Podcasts about Criminal law

Body of law that relates to crime

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Best podcasts about Criminal law

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Latest podcast episodes about Criminal law

The Extra Mile Podcast for Bar Exam Takers
Bar Review AMA with Celebration Bar Review Founder Jackson Mumey

The Extra Mile Podcast for Bar Exam Takers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 38:43


In this episode, Celebration Bar Review Founder Jackson Mumey takes student questions in an "Ask Me Anything" Session. Question topics included PhotoReading, Virtual Bootcamp, Study Pacing, and substantive study questions in Criminal Law and Torts. He also updates the new UBE cut scores and looks ahead to the California July 2022 exam results coming soon. Want to know what's keeping you from success on the bar exam? Take this FREE 60-second [QUIZ] What's Your #1 Bar Exam Mistake? [QUIZ] What's Your #1 Bar Exam Mistake? Video Episode 418 NEW: Virtual Bar Prep Bootcamp! Details Calming The Chaos™ Mindset Coaching Time Management Coaching 6 Keys To The Pass List Video Training Series Level Up Your Celebration Bar Review Course! Order PhotoReading For The Bar Exam™ BarMaps™ From Celebration Bar Review New Multistate Nutshell Videos™ New MasterClass: Abundance For Bar Study™ Calm and Health Paraliminal Set Paraliminal Pack Order Page Successful Student Case Studies Do Something Different! FREE Webinar Free Consultation with Jackson NCBE Bar Admissions Guide

MCLE ThisWeek Podcast
Social Media Spying and How Evidence is Being Used

MCLE ThisWeek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 20:01


While police have touted gang and social media databases as innovative and vital public safety tools, concerns have been raised that these tools infringe on liberty and due process, and have done little more than digitize structural racism. Get insight into how evidence is being used in this podcast, excerpted from MCLE's 4/26/202 live webcast: Gang Databases & Social Media.Speakers: Joshua Raisler Cohn, Committee for Public Counsel Services, RoxburyVictoria Kelleher, Law Office of Victoria Kelleher, BostonThe full program is available as an on demand webcast or an MP3 here.  Get 24/7 instant access to hundreds of related eLectures like this one—and more—with a subscription to the MCLE OnlinePass. Learn more at www.mcle.org/onlinepass.

Let's Brief It
The Past, Present, and Future of D.C.'s Criminal Law

Let's Brief It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 34:13


D.C.'s criminal code has not been significantly reformed since its adoption by the federal Congress in 1901. In 2016, the D.C. City Council began the most comprehensive effort to date to bring the City's criminal code into the 21st century when it established the Criminal Code Reform Commission. For the past six years, the Commission has endeavored to create a new criminal code for D.C. that is more in step with modern society and modern notions of what it means for a law to be fair and just. Hosts Eric Tarosky and Niranjan Seshadri, both law students at the Georgetown University Law Center, are joined by Patrice Sulton, Executive Director of DC Justice Lab and former senior attorney advisor to the Criminal Code Reform Commission, to talk about the past, present, and future of the District's criminal law. To learn more about the Revised Criminal Code Act of 2021, visit https://revisedcode.org/. UPDATE: On November 1, 2022, this bill unanimously passed an initial vote by the D.C. Council. In a few weeks, the council will hold a second and final vote on the bill which, if passed, will then head to Mayor Bowser's desk for her signature. Want to get ahead of the pack? Joining the D.C. Bar Law Student Community (LSC) can get you there. Your LSC membership will provide resume and skills boosting opportunities and one-on-one access to local practicing attorneys. To learn more, click here. Please note, the positions and opinions expressed by the speakers are strictly their own, and do not necessarily represent the views of their employers, nor those of the D.C. Bar, its Board of Governors or co-sponsoring Communities and organizations. Thank you to our Sponsor! The George Washington College of Professional Studies, Paralegal Studies Program: As Washington D.C.'s only academic-credit bearing paralegal studies program, the master's degree in Paralegal Studies is more than a powerful credential: it's a signal to the best employers that you withstood the academic rigor of one of the nation's best paralegal programs. George Washington University's Paralegal Studies program has met the approval of the American Bar Association for the excellence of its curriculum, faculty and administration, the only such program granted the designation in Washington, D.C. GW joins 260 programs nationally that have met the organization's requirements. Visit https://www.cps.gwu.edu/paralegal-studies-master-professional-studies to learn more.

The Chris Plante Show
11-3-22 Hour 1 - DC Legalizes Public Peeing

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 38:10


In hour 1, Chris talks about changes in DC's Criminal Law, including that public urination will no longer be a crime.  Also, CNN's new morning show sucks, and Katie Porter may lose her seat! For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday.To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Strangers on the Internet
Guest Chat: Dating as a Criminal Law Professor with Prof. Erin Sheley

Strangers on the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 49:24


In this guest episode, Irina and Michelle have the chance to sit down with Californian criminal law professor Erin Sheley who found love (and indeed, a fiance) on Bumble after dating app adventures across North America. While last time we had Catgate, this week's episode brings us Fishgate: this vegetarian scholar and her avid fisherman date from the apps did NOT see eye to eye when it comes to how many fish are okay to kill in a year. Erin also tells the tale of how a man tried to throw her on the train tracks in Calgary and how an intrepid cowboy intervened just in time to save her life! We will discuss the difficulties in settling down romantically as an itinerant academic, so come join us on this journey from DC to Canada, Oklahoma, Dallas, and finally San Diego. Also, what exactly was that guy planning to do on their car ride if Erin hadn't sent his info to her friends in advance? Can even a criminal law professor stay safe from crime by strangers on the Internet? We've got the tea - grab a cup and have a listen!Prof. Erin Sheley: https://www.cwsl.edu/directories/faculty-staff-directory/erin_sheley.htmlProf. Sheley's legal scholarship: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=1222553Prof. Sheley's book: https://www.amazon.com/Criminality-Common-Imagination-18th-Centuries/dp/1474450105 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Divorcing Well
The Intersection Between Criminal Law & Family Law With Sheldon Wisener

