Podcasts about widespread

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  • 771PODCASTS
  • 1,240EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 6, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about widespread

Show all podcasts related to widespread

Latest podcast episodes about widespread

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin
Gregor Paul: NZ Heral rugby writer recaps the All Black's one-sided defeat to South Africa

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 10:00


In a one-sided defeat to the Springboks where their attack failed display any form of fluency, they were dominated at the breakdown and struggled to defuse the aerial bombardment, All Blacks coach Ian Foster believes his side delivered their most improved performance of the season. A fifth loss from their last six tests revealed familiar issues for the beaten and bullied All Blacks to heap further pressure on Foster's troubled tenure. Despite losing 26-10 at Mbombela Stadium, a result in which the margin flattered the All Blacks, Foster clutched for positives in the form of new forwards coach Jason Ryan improving their maul defence. In a post-match interview on the pitch, Foster went further to claim this was the All Blacks best performance of the year following the first home series defeat in 27 years against Ireland last month. "We're bitterly disappointed but I felt it was our most improved performance this year," Foster said. "Some of the areas we really shifted our game forward. In a game dominated by defence we defended well but our timing was out a little bit in terms of the attack so we're going to have to go and have a look at that. There's a few players over here for the first time feeling the pressure that comes from this type of team. We're pretty excited about the next challenge of playing at Ellis Park for a trophy." Eben Etzebeth of South Africa and Beauden Barrett of New Zealand during the New Zealand All Blacks v South Africa Springboks rugby union match at Mbombela Stadium. Photosport.co.nz Foster, it is widely believed, must now lead a dramatic transformation next week to save his job. Addressing the many deep-seated issues in such a short timeframe appears impossible. Yet the embattled head coach projected confidence the All Blacks can achieve an upset at the home of South African rugby. "Quite easily really," Foster said when asked how he would get the team up. "We came over here for a two-game series and we always knew it was going to be tough. We felt that tonight. They get the lollies and they thoroughly deserve that. We've got to take some things that we've made big shifts in. We nullified a large part of their driving game. "We made some shifts defensively and in the last quarter we were starting to open things up. We started to snatch at a couple of balls which is frustrating but we've got to take that experience and take it into Ellis Park, walk in there and give it a crack." Springboks hooker Malcolm Marx celebrated his 50th test by having a field day with the All Blacks breakdown. This area contributed to the All Blacks attacking struggles, with captain Sam Cane admitting the support often didn't arrive quickly enough. "That was one of the keys to the test match – our inability to get enough momentum going. Malcom Marx in particular getting over the ball," Cane said. "Normally it comes down to the ball carrier winning the collision and snapping back but particularly the cleaners were half a second off and he was winning that race. Once he gets in a strong position over the ball he's probably one of the toughest in the world to move." Foster conceded mounting speculation around his future was difficult to escape and, on a personal level, taking its toll. Widespread calls for further change – after assistant coaches John Plumtree and Brad Mooar were jettisoned following the Ireland series – will now only intensify. "I'm going grey and my hair is receding pretty quickly. It's never easy. The standards we've got internally mean you want to do well but we've got a group that's still developing. I've been over here for a number of years with more established All Blacks teams than what we've got now. This one is still growing. It's not where we want it to be but I still believe it can get there." The All Blacks managed one late try to Shannon Frizell after a brilliant Caleb Clarke break but, otherwise, they never looked like scoring. Ongoing attacking issues, combined with the breakdown failings, scrum frustrations and a horror run of form leave the All Blacks seemingly in a tailspin towards their nadir. "It's not a matter of shutting it out it's there all the time," Foster said of his future. "If you spend too much time immersed in it, it doesn't do the team any good. We know we've had a couple of losses. We understand that but, in all honesty, I thought we shifted up a couple of cogs in this test. Some of the areas we wanted to focus on we made some significant improvement but didn't quite get the other ones right. "We're coming off a lost series and there's a lot of noise around this team now. When a team is working hard to get its game at a level it wants sometimes you get a little bit overeager. I thought there was a little bit of that today – almost wanting it too much and trying a little bit too hard. "It's one thing to say you want to get everything right and be perfect but it seldom happens. This team right now I know we're developing and growing. I know people are frustrated with that, and we're frustrated with results. But you don't achieve growth if you get too panicky and start making dramatic changes and putting too much pressure on players." Cane leapt to Foster's defence by insisting the team remained behind him and suggesting that, despite the string of defeats, they were not as far away as everyone believes. "One thing you may not see from the outside but you can certainly feel within the camp is the belief is really strong. Even with five minutes to go when there was the red card there was genuine belief," Cane said. "It's only something you can feel – and you can feel it when it's not there. The group's belief in themselves and what we're trying to achieve is high and when you've got that and an attitude to work hard it's a good recipe so we've got to stick at it and it'll turn. If we didn't have those things in place I'd be pretty worried but the right ingredients are there." - by Liam Napier in South AfricaSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Round Table China
Misuse of colored contact lenses widespread

Round Table China

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 52:02


The sales of colored contact lenses have been a strong growth point in the consumer market since China approved its online sales in 2015. But many consumers stick them into their eyes with no questions asked. Are there any potential problems(01:05)? / The stay-at-home workout craze was a storm that landed in Chinese households a few months ago, but like a storm, it would one day subside. Are we witnessing the end of a short-lived fad(25:07)? / Round Table's Happy Place(44:47)! On the show: Laiming, Huang Shan & Josh Cotterill

IRRAS Radio
Video: Published Case Review: Continuous Antibiotic Admin. Using IRRAflow for Intracranial Abscess

IRRAS Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:57


Intracranial abscesses are rare lesions with an incidence estimated at 1500-2500 cases per year in the United States. Widespread use of neuroimaging has led to rapid diagnosis, decreasing the mortality rate from 40-50% to approximately 20. Treatment options include systemic antibiotic therapy, needle aspiration through a burr hole, and open craniotomy for excision. The recently introduced IRRAflow self-irrigating catheter system has been used to treat subdural hematomas and intraventricular hemorrhages although research into other applications for this technology is still ongoing. Dr. Ryan Hess, neurosurgeon form Buffalo General Hospital presents a case review of an intracranial abscess treated via open craniotomy and IRRAflow placement allowing for continuous irrigation and drainage of the abscess. Read more here: https://www.cureus.com/articles/68647...

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Months of political infighting in Iraq prompt widespread protests and instability

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 4:26


Iraq has been reeling from unrest after the powerful Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr called for a revolution, taunting his Shiite rivals and demanding sweeping changes to the current political system. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn reports from Baghdad. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Bitachon4life
Bitachon4life Shiur 715 Widespread

Bitachon4life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 3:34


Is There a Crisis?

PBS NewsHour - World
Months of political infighting in Iraq prompt widespread protests and instability

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 4:26


Iraq has been reeling from unrest after the powerful Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr called for a revolution, taunting his Shiite rivals and demanding sweeping changes to the current political system. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn reports from Baghdad. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Months of political infighting in Iraq prompt widespread protests and instability

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 4:26


Iraq has been reeling from unrest after the powerful Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr called for a revolution, taunting his Shiite rivals and demanding sweeping changes to the current political system. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn reports from Baghdad. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Herpetological Highlights
120 Vipers With Eyebrows

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 32:58


Some vipers have crazy horns - we chat about it, and discuss a brand new species of lizard from South America. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Busschau, T., & Boissinot, S. (2022). Habitat determines convergent evolution of cephalic horns in vipers. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 135(4), 652–664. https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blac008 Species of the Bi-Week: Amézquita, A., Daza, J. M., Contreras, L. A. B., Orejuela, C., Barrientos, L. S., & Mazariegos H., L. A. (2022). One more and one less: a new species of large bromelicolous lizard (Gymnophthalmidae: Anadia) from the Andean cloud forests of northwestern Colombia and the phylogenetic status of Anadia antioquensis. Zootaxa, 5150(2), 217–238. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.5150.2.3 Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Petrovan, S. O., Al-Fulaij, N., Christie, A., & Andrews, H. (2022). Why link diverse citizen science surveys? Widespread arboreal habits of a terrestrial amphibian revealed by mammalian tree surveys in Britain. PloS one, 17(7), e0265156. Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, www.thepassionhifi.com

Utterly Moderate Network
R.I.P. American Democracy? (w/Jonathan Last & Tom Nichols)

