a better man versus a woman. What about being being more Christ like, and as a man, that makes me a better man? 48:04 I think that was one of our longest podcasts too, because we just couldn't stop talking. I mean, right three of the say that all thought this is such an important topic and right in what to do, right and better with that. 48:14 Yeah, it's it's important. And now we're at our season three finale. Three seasons. Moving up. Closing in on 100 episodes. Looking forward to season four as well. Any plans so you're moving to Florida over the summer? Any? Any summer plans while people are? 48:36 Lots of weddings? I got two more. I think that's pretty common for once you graduate. Yeah. 48:41 Once you get everybody's like we're graduated wedding here. Yeah. Yeah. colleges 48:45 that are similar to ours. Yeah. 48:47 Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Christian school. You finish it up. And then yeah, so I had to throw a Christian bachelor party too. And that's that was pretty nice story that you can tell because it was we had a devotional, you know, and I was like, there we go. Is Christian There 49:00 you go. That is maybe some coffee involved. Was there some coffee? It was no, I don't like is 49:05 that before after you guys hit the bars? Well, yeah. It was make us feel bad. 49:12 coffee bars. 49:15 The candy bars, right. Like I said, it's definitely day to day until we let loose 49:21 from that very, very nimbly there. 49:24 I brought it up. So I had to expect to be able to dodge Yeah, that's 49:27 true. My Buffy Rex. 49:30 Actually, interestingly enough, we my wife and I are probably going well, planning on spending a week in Orlando. Not to see me you know, not necessarily just to visit our esteemed minion but to go to a conference there and hopefully spent some time with a cousin that lives in Hilton Head and Oh, for years and I've never been there so beautiful to Charleston Savannah, and Some places like that, that as a history person, yeah, you know, wanted to see and never have seen. So we're planning on doing a little bit of 50:07 the South side that might see a little bit of the south of California. So doing some beach camping and a conference in San Diego, which there are worse places. 50:20 So yeah. So dogs the mouse like he is, 50:23 yeah. Is that Yeah, yeah, I will continue to dodge the mouse until the mouse cost less. Then probably getting back to Indiana season family. So yeah. And then also both you and Rex and I are teaching summer classes. So we'll be Well, we hope you enjoyed season three. I hope you enjoyed this kind of little recap, if you hadn't kind of seen those episodes, maybe go back and check them out. We will be pulling for those to do some a rerun. So we hope you enjoy kind of these reruns of highlighting some of these really important episodes and really important issues. And we're looking forward to season four and kind of continuing the conversation and continuing to make you think more deeply about theology and your life. 51:13 Congratulations on making it to the end of the podcast. Be sure to follow us on Instagram @jessupthink where we'll be posting updates and some behind the scenes content. We would love to hear your thoughts on the episode and engage with any questions you might have to leave us a comment or email us at think@jessup.edu. Our aim is to provide a framework for further reflection and deeper exploration of these important topics. And you want to support the show. Leave us a review on iTunes. We can reach more people. Until then, I'm Matthew Todd outro reader extraordinaire, and this has been Jessup Think. 51:45 If you're interested in learning more about Jessup, please visit us at jessup.edu. William Jessup is the premier fully accredited four year Christian University in the Sacramento area offering over 60 academic programs in undergraduate and graduate studies. Designed to see each student whipped and transformed into leader they're called to be as go don't forget to hit subscribe and share so you never miss an episode. Thanks for joining us for Jessup Think.

    Good Fire
    Rediscovering Cultural Fire with Russel Ross and William Nikolakis

    Good Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


    Good Fire Podcast by Amy Cardinal Christianson and Matthew KristoffStories of Indigenous fire stewardship, cultural and social empowerment, and environmental integrityEpisode highlightIn this episode, Russell Myers Ross and William Nikolakis speak about the work of the Gathering Voices Society on revitalizing traditional fire management in Tsilhqot'in Territory and the potential around carbon offsets.ResourcesRussell Myers Ross' StoryWilliam Nikolakis' ProfileGathering Voices SocietyThe North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance Ltd (NAILSMA)Intact FoundationWildfire governance in a changing world: Insights for policy learning and policy transferGoal setting and Indigenous fire management: a holistic perspectiveSponsorsThe Canadian Partnership for Wildland Fire ScienceSupport from:● California Indian Water Commission● Firesticks Alliance Indigenous CorporationTakeawaysValuing Indigenous knowledge and experience (7.59)Will created the Gathering Voices Society to support “a stewardship model, where First Nations manage the land in ways that are consistent with their values for their own goals and their own ways”. Practical action (10.54)Will shares that their goal is to support the community by employing people for the fire programs, and they are guided by their motto to learn by doing. Cultural burning can involve everyone in the community, not just firefighters, to begin seeing fire as a friend.Learning by doing (14.58)Will met Russ at a governance conference in 2015. They hosted Victor Steffensen in 2018 for knowledge exchange on different ways of practising cultural burning which led to them doing their first spring burn in 2019. Balancing benefits, mitigating effects (25.07)Even though many people hold misconceptions about cultural burning, Russ knows that the benefits will be visible in due time, and healthy land can be enjoyed by all. The community has been excited about reconnecting to the land and the energy is infectious.2017 wildfires (33.52)The Gathering Voices Society has secured funding to finance the fire stewardship in Russ' community. Russ speaks about the aftermath of the 2017 wildfires and the hope for development and education in this space ever since. Changing the world, one fire at a time (42.37)Will and Russ discuss the different tools used in cultural burning. Other communities are looking to him for inspiration on land management today. Will is working towards compiling scientific evidence of the validity and importance of this practice. Carbon (48.56)Will talks about working with NAILSMA, where they witnessed the growth of well-documented formal Indigenous fire programs that are groundbreaking in understanding the effect of fire across the landscape. Passing on the torch (54.46)Russ states that piloting the program in the community was important to measure practicality and interest, and they are now planning on how it can be expanded. He envisions this work to be intergenerational, keeping the community immersed in the knowledge. Send in your comments and feedback to the hosts of this podcast via email: amy.christianson@pc.gc.ca and yourforestpodcast@gmail.com.