Divorcing Well

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 37:27


In this week's episode of Divorcing Well, I chat with criminal lawyer Sheldon Wisener about the many ways that criminal law and family law intersect. We discuss cases of domestic violence, false allegations, child abduction, breaches of court orders and much more. We also discuss the differences between restraining orders, peace bonds and bail recognizances which is something that many people confuse or don't understand. Sheldon also acts for the Office of the Children's Lawyer in family protection cases and he discusses how he performs this role. If your partner is engaging in criminal behaviour this is an important episode to download. To contact Sheldon Wisener, please visit: http://wisenerlaw.com/

Set For Sentencing
Across the Pond: Sentencing in the United Kingdom

Set For Sentencing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 64:06


Watch this episode on YOUTUBE, on APPLE PODCASTS, or wherever you get your podcasts! We like to say the United States has "the greatest system in the world."  But do we?  There's simply no way to answer that question until we learn how other countries adjudicate crime.  Helping us get Set for Sentencing is Prof. Julian Roberts, a British scholar, sentencing expert, and Executive Dir. of The Sentencing Academy, UK, dedicated to developing expert and public understanding of sentencing in England and Wales. IN THIS EPISODE: The UK's criminal process from charge to sentencing; Why plea bargaining is rare in the UK system; The prevalence of pre-trial detention in the UK; Why non-lawyer magistrates impose 95 percent of sentences in the UK; The length of sentences in the US vs. in the UK; Whether mandatory minimums are a thing in the UK; The history and structure of sentencing guidelines in the U.K.; Application of an case example to illustrate the UK guidelines; Use of sentencing letters, witnesses, victim impact statements and sentencing videos; The catch-22 of “Indeterminate sentences for public protection”; The prevalence of life without parole or “whole life orders” in the UK; Separate sentencing regimes for juveniles, young adults and adults; LINKS:  The Sentencing Academy, UK

Old Blood
A Deadly Thrust: The Hatpin Panic

Old Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 67:25


When women discovered newfound freedom on the streets of turn-of-the-century America, they also observed new dangers. When society failed to protect them from those perils, women demanded the right to defend themselves with increasingly violent and un-ladylike methods that sent men into a panic. This episode is about the "Hatpin Panic" and the murders of Elizabeth Mize and William Keller.Sources:Abbott, Karen. “‘The Hatpin Peril' Terrorized Men Who Couldn't Handle the 20th-Century Woman.” Smithsonian Magazine. April 24, 2014. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/hatpin-peril-terrorized-men-who-couldnt-handle-20th-century-woman-180951219/Adler, Jeffrey S. “‘I loved Joe, but I had to shoot him': Homicide by Women in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago.” The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. Vol. 92. 2003. https://homicide.northwestern.edu/docs_fk/homicide/LawJournal/JCLC12.pdfBowman, Cynthia Grant and Altman, Ben. “Wife Murder in Chicago: 1910-1930.” The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. Vol. 92. 2003. https://homicide.northwestern.edu/docs_fk/homicide/jclc739-790.pdfBurnett, Zaron III. “Daggers in Their Hair: The Gilded Age Women Who Fought off Gropers With Deadly Sharp Hatpins.” Mel Magazine. 2022. https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/hatpin-panic-1900s“Case Number: 1553.” Homicide in Chicago, 1870-1930. Northwestern University School of Law. https://homicide.northwestern.edu/database/1541/Croyle, Jonathan. “1911: To Make City Safer, Syracuse Considers Taking on a Public Menace: ‘Bristling Hat Pins'.” Syracuse.com. 2021. https://www.syracuse.com/living/2021/01/1911-to-make-city-safer-syracuse-considers-taking-on-a-public-menace-bristling-hat-pins.htmlFreedman, Estelle. Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013).Jones, Mother. The Autobiography of Mother Jones. (Chicago: Charles H. Kerr Publishing Company, 1974).Rose, Shari. “Hatpin Panic: How Hat Pins Upended Gender Politics in the 20th Century.” Blurred Bylines. March 4, 2019. https://blurredbylines.com/blog/hatpin-panic-mashers-stabbings-hat-pins/Segrave, Kerry. Beware the Masher: Sexual Harassment in American Public Places, 1880-1930   (Jefferson: MacFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers, 2014).The Hatpin Menace: American Women Armed and Fashionable, 1887-1920 (Jefferson: MacFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers, 2016).Temby, Anna. “‘With daggers in her bonnet': The Australian Hatpin Panic of 1912. 3rd edition.” Australian Women's History Network. July 20, 2017. http://www.auswhn.org.au/blog/hatpin-panic/Newspapers: See oldbloodpodcast.com for a complete list.Music: Dellasera by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comFor more information, visit www.oldbloodpodcast.com

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Breaking Barriers: Women in Criminal Law

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 38:13


Women in the criminal justice system continue to face a number of different challenges and career barriers; especially as it relates to hiring, retention, and promotion. So, why are women lawyers underrepresented in criminal justice? Why do so many women leave the practice of criminal law? And, what can we do about it? Joining the podcast to discuss these issues is law professor and author, Maryam Ahranjani. Maryam Ahranjani is an experienced law professor at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where she teaches in the areas of constitutional, criminal and education law. She is also a textbook author, rule of law and human rights consultant, program manager and evaluator, and curriculum designer.

Texas Family Law Insiders
Emily Doron | What Family Lawyers Can Learn From Criminal Law

Texas Family Law Insiders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 40:00


Criminal law experience is an invaluable asset for a family lawyer…When family law and criminal law cases overlap, you need the knowledge to navigate them…And you can use the information-gathering techniques of prosecutors for your family law case…Emily Doron of The Draper Law Firm is here to discuss her background as an Assistant District Attorney and how that has helped her as a family law attorney.Listen to learn: The importance of understanding overlapping areas of criminal and family law Techniques for finding criminal history and other criminal-related evidence How to navigate CPS involvement in family law cases What to do if your family law client gets arrested And more

Benchmark Radio
Benchmark Weekly Criminal Law Review Friday, 14 October 2022

Benchmark Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 0:57


Benchmark Weekly Criminal Law Review Friday, 14 October 2022 by Benchmark

The Brief Case
Episode 10: PI and Criminal Law Cross-Over!