Utterly Moderate Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 44:40


Join the Connors Crew now by subscribing to our newsletter in just one click! American democracy is in serious trouble. We may be on the verge of the “greatest political and constitutional crisis since the Civil War” and quite possibly the “suspension of American democracy as we have known it,” in the words of Robert Kagan. Michael Gerson laments that recent developments in the U.S. are “revealing the frightening fragility of the American experiment.” And Jonathan Last warns, “America faces an authoritarian peril.” The problems are numerous, including: Election subversion efforts by leading political figures, including the attempted coup in 2020, the threat of a coup in 2024, and ongoing anti-democratic trends among elected officials at the state and local levels. Widespread misinformation/disinformation disseminated by partisan media outlets on television, the internet, and radio. Erosion of political and popular support for democracy and growing support for authoritarianism. Deep polarization, negative partisanship, and tribalism. Government gridlock and dysfunction. Threats of violence toward elected representatives and election officials. I asked a friend of mine who worked on Capitol Hill for years the following question: What percentage of members of Congress really have no principles and are just desperate to stay in the thrill of the game, acquire and maintain power and status, and stay relevant, regardless of whether what they did in Congress helped or hurt our democracy? This person's honest answer? At least 51% and maybe as high as 80% or more, and an alarmingly high number are probably sociopaths. There is ample evidence that this may very well be true throughout the recent books by Mark Leibovich and Tim Miller. Here is a major problem with that: Weaknesses in our system that were exploited for a near coup in 2020 remain unfixed to be exploited by these numerous less-than-honorable people in the future. As University of Baltimore law professor Kim Wehle explains: “There are massive holes in the Electoral Count Act. It is stunning that there is nothing requiring states to count the popular vote. . . That is not democracy. If this is not addressed, state legislatures and/or Congress can steal the next election. The future of our republic is at stake.” Just this week, The New York Times obtained emails showing that those attempting the massive multi-state Electoral College fraud in 2020 knew what they were doing was wrong, unethical, illegal, and “fake,” as one put it in an email. . . . . . but they did it anyway: “We would just be sending in ‘fake' electoral votes to Pence so that ‘someone' in Congress can make an objection when they start counting votes, and start arguing that the ‘fake' votes should be counted.” This is not democracy. Crossing our fingers and hoping is not going to fix this. We must get serious as a people and fix this through reforms to our system. Yet time is running out. And if American democracy dies, it cannot just be turned back on like a light switch. I promise that all of us, regardless of political orientation, will miss it when it is gone. The Bulwark's Will Saletan writes: “Americans like to think our country is immune to authoritarianism. We have a culture of freedom, a tradition of elected government, and a Bill of Rights. We're not like those European countries that fell into fascism. We'd never willingly abandon democracy, liberty, or the rule of law. But that's not how authoritarianism would come to America. In fact, it's not how authoritarianism has come to America. The movement to dismantle our democracy is thriving and growing, even after the failure of the Jan. 6th coup attempt, because it isn't spreading through overt rejection of our system of government. It's spreading through lies.” On this episode of the Utterly Moderate Podcast, host Lawrence Eppard is joined by Jonathan Last, editor and writer at The Bulwark, and Tom Nichols, writer at The Atlantic, to discuss whether American democracy is going to survive. Strap in, this episode gets really dark. Related links: The New York Times shows that those coordinating fraudulent Electoral College electors knew it was wrong, unethical, illegal, and fake. They did it anyway. “A Five-Alarm Fire for American Democracy” by Lawrence M. Eppard. The Death of Expertise and Our Own Worst Enemy from Tom Nichols as well as his writing at The Atlantic. Check out Jonathan Last's writing at The Bulwark. Why We Did It from The Bulwark's Tim Miller. Mark Leibovich article referenced in this episode. The “independent state legislature theory” explained. Former President Donald Trump pressures/threatens Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to overturn Georgia's election results. The Connors Forum is an independent entity from the institutions that we partner with. The views expressed in our newsletters and podcasts are those of the individual contributors alone and not of our partner institutions. Episode Music: “Please Listen Carefully” by Jahzzar (creative commons) “Draw the Sky” by Paul Keane (licensed through TakeTones) “When” by Stephan Siebert (creative commons) “Happy Trails (To You)” by the Riders in the Sky (used with artist's permission)  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NeurologyLive Mind Moments
69: The Widespread Effects of DMT Waste in Multiple Sclerosis

NeurologyLive Mind Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 54:42


Welcome to the NeurologyLive® Mind Moments™ podcast. Tune in to hear leaders in neurology sound off on topics that impact your clinical practice. In this episode, we spoke with Darin T. Okuda, MD, professor of neurology and director of Neuroinnovation and the Multiple Sclerosis & Neuroimmunology Imaging Program at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; and Karin Cook, senior vice president of medical strategy and clinical ethnographer, Heartbeat Medical Communications. The pair spoke about their research into the wasted costs associated with disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for patients with multiple sclerosis, what they've observed at their center, the wide-reaching impact of this waste on the healthcare continuum, and the future solutions that are being worked on for this problem. Click here for more coverage of this story: Multiple Sclerosis DMT Waste Is Staggering, New Study Shows Wasted DMTs in Dr. Okuda's office [Image] Episode Breakdown: 1:45 – Background on the study conducted by Okuda et al. 4:05 – Perspective on the cost driven by DMT waste  6:30 – Current landscape of prescriptions and adherence in MS 8:35 – Disparities in MS treatment adherence 11:00 – The link to the physician-patient relationship 16:40 – The process of choosing a DMT and shared decision-making  23:00 – Neurology News Minute 25:45 – Finding solutions to the DMT waste problem 33:40 – The role of the individual neurologist and patient 38:30 – Access to specialist care and resources 42:40 – Building trust with patients and general medical mistrust 47:00 – Next steps and closing thoughts This episode is brought to you by the Medical World News streaming service. Check out new content and shows every day, only at medicalworldnews.com The stories featured in this week's Neurology News Minute, which will give you quick updates on the following developments in neurology, are further detailed here: Zonisamide Oral Suspension FDA-Approved for Partial Seizures in Epilepsy FT218 Receives Tentative Approval for EDS, Cataplexy in Adults With Narcolepsy FDA Clears Rapid Hyperdensity Tool for Inclusion in RapidAI Platform for Neurovascular Conditions ALS Therapy Tofersen Has NDA Accepted by FDA, Granted Priority Review Thanks for listening to the NeurologyLive® Mind Moments™ podcast. To support the show, be sure to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. For more neurology news and expert-driven content, visit neurologylive.com. REFERENCE 1. Okuda DT, Burgess KW, Cook K, McCreary M, Winkler MD, Moog TM. Hiding in plain sight: the magnitude of unused disease-modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis and strategies for reducing the economic burden. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2022;63:103920. doi:10.1016/j.msard.2022.103920

Statewide
Statewide: The widespread trauma from gun violence

Statewide

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 50:33


It's not just those wounded or their families who are traumatized after a shooting. Entire communities are impacted. That can lead to a long road to recovery. We look closer at how those who survived the Highland Park shooting this month are coping. And, we remember the Eastland Disaster.

The Intelligence
To a greater degree: widespread heatwaves

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 24:21 Very Popular


Vast stretches of the temperate world are baking or burning, and as climate change marches on widespread heatwaves will only grow more intense and more common. After a half-century of insurgency, some rebels of Colombia's disbanded FARC group needed a new calling: they have become tour guides. And a look at where Ukraine can store its considerable grain harvest. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stratfor Podcast
Essential Geopolitics: China Protest Reveals Widespread Concerns About the Economy

Stratfor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 8:39


In its Third Quarter Forecast, RANE warned that global Inflation is posing a threat of recession in the developed world and that economic conditions could lead to unrest as well as increased security issues. But this kind of event is nearly unheard of in China. That's why the fact that people recently protested and scuffled with security guards in the Chinese city of Zhengzhou was worth looking into. In this Essential Geopolitics podcast, Emily Donahue speaks with Chase Blazek, RANE”s Asia-Pacific analyst. RANE (Risk Assistance Network + Exchange) is a global risk intelligence company that provides risk and security professionals with access to critical insights, analysis, and support, enabling them to more effectively anticipate, monitor, and respond to emerging risks and threats. RANE clients benefit from improved situational awareness, more efficient access to relevant intelligence and expertise, and better risk management outcomes. Join the millions who are tapping into the collective wisdom of the world's largest community of risk and business professionals. For more information about RANE, visit www.ranenetwork.com.

Economist Radio
To a greater degree: widespread heatwaves

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 24:21


Vast stretches of the temperate world are baking or burning, and as climate change marches on widespread heatwaves will only grow more intense and more common. After a half-century of insurgency, some rebels of Colombia's disbanded FARC group needed a new calling: they have become tour guides. And a look at where Ukraine can store its considerable grain harvest. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Arizona's Morning News
Investigators find "widespread failures" in Uvalde Police response

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 4:30


A new report finds "widespread failures" in the response of local, state and federal cops during the Uvalde shooting. Jim discusses the report and the newest information on the incident.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - World
Sri Lanka's future remains tenuous as the president resigns amid widespread protests

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 4:01


Sri Lanka has slipped into chaos after months of protests reached a tipping point this week, when protesters took over government buildings and forced the president to resign. A new interim government will be elected by Parliament. But the South Asian island nation of 22 million people is facing one of the worst economic crises since it gained independence in 1948. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

TonioTimeDaily
H.R.5448 - SAFE SEX Workers Study Act and Men Can Be Men and Wear Dresses, Too: Gender Equality in Fashion

