Podcasts about ksl

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 202PODCASTS
  • 6,977EPISODES
  • 17mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 27, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about ksl

    Show all podcasts related to ksl

    Latest podcast episodes about ksl

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Rep. Angela Romero on the Democrats' Response to the Dobbs Decision

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:39


    On Friday, the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade in a historic 5-4 decision. While conservatives celebrate the ruling, how are Utah Democrats reacting to the news? State Representative Angela Romero gives a look at what Democrats are feeling and the legislation that might be proposed in the next session. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    1st District Republicans Make Their Final Pitch Before Primary Day

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 6:09


    Primary Day is less than 24 hours away, and candidates are doing the rounds, giving their final pitches. The Republicans in the running for Utah's Congressional District 1, Tina Cannon, Andrew Badger, and Congressman Blake Moore, spoke to Inside Sources today and delivered their last message to voters before the election. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Federalism Could Be the Answer to Today's Political Violence Problem

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:03


    The Supreme Court's decisions on abortion, guns, and school prayer have been met with a lot of anger, threats of violence, and actual violence against people and property. But how can we cool things down in America? The answer might actually be more federalism. J.D. Tuccille from Reason has a recent piece outlining why making more decisions on the local level might cool things down. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    A Government Agency is Forcing Americans to Answer Deeply Personal Questions

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:52


    Did you know if you don't give up personal information to the government about your fertility history, time you spend at work, and your mortgage...you could be prosecuted and hit with huge fines? A little known survey from the Census Bureau forces millions of Americans to divulge this personal information each year. Adi Dynar from The Pacific Legal Foundation gives details on the American Community Survey and the people who are suing to stop it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Making the Case for the Filibuster

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:10


    The Senate filibuster has increasingly come under attack in recent years, with lawmakers from both sides of the aisle calling for it to be abolished so they can do everything from repeal Obamacare to pass voting rights legislation. But what would the Senate be like without the filibuster? Marty Gold and Matt Sandgren from The Hatch Foundation join Boyd to make the case for preserving this important legislative tool. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    The Supreme Court Rules on School Prayer

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:59


    There was a huge 1st Amendment decision that was handed down from The Supreme Court today. What will it mean for students, teachers, and others who pray at public schools? Kelsey Dallas from The Deseret News breaks down what was decided in Kennedy v. Bremerton and what it all means. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Tracks
    Kalani Sitake Previews the 2022 BYU Football Season

    Cougar Tracks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 29:53


    BYU football head coach Kalani Sitake spoke with Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte to preview the 2022 season, his seventh leading the program. Other topics on this episode of Cougar Tracks include Jan Jorgensen being hired as a defensive analyst, Mory Bamba commits to BYU, and BYU's bowl situation for the final year of Independence. Subscribe to the Cougar Tracks Podcast! Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-tracks/id1146971609 Google Play: https://kslsports.com/category/podcast_results/?sid=2035&n=Cougar%20Tracks Download the KSL Sports app Google: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bonneville.kslsports&hl=en_US iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/ksl-sports/id1435930251 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    Cougar Sports Saturday Highlights June 25th

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 94:14


    This is a compilation of highlights from Cougar Sports Saturday on June 25, 2022. Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte break down BYU Media Day this week and the news and notes around BYU Football. They take a look at the first released depth chart and speak with head coach Kalani Sitake. They're also joined by wide receivers Brayden Cosper and Chase Roberts.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    BYU's WR Room Is Deep In 2022

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 12:25


    BYU wide receivers Brayden Cosper and Chase Roberts join Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte from BYU Media Day. Cosper and Roberts make up part of a talented group of receivers and they discuss how they push each other. They also highlight their paths to BYU and expectations for 2022.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    Top 5: Best Coaches Among Former BYU Players

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 16:28


    Producer Dallen Graff joins Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte for the weekly Top 5. This week, the guys will look at the best coaches among former BYU players. The list includes the current BYU head coach Kalani Sitake, Andy Reid, and more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    First Depth Chart of 2022 Released For BYU Football

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 14:14


    Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte discuss the first depth chart of 2022, which was released at BYU media day earlier this week. Matt was surprised by the right guard position, with Joe Tukuafu seemingly ahead of Campbell Barrington. Mitch mentioned that Jacob Conover was listed as QB2, not an "or", on the initial depth chart.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    Kalani Sitake Prepares For Seventh Year As BYU Head Coach