The Brief Case

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 16:52


Thank you for listening to The Brief Case! A podcast for lawyers, hosted by lawyer and cartoonist Sarah-Elke Kraal. Catch us on Instagram (@briefcasepod) and the world wide web: www.briefcasepod.com. My guests in this episode are: Nick Dore, Managing Principal, Fisher Dore Lawyers and Accredited Specialist (Criminal Law) — Qld; Steve Herd, Principal, Fisher Dore Lawyers and Accredited Specialist (Personal Injuries) — Qld. Show them some love! Steve discusses the cases: Walker v State of Queensland [2022] QDC 168 Eaves v Donelly [2011] QDC 207 Nick provides commentary on police procedure and reveals whether or not he has ever sat in a watch house (or worn handcuffs).

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Intellectual property (IP) (Part 02)

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 18:05


Copyright infringement. Copyright infringement is reproducing, distributing, displaying or performing a work, or to make derivative works, without permission from the copyright holder, which is typically a publisher or other business representing or assigned by the work's creator. It is often called "piracy". While copyright is created the instant a work is fixed, generally the copyright holder can only get money damages if the owner registers the copyright. Enforcement of copyright is generally the responsibility of the copyright holder. The ACTA trade agreement, signed in May 2011 by the United States, Japan, Switzerland, and the EU, and which has not entered into force, requires that its parties add criminal penalties, including incarceration and fines, for copyright and trademark infringement, and obligates the parties to actively police for infringement. There are limitations and exceptions to copyright, allowing limited use of copyrighted works, which does not constitute infringement. Examples of such doctrines are the fair use and fair dealing doctrine. Trademark infringement. Trademark infringement occurs when one party uses a trademark that is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark owned by another party, in relation to products or services which are identical or similar to the products or services of the other party. In many countries, a trademark receives protection without registration, but registering a trademark provides legal advantages for enforcement. Infringement can be addressed by civil litigation and, in several jurisdictions, under criminal law. Trade secret misappropriation. Trade secret misappropriation is different from violations of other intellectual property laws, since by definition trade secrets are secret, while patents and registered copyrights and trademarks are publicly available. In the United States, trade secrets are protected under state law, and states have nearly universally adopted the Uniform Trade Secrets Act. The United States also has federal law in the form of the Economic Espionage Act of 1996 (18 U.S.C. §§ 1831–1839), which makes the theft or misappropriation of a trade secret a federal crime. This law contains two provisions criminalizing two sorts of activity. The first, 18 U.S.C. § 1831(a), criminalizes the theft of trade secrets to benefit foreign powers. The second, 18 U.S.C. § 1832, criminalizes their theft for commercial or economic purposes. (The statutory penalties are different for the two offenses.) In Commonwealth common law jurisdictions, confidentiality and trade secrets are regarded as an equitable right rather than a property right but penalties for theft are roughly the same as in the United States. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Intellectual property (IP) (Part 01)

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 14:43


Intellectual property (IP) is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect. There are many types of intellectual property, and some countries recognize more than others. The best-known types are copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. The modern concept of intellectual property developed in England in the 17th and 18th centuries. The term "intellectual property" began to be used in the 19th century, though it was not until the late 20th century that intellectual property became commonplace in the majority of the world's legal systems. The main purpose of intellectual property law is to encourage the creation of a wide variety of intellectual goods. To achieve this, the law gives people and businesses property rights to the information and intellectual goods they create, usually for a limited period of time. This gives economic incentive for their creation, because it allows people to benefit from the information and intellectual goods they create, and allows them to protect their ideas and prevent copying. These economic incentives are expected to stimulate innovation and contribute to the technological progress of countries, which depends on the extent of protection granted to innovators. The intangible nature of intellectual property presents difficulties when compared with traditional property like land or goods. Unlike traditional property, intellectual property is "indivisible", since an unlimited number of people can "consume" an intellectual good without its being depleted. Additionally, investments in intellectual goods suffer from problems of appropriation: Landowners can surround their land with a robust fence and hire armed guards to protect it, but producers of information or literature can usually do little to stop their first buyer from replicating it and selling it at a lower price. Balancing rights so that they are strong enough to encourage the creation of intellectual goods but not so strong that they prevent the goods' wide use is the primary focus of modern intellectual property law. Rights. Intellectual property rights include patents, copyright, industrial design rights, trademarks, plant variety rights, trade dress, geographical indications, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets. There are also more specialized or derived varieties of sui generis exclusive rights, such as circuit design rights (called mask work rights in the US), supplementary protection certificates for pharmaceutical products (after expiry of a patent protecting them), and database rights (in European law). The term "industrial property" is sometimes used to refer to a large subset of intellectual property rights including patents, trademarks, industrial designs, utility models, service marks, trade names, and geographical indications. Patents. A patent is a form of right granted by the government to an inventor or their successor-in-title, giving the owner the right to exclude others from making, using, selling, offering to sell, and importing an invention for a limited period of time, in exchange for the public disclosure of the invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem, which may be a product or a process and generally has to fulfill three main requirements: it has to be new, not obvious and there needs to be an industrial applicability.  To enrich the body of knowledge and stimulate innovation, it is an obligation for patent owners to disclose valuable information about their inventions to the public. Copyright. A copyright gives the creator of an original work exclusive rights to it, usually for a limited time. Copyright may apply to a wide range of creative, intellectual, or artistic forms, or "works". Copyright does not cover ideas and information themselves, only the form or manner in which they are expressed. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

FUTURATI PODCAST
Ep. 106: Neurotech and the future of law | Allan McCay

FUTURATI PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 50:10


Dr Allan McCay is Deputy Director of The Sydney Institute of Criminology and an Academic Fellow at the University of Sydney's Law School. He coordinates the Legal Research units at the Sydney Law School, and lectures in Criminal Law. Named as one of one of the most influential lawyers of 2021 for his work on neurotechnology, he is a member of the Management Committee of the Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence at the University of Sydney, an Affiliate Member of the Centre for Agency, Values, and Ethics, at Macquarie University, and a member of the Minding Rights Network (an international group who are working on human rights challenges related to emerging technologies). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr
Investigating White-Collar Crime - Tim Harris - S6E5

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 24:34


The legal sector is wide in its variety; from private client to blockchain and to property, family and criminal - they're all equally exciting in their own right but how often are we able to dive deep into the day-to-day life of a solicitor acting in arguably one of the 'juiciest' areas of law?The term "white-collar crime" refers to a financially motivated, nonviolent or non-directly violent crime committed by individuals, businesses and government professionals and this week, we're chatting to white-collar crime defence lawyer, Tim Harris.Tim trained as a solicitor at Eversheds, before specialising in business and white-collar crime in the financial services sector, at Bark & Co Solicitors and then Simmons & Simmons. While at Simmons, Tim was a legal secondee at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Now, he is a counsel at Cohen & Gresser LLP, focusing on international and regulatory investigations, regulatory enforcement and financial crime compliance.  