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 44:07


"The Congress finds the following: (1) People who engage in consensual, transactional sex utilize online platforms to protect their health, safety, and independence. This use includes building community connections, distribution of harm reduction information and techniques, identification and screening of potential clients, and negotiating the terms of consensual, transactional sex services, including condom use and other harm reduction strategies. (2) Widespread discrimination against populations, including LGBTQI+ individuals, particularly transgender women of color, prevents many from accessing formal employment resources and educational opportunities. (3) In the 2015 United States Transgender Survey conducted by the National Center for Transgender Equality, 19 percent of respondents reported having exchanged sex for resources, such as for money, food, or a place to sleep. Transgender women of color, including Black (42 percent), American Indian (28 percent), multiracial (27 percent), Latina (23 percent), and Asian (22 percent) respondents were more likely to have participated in sex work than the overall sample. (4) In the 2015 United States Transgender Survey, respondents who experienced homelessness in the past year (17 percent) were more than three times as likely to have participated in sex work during that year compared to the overall sample. (5) On a broader scale, internet platforms foster connections between people and play an integral part in American society. Meaningful regulation of internet platforms must take into account the role they play in the health, safety, and privacy of all people's lives. (6) While policymakers, representatives of internet platforms, and some advocates have discussed ways to mitigate the use of internet platforms to decrease exploitation, people who consensually trade sex are rarely involved in the drafting of legislation or policies, or in assessing their impact, despite being amongst the populations who are impacted by legislation and policies related to the regulation of these internet platforms. (7) On February 27, 2018, the House of Representatives passed the Allow States to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act, known as SESTA/FOSTA. While SESTA/FOSTA holds websites liable for user-generated content that facilitates sex trafficking, it also impacts online platforms where users discuss consensual sex work and related topics. (8) Contemporaneously with the passage of SESTA/FOSTA in the Senate on March 21, 2018, websites preemptively shut down, some directly citing the law's passage as the rationale for closure." "If you need more arguments FOR males wearing dresses and skirts, consider the following: Dresses and skirts are non-constricting and very comfortable. Cool down by wearing them during the summer season or in hot climates. People have the freedom to dress as they like. Fabric is not sexualized; attitude is. Women wear pants so why can't men wear dresses? The bottom line is it's OK for men to be in skirts and boys to be in dresses. It doesn't make you less of a man if you want to rock a floral gown. The Harry Styles photoshoot has proven that you can wear a dress and be a man at the same time. Whether you choose to wear it for the night or as part of your streetwear fashion, you do you." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Sri Lanka's future remains tenuous as the president resigns amid widespread protests

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 4:01


Sri Lanka has slipped into chaos after months of protests reached a tipping point this week, when protesters took over government buildings and forced the president to resign. A new interim government will be elected by Parliament. But the South Asian island nation of 22 million people is facing one of the worst economic crisis since it gained independence in 1948. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Grace in Focus
What is Lordship Salvation and How Widespread is it?

Grace in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 13:50


Welcome to Grace in Focus radio. Today, Bob and Shawn are joined in the studio by Steve Elkins. We will first hear more about Steve, and his background at DTS, and his work with Young Life. In addition, the guys will be diving into the theological position known as “Lordship Salvation.” In addition, we will

EM360 Podcast
The Widespread Adoption of Business Automation

EM360 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 13:32


From healthcare to finance, manufacturing, energy and more, business automation is taking the enterprise tech world by storm. The ubiquitous nature of automating recurring processes can fit the priorities of any sector. So how should businesses be looking to adopt and utilise automation? In this episode of the EM360 Podcast, Editor Matt Harris talks to Mika Vainio-Mattila, CEO and co-founder of Digital Workforce, to discuss: End-to-end business automation Application of APIs and low code tooling How business automation will mature by 2030

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Our tech columnist looks at the issues behind the widespread Rogers network outage

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 8:49


The massive Rogers Communications outage that happened last Friday prevented many Canadians from accessing crucial services. Nur Zincir-Heywood talks about what Rogers should have done differently to avoid the outage and what it needs to do now to prevent another one.

Houston's Morning News w/ Shara & Jim
Biden-flation: Are Widespread Layoffs Coming Next? - Joshua Evans

Houston's Morning News w/ Shara & Jim

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 3:16


The Deeper Dig
Can Covid be tracked without widespread testing?

The Deeper Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 20:22


Last week, Vermont shut down its Covid-19 testing sites. These sites operated for more than two years and accounted for most of the 3.6 million results recorded by the state Department of Health over the course of the pandemic. State officials have pointed to the increased use of antigen tests as one reason for this shift. As take-home testing has become more common, public health agencies have adjusted their tools for measuring the virus's risk. But each of these metrics — whether scattered PCR tests, hospitalizations or wastewater sampling — offers an incomplete picture. With this change, Covid infrastructure that has been offered at no up-front cost to individuals is increasingly absorbed into the normal healthcare system. And Congress appears unlikely to re-up federal Covid funding, meaning individuals will likely have to pay for future tests, vaccines and treatment either through insurance or out-of-pocket. On this week's podcast, VTDigger data reporter Erin Petenko and Dr. Trey Dobson, chief medical officer at Southwestern Vermont Medical Center, assess what the end of widespread PCR testing means at this stage of the pandemic, and what data sources they're looking to now. 

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)
We hear from two businesses affected by the widespread Rogers outage. On the phone-in: Niki Jabbour

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 53:00


A widespread Rogers outage is affecting thousands of customers across Canada, including here in the Maritimes. Debit and some ATM are also unavailable. We hear from two businesses affected by the outage. And on the phone-in: Niki Jabbour takes your gardening questions.

Farm and Ranch Report
Can Dairy Methane Digesters Reach Widespread Adoption?

Farm and Ranch Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022


Today, not all dairies are going to be as well-positioned for digesters depending on their size and location.

Comsteria Podcast
Lock Screen content is the next big thing, TikTok still committed to shopping, new Apple patents.

Comsteria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 1:30


TikTok is hitting back at reports it's cooling on the idea of live shopping through its app.   Widespread reports yesterday quoted an unnamed TikTok source saying sales figures had been disappointing and a planned roll out of the feature was on ice - the company says it never planned to launch in continental Europe in the first half of this year and it remains committed to it's UK service.   Certainly the TikTok website is still encouraging brands and influencers to ‘open a shop' at shop.tiktok.com     The Consumer Technology Association has picked dup some new patent filings from Apple which suggest a future range of MacBoooks could offer wireless charging for iPhone and keyboards that can sense multiple inputs. There's also the potential for MacBooks to be made from materials such as ceramics and glass instead of aluminium.      And I think we'll be hearing more about ‘lock screen content' in the coming months.   Rather than unlocking your phone, choosing an app and then seeing content, the future might involve giving one app control over your lock screen and having it serve a rotating feed of news headlines, quizzes, games and pictures - think of it as a really clever screensaver - and yes, it'll almost certainly contain ads as well.  

AlternativeRadio
[David Korten] Our Planetary Existential Crisis

AlternativeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 57:00


Our planet and humankind are in danger. The warnings coming from UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres could not be more unambiguous. He says we are heading “towards an unlivable world. We are on a fast track to climate disaster. Major cities under water. Unprecedented heatwaves. Terrifying storms. Widespread water shortages. The extinction of a million species of plants and animals. This is not fiction or exaggeration,” he continues. “It is what science tells us will result from our current energy policies. We are on a pathway to global warming of more than double the 1.5-degree limit agreed in Paris. If you care about justice, and our children's future, I am appealing directly to you. Climate promises and plans must be turned into reality and action, now. It is time to stop burning our planet, and start investing in the abundant renewable energy all around us.”

Montana Public Radio News
Widespread thunderstorms are likely in Montana this week, forecasters say

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 1:07


Montana weather forecasters say widespread potentially powerful thunderstorms are likely this week.

Intermediate Spanish Stories
E40 La Ciudad en Llamas de 1992

Intermediate Spanish Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 31:55


The 1992 Los Angeles riots, were a series of riots and civil disturbances that occurred in Los Angeles County, California, in April and May 1992. The unrest began in South Central Los Angeles on April 29, after a jury acquitted four officers of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) charged with using excessive force in the arrest and beating of Rodney King. This incident had been videotaped and widely shown in television broadcasts.The rioting took place in several areas in the Los Angeles metropolitan area as thousands of people rioted over six days following the verdict's announcement. Widespread looting, assault, and arson occurred during the riots, which local police forces had difficulty controlling due to lack of personnel and resources. When the riots ended, 63 people had been killed, 2,383 had been injured, more than 12,000 had been arrested, and estimates of property damage were over $1 billion, which made the riots one of the most-devastating civil disruptions in American history.Koreatown, situated just to the north of South Central LA, was disproportionately damaged.  You will find the full transcript at https://interspanish.buzzsprout.comAs always, I really appreciate your thoughts and feedback about the show. You can reach out to me :Email: InterSpanishPodcast@gmail.comYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUn1MRmbmxL0ePiYDGfsJVwFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/interspanishPodcast/about/?ref=page_internalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/interspanish/Twitter: https://twitter.com/InterSpanishPod

Morning Mix with Alan Corcoran
We spoke to Sean an 85 year old man whose story has caused widespread reaction after the failure to access dental services he had to pull his own teeth

Morning Mix with Alan Corcoran

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 8:48


Kings and Generals: History for our Future
3.4 Fall and Rise of China: The Rebellion of Li Zicheng