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 12:55


    BYU Head Coach Kalani Sitake joins Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte to discuss his team in 2022 and expectations for the season. Sitake discussed the transition to the Big 12, saying the legacy of greats before him have paved the way.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    Tom Holmoe on the State of the Program

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 5:16


    Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte continue to discuss BYU Media Day and comments made from BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe in his State of the Program address. He addressed NIL, saying it isn't working and suggesting the government needs to be involved. He also discuss the transfer portal and how it's changing the landscape of college sports.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Cougar Sports Saturday
    Final BYU Media Day Of The Independence Era

    Cougar Sports Saturday

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 14:02


    Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte start off the showing reacting to a busy BYU Media Day this week. The final of the independence era, the guys react to the tone from players and coaches and look ahead at 2022.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
    Podcast #92: Alterra Mountain Company CEO Rusty Gregory

    The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 91:45


    To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 25. Free subscribers got it on June 28. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoRusty Gregory, CEO of Alterra Mountain Company, owner of the Ikon PassRecorded onJune 23, 2022About Alterra Mountain CompanyOwned by: KSL Capital and Henry Crown and CompanyAbout the Ikon PassHere’s a breakdown of all the ski areas that are party to Alterra’s Ikon Pass:Why I interviewed himIn its first five years, Alterra has gotten just about everything right – or about as right as any ski company can as it Starfoxes its way through an asteroid belt filled with Covid and empowered workers and shattered supply chains and The Day After Tomorrow weather patterns and an evolving social fabric and the sudden realization by U.S. Americans that there’s such a thing as outside. The company changed the name of one of America’s iconic resorts, managed a near meltdown of its Pacific Northwest anchor, met Covid as well as it could, and continually tweaked Ikon Pass access tiers to avoid overwhelming partner mountains while still offering skiers good value. Oh, and adding Sun Valley, Snowbasin, Chamonix, Dolomiti Superski, Kitzbühel, Schweitzer, Red Mountain, Mt. Bachelor, and Windham to the pass – all since Covid hit.If it’s all seemed a little improvisational and surprising, that’s because it has been. “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy,” Gregory tells me in the podcast. That explains a lot. In the frantic weeks after Covid zipped North American skiing shut in March 2020, angry skiers demanded concessions for lost spring skiing. Vail released, all at once, an encyclopedic Epic Pass credit plan, which metered discounts based upon number of days skied and introduced an “Epic Coverage” program that secured your investment in the event of everything from a Covid resurgence to the death of a beloved houseplant. Alterra, meanwhile, spun its plan together in four dispatches weeks apart – a renewal discount here, a deferral policy there, an extension six weeks later. “We’re continuing to strengthen our offerings,” Gregory told me on the podcast mid-way through this staggered rollout.In other words, Dude, just chill. We’ll get it right. Whether they ultimately did or not – with their Covid response or anything else – is a bit subjective. But I think they’ve gotten more right than wrong. There was nothing inevitable about Alterra or the Ikon Pass. Vail launched the Epic Pass in 2008. It took a decade for the industry to come up with an effective response. The Mountain Collective managed to gather all the best indies into a crew, but its reach was limited, with just two days at each partner. M.A.X. Pass, with five days per partner, got closer, but it was short on alpha mountains such as Jackson Hole or Snowbird (it did feature Big Sky, Copper, Steamboat, and Winter Park) and wasn’t a season pass to any ski area. The Ikon Pass knitted together an almost impossible coalition of competitors into a coherent product that was an actual Epic Pass equal. Boyne, Powdr, and the ghosts of Intrawest joining forces was a bit like the Mets and the Red Sox uniting to take on the Yankees. It was – and is – an unlikely coalition of competitors fused around a common cause.The Ikon Pass was a great idea. But so was AOL-Time Warner – or so it seemed at the time. But great things, combined, do not always work. They can turn toxic, backfire, fail. Five years in, Alterra and Ikon have, as Gregory tells me, “dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row.” While Rusty is allergic to credit, he deserves a lot. He understands how complex and unruly and unpredictable skiing and the ski industry is. He came up under the tutelage of the great and feisty Dave McCoy, founder of the incomparable and isolated Mammoth Mountain, that snowy California kingdom that didn’t give a damn what anyone else was doing. He understood how to