Viced Rhino: The Podcast
A Reasonable Doubt About the Resurrection?

Viced Rhino: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 38:33


Ruth Jackson of Premiere Unbelievable attempts to answer the question "Can you prove Jesus' resurrection?" After we strip away the word games and equivocation, turns out the answer is no.Sources:Reasonable Doubt in Criminal Law: https://tinyurl.com/y46g8j97How Reliable Are Eyewitnesses?: https://tinyurl.com/2xq57z24A New Natural Interpretation of the Empty Tomb: https://tinyurl.com/2pujfpcgThe Life of Flavius Josephus: https://tinyurl.com/2gfxnm8qPilate - Incidents with the Jews: https://tinyurl.com/hlb5zluPost-bereavement hallucinatory experiences: A critical overview of population and clinical studies: https://tinyurl.com/2prle7qmOriginal Video: https://tinyurl.com/2kdb7y9hCards:How Christianity (Probably) Began... No Resurrection Required:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUCI3cMJCvUAll my various links can be found here:http://links.vicedrhino.com

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Jeffrey Swartz, Professor of Criminal Law, Thomas M. Cooley Law School – Tampa Campus

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 11:01


Michigan's Big Show
* Jeffrey Swartz, Professor of Criminal Law, Thomas M. Cooley Law School – Tampa Campus

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 11:01


4 Legal English Podcast
Mid-Term Elections in the US | Law in the News

4 Legal English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 25:39


In this episode, we discuss the upcoming Mid-Term Elections in the United States,  focusing on the US Congress, also outlining  elections in the US in general. What are Mid-Term Elections? What offices are being elected? What, if anything, will change after the elections on 8 November?For the show notes, go here. Comment below the show notes if you have any questions about this episode.Note: No Word of the Week this week! This 2nd weekly episode will return next week.For more about this podcast, go here. For ways to improve your Legal English, go here.For the Intro To Legal English Course, go here. This is a free course!To read more about or to purchase Criminal Law Lexicon, go to the Amazon page here.The author is Timothy Barrett, the host of this podcast. This book is designed for non-native English speakers who want to improve their understanding of the proper Legal English terms concerning the field of Criminal Law. This book introduces this lexicon and gives examples of using these words.

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Gambling

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 20:28


Gambling (also known as betting or gaming) is the wagering of something of value ("the stakes") on an event with an uncertain outcome with the intent of winning something else of value. Gambling thus requires three elements to be present: consideration (an amount wagered), risk (chance), and a prize. The outcome of the wager is often immediate, such as a single roll of dice, a spin of a roulette wheel, or a horse crossing the finish line, but longer time frames are also common, allowing wagers on the outcome of a future sports contest or even an entire sports season. The term "gaming" in this context typically refers to instances in which the activity has been specifically permitted by law. The two words are not mutually exclusive; for example, a "gaming" company offers (legal) "gambling" activities to the public and may be regulated by one of many gaming control boards, for example, the Nevada Gaming Control Board. However, this distinction is not universally observed in the English-speaking world. For instance, in the United Kingdom, the regulator of gambling activities is called the Gambling Commission (not the Gaming Commission). The word gaming is used more frequently since the rise of computer and video games to describe activities that do not necessarily involve wagering, especially online gaming, with the new usage still not having displaced the old usage as the primary definition in common dictionaries. "Gaming" has also been used to circumvent laws against "gambling". The media and others have used one term or the other to frame conversations around the subjects, resulting in a shift of perceptions among their audiences. Gambling is also a major international commercial activity, with the legal gambling market totaling an estimated $335 billion in 2009. In other forms, gambling can be conducted with materials that have a value, but are not real money. For example, players of marbles games might wager marbles, and likewise games of Pogs or Magic: The Gathering can be played with the collectible game pieces (respectively, small discs and trading cards) as stakes, resulting in a meta-game regarding the value of a player's collection of pieces. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Gray Matters: The Pulse of the Court: Separation of Powers, Criminal Law, & Petitions from the Second Circuit

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 49:32


Join Prof. Steve Vladeck (U-Texas) & Prof. Jenn Mascott who discuss Prof. Mascott’s amicus brief in Nordlicht v. U.S. (21-1319), distributed for the Court’s 9/28 conference this week, that addresses Blackstone, Rule 33 motions, and a deep circuit split & Prof. Vladeck’s recently filed petition in Donziger v U.S. (22-274), addressing the Appointments Clause, special prosecutors, and a split Second Circuit decision dividing two President Trump-appointed […]

Arbitrary & Capricious
The Pulse of the Court: Separation of Powers, Criminal Law, & Petitions from the Second Circuit

Arbitrary & Capricious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 49:32


Join Prof. Steve Vladeck (U-Texas) & Prof. Jenn Mascott who discuss Prof. Mascott’s amicus brief in Nordlicht v. U.S. (21-1319), distributed for the Court’s 9/28 conference this week, that addresses Blackstone, Rule 33 motions, and a deep circuit split & Prof. Vladeck’s recently filed petition in Donziger v U.S. (22-274), addressing the Appointments Clause, special prosecutors, and a split Second... Source

The Quicky
Could A ‘No Body, No Parole' Law Help Find Lynette Dawson?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 18:07