    Daybreak North
    Daybreak North June 27 - full episode

    Daybreak North

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 125:42


    Mental health calls will have a new resource in Fort St John, a northern B.C. First Nation has signed agreements with two forestry firms, and turbulence for Air Miles collectors.

    Arty Farty
    S04 - Book Club #1 - Adam Goodes, Ellie Laing & David Hardy

    Arty Farty

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 45:32


    Join Adam, Ellie and David for an exciting talk about this new work, looking at their inspirations for developing this book, their creative process and their journeys as storytellers. "Welcome to Our Country" is a collaboration between Adnyamathanha and Narungga man Adam Goodes, political advisor and former journalist Ellie Laing, and Barkindji illustrator David Hardy.The first book in the series, Somebody's Land introduces readers to the term ‘terra nullius', a Latin term meaning ‘nobody's land' – applied to the colonisation of Australia by white settlers. The book invites children and their families to imagine themselves in Australia's past, to feel the richness of our First Nations' history, and to acknowledge that our country was never terra nullius.-Watch other children and family videos on Stream. The new streaming service from the Sydney Opera House. Register for free now and start watching.Follow the Sydney Opera House on: Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Speaking Out
    Queen's Birthday Honours

    Speaking Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


    A number of First Nations people were recognised in the recent Queen's Birthday Honours.

    Speaking Out
    Aunty Glendra Stubbs awarded an Order of Australia Medal

    Speaking Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 6:48


    Aunty Glendra Stubbs has been recognised for her services to the Indigenous community of New South Wales.

    Speaking Out
    Am I Black Enough For You? 10 Years On

    Speaking Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 20:20


    Award winning Author, Anita Heiss reflects on the 10th Anniversary of her critically acclaimed Memoir, Am I Black Enough For You? 

    AWAYE! - Separate stories podcast
    Kylie Bracknell wins First Nations creative award

    AWAYE! - Separate stories podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 12:09


    Kylie Bracknell wins Deutsche Bank Fellowship for First Nations Creatives at the Sydney Film Festival.

    Chatter that Matters
    TRUTH MATTERS to Phil Fontaine

    Chatter that Matters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 41:04


    I invite Phil Fontaine to join me on Chatter that Matters to honour National Indigenous Peoples Day. Phil is an advocate for human rights and a survivor of residential school abuse. To bring about positive change, Phil served three terms as the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, the first being when he was only 28. He was also among the first to openly talk about the abuses in residential schools and twice visited the Vatican seeking an apology. Phil Fontaine's contribution to our country deserves to be honoured, as are his beliefs that the founding peoples of Canada must include Aboriginals. Phil also views self-determination as key and one that leads to a First Nation Economy where the best education is available and pursued, culture preserved, and wealth created. Two of my previous guests, Sandi Boucher and Jennifer Menard-Shand, join the show to ask Phil Fontaine an important question; his answers alone are worth the listen. I end the episode by inviting Dale Sturges, National Managing Director, Indigenous Financial Services Group at RBC, to share his perspective on Phil Fontaine, his pursuit of truth and a life well-lived.   

    Fierce Girls
    INTRODUCING — Fierce Girls Celebrates NAIDOC Week

    Fierce Girls

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 3:18


    Fierce Girls is celebrating First Nations women who Get Up! Stand Up and Show Up! As Australia celebrates NAIDOC week in July, we're putting the spotlight on seven fierce Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

    Big Ideas
    What do Australian books and plays tell us about our national identity?

    Big Ideas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 54:53


    Australian national ‘identity' has long been contested, as has the narrative of the foundation of Australia. What does the history of Australian literature and theatre tell us about who we are, and how we have changed? Are we now ready to put the history and culture ‘wars' behind us? This discussion brings together the authors of three books - all of which delve into our cultural history, and our shifting notions of identity and nationhood.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Sitansisk First Nation holds its first Pow Wow in three years,

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 8:31


    Chief Allan Polchies of Sitansisk, also known as St. Mary's First Nation.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Metepenagiag First Nation artist displays beaded portrait at the Beaverbrook Gallery

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 5:14


    Mel Beaulieu of Metepenagiag First Nation, speaking with the CBCs Lindsay Bird.