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 53:12 Very Popular


Last time we spoke, the death of Nurhaci led to the rise of his grandson Hung Taiji. The Sea King Mao Wenlong was finally caught lying about his military achievements and even secretly negotiating with the Jin. Mao's rival Yuan Chonghuan took little time to get rid of Mao, thus riding himself of the man stealing his limelight. Unfortunately it was not long when Yuan would fall victim to a sneaky ploy of Hung Taiji and was executed under the false pretense that he was a turncoat like Mao. Hung managed to gain some very valuable Ming defectors and upgraded his military with new cannons and naval units. Then Hung proclaimed his people to be the Manchu under a brand new Qing dynasty as he conquered all of Korea. With the Koreans now giving him tribute, he soon turned his gaze towards the Ming, with some new toys in hand.   Welcome to the Fall and Rise of China Podcast, I am your dutiful host Craig Watson. But, before we start I want to also remind you this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Perhaps you want to learn more about the history of Asia? Kings and Generals have an assortment of episodes on world war two and much more  so go give them a look over on Youtube. So please subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry for some more history related content, over on my channel, the Pacific War Channel where I cover the history of China and Japan from the 19th century until the end of the Pacific War. This episode is The Rebellion of Li Zicheng In early 1634, one man, Chen Qiyu, was instilled with an incredible amount of power. He was made Supreme commander of Shaanxi, Shanxi, Henan, Huguang and Sichuan. The Ming Court had realized the required authority necessary to coordinate operations against the wandering bandit menace. Droughts, famine, even cannibalism was seen all over, driving peasants to swell the ranks of bandits who soon became rebel armies. So many officials in numerous provinces complained they lacked the resources necessary to feed their troops, distribute relief or quell rebellions. In turn when they would fail, they would be dismissed, leading to a further shortage of competent men to manage the terrible situation. In the area between Shaanxi and Henan, over 200,000 rebels began taking smaller towns and killing local officials. The rebels would routinely attack smaller towns, usually in groups of 10,000 and perform atrocities against officials. They would avoid any open battles with Ming forces, always on the move. Then all the prominent rebel leaders got together for a meeting, which would be a rather dramatic turning point. The overarching leader amongst them was Li Zicheng who would make many key decisions for them all. They decided to divide their forces and strike out simultaneously in all directions. The most successful of these groups would be the Rebel leaders Zhang Xianzhong and Gao Yingxiang who hit Nan Zhili. Enroute to their target, their troops carried around banners declaring themselves followers of the True Primal Dragon Emperor and thus they were identifying themselves as something more than just mere bandits. They marched through Henan on their way into Nan Zhili, looting the town of Fengyang. There they killed over 4000 Ming officials and civilians performing some heinous atrocities, some stating they even ripped fetuses out of pregnant women. They razed everything to the ground and looted the place for days. Once they were done, Gao headed west and Zhang went east to attack Luzhou. Defending Luzhou was commander Wu Dapo who deployed peasants and troops to defend the town. He set up cannons atop walls and stockpiled large logs to be thrown at the rebels. Then as the bandits got close, his forces opened fire killing around a 1000 of them.Yet such local competent commanders were increasingly becoming rare and the Emperor continuously resorted to dispatching eunuchs wherever he could to resolve matters. These eunuchs of course were not military men and many had ulterior motives. The bandits were moving further south freaking out the Ming Court and Emperor. Drastic measures were enforced such as rushing 43,000 troops from other theaters, such as from the northeast where the Qing could strike at any moment. In the wake of the absolute disaster at Fengyang, Hong Chengchou was given the task to crush the rebels within 6 months time and the emperor followed this up by pledging almost 1 million taels worth of supplies for the task. Despite all these major efforts, Hong had far too few troops, too much ground to cover and far little time.    The rebels roamed freely, prompting one official in Henan to state “the villages are bereft of people, white bones fill the wilderness and at night the crying of ghosts can be heard everywhere”. Rice inflation was so high, it is alleged people were buying human flesh of the deceased in markets. The rebel groups were demonstrating more and more tactical awareness. They began burning crops in certain areas to deny food supplies to pursuing Ming forces. Gao Yinxiang besieged Guangzhou with a force of possibly 70,000 and used many heavy cannons. Gao followed this up by attacking Taozhou, dangerously close to the secondary capital of the Ming, Nanjing. His forces would crush a Ming army in Song and Henan before he returned to Shaanxi in 1636. The rebels and Ming officials would go back and forth with countless battles and one Ming official realized the rebellions now needed to be quelled as a first priority. The Minister of War Yang Sichang stated the rebels were a “disease of the heart” and that the capital region must be protected from the spreading poison of the rebels. The frontier war with the Manchu he deemed to be like the arms of a person, not necessary for survival, but the heart was. Yang saw the greatest danger being in Shaanxi, Henan, Huguang and Jiangbei. He thought the empire required a bold new strategy to restore state control of the central plains. Once this was achieved, then they could turn their attention towards the Manchu threat. Yang's plan was to become known as “shi ian zhi wang” the Ten-sided net. Like most grand proposals during this time, it looked amazing on paper and would be a catastrophic failure.   By 1637 the scope of the rebellions had expanded greatly and the center of its activity was shifting from south and east closer to the capital and the agricultural heartland of the Ming dynasty. Thus Yang proscribed the construction of more defenses along the frontier, hoping to bolster everything aside from troops. He wanted to keep around just 50,000 troops outside the Great Wall, thinking it would be a sufficient deterrent against the Manchu. The idea was, if the 50,000 were attacked by Manchu invaders, they could buy enough time for reinforcements to come. In the meantime they could even open up peace talks with the Manchu simply to buy more time for what he really wanted to do, quell the rebellions once and force all. There was quite an uproar in the Ming Court over the idea of opening peace talks with the Manchu, but it would begrudgingly be done. Some others in the court advised opening up trade markets with their Mongol allies to procure horses, hoping to drive a wedge between the Manchu and their Mongol allies. Ming intelligence at the time suggested the Mongolia frontier situation was a hot spot not just between the Ming and Manchu, but also between the Manchu and certain Mongol groups. The idea as stated by one official was “to use barbarians to control barbarians”.   Yang believed given adequate supplies, how many times have I stated that one at this point, given adequate supplies the soldiers could be fed and would fight, and in turn would be able to depend on the populace accordingly. Once the populace felt safe, they would direct their allegiance to the Ming government and be less inclined to join rebel groups. Then with the populace, they could form militias and finally cut off, isolate and stave out the rebel groups. Yang then prescribed punishment and even execution for Ming officials who were derelict in their duties. This was the “ten-sided net” strategy. Yang said Shaanxi, Henan, Huguang and Jiangbei would have 4 lines of defense, each with a pacification commissioner assigned. At Yansui, Shaanxi, Shandong, Jiangnan, Jiangxi and Sichuan would be 6 auxiliary lines of defense, each also assigned pacification commissioners. Those commissioners would be directing both defensive and offensive operations. Through their efforts they would gradually close in around rebel positions until all were trapped, then killed or captured. Defense was the primary function of it all. Once the net closed in on the rebels, the Ming would employ “clearing the fields and strengthening the walls” as a general strategy. Thus with heavily defended cities and no supplies available to them, the rebels would eventually be forced to surrender. 2 supreme commanders, the Zongli and Zongdu would smash the enemy wherever possible, while the rest of the officials would act more locally. The Zongli and Zongdu's troops would be elite troops with better mobility. Yang estimated they would need 10,000 troops in key defensive posts and around 30,000 for each supreme commander. In total they would require 120,000 troops, of which 36,000 would be mounted. Overall, the problem should be resolved in a matter of just 6 months, sure. Now to equip and supply all these troops it was estimated to cost 2.8 million taels. How were they going to pay for all this, taxes taxes taxes. Yang argued they could increase the land tax by about 12 ounces of grain to bring in an extra 1.9 million taels and get another 400,000 via special taxes on surplus lands. 200,000 from postal revenues and the rest perhaps by raising the sales tax a bit. There was a ton of debate in the Court over all this, but Yang got his way. The plan was a go though it certainly had its critics. One major critic against Yang and his plan was Sun Chuanting, the Grand coordinator of Shaanxi. Sun argued countless problems with the ten-sided net plan. First he argued the funds and manpower for it were highly unrealistic “how can the state raise an extra 2.8 million tales when they've already spent more than 1 million taels in extra revenues”. Sun re-iterated this argument asking where the troops would even come from and how the hell would he manage to do all this in just 6 months. Sun also stated the seasons when this would take place were not the same seasons the bandits usually were at large. There was also the issue of terrain, the rebels could still flee to mountains and forests, which large Ming armies would lose them in. Sun said many more troops would actually be required for this plan and those officials appointed needed to not only be competent, but also very knowledgeable at the local levels. Sun characterized the plan to be more of an “empty net strategy”. But like most critics, hell the majority of our politicians today to boot, Sun had no alternative plan. I am sure any of you in the audience can already see one of the largest issues with this plan, that of taxation. The peasants are rebelling because there is no food or funds in their regions, so the plan is to further tax them to stop them from rebelling? This issue did not go unnoticed, the Emperor stated himself “leadership and money needs to come from the gentry, not the masses. Suppressing the bandits requires a big campaign which requires lots of troops. The money can't come from the people, but should come from the treasury, but the treasury is empty”.  Xiong Wencan, a man who gained a reputation for quelling rebels was appointed as one of the supreme commanders, alongside Hong Chengchou. Out in the field, Xiong and Hong managed to achieve many victories against the rebels,  Hong even managed to defeat Li Zicheng, one of the biggest rebel leaders at large. But these victories did not amount to peace for the populace. Many of the pacifications armies would loot and rape as they drove the rebels into the mountains. As is expected, Ming commanders would not venture deep into mountains, fearing rebel ambushes. Ming forces won numerous battles, claiming the lives of thousands of rebels, but were never able to eliminate the enemy entirely from any given region. At one point, the rebel leader Zhang Xianzhong was defeated in battle and had to surrender. This prompted some Ming officials to discuss the idea of using Zhang Xianzhong to kill other rebel leaders. Most officials deemed the idea completely insane and it was soon disregarded. While the discussions were going on  however, Xiong Wencan allegedly gave Zhang 20,000 men to help maintain local order. This eye opening moment prompted Yang Sichang to become more more personally involved in the campaign, not liking how his subordinates were simply doing things on their own and some not even following direct orders. Yang also vowed to the emperor it would all be done by the winter of 1638. Yang then berated field commanders to obey the authority of the Ming officials. Winter of 1638 came with no significant results, and Yang asked the emperor to replace him, but was refused. This prompted Yang to make a list of officials who he deemed deserved punishment for lack of action during the campaign, one of the most notable was Hong Chengchou who seemed to be making no ground. Many officials were punished, except for Hong who the emperor personally liked and protected.    There were many unforeseen problems, such as local officials hiding resources and bribing the tax agents who came looking for funds. Natural disasters plagued China as well. Locust plagues hit and caused more famines in Henan, Suzhou and Shandong forcing more and more peasants to scrounge for food and many Earthquakes hit Sichuan. More and more the strong joined the rebels and the weak starved to death. Yang himself seemed to not even be following the ten-sided net strategy anymore by 1638. Yang began to prioritize certain regions over others, rather than keeping the net closing overall and when the Emperor questioned him, Yang would argue it was too difficult to coordinate the officials. As I mentioned many of the sub commanders and other officials were beginning to not heed orders and it was becoming a noticeable problem. And of course Yang gave the old, lack of troops, lack of supplies speech. All in all, rebels were certainly being killed or captured and many of their leaders were falling, its not like the Ming were not making headway. Yang was even beginning to feel some confidence that the plan was working and proposed grabbing another million taels for the plan and famine relief. Then disaster would strike.   