bring people together while allowing them to exist apart. That’s not easy. I can’t get 10 people to agree to a set of rules at a tailgate cornhole tournament (the beer probably doesn’t help). Everyone who loves the current version of lift-served skiing – which can deliver a skier to just about any chairlift in the United States on a handful of passes (and that’s definitely not all of you), and has inspired an unprecedented wave of ski area re-investment – owes Gregory at least a bit of gratitude.What we talked aboutThe accidental CEO; Alterra’s “first order of business was to do no harm”; Rusty’s mindset when the Ikon Pass launched; the moment when everyone began believing that the Ikon Pass would work; reflections on the first five years of Alterra and Ikon; the challenges of uniting far-flung independent ski areas under one coalition; “every year we have to make the effort to stay together”; the radically idiosyncratic individualism of Dave McCoy; what it means that Ikon has never lost a partner – “there’s no points in life for losing friends”; Alterra doesn’t like the Ikon Base Plus Pass either; Covid shutdown PTSD; the long-term impact of Covid on skiing and the world; the risks of complacency around the Covid-driven outdoor boom; why Alterra’s next CEO, Jared Smith, comes from outside the ski industry; how the Ikon Pass and Alterra  needs to evolve; preserving the cultural quirks of individual mountains as Alterra grows and evolves under new leadership; “we dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row”; the importance of ceding local decisions to local resorts; “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy”; the current state of the labor market; Ikon Pass sales trends; “having too many people on the mountain at one time is not a great experience”; staying “maniacally guest-experience focused”; Crystal Mountain’s enormous pass price increase for next season; why Deer Valley and Alta moved off the Base Pass for next season; Mayflower, the resort coming online next to Deer Valley; the Ikon Session Pass as a gateway product; why Alterra pulled Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective Pass; Sun Valley and Snowbasin joining Ikon; Ikon’s growing European network; whether Alterra would ever look to buy in Europe; “we’re making constant efforts” to sign new Ikon Pass partners; “we’re very interested in Pennsylvania”; I just won’t let the fact that KSL owns Blue and Camelback go; “Alterra needs to move at the right pace”; whether we will ever see more Ikon partners in the Midwest; why Alterra hasn’t bought a ski area since 2019; whether Alterra is bidding on Jay Peak; and thoughts on Rob Katz’s “growth NIMBYism” speech.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewGregory has been Alterra’s CEO for about four and a half years. That seems to be about four and a half years longer than he wanted the job. In 2017, he was enjoying retirement after four decades at Mammoth. As an investor in the nascent Alterra Mountain Company – a Frankenski made up of Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and the remains of Intrawest – he helped conduct a wide-reaching search for the company’s first CEO. He ended up with the job not through some deft power play but because the committee simply couldn’t find anyone else qualified to take it.His only plan, he said, was to do no harm. There are, as we have seen, plenty of ways to make multi-mountain ski conglomerates fail. Boyne alone has managed the trick over the extra long term (a fact that the company does not get nearly enough credit for). The years after Gregory took the job in February 2018 certainly tested whether Alterra and Ikon, as constructs, were durable beyond the stoke of first concept.They are. And he’s done. At 68, confined for the past half decade to a Denver office building, I get the sense that Gregory is ready to get away from his desk and back in the liftline (or maybe not – “I will be so pissed if I have to wait in a line,” he tells me on the podcast). He’s earned the break and the freedom. It’s someone else’s turn.That someone else, as we learned last month, will be Jared Smith, Alterra’s current president. Gregory will move into a vice chairman of the board role, a position that I suspect requires extensive on-the-ground snow reporting. Smith, who joined Alterra last year after nearly two decades with Live Nation/Ticketmaster, has plenty to prove. As I wrote in May:Gregory was the ultimate industry insider, a college football player-turned-liftie who worked at Mammoth for 40 years before taking the top job at Alterra in 2018. He’d been through the battles, understood the fickle nature of the ski biz, saved Mammoth from bankruptcy several times. Universally liked and respected, he was the ideal leader for Alterra’s remarkable launch, an aggressive and unprecedented union of the industry’s top non-Vail operators, wielding skiing’s Excalibur: a wintry Voltron called the Ikon Pass. That such disparate players – themselves competitors – not only came together but continued to join the Ikon Pass has no doubt been at least partly due to Gregory’s confidence and charisma.Smith came to Alterra last June after 18 years at Live Nation and Ticketmaster. I don’t know if he even skis. He is, by all accounts, a master of building products that knit consumers to experiences through technology. That’s a crucial skillset for Alterra, which must meet