    Policy Forum Pod
    Healing from the heart

    Policy Forum Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 59:36


    This week on Policy Forum Pod, Virginia Marshall joins us to discuss the Uluru Statement from the Heart and Australia's pathway towards healing. How can Australia place kindness and care at the centre of its policy-making? What do First Nations' knowledge systems tell us about protecting the land, waterways, and environment? And can implementing the Uluru Statement from the Heart spark the truth-telling and healing Australia needs? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Virginia Marshall joins us to discuss the future of First Nations' policy and Australia's journey to a fuller expression of its nationhood.Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Regulation and Global Governance and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is also a lawyer and solicitor and has been a regular guest and occasional host of Policy Forum Pod and Democracy Sausage. Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children's Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.Show notes | The following were mentioned during this episode:Australian species on the brink, Policy Forum Pod, (2022) Close the Gap, Australian Human Rights Commission, (2022)Food, water and energy for all, Policy Forum Pod, (2022)The meaning of Country, Policy Forum Pod, (2021)The Uluru Statement, The Uluru Dialogue, (2017)Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We'd love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    CTV Power Play Podcast
    Power Play #1316: Exclusive One-on-One with AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald

    CTV Power Play Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 47:19


    National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, Assembly of First Nations; Jean Charest, Conservative Leadership Candidate; Kevin Gallagher, CTV News; Kevin King, Union of National Employees; Joyce Napier, CTV News; and Robert Benzie, the Toronto Star.

    The Slippery Slope
    Senator Lidia Thorpe Should be Dismissed.

    The Slippery Slope

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:44


    Lidia Thorpe says Australian parliament has no permission to be here and her plans to infiltrate it Outspoken Greens senator Lidia Thorpe claims Australia's Parliament has no permission to be here - and says she's only a member so she can 'infiltrate' the institution. The senator said her entry into the 'colonial project' was due to her aspirations to 'renew the nation' and be a spokesperson for First Nations people. Incoming Northern Territory Country Liberal Party senator Jacinta Price has called for senator Thorpe to be dismissed from parliament. 'I think she has nothing but contempt for the Australian people and she doesn't respect the position she is in,' Ms Price said. This is just my opinion. J Fallon Apple Music J Fallon Spotify J Fallon YouTube The Slippery Slope Apple Podcasts The Slippery Slope YouTube The Slippery Slope Stitcher --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason-fallon/message

    RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
    Calls for First Nations Senator to be removed from Parliament

    RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 15:26


    Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe has bought into the Australian flag controversy enveloping the Party, saying Parliament is a colonial project which she has infiltrated. Incoming Coalition Senator Jacinta Price says Lidia Thorpe is showing contempt for the Australian people and has questioned if she should be removed from the Senate.

    DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information
    DLW 240: A VIP Tour with Kawehi

    DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 78:40


    This week, some retail changes for the D23 Expo, Magic Key Holders could have an easier way to get reservations, more electrical parade merchandise, new flower displays in Downtown Disney, we talk to VIP tour guest Kawehi, and more! Please support the show if you can by going to https://www.dlweekly.net/support/. If you want some DLWeekly Swag, you can pick some up at https://www.dlweekly.net/store/. Book your travel through ConciEARS at no extra cost to you! Be sure to mention that you heard about ConciEARS from DLWeekly at booking! DISCOUNTS! If you want some awesome headwear or one of a kind items, be sure to visit our friends over at All Enchanting Ears! You can use the promo code DLWEEKLY10 to get 10% off your order! We have partnered with the Howard Johnson Anaheim Hotel & Water Playground to get great deals for our listeners! Book your stay at the Howard Johnson Anaheim and get 15% off your stay (code 1000022077)! Magic Key Holders get 20% off their stay (code 1000025935) as well! Book now! Need the perfect bag for your days in the parks? Look no further than Designer Park Co.! Purchase the Rope Drop Bag as featured on Episode 222 and get 10% off your purchase! Use coupon code DLWEEKLY to get the discount. News: The D23 expo is getting a new, immersive retail experience called the “Expo Marketplace.” The 27,000 foot space will include everything from limited-time merch to the first items celebrating 100 years of Disney. You'll find pins, t-shirts, hats, books, plush toys and so much more. Some of these spaces will require a virtual queue boarding pass. More details on a reservation system will come out later this summer and if you're not able to attend, some of these items will make it to the ShopDisney store. – https://d23.com/d23-expo-marketplace-2022/ There's some hope that magic key holders won't have to keep refreshing the availability calendar for days to open up. Disneyland Paris launched a waiting list for Magic Key holders. With the new option, Magic Key holders put themselves on a waiting list for any day that may appear unavailable. If the day opens up, those on top of the waiting list are automatically given a reservation for that day. This is currently only available at the Paris Park, but that's also where the Lightning Lane started before coming State-side, which definitely helps fuel some of the speculation. – https://www.ocregister.com/2022/06/15/will-disneyland-introduce-a-magic-key-reservation-waiting-list/ Guests that have seen the recently reopened World of Color and Fantasmic! nighttime entertainment may have noticed some updates. For World of Color, some elements were updated since parts to repair them were no longer available. From new 4k projectors to brighter lights on the Incredicoaster, the show looks amazing. Fantasmic! also received an extensive refurbishment to the entire show, which received some tech upgrades in 2017. – https://www.ocregister.com/2022/06/20/how-disneyland-updated-fantasmic-and-world-of-color-special-effects/ There has been a lot of merchandise already on sale for the 50th anniversary of the Main Street Electrical Parade, but some new items have hit the shelves. First up is a 50th anniversary pin for $19.99, which features the Mickey drum float from the start of the parade with the 6.17.22 date on the side. There is also a t-shirt for $39.99 that features Elliot and June 17, 2022 written out. A mug is also on sale for $19.99. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/19/whats-new-in-disneyland-resort-creepy-star-wars-busts-now-in-galaxys-edge/ Fans of a certain Space Ranger can now meet their hero in his younger form from the new Lightyear movie. The character is now a face character and not the same version of Buzz from the Toy Story movies. This version fits in well with the new movie since the movie is about the real Buzz that the toy from Toy Story is based on. Guests can meet the new Buzz every hour until 4pm daily. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/17/buzz-lightyear-gets-a-new-look-in-disneyland-and-we-have-thoughts/ Several pops of color In Downtown Disney can be traced back to a Colombian-inspired tradition. The floral displays, or silletas, are a celebration of flowers. Fittingly, they start with a massive display from Encanto's Isabella and move throughout the district. The displays are a big display of inclusion and representation, such as LBGTQ+ Pride, Asian, Pacific Islander and Hawaiian heritage, Judaism, women, Indigenous and First-Nations people, Black, Hispanic, People of Latin heritage and people with different abilities. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2022/06/encanto-inspired-floral-displays-at-downtown-disney-district-represent-inclusion-at-the-disneyland-resort/ Last week, Cars Land turned 10 years old. The biggest part of the 1 billion dollar expansion of the Disneyland Resort opened on June 15, 2012. The Disney Parks Blog posted 10 ways to celebrate the anniversary. Meeting Cars Car-acters, getting the new Tow Mater popcorn bucket from Flo's or the Cozy Cone Motel, taking a photo with Guido in front of Luigi's, picking up a limited edition 10th anniversary Lightning McQueen and Tow Mater pin and more. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2022/06/10-ways-to-celebrate-cars-lands-10th-anniversary-at-disneyland-resort/ A shop on Main Street that has been closed since the start of the pandemic apears to be on the way to coming back. The Silhouette Shop on Main Street has posted some job listings looking for artists for the location, so hopefully this location will reopen soon. – https://www.micechat.com/324417-disneyland-news-update-buzz-construction-cars-land-anniversary/ A couple of quick updates from around the resort. Over in New Orleans Square, progress can be seen at Pirates of the Caribbean. The wall inside of the Blue Bayou restaurant has come down and the bayou is looking fresh! Concrete and cobblestone is being set in the outdoor queue area, and at this time is does not appear that Lightning Lane will be added to this classic attraction. The new planters at the entrance of Tomorrowland are now complete. – https://www.micechat.com/324417-disneyland-news-update-buzz-construction-cars-land-anniversary/ Guess what classic Disneyland treat has a new variation! If you guessed churro, you would be correct. This time, it is an orange pop churro, which is a churro covered in orange flavored and colored, and comes with a side of orange and vanilla dipping sauce for $6.75 near the Haunted Mansion. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/19/disneys-newest-churro-tastes-like-your-favorite-ice-cream-bar/ The Red Rose Tavern in Fantasyland has received some extended hours and a new “late nite dining” menu options. From 8:30pm until at least 11pm there are some offerings like classic poutine, a plant-based chili cheese poutine, firelight fries, and a pickle. The normal menu options are not available during the late nite dining time. – https://dlnewstoday.com/2022/06/review-staying-up-for-hawaiian-style-tenders-poutine-and-more-late-night-bites-at-red-rose-taverne-and-galactic-grill-in-disneyland/ Discussion Topic: Kawehi – VIP Tour at Disneyland – https://disneyland.disney.go.com/vip-tours/ and (714) 300-7710

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Listuguj First Nation basket weaver displays work at Petapan: First Light symposium.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:08


    Artist Mali Wysote spoke with the CBCs Lindsay Bird.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Former NHL star Jordin Tootoo helps open Elsipogtog First Nation Community School.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 8:41


    Jordin Tootoo was the first Inuk to play the NHL, retiring in 2018.

    The Behaviour Speak Podcast
    Episode 37 - The Realities of Autism in First Nations Communities in Canada with Grant Bruno, Ph.D. (Candidate)

    The Behaviour Speak Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 89:28


    In this episode, Ben chats with Grant Bruno. Grant is Nehiyaw (Plains Cree) from Maskwacis, Alberta, a Ph.D. student in Medical Science in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, and a father to autistic children. His Ph.D. research explores autism in First Nations communities through a Nehiyaw lens. In Cree, the word used to describe autism is pîtoteyihtam — he/she/they think differently.   Continuing Education Units (CEUs): https://cbiconsultants.com/shop BACB: 1.5 Learning IBAO: 1.5 Learning    Show Notes: Hobbema Residential School: https://collections.irshdc.ubc.ca/index.php/Detail/entities/1080  University of Alberta - Native Studies Program: https://www.ualberta.ca/native-studies/index.html  Lonnie Zwiagenbaum: https://www.ualberta.ca/medicine/about/people/details.html?n=lonnie-zwaigenbaum;    https://sites.google.com/a/ualberta.ca/autismresearchcentre/our-team/lonnie-zwaigenbaum  David Nicholas: https://socialwork.ucalgary.ca/david-nicholas Nehiyaw Language: https://cfrac.com/projects-initiatives/nehiyaw-language-lessons     Tla'amin First Nation: https://www.tlaaminnation.com   Israel Powell: https://powellriver.ca/pages/backgroundinfo   