As I previously mentioned, part of the plan was to open up peace talks with the Qing, to bide more time to finish off the rebels. In 1638, the Ming were not looking so good and the Manchu's were coming off multiple war victories making them not too willing to talk about peace. Some in the Ming Court thought they should negotiate making Hung Tiaji a tributary prince, Yang Sichang pushed for this heavily. Yuan Chongzhen held a meeting with many officials over the state of the frontier defenses. They lacked firepower and many competent commanders were busy with the rebels. In the end as a result of the circumstances the Emperor ruled in favor of offering to make Hung Taiji a tributary prince. Meanwhile Qing nobles such as Dorgon, Kong, Geng and Shang began raiding Ming territroy outside the great wall. Then Dorgon had a lucky encounter at a large redoubt near the Great Wall and annihilated the force in it and proceeded across the border and approached the Yellow River. Zu Dashou alerted the capital and demanded relief forces to rush over. The Ming Court debated on what action to take, Yang Sichang advocated for negotiations, while others urged for battle. One commander Lu Xiangsheng argued with Yang “If you discard war but talk of negotiations,you nourish disaster and bring disgrace to the country. Who doesn't know this? What's the point of my receiving the double-edged sword from the emperor if I don't exert myself in battle”. Yang's rebuttal to this was to sneakily transfer troops from Lu Xiangsheng to another commander named Gao Qiqian, leaving Lu with only 20,000 men. The Emperor for his part was outraged by the Qing threat to his capital yet again and yelled at Yang in front of the Court. It seemed the Emperor was most angry about the idea that those around him thought he personally believed peace talks were the best choice of action, as he did not think they were. The Emperor then ordered Lu Xiangsheng to pursue the enemy and for Gao Qiqian to defend Shanhaiguan. The Emperor sent 40,000 taels to Lu as a reward and stated “Peace talks were the idea of the outer court officials. The Emperor personally favors wars”.    The Qing attacked Gaoyang, where the now 76 year old and retired Sun Chenzong was. He, alongside his whole family participated in the defense of the city. The city fell after 3 days, poor Chenzong and 19 of his family members perished. Lu Xiangsheng pushed for a counter attack, but Gao Qiqian argued they would be better to take up defensive positions. Lu's forces were fighting the enemy at Baoding, but had no rations left. Lu pleaded with his men to continue fighting “you and I have all received the blessings of the state. In this calamity we may not avoid death, but there is no calamity in which we might not attain life!”. His men resolved to fight on to delay the enemy, praying for relief forces to come. Gao's forces were only 15 miles away when they received a plea from Lu to come help, Gao did not reply. Lu's force was surrounded near the Gaoshui bridge outside Jiazhuang, they then engaged the enemy. The battle lasted 6 hours with cannons, guns and arrows flying off. Lu's sub commanders pleaded to try and break out of the encirclement, but Lu demanded they all make a last stand. Lu would die from 4 arrows and 3 sword blows, allegedly after taking 10 men with him. The Qing took Changping, Jizhou, Pinggu and reached the outskirts of Jinan by January of 1639. Jinan city would fall and be razed to the ground, and the Ming Prince Zhang Bingwen would die from arrow fire in street fighting as the defenders fled. Dorgon then raided some territory around Tianjin before heading back east. By the time any significant Ming relief forces came to bear down on the Qing they were already making a withdrawal. The Qing raids had lasted 5 months, they hit 53 cities of which they captured 8. They fought 57 battles defeating 33 Ming divisions and captured an incredible 473,000 Ming, 4000 taels of gold and nearly a million taels of silver. Over 100 Ming officers were killed and sadly 150,000 civilians. The Ming Court responded first with the execution of 32 officials deemed to have allowed the situation to get out of hand. Yang Sichang was impeached, but managed to avoid execution. Competent commanders who were quelling the rebels were transferred to the northeast to prepare new defenses against future Qing attacks leaving the northwest to fester with more rebellions.    A little while back I mentioned the talk of using the surrendered rebel leader Zhang Xianzhong to help kill other rebel leaders. Well this whole time he was in Gucheng training a so-called militia and making promises to the Ming that he would help pacify all of Huguang. He had erected customs houses on the Han river to collect transit taxes, under the guise they were to help defend Gucheng. He was also bribing officials and local administrators left right and center, effectively having them firmly in his hands. Meanwhile Xiong Wencan was still performing offensive operations against the rebels, while the Ming Court in late 1638 falsely believed the rebels were largely quelled. Then Zhang Xinazhong, to the surprise of no one, began rebelling with that so-called militia group he had been training. It should come to no surprise, Zhang's efforts the whole time were in preparation for future rebelling. He had  extorted money through the transit tax schemes and used the funds to reinforce the walls of the town where he settled his garrison. On top of bribing so many officials to turn an blind eye to his actions, upon re-commencing with the rebellion, he sent a release of records of all the corrupt officials who dealt with him and made it public, leading to more and more executions. Zhang's force joined up with another rebel leader's force namd Luo Rucai and they soon began to attack Fangxian which fought them for over a week before its gates were opened. The rebels plundered Fangxian and then casually moved into the mountains near the Shaanxi border. The man who had captured Zhang in the first place, Xiong Wencan was berated for all of this of course. Xiong sent Zuo Liangyu to pursue the rebels, but Zuo's force would be ambushed in the mountains, taking 10,000 casualties and having to retreat. It was one of the greatest rebel victories, they had not only killed a large number of Ming soldiers, his force also got their hands on a ton of war supplies and Zuo's official seals of authority.    The disgraced and severely deranked Yang Sichang demanded to be allowed to deal with the problem and was reappointed minister of war, Grand secretary, Supreme Commander of Bandit pacification and bestowed the double edged sword of authority in 1639, wow talk about the kitchen sink of appointments. The Emperor agreed to give Yang 5 million taels to wipe the rebels out once and for all and pretty much gave Yang carte blanche for how to operate. Apparently the Emperor even personally served Yang wine at a later banquet and gave him a handwritten poem, what a fall and rise moment. Xiong was impeached of course for his incompetence and even being accused of taking bribes from Zhang Xianzhong. Yang had a 6 step plan now to stop the spread of the rebels. First, taxes would be used to raise local troops with military farms established to feed them. Second, town walls would be improved, Third mercenaries would be hired to help train local militias. Fourth all cities would have firearms mounted on their walls. Fifth the government needed to improve famine relief efforts. And sixth they needed river forces to stop rebel boats and advocated for bringing troops from neighboring regions to help encircle the rebels. As you can imagine, the funding for all of this came from what else, new taxes. Surprisingly, Zuo Liangyu was appointed Bandit Pacifying General despite his enormous defeat to Zhang. Zuo from the offset would also believe he was being held back by Yang, who kept him in a defensive position and denying him any opportunity to get revenge upon Zhang.    Despite the efforts, the rebels remained on the rise, now Luo Rucai and Zhang Xianzhong commanded a force of 100,000 by the fall of 1639. Yang decided to surround Zhang's stronghold of Gucheng, as Chongzhen berated him demanding to know how long this would all take. Throughout 1639-1640 the Ming seemed to be piling up victories over the rebels and even Zhang Xianzhong had fled into Sichuan being pursued by a very angry Zuo Liangyu. Yang ordered Zuo to stop pursuing him, but Zuo ignored the order and managed to encircle Zhang near Mount Manao. There he made a major victory, inflicting 3500 casualties, captured several commanders and also Zhang's wives and concubines. Zuo seemingly exonerated himself, but Zhang managed to escape further west into Sichuan, not to mention Yang was not too happy he disobeyed orders. Yang, as was typical of Ming officials, sought to limit those he saw as a rising rival such as Zuo. So Yang recommended another general, He Renlong to be invested with Zuo's title, which would prove to be a serious mistake. Yang's recommendation fell dead, and now he had alienated both Zuo and He. Zuo then turned to pursue Zhang who was beginning a rampage throughout Sichuan. Many Ming soldiers began deserting at this time, prompting Yang to more desperate acts, such as recruiting Shaolin monks at the Temple in Henan. Soon all of Sichuan was in trouble as tons of cities were taken by rebels or simply abandoned. Famines forced peasants to cannibalism and thus many joined the rebels, soon Yang yet again asked to be relieved of his post, but the emperor responded by sending 200,000 taels for famine relief instead.    Because of Yang's strategy to coordinate regional defenses, many local communities were left largely to fend for themselves against the wandering rebels. Zhang and Luo's combined forces struck several cities in Sichuan. Yang was pushed to relocate his HQ to Chongqing where he could be closer to the fighting. He then began to place a bounty on Zhang's head and announced clemency for other rebels if they brought him Zhang's head. To make matters worse, the Ming court increasingly became frustrated with Yang's inability to achieve results with his numerous disputes with his subordinates whom all were rallying against him, stating he was incompetent and should be replaced. To all of this Zhng Xianzhong wrote a poem mocking Yang “Before we had coordinator Shao Who often came forth and danced with me Then came the armies who would not fight But followed me around But now we have good commander Yang Who graciously leaves me a three day road!”. The rebels took Luzhou in December of 1640 and fled at the first sight of Ming troops trying to encircle them. Yang was desperate and ordered all his commanders to assemble at Yunyang and to mount one more campaign to crush the rebels once and for all. Yet by this point many of the commanders were simply ignoring Yang's orders. For example Zuo Liangyu headed east trying to stop rebels from escaping into Shaanxi and He Renglong had gone west doing a similar operation. Yang was lashing out at the commanders arguing with so much terrain to cover it was now better to go on the offense than defense, but all the commanders ignored him. Then Yang's fears were realized when Zhang Xianzhong managed to capture Ming Prince Xiang at Xiangyang. Zhang's men had plundered some seals of office from Ming forces and used them to get into the town. Now Zhang occupied the prince's seat in his palace. Zhang allegedly poured the prince some wine at the palace and demanded of  Xiang “I wish to have the head of Yang Sichang, but he is far away in Laikou, so now I'll have to borrow the prince's head in his stead. This will cause Sichang to suffer the full penalty of the law for having lost his princely fief. Now the prince should use all his strength to finish his wine”. Zhang then tied prince Xiang to the palace wall and lit him and his concubines on fire. Zhang then distributed some 150,000 taels from the prince's treasury to the people, but it should be noted his men also performed horrible atrocities upon the people as well. They cut several hands, feet, ears and noses from random civilians when they captured towns in the area. Now the rebel army moved east taking even more towns, even Guangzhou.    Upon hearing the news Yang was livid with the commanders, who all defended themselves stating they were guarding against raids from Li Zicheng's rebel army from the north. To add insult to injury, Li Zichengs forces did strike from the north hitting Luoyang and managed to capture the extraordinary fat Prince Fu and his grandson. By contemporary accounts, its estimated Prine Fu may have been over 400 pounds and was quite reviled by the local populace. Prince Fu kowtowed before Li, begging for his life. Li of course killed him and then distributed a lot of his wealth to the people of Luoyang stating to them “the prince and the wealthy stripped away the flesh of the people and had no regard for the life or death of the common folk. I've killed him on your behalf”. Allegedly, Li and his sub commanders then stripped flesh from Prince Fu and consumed it with wine as a cruel pun. For taking Luoyang, Li became the foremost rebel leader and the term “dashing Prince” began to be associated with him. Luo Rucai similarly held the title “generalissimo chosen by heaven to pacify the people”.    