skiers on the devices that have eaten their lives. But technology won’t matter at all if the skiing itself suffers. Alterra has thrived as the anti-Vail, a conglomerate with an indie sheen. Will the Ikon Pass continue to tweak access levels to mitigate crowding? Will Alterra continue its mega-investments to modernize and gigantify its resorts? Can the company keep the restless coterie of Boyne, Powdr, Jackson Hole, Alta, Taos, A-Basin, Revelstoke, Red, and Schweitzer satisfied enough to stay united on a single pass? For Alterra, and for the Ikon Pass, these are the existential questions.I have been assured, by multiple sources, that Smith does, in fact, ski. And has an intuitive understanding of where consumers need to be, helping to transform Ticketmaster from a paper-based anachronism into a digital-first experience company. Covid helped accelerate skiing’s embrace of e-commerce. That, according to Gregory, is just the beginning. “Different times require different leadership, and Jared Smith is the right leader going forward,” Gregory tells me in the podcast.Alterra’s first five years were a proof of concept: can the Ikon Pass work? Yes. It works quite well. Now what? They’ve already thought of all the obvious things: buy more mountains, add more partners, play with discounts to make the thing attractive to loyalists and families. But how does Alterra sew the analogue joy that is skiing’s greatest pull into the digital scaffolding that’s hammering the disparate parts of our modern existence together? And how does it do that without compromising the skiing that must not suffer? Is that more difficult than getting Revelstoke and Killington and Taos to all suit up in the same jersey? It might be. But it was a good time to get Gregory on the line and see how he viewed the whole thing before he bounced.Questions I wish I’d askedEven though this went long, there were a bunch of questions I didn’t get to. I really wanted to ask how Alterra was approaching the need for more employee housing. I also wanted to push a little more on the $269 Steamboat lift tickets – like seriously there must be a better way. I also think blackout dates need to evolve as a crowding counter-measure, and Vail and Alterra both need to start thinking past holiday blackouts (as Indy has already done quite well). I’ve also been preoccupied lately with Alterra’s successive rolling out of megaprojects at Palisades Tahoe and Steamboat and Winter Park, and what that says about the company’s priorities. This also would have been a good time to check in on Alterra’s previously articulated commitments to diversity and the environment. These are all good topics, but Alterra has thus far been generous with access, and I anticipate ample opportunities to raise these questions with their leadership in the future.What I got wrongWell despite immense concentration and effort on my part, I finally reverted to my backwater roots and pronounced “gondola” as “gon-dole-ah,” a fact that is mostly amusing to my wife. Rusty and I vacillated between 61 million and 61.5 million reported U.S. skier visits last year. The correct number was 61 million. I also flip-flopped Vail’s Epic Pass sales number and stated at one point that the company had sold 1.2 million Epic Passes for the 2021-22 ski season. The correct number is 2.1 million – I did issue a midstream correction, but really you can’t clarify these things enough.Why you should consider an Ikon PassI feel a bit uncomfortable with the wording of this section header, but the “why you should ski X” section is a standard part of The Storm Skiing Podcast. I don’t endorse any one pass over any other – my job is simply to consider the merits and drawbacks of each. As regular readers know, pass analysis is a Storm pillar. But the Ikon Pass is uniquely great for a handful of reasons:An affordable kids’ pass. The Ikon Pass offers one of the best kids’ pass deals in skiing. Early-birds could have picked up a full Ikon Pass (with purchase of an adult pass) for children age 12 or under for $239. A Base Pass was $199. That’s insane. Many large ski areas – Waterville Valley, Mad River Glen – include a free kids pass with the purchase of an adult pass. But those are single-mountain passes. The Ikon lets you lap Stratton from your weekend condo, spend Christmas break at Snowbird, and do a Colorado tour over spring break. The bargain child’s pass is not as much of a differentiator as it once was – once Vail dropped Epic Pass prices last season, making the adult Epic Pass hundreds of dollars cheaper than an Ikon Pass, the adult-plus-kids pass equation worked out about the same for both major passes. Still, the price structures communicate plenty about Alterra’s priorities, and it’s an extremely strong message.A commitment to the long season. On April 23 this year, 21 Ikon partners still had lifts spinning. Epic passholders could access just nine resorts. That was a big improvement from the previous season, when the scorecard read 20-2 in favor of Ikon. Part of this is a coincidence – many of Alterra’s partners have decades-long histories of letting skiers ride out the snow: Killington, Snowbird, Arapahoe Basin, Sugarloaf. Others. But part of it is Alterra’s letting of big operational decisions to its individual resorts. If Crystal Mountain wants to stay open into June, Crystal Mountain stays open into June. If Stevens Pass has a 133-inch base on April 