    RIMScast
    RIMS DE&I in June: Pride, Juneteenth, and National Indigenous History Month

    RIMScast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 29:28


    Welcome to RIMScast. Your host is Justin Smulison, Business Content Manager at RIMS, the Risk and Insurance Management Society.   In celebration of Pride Month, Juneteenth, and National Indigenous History Month, Justin is joined by Denise Williamee, the Director and Vice President of Corporate Services at Steel City Re, and Tara Lessard-Webb, the Director of Corporate Governance at Intact. Both Denise and Tara are prominent members of the RIMS DE&I Council and are here to discuss why Indigenous People's Heritage is so critical to them personally; how we, as a community, can better support the Indigenous population; and what organizations and associations can do to craft a successful DE&I campaign that can bring more awareness and support to underrepresented groups.   Awareness is the starting point. Tune in to learn more about what you can do to get more involved with these important dates, and better support and uplift as an ally.   Key Takeaways: [:01] About the RIMS Membership. [:16] About RIMScast. [:27] About today's episode with Denise Williamee and Tara Lessard-Webb. [:50] Upcoming RIMS webinars and workshops. [1:19] About the upcoming RIMS Canada Conference in Halifax. [1:45] About the RIMS ERM Conference 2022. [2:24] More about today's episode! [3:16] Justin welcomes Tara Lessard-Webb and Denise Williamee to RIMScast. [3:33] About Denise's role at Steel City Re and how she contributes to RIMS as a member of the RIMS DE&I Council. [4:07] About Tara's full-time role and how she contributes to RIMS alongside Denise. [4:25] Tara shares about National Indigenous History Month and National Indigenous People's Day, why they are both so critical, and what we can do as a community to support our Indigenous population. [7:20] Denise shares about her background and what inspired her to join the RIMS DE&I Council. [8:18] How RIMS leaders and risk management professionals globally can support Indigenous communities. [10:42] Denise's thoughts on what we can do to make companies more sustainable and better support Indigenous communities. [12:11] RIMS plug time! All about upcoming RIMS events, workshops, and more! [14:54] Tara's recommended summer solstice reading list in the spirit of Heritage Month. [16:14] Tara shares her recommendations on how companies and associations can craft a successful DE&I campaign. [20:20] Denise shares her advice on how to run a successful DE&I campaign and examples of what it might look like in practice. [21:16] How do days like National Independence Day/Juneteenth, reverberate inside and outside the U.S.? [22:54] How you can support as an ally during Juneteenth. [24:21] About the resources in the links below. [24:32] Tara highlights the importance of Pride Month. [25:32] Denise shares her final thoughts on the importance of DE&I. [26:25] Justin thanks Tara and Denise for joining the podcast and shares some of the links to check in today's show notes.   Mentioned in this Episode: Indigenous Services Canada Learn more about First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples across Canada (rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca) Risk Management Magazine (June 2022) | "The Critical Role of Allyship in DE&I Initiatives"  "Summer Solstice Reading Suggestions" Indigenomics: Taking a Seat at the Economic Table, by Carol Anne Hilton The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet, by Sheila Watt-Cloutier RIMS Events, Education, and Services: RIMS Diversity Equity & Inclusion Vision Statement NEW FOR MEMBERS! RIMS Mobile App RIMS Canada 2022 — Turning Tides — Sept. 11th‒14th in Halifax! RIMS Advocacy — Legislative Summit Returns on September 20th! Spencer Educational Foundation | Annual Gala Returns Sept. 22, 2022 RIMS ERM Conference 2022: Call For Session Proposals — Due June 22! RIMS Buyers Guide RISKWORLD registrants can still access educational sessions on-demand through the RISKWORLD app and through desktop here. Dan Kugler Risk Manager on Campus Grant RIMS Announces Gary LaBranche as New CEO Sponsor RIMScast: Contact sales@rims.org or pd@rims.org for more information. In-Person Events: The 2022 Florida RIMS Educational Conference | Naples, FL | July 26‒July 30 Create a Contract that Effectively Transfers Risk | Naples, FL | July 30‒31 Virtual Workshops:  “Managing Worker Compensation, Employer's Liability and Employment Practices in the U.S.” – June 22‒23 | 10 a.m.‒5:30 p.m. EST “Captives as an Alternate Risk Financing Technique” – July 13‒14 “Fundamentals of Risk Management” – Aug 10‒11 Webinars: June 28, 2022 | “Your Greatest Asset: Smart Risk Management in the Age of Workforce Transformation” | Sponsored by Travelers June 30, 2022 | “What Really Happens When You Negotiate with a Hacker?” | Sponsored by Gallagher Core Insights 360 Sponsored RIMScast Episodes: “How to Reduce Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Risks” | Sponsored by TÜV SÜD (NEW) “Managing Global Geopolitical Risk in 2022 and Beyond” | Sponsored by AXA XL “Keeping Subcontractors Safe Through Partner Elevation” | Sponsored by Highwire “ESG: A Responsibility and a Growing Megatrend” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers Ltd. “Focusing on Your Team to Deliver Exceptional Quality and Service to Your Clients” | Sponsored by Gallagher Bassett “Bermuda Opportunities in 2022 with BDA Chair Stephen Weinstein” | Sponsored by Bermuda Business Development Agency “SyncR: A Tool to Enhance Your Risk Quality & Insurance Strategy” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers Ltd. “Navigating the Risk Landscape in 2022” | Sponsored by AXA XL “Prioritizing People: Expertise and Innovation” | Sponsored by Gallagher Bassett “Risk Findings for the Industrial & Manufacturing Industry” | Sponsored by Aon “Establishing the Right Assurance to Request From Business Partners” | Sponsored by HITRUST “Aon's 2021 Retail Industry Overview” | Sponsored by Aon “A Legacy of Resilience” | Sponsored by J.B. Boda Group “The Golden Era of Insurance” | Sponsored by The Hartford “Insurance Investigation Trends Happening Now” | Sponsored by Travelers “What Could a CRO Do for Your Business?” | Sponsored by Riskonnect “Hard Reality: A Look at Rising Rates in Property & Excess Casualty” | Sponsored by AXA XL “Property Valuation Deep Dive” | Sponsored by TÜV SÜD “Property Loss Control Engineering” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers NEW RIMSCAST VIDEO: “Climate Change and Insurance: A Fireside Chat with Dev Bhutani and Deepak Madan” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers Ltd. Related RIMScast Episodes: “Launching DEI Initiatives with Tara Lessard-Webb” “Pride Month 2021: How Risk Pros Can Protect and Uplift LGBTQ+ Employees” “Diversity as a Successful Business Division with Rodney Johnson” “Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2021” “Discussing Black History Month and the Risk Profession with Tammy Franklin of Marsh” “Pride Month with RIMS D&I Council Members, Kevin Thomas, and Victoria Nolan” “Talking Diversity and ERM at the RIMS ERM Conference 2019” “The Current State of the Risk Management Profession's Talent Supply, Future Outlooks, and the Influence of Diversity and Inclusion Programs” RIMS Publications, Content, and Links: RIMS Membership — Whether you are a new member or need to transition, be a part of the global risk management community! RIMS Virtual Workshops Upcoming RIMS Webinars On-Demand Webinars RIMS Advisory Services — Ask a Peer Risk Management Magazine Risk Management Monitor RIMS Coronavirus Information Center RIMS Risk Leaders Series RIMS-Certified Risk Management Professional (RIMS-CRMP) RIMS-CRMP Stories — New interview featuring RIMS Treasurer Jennifer Santiago! Spencer Educational Foundation RIMS DEI Council RIMS Path to the Boardroom   Want to Learn More? Keep up with the podcast on RIMS.org and listen on iTunes. Have a question or suggestion? Email: Content@rims.org.   Join the Conversation! Follow @RIMSorg on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.   Follow up with Our Guests: Tara Lessard-Webb's LinkedIn Denise Williamee's LinkedIn   Tweetables (For Social Media Use):   “Now is the time to reflect and recognize where we are in our present state and look forward to what we can do better in the future. First, we need to promote healing within the [Indigenous] community.” — Tara Lessard-Webb   “I think education is the foundation. It's an important starting point to create more awareness. … Awareness is key.” — Tara Lessard-Webb   “Diversity is a constantly evolving, living issue that's going on. [DE&I is] something that needs to be implemented.” — Denise Williamee  