When Chris Dawson was finally found guilty of the murder of his former wife Lynette after 40 years, the next question asked was, where is she? Since she went missing in 1982, that's something her family have been desperately wanting the answer to but so far, they still wait for news as to where their mother, sister and aunty's remains lay. But could that change? In today's episode, The Quicky team looks at whether the much publicised 'No Body, No Parole' law could motivate someone like Chris Dawson to give up their victim's final resting place.  Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au CREDITS  Host: Claire Murphy With thanks to:  Renee Simms - Lynette Dawson's niece  Dr Arlie Loughnan - Professor of Criminal Law and Criminal Law Theory, School of Law, University of Sydney Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Liv Proud Audio Producer: Thom LionBecome a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Diagnosing Health Care Podcast
Hot Areas in COVID-19 Enforcement, Testing, and Funding

Diagnosing Health Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 27:27


While the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be moving into our rearview mirror, government investigations and enforcement actions targeting COVID-19-related fraud are just starting to heat up. What can businesses do to prevent or mitigate potential civil and criminal charges in this area? On this episode, Epstein Becker Green attorneys Melissa Jampol, Erica Sibley Bahnsen, and Rachel Weisblatt discuss COVID-19 relief funding programs that are now subject to enforcement actions, the type of government enforcement that we've been seeing so far, and what we can expect to see next. Visit our site for related resources and email contact information: https://www.ebglaw.com/dhc49. Subscribe for email notifications: https://www.ebglaw.com/subscribe. Visit: http://diagnosinghealthcare.com. The EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® and DIAGNOSING HEALTH CARE podcasts are presented by Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights are reserved. This audio recording includes information about legal issues and legal developments. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and should not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances, and these materials are not a substitute for the advice of competent counsel. The content reflects the personal views and opinions of the participants. No attorney-client relationship has been created by this audio recording. This audio recording may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions under the applicable law and ethical rules. The determination of the need for legal services and the choice of a lawyer are extremely important decisions and should not be based solely upon advertisements or self-proclaimed expertise. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A
Wine Kinetically Meets Head & Hatchet Surprise!

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 77:10


A storeowner offers a disgruntled customer a kinetically delivered bottle of wine, and a NYC man introduces some new acquaintances to his friend the hatchet.  Lawful? Unlawful? How does use-of-force law apply to such cases?NEW! AMERICAN LAW COURSES: Criminal Law!Criminal Law course starts WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7!First-year law school classes, as Attorney Branca was taught them.Register before class starts, get 50% OFF!https://lawofselfdefense.com/lawschoolFREE! Law of Self Defense “HARD TO CONVICT” Webinar!https://hardtoconvict.com/FREE, BUT VERY LIMITED SEATS!FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION!We ONLY consult on legal cases for our Platinum members!BE HARD TO CONVICT, become a Law of Self Defense Platinum member TODAY!http://lawofselfdefense.com/platinumFREE BOOK! “The Law of Self Defense: Principles”Physical book, 200+ pages, we just ask that you cover the S&H:http://lawofselfdefense.com/freebookFREE 5-ELEMENTS OF SELF-DEFENSE LAW CHEAT SHEET!Totally free cheat sheet explaining the 5-elements of any claim of self-defense.If you don't understand these five elements you have no idea what legally qualifies as lawful self-defense.PDF download, zero cost:http://lawofselfdefense.com/elements

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Fraud

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 16:19


In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain, or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (for example, a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (for example, a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A hoax is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim. As a civil wrong. In common law jurisdictions, as a civil wrong, fraud is a tort. While the precise definitions and requirements of proof vary among jurisdictions, the requisite elements of fraud as a tort generally are the intentional misrepresentation or concealment of an important fact upon which the victim is meant to rely, and in fact does rely, to the harm of the victim. Proving fraud in a court of law is often said to be difficult as the intention to defraud is the key element in question. As such, proving fraud comes with a "greater evidentiary burden than other civil claims." This difficulty is exacerbated by the fact that some jurisdictions require the victim to prove fraud by clear and convincing evidence. The remedies for fraud may include rescission (for example, reversal) of a fraudulently obtained agreement or transaction, the recovery of a monetary award to compensate for the harm caused, punitive damages to punish or deter the misconduct, and possibly others. In cases of a fraudulently induced contract, fraud may serve as a defense in a civil action for breach of contract or specific performance of contract. Similarly, fraud may serve as a basis for a court to invoke its equitable jurisdiction. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp
Laurie Levenson on Mar-a-Lago and immigration

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 12:43


09/20/22: Joel is joined by Laurie Levenson, a Professor of Law at Loyola Law, and has taught Evidence, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, White Collar Crime, Ethical Lawyering, and the Law and Advanced Trial Advocacy. She joins Joel to share her expertise on the special master in the Mar-a-Lago search, as well as regarding Governor DeSantis sending immigrants to Massachusetts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4 Legal English Podcast
Under Suspicion & Police Interviews

4 Legal English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 31:39


In this episode, we discuss the 2000 movie "Under Suspicion", starring Gene Hackman and Morgan Freeman. This movie is about a police interview of a murder suspect. What was supposed to be a quick 10 minute conversation turned into an interrogation that went on all evening. We will focus on : Police interview/interrogation process and techniques. This is an ongoing series we have - featuring some of the best legal movies. We will examine the law demonstrated in the movie, and what can lawyers or law students learn from this movie, as well as the entertainment aspect.For the show notes, go here. Comment below the show notes if you have any questions about this episode.To read more about or to purchase Criminal Law Lexicon, go to the Amazon page here. The author is Timothy Barrett, the host of this podcast. This book is designed for non-native English speakers who want to improve their understanding of the proper Legal English terms concerning the field of Criminal Law. This book introduces this lexicon and gives examples of using these words. For more about this podcast, go here. For ways to improve your Legal English, go here.For the Intro To Legal English Course, go here. This is a free course!

Law Schoolers
78: Criminal Law. Causation

Law Schoolers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 8:25


MCLE ThisWeek Podcast
Race in Jury Empanelment

MCLE ThisWeek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 75:27


Hear a panel discussion of race issues in jury empanelment in a criminal case in this podcast, excerpted from MCLE's 3/30/2022 program, Prosecuting & Defending Homicide Cases. The full program is available as an on demand webcast or an MP3 here. Get 24/7 instant access to hundreds of related eLectures like this one—and more—with a subscription to the MCLE OnlinePass. Learn more at www.mcle.org/onlinepass.