18… too bad. Closing day (in 2021) is April 18. The long season doesn’t matter to a lot of skiers. But to the ones it does matter to, it matters a lot. Alterra gets that.That lineup though… The Ikon Pass roster has been lights out from day one. But as the coalition has added partners, and as key mountains have migrated from Epic to Ikon, it has grown into the greatest collection of ski areas ever assembled. As I wrote in March:Whatever the reason is that Snowbasin and Sun Valley fled Epic, the ramifications for the North American multipass landscape are huge. So is Alterra’s decision to yank its two California flagships and its top-five New England resort off of the Mountain Collective. Those two moves gave the Ikon Pass the best top-to-bottom destination ski roster of any multi-mountain ski pass on the continent.Good arguments can still be made for the supremacy of the Epic Pass, which delivers seven days at Telluride and unlimited access to 10 North American megaresorts: Whistler, Northstar, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Park City, Crested Butte, Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone, and Breckenridge, plus Stowe, one of the top two or three ski areas in the Northeast.But many of Vail’s ski areas are small and regionally focused. I like Hunter and Jack Frost and Roundtop and Mount Brighton, Michigan, and their value as businesses is unquestioned, both because they are busy and because they draw skiers from rich coastal and Midwestern cities to the Mountain West. But the Epic Pass’ 40-some U.S. and Canadian mountains are, as a group, objectively less compelling than Ikon’s.The Ikon Pass now delivers exclusive big-pass access to Steamboat, Winter Park, Copper Mountain, Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, Crystal Washington, Red Mountain, Deer Valley, Solitude, and Brighton, as well as a killer New England lineup of Killington, Stratton, Sugarbush, Sunday River, and Loon. The pass also shares big-mountain partners with Mountain Collective: Alta, Arapahoe Basin, Aspen Snowmass, Banff Sunshine, Big Sky, Jackson Hole, Lake Louise, Revelstoke, Snowbasin, Snowbird, Sugarloaf, Sun Valley, and Taos. For pure fall-line thrills and rowdy, get-after-it terrain, there is just no comparison on any other pass.In large parts of America, it’s become impossible to imagine not buying an Ikon Pass. The lineup is just too good. Epic still makes more sense in many circumstances. But for the neutral party, aimed primarily for big-mountain destinations in a city not defined by access to a local, the Ikon is telling a damn good story.Podcast NotesRusty and I talked a bit about the huge jump in Crystal’s pass price for next season. Here’s a more comprehensive look that I wrote in March, based on conversations with Crystal CEO Frank DeBerry and a number of local skiers.We also discuss Mayflower Mountain Resort, which is to be built adjacent to Deer Valley. Here’s a bit more about that project, which could offer 4,300 acres on 3,000 vertical feet. The developers will have to overcome the ski area’s relatively low elevation, which will be compounded by Utah’s larger water issues.Rusty explained why Alterra pulled Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective pass ahead of next ski season. Here were my initial thoughts on that move. A tribute to Mammoth Mountain founder Dave McCoy, who died in 2020 at age 104:Previous Storm Skiing Podcasts with Rusty or Ikon Pass mountain leadersThe Summit at Snoqualmie President & GM Guy Lawrence – April 20, 2022Arapahoe Basin COO Alan Henceroth – April 14, 2022Big Sky President & COO Taylor Middleton – April 6, 2022Solitude President & COO Amber Broadaway – March 5, 2022The Highlands at Harbor Springs President & GM Mike Chumbler – Feb. 18, 2022Steamboat President & COO & Alterra Central Region COO Rob Perlman – Dec. 9, 2021Jackson Hole President Mary Kate Buckley – Nov. 17, 2021Crystal Mountain, Washington President & CEO Frank DeBerry – Oct. 22, 2021Boyne Mountain GM Ed Grice – Oct. 19, 2021Mt. Buller, Australia GM Laurie Blampied – Oct. 12, 2021Aspen Skiing Company CEO Mike Kaplan – Oct. 1, 2021Taos Ski Valley CEO David Norden – Sept. 16, 2021Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – March 25, 2021Sunday River GM Brian Heon – Feb. 10, 2021Windham President Chip Seamans – Jan. 31, 2021Sugarbush President & GM John Hammond – Nov. 2, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 2 – Sept. 30, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 1 – Sept. 25, 2020Palisades Tahoe President & COO Ron Cohen – Sept. 4, 2020Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – May 5, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – April 1, 2020Sunday River President & GM Dana Bullen – Feb. 14, 2020Loon Mountain President & GM Jay Scambio – Feb. 7, 2020Sugarbush President & COO Win Smith – Jan. 30, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – Nov. 21, 2019Killington & Pico President & GM Mike Solimano – Oct. 13, 2019Future Storm Skiing Podcasts scheduled with Ikon Pass mountainsBoyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – September 2022Sun Valley VP & GM Pete Sonntag – September 2022The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 69/100 in 2022, and number 315 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Please be patient - my response may take a while. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