    Ontario Morning from CBC Radio
    Ontario Morning Podcast - June 21 2022

    Ontario Morning from CBC Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 31:39


    We started off National Indigenous Peoples Day with help from First Nations poet Jillian Morris. A growing number of doctors are burning out and closing their practices. In Cornwall, the city's first and oldest walk-in clinic is shutting down after serving the community for 32 years. To address the housing crisis, a Kingston company has teamed up with Habitat for Humanity to create 3D-printed homes. We heard about the process and why they say it's a better option when it comes to battling unaffordability. Today is not only National Indigenous Peoples' Day. It's also the longest day of the year, the start of a new season. We heard from an Indigenous life and wellness coach about the significance of the Summer Solstice.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Elsipogtog First Nation celebrates the official grand opening of its new community school

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 8:31


    Ivan Augustine is the director of education for the Elsipogtog First Nation education authority.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    Two-spirited fashion designer from Listuguj First Nation displays work as part of Petapan: First Light symposium in Fredericton.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 5:04


    Oakley Rain Wysote Gray is a graduate of the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design.

    Vibe Radio Network
    Ghost Stories with Haunts of Richmond presents the Spirits of Victoria, BC

    Vibe Radio Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 63:00


    Spirits of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Tucked away in a beautiful corner of Canada's west coast is the City of Victoria. Also aptly known as "The Garden City", this area has been drawing people for thousands of years. From the First Nations, to the Hudson's Bay Company, to the gold rush, to the Edwardian Era building boom that has left the city with much of its most iconic architecture, the modern city is a major tourism hub with something for almost everyone. That said, every city with a shiny exterior will also cast some shadows, and having drawn so many people to its shores, it's little wonder that some of the spirits of generations past are lingering on today.