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A
Q&A With A Professional Interrogator!

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 125:46


What's it like to be questioned by the police after you've defended yourself or your family?Join us for special guest, former Federal LEO and professional interrogator (and one of my very best friends!) Dr. TC Fuller, and get the inside scoop!NEW! AMERICAN LAW COURSES: Criminal Law!Criminal Law course starts WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7!First-year law school classes, as Attorney Branca was taught them.Register before class starts, get 50% OFF! https://lawofselfdefense.com/lawschoolFREE! Law of Self Defense “HARD TO CONVICT” Webinar!https://hardtoconvict.com/FREE, BUT VERY LIMITED SEATS!FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION!We ONLY consult on legal cases for our Platinum members!BE HARD TO CONVICT, become a Law of Self Defense Platinum member TODAY!http://lawofselfdefense.com/platinumFREE BOOK! “The Law of Self Defense: Principles”Physical book, 200+ pages, we just ask that you cover the S&H:http://lawofselfdefense.com/freebookFREE 5-ELEMENTS OF SELF-DEFENSE LAW CHEAT SHEET!Totally free cheat sheet explaining the 5-elements of any claim of self-defense.If you don't understand these five elements you have no idea what legally qualifies as lawful self-defense.PDF download, zero cost:http://lawofselfdefense.com/elements

Dewhitt L Bingham Justice For All Podcast Show

Episode 45: Criminal LawGuest: Raegan Thompson and Cristian CasasDewhitt interviews two more of his fall 2022 Heartland Community College Introduction to Criminal Justice students, Raegan Thompson and Cristian Casas. They both are from the Bloomington Normal area. Raegan attend Normal Community West High School and Cristian attended Bloomington High School. Dewhitt, Raegan and Cristian discuss the following:   The start of school yearHer career goalCriminal lawMens reaActus reus1st Amendment6th Amendment8th AmendmentTriangular HomicideMurderManslaughterWhite Supremacy Black Lives MatterLegalization of cannabis Defunding the policeRacismThe Capital insurrectionVoter fraudWhat they'd Like the Biden Administration to AccomplishYou can listen to the JFA Podcast Show wherever you get your podcast, by clicking on one of the links below or by entering one of the links into your browser. https://dlbspodcast.buzzsprout.comhttps://blog.feedspot.com/social_justice_podcasts/ https://peculiarbooks.org   Also if you are interested in exercise and being healthy check out the Top 20 Triathlon Podcasts.https://blog.feedspot.com/triathlon_podcasts/

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: false pretenses

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 14:31


In criminal law, property is obtained by false pretenses when the acquisition results from intentional misrepresentation of a past or existing fact. Elements. The elements of false pretenses are: a false representation, of a material past or existing fact, which the person making the representation knows is false, made for the purpose of causing, and which does cause, the victim to pass title, and to his property. False pretenses is a statutory offense in most jurisdictions; subject matter covered by statute varies accordingly, and is not necessarily limited to tangible personal property - some statutes include intangible personal property and services. For example, the North Carolina false pretense statute applies to obtaining "any money, goods, property, services, choses in action, or any other thing of value ..." Under common law, false pretense is defined as a representation of a present or past fact, which the thief knows to be false, and which he intends will and does cause the victim to pass the title of his property. That is, false pretense is the acquisition of title from a victim by fraud or misrepresentation of a material past or present fact. a false representation - there must be a description or portrayal of something that is false. If a person makes a statement about something that he mistakenly believes to be untrue there is no false representation. For example, if a person represents that the ring is a diamond solitaire when he believes that is in fact made of cubic zirconium he is not guilty of false pretenses if it turns out that the ring was in fact a diamond. The representation must be false at the time the title passes. Thus if the representation was false when made but is true at the time title to the property passes there is no crime. For example, representing to a seller that you have funds available in your bank account to pay for the goods when in fact your account has a zero balance is not false pretenses if at the time the transaction takes place adequate funds are present in the account. The representation may be oral or written. The misrepresentation has to be affirmative. A failure to disclose a fact does not fit this misrepresentation in common law, unless there is a fiduciary duty between the thief and victim. Moreover, opinion and puffing are not considered misrepresentation as they color the facts but do not misrepresent them. of a material past or existing fact - the representation must relate to a material past or existing fact. A representation concerning a future state of facts is not sufficient. Nor is merely an expression of opinion. which the person making the representation knows is false - A mistaken representation about some past or existing state of facts is not sufficient for false pretense. made for the purpose of causing and which does cause - It is essential that the victim of the false pretenses must actually be deceived by the misrepresentation: the victim must transfer title to the property in reliance on the representation; and the victim being deceived must be a major (if not the only) reason for the victim's transferring title to the defendant. Simply making a false promise or statement is not sufficient. It is not a defense to a false pretenses charge that a reasonable person would not have been deceived by the false representation. No matter how gullible the victim, if he or she was in fact deceived the offense has been committed. On the other hand, the offense requires the victim to believe the representation to be true. If the person to whom the representation has been made has doubts or serious misgivings about the truth of the representation but nonetheless goes through with the transaction he has not been deceived - he has basically assumed the risk of a false representation. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

FedSoc Events
Did the Law Cause Columbine? [Archive Collection]

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 119:45


On August 13, 1999, the Federalist Society's Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group sponsored a panel at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The panel considered the question "Did the Law Cause Columbine?". Featuring:Introduction: Justice George Nicholson, California Court of Appeal, Third DistrictModerator: Troy Eid, Chief Counsel to Gov. Bill Owens (CO)Chief Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson, United States Court of Appeals, Fourth CircuitAnn Beeson, Staff Attorney, ACLUMichael J. Horowitz, Senior Fellow, Hudson InstituteProf. William F. Kilpatrick, Boston CollegeJames A. Rapp, Editor in Chief, Education Law

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A
GRAB THIS! 30 minutes of EXPERT Criminal Law FREE!