Yang fell into despair believing all was lost, now he sent a letter to the emperor asking for his own execution. Yang eventually stopped eating and died in march of 1641. Zhang Xianzhong would later capture Yang's ancestral home of Wuling and dig up his grave and desecrate Yang's corpse. Yang's demise truly illustrates the many problems of the late Ming politics and Military situation. All too often, sweeping authority was bestowed on civil officials who lacked military experience. The ten-sided net strategy was doomed from the beginning. The main problem with it was that of resource allocation. If perhaps the Manchu threat had been contained in the northeast, then maybe Yang ould have mustered the forces and resources necessary to beat the rebels. But the entire time there was a fight over resources between the Manchu problem or the Rebel problem, and many in the Court did not know which one was the largest threat. The numerous natural disasters that led to wide scale famines did not help at all and were only made worse by Yang's lack of military experience. While the Ming forces pretty much always bested the Rebels during battle, the rebels enjoyed superior mobility and easily disappeared when needed.   For the remainder of 1641 the Ming tried to fight off the rebels in central China. Ding Qirui replaced Yang Sichang and Fu Zonglong was appointed Vice Minister of War and Supreme commander of Shaanxi. Li Zicheng had risen to be the most powerful rebel leader with Zhang Xianzhong and Luo Rucai beneath him, but all held significant reputations and status. As a result of all the battles to destroy the rebels, now the rebels had earned significant battle experience, technological expertise and a ton of weapons. The Ming were losing their technological edge in war against the rebels.   After the Qing raid into Shandong, the Qing launched a probe attack on Songshan in March of 1639. A Qing force of 30,000 approached Songshan and were met with 37 heavy cannon fire which repulsed the invaders quite quickly. Hung realized the Ming were not yet ready to abandon their defenses outside the Great Wall so easily. Plans for defending the Liaodong region continued, but at this point Ming officials feared to advance any plan for war in fear of failing and being punished for it. It goes without saying the Emperor's temper was pretty high at this point and one was likely to be executed or atleast lose significant status for such ventures if they did not pan out. As the war against the rebels intensified in western and central China, the Qing began to make more noise in Liaodong. Ningyuan remained a thorn in Hung Taiji's side, alongside Songshan and Jinzhou for over a decade now. Since early 1640, the Qing began setting up military farms in preparation for future attacks on Ming territory. The Joseon dynasty was now also helping the war effort by sending food supplies by ship to Xiaolinghe and Dalinghe. Many war plans were brought to Hung by his commanders, and eventually one would be approved. The plan was to capture Songshan and Jinzhou which were thought to be the key to take Shanhaiguan. The war planners argued that previous raids had failed against Shonghan and Jinzhou because the Ming held Shanhai-son jin corridor, but if that was severed, the Qing could consolidate all Liaodong and then hit China proper. Now the Ming were not sitting by idle, they saw the Qing build up and knew a massive invasion was incoming. The Ming also rightfully deduced an attack would be made on Songshan and Jinzhou so both were heavily fortified and prepared for sieges.   The Qing first made their attack on Jinzhou in may of 1640. The Qing began to dig trenches around the city preparing for a very long siege. By March of 1641, Zu Dashous sent a messenger outside the walls of Jinzhou stating to the Qing forces “we've got enough food to last 2-3 years. It will be a long siege; will you be able to hold out that long to outlast us?”. The Qing replied “we aren't lifting the siege, whether it lasts 2-3 or even 4-5 years. How are you going to keep getting food?”. The back and forth talk seemed to unsettle the Ming's Mongol allies at Jinzhou who began to negotiate with the Qing separately. This drove Zu to panic somewhat and go out and strike up a battle with the Qing, but was beaten back into the city. The Qing began to hack their way through the first layers of the city defenses as the Ming continuously sent relief forces from Xingshan, but all were being ambushed and defeated. Then in April of 1641, the Qing assaulted the outpost of Chayeshan. The Qing bombarded it with large cannons and arquebuses. The soldiers and a small force of monks there fought back as best they could using spears, boulders and incendiaries. Soon the Qing overwhelmed the outpost with firepower and razed it to the ground. Then in May of 1641 the Ming engaged a Qing force just outside Xingshan led by Wu Sangui. Wu's force was outmaneuvered despite having a lot of cavalry and encircled by the Qing commanders Dodo and Jirgalang. The Ming lost a few thousand men and several commanders fled, only to then get caught up in another engagement around Liangmashan just a few miles from Jinzhou. At Liangmashan the Ming dug in and tried to bait a force of 3000 Qing into a fight, but the Qing did not take the bait. More fighting occurred outside various outposts and the Ming kept driving off Qing raiders who in turn would just wait until night time to hit walls with siege ladders. Songshan resisted a 37 day long siege under heavy Qing fire, until a Ming relief force arrived. The Qing were camped a few miles due east of Songshan and had to fend off multiple Ming strikes against them. It seemed all the outposts and major walled cities were managing to hold off the Qing. The Qing strategy of bombarding them and trying to draw them out into decisive battles in the field was not working. It seemed the Ming still enjoyed the edge when it came to firepower, but Ming scouts were sending concerning reports that the Qing were busy building a ton of weapon carts and ships at Shenyang. It was clear that a purely defensive war would not be enough. The Ming commanders began to analyze the situation and they discussed the importance of trying to force a decisive battle that might allow them to retake Liaodong. They believed if they could dictate the place and style of combat then they might stand a chance. The Ming also began to get reports that Korean ships were transporting Qing soldiers in the Bohai Gulf which raised the concern the Qing might sever their sea supply lines. This all accumulated into a major war planning session in april of 1641. The Ming commanders held a conference at Ningyuan and decided they needed to break the Qing encirclement of Songshan and Jinzhou. Wu Sangui would lead an initial attack followed up by Zu Dashou from Jinzhou. They ended up clashing with a Qing cavalry force of about 8000, sending the Qing fleeing with their superior cannons. The battle was embarrassing for the Qing, and the commander of the force, Jirgalang was replaced by Hung's brother Dorgon from that point on. It was also around this time the rebels armies had captured and killed the 2 Ming princes and Yang Sichang suicide. All the northeast outposts and cities were demanding further relief forces and supplies, but the Ming court decided to focus on the increasing rebel problem and thus the northeast would just have to rely on what had on hand.   In the summer of 1641, Hung renewed the efforts against Jinzhou and Songshan. The Qing erected their siege weapons, dug moats and trenches around the cities to thwart any relief or supply efforts and dispatched mobile forces to hit anyone outside walls. Chongzhen did not want to send any significant force against the Qing, believing by autumn the Qing would become weakened through attrition. The Emperor did not agree with this plan however and sent the Minister of War Chen Xinjia and Zhang Ruoqi to goad Chongzhen into action. Chen began attacking Chongzhen for what he argued was his lack of faith in the Ming forces. The same factionalism that had plagued the Ming for decades was soon going to force a catastrophe.    Meanwhile, since the death of Yang Sichang, the rebel leader Li Zicheng's ambitions were growing each day. He was now recognized as a charismatic leader and quite the military genius. The way in which he dealt with Prince Fu had gained him a lot of notoriety with the populace since he was handing out money and food. Li then gained the attention of some gentry, one notable one was named Li Yan. Li Yan joined Li and advised him “you must take capturing the hearts of all the people under heaven as the root. If you don't kill people, then you'll win their hearts”. This seems to have had a profound effect on Li as he began to do just that. Li also began a program of making popular slogans for his rebel movement, one went like this “Kill your oxen and sheep. And prepare your wine and spirits.Open your gates and welcome the Dashing Prince. When the Dashing Prince comes. You won't be paying taxes”. A man after my own heart and wallet, if I must say. Shortly after Li Zicheng began changing how his force rebelled, more gentry joined him such as Niu Jinxing and a midget sorcerer named Song Xiance. Yes a Midget sorcerer. Song Xiance was a native of Guide in Henan. He walked with a limp because of a bad right foot and was known by locals as Son the Child. His reputation as a sorcerer came from the fact he went around telling fortunes and casting divinations, which was something seen throughout Chinese history for midgets. Well one of these fortunes he told was that of Li Zicheng who he predicted would have his 18th grandson assuming the imperial throne and that his name would also be Li. So as Li Zicheng enjoyed popular support and expanded his movement, other rebel leaders continued to rampage throughout western and central China. Widespread famine and more people resorting to cannibalism swelled the rebel armies ranks. The situation dramatically changed in august of 1641 when Luo Rucai broke off from Zhang Xianzhong and joined up with Li Zicheng in Henan. Alongside Luo other smaller rebel leaders also joined Li and Li took this newfound force to attack Xincai along the Henan - Nan Zhili border. The commander at Xincai was Fu Zonlong who managed to beat back the rebels with cannons, but the rebel hoards kept coming. Fu then sent word to He Renlong and Li Quoqi asking the 2 commanders for help, but both complained it was not possible to cut through the rebel lines to get to Xincai. Li began to step up the siege and Fu's defenders were soon running low on food. It is alleged, Fu's forces were forced to eat the corpses of slain rebels. When the gunpowder ran out Fu had no other choice but to attack the rebels. Fu led 6000 men out at night to attack the rebels and managed to kill an estimated 1000 rebels before breaking out of the encirclement. They fled for their lives being chased by rebel forces and Fu was eventually captured. The rebels then tried to use Fu to open the gates of Xincai. When he was marched in front of the gate he screamed out “I am the commander of Shaanxi and though I have fallen into rebel hands and there are rebels on all sides of me, I will never serve you. I am a high official. If you wish to kill me, then kill me. How can I not sacrifice my life rather than help you bandits deceive those in the city?”. With all of that said, the rebels beat him to the ground, cut off his nose and Fu would die from his wounds, Xincai would soon after.   Zuo Liangyu would attack Li and Luo's force, driving them in the direction of Henan. From there the rebels would target Nanyang in November of 1641. Nanyang was defended by Meng Ruhu who died trying to defend the city. When Nanyang fell, Li burnt down the residence of Prince Tang furthering his personal war against the Ming monarchy. After this Li began to occupy towns in southwestern Henan much to the dismay of the Ming Court. The Ming Court appointed Sun Chuanting straight out of jail, to be the new Supreme Commander of the 3 Frontiers. By the way I have not made much mention of it, but so many officials were jailed for failing their jobs, only to later be reappointed to that same job or another job and taken out of jail, it really was chaotic.    At this time the Ming official Wang Qiaonian decided to attack Xiangcheng in central Henan which had recently fallen to rebels. Wang led 10,000 well trained troops to take the city and found it relatively undefended, little did he know the rebels had moved on early. Unfortunately, once the rebels heard of Wang taking Xiangcheng they soon returned and surrounded the city. Wang along with many of his men would be killed in street fighting over the city. Zhang Xianzhong made an assault on Shucheng in southwestern Nan Zhili in march of 1642 which fell quite easily after a 3 day siege. Zhang changed the city's name to Desheng meaning “attained victory”. Over the next few months, Li Zicheng and Luo Rucai continued to raise hell in Henan, he rebel forces were rotting the Ming Dynasty to its core.   I would like to take this time to remind you all that this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Please go subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry after that, give my personal channel a look over at The Pacific War Channel at Youtube, it would mean a lot to me.  The Ming dynasty was like a roast beef rotting from the inside while being carved up from the outside. Droughts, famines and terrible administration led so many starving and wartorn peasants to join rebel groups and now Li Zicheng emerged the largest rebel leader amongst others who now held entire armies at their command. Yang Sichang began the disastrous “ten sided net plan” which resulted in many victories over the rebels, but at terrible costs. The more the Ming allocated resources towards quelling the rebels in the northwest and center of China, the weaker their northeastern frontier became, ripe for the plucking for Hung Taiji. Now Hung focused his attention on long term sieges of major Ming held fortresses outside the Great Walls, but once those fell he could attack China proper.   