    The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast
    277: Yoga and Land Acknowledgement with Jessica Barudin & Emmy Chahal

    The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 76:05


    The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast 277: Yoga and Land Acknowledgement with Jessica Barudin & Emmy Chahal   Description: What are land acknowledgements? Who needs to do them, and why? How is it relevant to yoga, and how does this fit into the larger context of deepening our connection to the lands we occupy? Jessica Barudin and Emmy Chahal answer these questions and more in this episode.   Jessica Barudin (she/her) is Kwakwaka'wakw, a member of the 'Namgis First Nation living in Alert Bay, BC. She is a proud mother, Sundancer, yoga student, and trauma-informed yoga teacher. Jessica is the co-founder of Cedar and Gold, and collaborates with Nations and organizations across Turtle Island. Additionally, she is completing her doctoral studies focusing on developing a culturally-rooted, trauma-informed yoga for First Nations women and two-spirit folks. Jessica's classes weave in Indigenous embodied practices and teachings as well as honors Yoga's roots through sound, mudra, and a variety of forms made accessible for all bodies.   Emmy Chahal is a trauma informed yoga teacher, bodyworker/energy healer and workshop facilitator based on Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Territory (in the place now known as Vancouver). Emmy works at the crossroads of business, social justice, and spirituality. Emmy has experience of more than 19 years of steady yoga and meditation practice, and over 10 years of teaching. She integrates her educational background in Cultural Studies, and Gender and Women's Studies to offer tailored workshops for workplaces around wellness topics, cultural education for yoga teachers and practitioners on topics like cultural awareness, ancestral healing, and uncolonizing yoga, as well as intuitive healing sessions. Emmy also offers mentorship for yoga teachers and semi-private or family yoga classes.    Land acknowledgment is just a tiny but important step within a much larger journey. Emmy and Jessica share why emotions like pain, guilt, fear, and anger are high for everyone with this topic and how we can deal with them. They also explain why deepening our connections to the land we inhabit is important and how we can learn about and honor different traditions, including yoga and indigenous healing traditions.   Key Takeaways: [3:14] Shannon introduces her guests for this episode - Jessica Barudin and Emmy Chahal [11:26] What do Jessica and Emmy do? [15:07] Shannon shares why she was nervous about approaching the topic of land acknowledgements. [17:12] Why is it important to share land acknowledgements and who needs to be doing it? [23:23] Many people may start to feel defensive when talking about land acknowledgements. Why is that, and what can we do instead? [29:20] Jessica highlights the importance of continuing these conversations even as we may feel hesitant or uncomfortable about them, and how we can move forward from there. [32:54] How can we strengthen this practice of giving land acknowledgements beyond just paying lip service? Where can we start with this, especially if it may feel uncomfortable? [37:38] Shannon shares a clip of a short conversation she had with a yoga teacher about OfferingTree. [43:13] Jessica shares some insights about her particular geographical location and the history and connection she has to the land. [50:38] There may be no easy way to wrap up land acknowledgement and lineage acknowledgment into one or two sentences that encompass the entire history. [54:36] One key thing Emmy would like to see is people of European descent remembering their ancestors and going back to their earth-based embodiment and spiritual practices. [56:44] How has yoga helped indigenous communities? There is a lot of cross cultural learning, rather than blending or merging traditions and systems. [65:02] Jessica and Emmy share more about how you can work with and learn from them. [70:46] Shannon shares her reflections and takeaways from this discussion with Jessica and Emmy.   Links: Jessica Barudin Jessica Barudin on Instagram Emmy Chahal Emmy Chahal on Instagram Robin DiAngelo and Resmaa Menakem: In Conversation, On Being with Krista Tippett Sara Villamil Braiding Sweetgrass, by Robin Wall Kimmerer Pelvic Health Professionals Native Land Digital Shannon Crow on Instagram The Connected Yoga Teacher Facebook Group   Gratitude to our Sponsor, OfferingTree.   Quotes from this episode: "Land Acknowledgments - I feel like it's the tip of the iceberg. It's one tiny tiny gesture that is an invitation for people to really look at their complacency, complicity in colonialism." - Emmy   "Emotions are always part of this conversation and I think it's really important to be gentle with yourself and forgiving and to sit with the complexity and the pain and the guilt and all of that." - Emmy   "When we acknowledge the land, is it just a token gesture or is it something that we're deepening our relationships with where we are and what time in history." - Jessica   “It has to be heartfelt and it has to be honest and it has to point towards deeper action." - Emmy   "When people tell me they're nervous or they're scared or hesitant to say the wrong thing, I always take that as a good sign. That means that you care, and have the courage to make mistakes and try and try again. I think that's really important." - Emmy

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    A special addition to Fort Folly First Nation's regalia lending library

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 13:42


    Nicole Porter is the cultural co-ordinator for Mi'gmaq Child and Family Services. Michelle Knockwood is a member of Fort Folly First Nation.

    Weird Crap in Australia
    Episode 211 - British Bastards Bomb... Aus. Part 3 (1952-1963)

    Weird Crap in Australia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 62:25


    The 1950s were a glorious time! UFO sightings, post-War trauma and nuclear sunsets for everyone!At the end of WWII, Britain found itself locked out of the nuclear race it had directly contributed to not a few months before. Feeling the pinch, they searched the world for somewhere to test their armaments - and like their ancestors before them, found the Great Southern Land to their liking.