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 38:36


To celebrate the launch of our American Law Courses generally, and of Professor Steve Gosney's law school-level Criminal Law course for American patriots in particular, we're sharing with all of you the first 30 minutes of Professor Gosney's first-ever Criminal Law class from that course!Enjoy!To learn more about our American Law Courses, and to lock in your 50% OFF TUITION, point your browser to:https://lawofselfdefense.com/lawcourses--AndrewDean & Attorney Andrew F. BrancaAmerican Law CoursesLaw of Self Defense

Law Schoolers
66: Criminal Law. Mental Culpability and Strict Liability

Law Schoolers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 7:11


Law Schoolers
64: Criminal Law. Introduction to Mens Rea

Law Schoolers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 7:09


Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Extortion

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 11:08


Extortion is the practice of obtaining benefit through coercion. In most jurisdictions it is likely to constitute a criminal offense; the bulk of this article deals with such cases. Robbery is the simplest and most common form of extortion, although making unfounded threats in order to obtain an unfair business advantage is also a form of extortion. Extortion is sometimes called the "protection racket" because the racketeers often phrase their demands as payment for "protection" from (real or hypothetical) threats from unspecified other parties; though often, and almost always, such "protection" is simply abstinence of harm from the same party, and such is implied in the "protection" offer. Extortion is commonly practiced by organized crime. In some jurisdictions, actually obtaining the benefit is not required to commit the offense, and making a threat of violence which refers to a requirement of a payment of money or property to halt future violence is sufficient to commit the offense. Exaction refers not only to extortion or the demanding and obtaining of something through force, but additionally, in its formal definition, means the infliction of something such as pain and suffering or making somebody endure something unpleasant. The term extortion is often used metaphorically to refer to usury or to price-gouging, though neither is legally considered extortion. It is also often used loosely to refer to everyday situations where one person feels indebted against their will, to another, in order to receive an essential service or avoid legal consequences. Neither extortion or blackmail requires a threat of a criminal act, such as violence, merely a threat used to elicit actions, money, or property from the object of the extortion. Such threats include the filing of reports (true or not) of criminal behavior to the police, revelation of damaging facts (such as pictures of the object of the extortion in a compromising position), etcetera. In law extortion can refer to political corruption, such as selling one's office or influence peddling, but in general vocabulary the word usually first brings to mind blackmail or protection rackets. The logical connection between the corruption sense of the word and the other senses is that to demand bribes in one's official capacity is blackmail or racketeering in essence (that is, "you need access to this resource, the government restricts access to it through my office, and I will charge you unfairly and unlawfully for such access"). Extortion is also known as shakedown, and occasionally exaction. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A
Defense Against Animal Attack: What's the Law?

Law of Self Defense News/Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 61:22


What if you're attacked by a wild animal, and use deadly force to defend yourself?  How is this scenario different than defending against a human attack? Are the rules the same?NEW! AMERICAN LAW COURSES: Criminal Law!Criminal Law course starts WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7!First-year law school classes, as Attorney Branca was taught them.Register before class starts, get 50% OFF! https://lawofselfdefense.com/lawschoolFREE! Law of Self Defense “HARD TO CONVICT” Webinar!https://hardtoconvict.com/FREE, BUT VERY LIMITED SEATS!FREE LEGAL CONSULTATION!We ONLY consult on legal cases for our Platinum members!BE HARD TO CONVICT, become a Law of Self Defense Platinum member TODAY!http://lawofselfdefense.com/platinumFREE BOOK! “The Law of Self Defense: Principles”Physical book, 200+ pages, we just ask that you cover the S&H:http://lawofselfdefense.com/freebookFREE 5-ELEMENTS OF SELF-DEFENSE LAW CHEAT SHEET!Totally free cheat sheet explaining the 5-elements of any claim of self-defense.If you don't understand these five elements you have no idea what legally qualifies as lawful self-defense.PDF download, zero cost:http://lawofselfdefense.com/elements

Carlson & Meissner
Can I lose Custody of My Kids Due to a Domestic Violence Charge?

Carlson & Meissner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 1:29


If You've Been Arrested for Domestic Violence, one of the worst fears you're likely to experience is whether or not you're going to lose Custody of your Children.

The Art Law Podcast
Director of the Louvre Arrested and a Dive into French Criminal Law

The Art Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 50:35


To open Season 6, Katie and Steve discuss the shocking arrest of Jean-Luc Martinez, director of the Louvre in Paris from 2013 to 2021, related to his involvement in the alleged trafficking of antiquities for the Louvre Abu Dhabi with French criminal lawyer Sarah Arpagaus. They discuss cultural property crimes more broadly and take a detour into the world of French criminal law and its striking difference with the system here in the US.

Law School
Criminal law (2022): Crimes against property: Embezzlement

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 12:33


Embezzlement is the act of withholding assets for the purpose of conversion of such assets, by one or more persons to whom the assets were entrusted, either to be held or to be used for specific purposes. Embezzlement is a type of financial fraud. For example, a lawyer might embezzle funds from the trust accounts of their clients; a financial advisor might embezzle the funds of investors; and a husband or a wife might embezzle funds from a bank account jointly held with the spouse. The term "embezzlement" is often used in informal speech to mean theft of money, usually from an organization or company such as an employer. Embezzlement is usually a premeditated crime, performed methodically, with precautions that conceal the criminal conversion of the property, which occurs without the knowledge or consent of the affected person. Often it involves the trusted individual embezzling only a small proportion of the total of the funds or resources they receive or control, in an attempt to minimize the risk of the detection of the misallocation of the funds or resources. When successful, embezzlement may continue for many years without detection. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond
356: Listen and Learn -- Criminal Law: Warrant Requirements