    KSL Greenhouse
    Butterfly Gardens

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 18:41


    Grace wants to know if it's too early to take out iris. Bonnie has a butterfly garden that has bulbs. She wants to know if she needs to dig them up now. Doug wants to know what will grow well at 8,000 feet. Listeners want to know the best height for fruit trees. Kelvin has squash plants that are attracting bugs.   Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Greenhouse
    Water Wise Soil

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 17:06


    This week's Water Wise segment features what kind of soil is best to use when it comes to conserving water. To learn more about water wise soils you can find an article about these soils on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page. Lindy has a tree that has sparse dry leaves. She wants to know if it's dead. Jesse's garden is infested with grasshoppers. She wants to know if a spray will get rid of them.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Greenhouse
    What Should Take Its Place?

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 15:38


    Listeners want to know when to replace the soil in a raised bed for tomatoes. Sue has grubs in her grow boxes and wants to know what to use or how to get rid of them. Louis has a Japanese Maple that has died and is looking for suggestions on what to replace it with. Chris has two maple trees and one of them has turned yellow and wants to know how it can be fixed.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Greenhouse
    Hanging Baskets In The Heat

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 18:16


    With temperatures rising it can be difficult maintaining hanging baskets. Maria and Taun go over tips and other things to take into consideration when keeping hanging baskets healthy in hot weather. For more information you can check out an article on hanging baskets on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page. Dig Around Town  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Greenhouse
    When Should I Plant?

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 19:18


    Listeners want to know if it's ok to buy bushes now and plant later. Tammy wants to know how she can get rid of Secaidas. Maria asks Taun to describe what horticultural soap is and what it does. Listeners are asking Taun when they should plant certain things. Taun directs them to a great reference that will tell you when to plant.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Greenhouse
    Canterbury Bells

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 19:19


    The Plant of the Week is the Canterbury Bells. Canterbury Bells was a popular Victorian era garden plant that self-seeds. Deadheading this plant will allow it to bloom longer. To learn more about the Canterbury Bells you can find an article on this plant on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Behind the Scenes Look at the Supreme Court's Decision to End Roe

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 9:58


    With the decision overturning Roe v. Wade handed down today, how did we get here? And what role is Chief Justice John Roberts playing in this and other decisions? Mariana Alfaro from The Washington Post takes us behind the scenes of The Supreme Court. Guest Hosts: Cate Klundt and Scott Simpson. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    The Other Major Supreme Court Case...on Guns

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 6:21


    It's not just abortion. The Supreme Court also handed down a major ruling on guns. Why does it matter in Utah and what comes next? Jim Burling with the Pacific Legal Foundation breaks down the case. Guest Hosts: Cate Klundt and Scott Simpson. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.