    Roy Green Show
    Chief Cadmus Delorme. The Assembly of First Nations suspends National Chief RoseAnne Archibald

    Roy Green Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 17:13


    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    2 Pentecostals and a Microphone
    A Conversation with Jeff Ready (Multicultural Evangelism)

    2 Pentecostals and a Microphone

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 55:18


    Join us for a great conversation with Jeff Ready! Bro. Ready was with UPCI's Multicultural Ministries and is now a missionary to the First Nations tribes of North America. Subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Coming soon to Apple Music!Reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram with your take on this discussion.Visit our home on the web: 2pentecostals.com

    SBS World News Radio
    Protesters call for a ban on guns in remote Indigenous communities

    SBS World News Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 3:28


    First Nations people have rallied across the country in a national Day of Action, demanding police stop carrying guns in remote communities. The protest also marks 15 years since the start of the Northern Territory Intervention.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
    As Premier Blaine Higgs floats idea to reopen province to shale gas exploration, a member of Elsipogtog First Nation says she'll continue to oppose it.

    Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 6:11


    Squiz Today
    Tuesday, 14 June - Action on gun violence in the US; The energy supply crisis; SA and a First Nations Voice to Parliament; and the Queen breaks another record...

    Squiz Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 10:13


    The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Sign up (it's free!) - www.thesquiz.com.au.LINKS: January 6 hearings in the US - video.Other things we do:Politics Today - a weekday newsletter getting you across the latest in politics, both here and abroad. Sport Today - a sports news podcast designed to keep you ahead of the game. Or sign up to the newsletter here.Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topicsSquiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age appropriate news without the nasties! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    EcoJustice Radio
    Solidarity Actions on Climate Justice - Stopping Pipelines and Dirty Banks

    EcoJustice Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 58:32


    EcoJustice Radio Executive Producer Jack Eidt shares speeches and discussions from multiple street actions on national and international climate, environmental, and social justice issues. The main action we feature is in solidarity with the Indigenous Peoples fighting the Coastal GasLink Pipeline now under construction on the West Coast of Canada. The Royal Bank of Canada is financially supporting a 416 mile gas pipeline through Indigenous Wet'suwet'en territory in British Columbia. They are also the parent company of City National Bank, 25% of whose business is connected to Hollywood celebrities and productions. Leonardo DiCaprio and Mark Ruffalo are now taking action among many others, creating the No More Dirty Banks [https://www.nomoredirtybanks.com/] campaign in support of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation in British Columbia, as well as signing a letter to City National Bank and their parent company Royal Bank of Canada demanding that the banks cut financial ties with and stop funding the Coastal Gas Link Pipeline. We present a speech from Climate Scientist Peter Kalmus [https://peterkalmus.net/] on building the movement for a stable climate. We also share testimony from movie writer & director Adam McKay of the recent film Don't Look Up [https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11286314/] and his calls for the Hollywood film and music industry to divest from City National Bank and their parent company, the Royal Bank of Canada, who are funding the Coastal GasLink pipeline. We hear from Indigenous and Environmental Rights activist Lydia Ponce, a Mayo-Quechua Indigenous leader and social justice activist, member of AIM (American Indian Movement), and organizer with Society of Native Nations and SoCal 350. Other Speakers: Jay Ponti - environmental/social justice organizer. George Funmaker - Red Earth Defense Keya Chaudhuri - Extinction Rebellion Youth LA and national coordinator of Extinction Rebellion Youth US. Stephanie Mushrush - American Indian Counseling Center Sim Bilal - Youth Climate Strike Los Angeles Josiah Edwards - Sunrise Movement LA We also feature excerpts of the documentary Your Voice, Our Future from the Office of the Wet'suwet'en [https://vimeo.com/user7141394] on the similar struggle in 2011 against a different pipeline, the Northern Gateway Tar Sands Pipeline by Enbridge, which was rejected by all the first Nations and eventually by the government of Canada. Speakers include: Klaseet - Violet Gellenbeck Chief Madeek - Jeff Brown Virginia deWit Chief Na'moks - John Ridsdale - The Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs have maintained their use and occupancy of their lands and hereditary governance system for thousands of years. Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs are the Title Holders and maintain authority and jurisdiction to make decisions on the unceded Wet'suwet'en lands. Chief Na'moks, along with his fellow Hereditary Chiefs, have been standing up for their Yintah - their land, and for Wet'suwet'en sovereignty, his entire life.” Karen Nyce - Haisla Dzi Ggot - Ron Austin Lloyd Spencer Morris Jr David deWit Dolores Alfred music Martin Naziel Caryssa Nikal Wila'at - Susie Alfred Chief Samooh - Herb Naziel Chief Gisdaywa - Dr. Alfred Joseph Mike Ridsdale To hear all speakers listed, listen here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/67706478 More Info: https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/political-commentary/coastal-gaslink-pipeline-divest-fossil-fuels-climate-1343046/ Host and Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Intro and Producer: Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Created by: Mark and JP Morris Episode 137 Photo credit: Jack Eidt