The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 25:11 Very Popular


Welcome back to the Law School Toolbox podcast! Today, as part of our "Listen and Learn" series, we're discussing Criminal Procedure, specifically what is needed for a valid search warrant, and the situations in which a warrant is not required. In this episode we discuss: What is a warrant? Requirements for a valid search warrant Eight exceptions to the warrant requirement Analyzing two hypos, from the July 2009 and February 2006 California bar exams Resources: “Listen and Learn” series (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/law-school-toolbox-podcast-substantive-law-topics/#listen-learn) California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, July 2009 (https://nwculaw.edu/pdf/bar/July%202009%20Essays%20and%20Sample%20Answers.pdf) California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, February 2006 (https://nwculaw.edu/pdf/bar/February%202006%20Essays%20and%20Sample%20Answers.pdf) Bar Exam Toolbox Podcast Episode 141: Listen and Learn – The Fourth Amendment (https://barexamtoolbox.com/podcast-episode-141-listen-and-learn-the-fourth-amendment/) Download the Transcript  (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/episode-356-listen-and-learn-criminal-law-warrant-requirements/) If you enjoy the podcast, we'd love a nice review and/or rating on Apple Podcasts (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/law-school-toolbox-podcast/id1027603976) or your favorite listening app. And feel free to reach out to us directly. You can always reach us via the contact form on the Law School Toolbox website (http://lawschooltoolbox.com/contact). If you're concerned about the bar exam, check out our sister site, the Bar Exam Toolbox (http://barexamtoolbox.com/). You can also sign up for our weekly podcast newsletter (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/get-law-school-podcast-updates/) to make sure you never miss an episode! Thanks for listening! Alison & Lee

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ
Approach the Bench - A Round Table with Lawyers

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 27:31


Tim O'Keeffe, Tatum O'Brien and Tracy Lyson from O'Keeffe O'Brien Lyson Attorneys in Fargo, ND take calls and texts from listeners with questions about navigating the legal system.  Questions about Family Law, Criminal Law, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death and more. Contact O'Keeffe O'Brien Lyson at 701-235-8000 or www.okeeffeattorneys.com Disclaimer: This is not binding legal advice and you should not consider this a replacement for securing representation.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED’s Forum
What We've Learned Since the FBI's Search of Mar-a-Lago

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 55:28


The now-unsealed warrant authorizing the search of Donald Trump's residence last week indicates the FBI is investigating the former president for possible violations of three laws, including the Espionage Act. Eleven sets of classified documents, some of which were marked top-secret, were recovered by the FBI at Mar-a-Lago. We'll talk about what we can expect next from the Justice Department, recap the defenses and claims made so far by the former president and his team, and analyze how this could play out politically. Guests: Andrew Weissmann, professor of Practice with the Center on the Administration of Criminal Law, New York University School of Law - former federal prosecutor and general counsel to the FBI Marisa Lagos, politics correspondent, KQED; Co-host of KQED's Political Breakdown show

Employment Law This Week Podcast
#WorkforceWednesday: Managing Enforcement Risk in a Post-Roe World

Employment Law This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 4:38


The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, which overturned Roe v. Wade, occurred on June 24, and the federal government and states are still introducing legislation and issuing new guidance almost daily. Meanwhile, employers are adjusting benefits offerings to address employee needs. How can employers navigate enforcement risk in this post-Roe world? Epstein Becker Green white collar attorneys Sarah Hall and Elena Quattrone tell us more. Visit our site for this week's Other Highlights and links: https://www.ebglaw.com/eltw267. Subscribe to #WorkforceWednesday - https://www.ebglaw.com/subscribe/. Visit http://www.EmploymentLawThisWeek.com. The EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® and DIAGNOSING HEALTH CARE podcasts are presented by Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights are reserved. This audio recording includes information about legal issues and legal developments.  Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments.  These informational materials are not intended, and should not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances, and these materials are not a substitute for the advice of competent counsel. The content reflects the personal views and opinions of the participants. No attorney-client relationship has been created by this audio recording. This audio recording may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions under the applicable law and ethical rules. The determination of the need for legal services and the choice of a lawyer are extremely important decisions and should not be based solely upon advertisements or self-proclaimed expertise. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Inside The Badge
miller_vs_state_undercover_police_decoy_and_entrapment

Inside The Badge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 5:55


Botanical Brouhaha Podcast
Bonus: Judge Victoria Pratt on The Power of Dignity

Botanical Brouhaha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 57:57


At Botanical Brouhaha, we've spent over a decade sharing our belief in the power of flowers to change lives and impact communities. Today's bonus episode of the BB Podcast not only supports that notion, but also serves as a call to action for us to continue using our artistic medium for the healing of our communities. After reading The Power of Dignity: How Transforming Justice Can Heal Our Communities by Judge Victoria Pratt, we knew we needed to share not only the book with you, but the author as well! And although she's not a florist, we believe she holds some powerful tools we can use to successfully flower with purpose in our communities and beyond. So, it's a pleasure to introduce you to The Honorable Victoria Pratt who served as the chief judge of the Newark Municipal Court, has been a professor at the Newark School of Criminal Law, and has taught at the Rutgers School of Law. Her TED talk clip has been viewed over 30 million times on Facebook. Judge Pratt's reforms transformed her courtroom by introducing creative tools like essay writing and social services partnerships. And, ultimately, she helped defendants begin to trust the justice system again because of the dignity she showed them throughout the court proceedings. In this episode, Judge Pratt shares: the 4 Principles of Procedural Justice Voice Neutrality Understanding Respect how she was able to transform her courtroom into a space for problem-solving and a resource for healing the power of community gardens on healing neighborhoods the impact of court fines on the success of restorative justice how business owners can use their leadership skills to impact their teams and communities the power of youth courts in using positive peer pressure and accountability for young people Mentioned in this episode: The Process is the Punishment: Handling Cases in a Lower Criminal Court Dr. Norma Bowe | Kean University | Changing the Landscape for Peace One Garden at a Time Tom Tyler | Why People Obey The Law Red Hook Community Justice Center | Brooklyn Newark Community Solutions Center for Court Innovation LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WORK OF JUDGE VICTORIA PRATT: GET THE BOOK WEBSITE INSTAGRAM TED TALK TWITTER MEDIA Host: Amy McGee (Botanical Brouhaha + Bloom Trust Co.) BB Podcast Sound Engineer: Grayson McGee Music Written & Performed by: Landon McGee

The Citizen's Guide to the Supreme Court
Last Call for Criminal Law

The Citizen's Guide to the Supreme Court

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 44:09 Very Popular


It's the end the term, so this week's episode ties up loose ends, which include: a mea culpa on cannon ownership (2:00); the plan so far for the Season Finale episode (5:00); discussion on Concepcion v. U.S. (how judge's should interpret the First Step Act), Hemphill v. NY (whether there are exceptions to the Confrontation Clause, and Ruan v. U.S. (mens rea requirements for doctors violate drug distribution laws).