Smart Talk
988 crisis hotline scheduled to be widespread soon — faces challenges

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 12:44


Almost all Americans should be able to able to dial 9-8-8 on their phones in the future if they are someone close to them is in a crisis. The 988 hotline is scheduled to go live in mid-July and for many mobile phone users, it's live already and calls are coming into crisis intervention centers. However, they're facing challenges in getting 988 up and running. That includes people to staff intervention centers and answer the phones, paying for 988 hotlines and just the infrastructure needed. WITF's Transforming Health reporter Brett Sholtis has investigated the rollout of 988 and is on Tuesday's Smart Talk with details. Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alan Carter
'Opportunities are widespread': Summer job market's making a strong comeback for youth

Alan Carter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:16


Alan speaks with Brendon Bernard, a senior economist at the global job website Indeed.

Ohio Mysteries
UNRESOLVED Ep. 11, Part 1: Tommy Sumerix and Ruth Guthrie

Ohio Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 20:45


An Ohio Mysteries/Akron Beacon Journal crossoverIn 1963, 15-year-old Tommy Sumerix of Green and 12-year-old Ruth Guthrie of Tallmadge disappeared from their community streets within one week of each other. Widespread organized searches failed to turn up a shred of evidence as to what had happened. Ohio Mysteries: http://www.ohiomysteries.com Akron Beacon Journal: http://www.beaconjournal.com (add music notes) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Earth Wise
Methane From Thawing Permafrost | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 2:00


The Arctic permafrost contains a massive amount of carbon in the form of frozen soil, which contains remnants of plants and animals that died millennia ago.  Estimates are that there is 2 ½ times as much carbon trapped in this Arctic soil than there is in total in the atmosphere today. As the Arctic warms, […]

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:24


Today's Network Break podcast discusses new SASE features from Cloudflare, a Cloudflare outage and its post-mortem, why EU regulators want a closer look at Broadcom's proposed VMware acquisition, and more IT news. The post Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:24


Today's Network Break podcast discusses new SASE features from Cloudflare, a Cloudflare outage and its post-mortem, why EU regulators want a closer look at Broadcom's proposed VMware acquisition, and more IT news. The post Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:24


Today's Network Break podcast discusses new SASE features from Cloudflare, a Cloudflare outage and its post-mortem, why EU regulators want a closer look at Broadcom's proposed VMware acquisition, and more IT news. The post Network Break 388: Cloudflare Diagnoses Widespread Outage; EU Pumps Brakes On Broadcom/VMware appeared first on Packet Pushers.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Report finds widespread sexual abuse and harassment in WA mining sector

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 12:03


An explosive parliamentary report has lifted the lid on rampant sexual assault and harassment in WA's resources sector, putting pressure on the State Government to act. It's found female FIFO workers "frequently have to deal with sexual harassment and sexual assault", with many incidents ignored or overlooked by employers and the regulator blind to the problem.

Beyond The Horizon
How Record-Breaking Diesel Fuel Prices Could Lead To Widespread Food Shortages (6/19/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 16:41


One thing we never really think about in the United States, even during the worst of times, is a food supply chain that has been interrupted. We are a nation that wastes as much as we consume and a food shortage is certainly not on the list of worries. Yet, as the recession creeps on us and the markets , be it Crypto or the stock market see's the floor fall out, it's only going to drive inflation even higher. So, the question is, at what point does it become unsustainable for the truckers to continue to keep filling up and hitting the road? (commercial at 11:07)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://nypost.com/2022/06/17/record-diesel-prices-could-lead-to-food-shortages-farmers-warn/

The Epstein Chronicles
How Record-Breaking Diesel Fuel Prices Could Lead To Widespread Food Shortages (6/19/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 16:41


One thing we never really think about in the United States, even during the worst of times, is a food supply chain that has been interrupted. We are a nation that wastes as much as we consume and a food shortage is certainly not on the list of worries. Yet, as the recession creeps on us and the markets , be it Crypto or the stock market see's the floor fall out, it's only going to drive inflation even higher. So, the question is, at what point does it become unsustainable for the truckers to continue to keep filling up and hitting the road? (commercial at 11:07)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://nypost.com/2022/06/17/record-diesel-prices-could-lead-to-food-shortages-farmers-warn/

The Politicrat
Federal Hate Crimes Charges Against A Racist White Terrorist; Long Covid Is Severe And Widespread

The Politicrat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 84:53


On this Wednesday episode of THE POLITICRAT daily podcast: U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland announces Federal hate crimes charges against a racist white male terrorist in Buffalo. Also: Do not ignore Long Covid - it is far more widespread and serious than you may think. (Story: https://bit.ly/3zCzqFI) And: Five more states' voting registration deadline dates, etc. Register to vote NOW: https://vote.org June 15, 2022. The ENOUGH/END GUN VIOLENCE t-shirts on sale here: https://bit.ly/3zsVDFU Donate to the Man Up Organization: https://manupinc.org FREE: SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE BRAND NEW POLITICRAT DAILY PODCAST NEWSLETTER!! Extra content, audio, analysis, exclusive essays for subscribers only, plus special offers and discounts on merchandise at The Politicrat Daily Podcast online store. Something new and informative EVERY DAY!! Subscribe FREE at https://politicrat.substack.com Buy podcast merchandise (all designed by Omar Moore) and lots more at The Politicrat Daily Podcast Store: https://the-politicrat.myshopify.com The Politicrat YouTube page: bit.ly/3bfWk6V The Politicrat Facebook page: bit.ly/3bU1O7c The Politicrat blog: https://politicrat.politics.blog Join Omar on Fanbase NOW! Download the Fanbase social media app today. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to this to this podcast! Follow/tweet Omar at: https://twitter.com/thepopcornreel

The Micah Hanks Program
Unclear Intent: Analyzing UAP Behavior and Intention | MHP 06.14.22.

The Micah Hanks Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 87:40 Very Popular


Widespread interest in unidentified aerial phenomena, as well as their possible nature and origins, has surged since 2017. World governments, scientists, and civilian organizations have all begun to weigh in on the matter, with the latest effort being announced by NASA, which plans to conduct its own study of the phenomena beginning in late 2022.  However, with the question over UAP and their origins also comes the question of intent: if some of these UAP are intelligently-controlled, technological devices, then what is their purpose, and what are the motives and intention of their operators? This week on The Micah Hanks Program, we explore these questions and analyze what UAP behavior in some of history's most well-documented cases might convey about their possible intent.  The story doesn't end here... become an X Subscriber and get access to even more weekly content and monthly specials. Enjoy The Micah Hanks Program? Check out Micah's other podcasts here.  Want to advertise/sponsor The Micah Hanks Program? We have partnered with the fine folks at Gumball to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. If you would like to advertise with The Micah Hanks Program, all you have to do is click the link below to get started: Gumball: Advertise with The Micah Hanks Program Show Notes Below are links to stories and other content featured in this episode: NEWS: Asteroid Ryugu contains material older than the planets, among the most primitive ever studied Gaia probe reveals stellar DNA and unexpected 'starquakes' Mysterious, ghost-like black hole may have been discovered by UC Berkeley researchers   Repeating fast radio bursts from space are mysterious. This one is even weirderNASA UAP STUDY: NASA to Set Up Independent Study on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena BECOME AN X SUBSCRIBER AND GET EVEN MORE GREAT PODCASTS AND MONTHLY SPECIALS FROM MICAH HANKS. Sign up today and get access to the entire back catalog of The Micah Hanks Program, as well as “classic” episodes of The Gralien Report Podcast, weekly “additional editions” of the subscriber-only X Podcast, the monthly Enigmas specials, and much more. Like us on Facebook Follow @MicahHanks on Twitter Keep up with Micah and his work at micahhanks.com.

Counter Apologetics
CA97 Widespread Theistic Belief & Religious Disagreement (Devil’s Advocate pt. 2)

Counter Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 56:58


I recently participated in a “devil's advocate” debate on God's existence. Today, we continue to take a closer look at the arguments I raised. We discuss the common consent argument, epistemic authorities, soteriology, universalism, eternal conscious torment, religious diversity, and divine hiddenness. This is part two of a three-part series. The full series is available … Continue reading CA97 Widespread Theistic Belief & Religious Disagreement (Devil's Advocate pt. 2) →

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Gravel Rides Scotland with author Ed Shoote

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 32:40 Very Popular


This week we sit down with the author of Gravel Rides Scotland, Ed Shoote to learn about the history of gravel cycling in Scotland and why it should be on top of your list of gravel travel destinations. Gravel Ride Scotland Book Episode sponsor: Athletic Greens Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Gravel Rides Scotland [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the podcast. We welcome ed chute. He's the author of gravel ride Scotland. Many of you frequent listeners of the podcast will know I'm a big fan of the idea of gravel travel. So when this book came across my desk, I was super excited to dig in. I hadn't thought much about riding in Scotland and after seeing some of the pictures and reading some of the descriptions of these rides, it's definitely on my list of places to go. We dig in a little bit about the history of gravel roads in Scotland, how ed came to the sport of gravel cycling and what inspired him to write this great resource guide for all of us, I'll put a link to the book in the show notes. Everybody knows how to find it. And I hope you enjoy the conversation with ed. Before we jump in i need to thank this week sponsor our friends at athletic greens. Athletic greens is literally a product that I take every day. I discovered athletic greens many years ago, as I was recovering from my treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma. I was looking for something that had the vitamins, minerals and probiotics that I needed to kind of just give me baseline support. After I was through that difficult period of my life. I realized that this was sort of a baseline thing I needed for all my athletic endeavors as well. With one scoop of athletic greens, you're absorbing 75 high quality vitamins minerals, whole food source, superfoods. Probiotics and APTA gins. To help you start your day, right? It's a special blend of ingredients to support your gut health. Your nervous system, your immune system, your energy, your recovery, your focus and aging. All the things. I went out on a wet ride with my friend, Jason. On Sunday of this week, we got caught out there on our gravel bikes and relate to a little bit of a punishing day. From a weather perspective. I was pretty drained and I actually, when that happens to me, I come back and I take a second. Cup full of athletic greens, just figuring I'm going to just top it off. When my energy is depleted, it's something that I mixed with ice and shakeups. So it's pretty simple. It's something I travel with in little packets. It's pretty easy to get into a routine. And for me, I've just always felt comfortable that again, I'm covering my nutritional basis . I encourage you to check it out, to see if it's something that might fit for you to make it easy. Athletic greens is going to give you a free one year supply of immune supporting vitamin D and five free travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is that the athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. Again, that's athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. To take ownership of your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance. Would that business from our friends out of the way, let's jump right into my interview with ed. Hey ed, welcome to the show. [00:03:28] Ed Shoote: Alright, thanks for having me on, [00:03:30] Craig Dalton: Cheers. Where are you located today? [00:03:31] Ed Shoote: So I'm just south of Edinburgh in Scotland. So a little town called peoples it's a. [00:03:37] Craig Dalton: for the listener. This is all gonna come together. Why it's important that he's in Scotland and what we're going to be talking about today. As I mentioned in the intro. We always like to start off ed, just by getting a. little bit about your background and maybe how you discovered cycling and when off-road cycling became a passion of yours. [00:03:55] Ed Shoote: Yeah. So, for those you who know accents I've not got a Scottish accent. So actually I grew up in the Southeast of England in this. Which is pretty flat. So I didn't really get into kind of mountain biking. Off-road riding hugely until I was probably about 17 or 18. I just grew up riding road bikes and time trials and then realized that was quite good base, I guess, to do a mountain bike. And so I started doing cross country racing in the late nineties, early two thousands, I guess. And then just got the puck for off-road riding. So, so as all good cyclists. University of college based on where the best biking was. And that's kind of what, w what took off for me, I guess my mountain biking kind of passion. [00:04:32] Craig Dalton: where you staying in the UK for university. [00:04:35] Ed Shoote: Yeah. So I just went to the north of England. It tackled York which is great. Yes. Great spot to stop actually visiting. Cause it's got loads of history, but it's also surrounded by Hills. Really nice mountain biking terrain as well. Yeah, the course was, is a small consideration, but yet it was just the perfect spot for the analyst to select in ready. [00:04:52] Craig Dalton: And the UK obviously has got such a rich history of cycling across all disciplines, including mountain biking. [00:04:59] Ed Shoote: yeah. Yeah. You kind of get pockets, I guess, of real passion for road riding and mountain bike and where I am now in Scotland is it's huge amounts of biking. We have a lot of injury world series. Now bike is based here and. Right. Is coming up through the youth ranks as well. So it's a real buzz here and I guess yeah, like Edinburgh just north has got a really good road scene. So yeah, it's always a pocket of psych dinner, some chronic scenes wherever you are in the country, which is, yeah, it's great. It's great to see [00:05:25] Craig Dalton: And at university, were you studying? Writing as a discipline. [00:05:30] Ed Shoote: No, I studied mountain biking indirectly, actually. So. It's all fenced together. No, I was doing kind of a pied economics, which was focusing on environmental issues and mountain biking kind of fit it into that food forestry management. So it's again boring probably, but yeah, so I actually ended up doing a dissertation on mountain biking and the impact of mountain biking, which is, yeah, this is great. It was great. [00:05:52] Craig Dalton: Yeah, Amazing. And then from, I understand you spent some time abroad at some point after that. [00:05:58] Ed Shoote: Yeah, so that, that was kind of the last time I lived in England thought. Yeah, pretty much. That's how I sit in England actually thinking about it. Yeah, so I left from university, went traveling and then I got to work in DC to Canada. So I went to Southeast Asia then worked in British Columbia and Canada in mountain biking in the summer. One of the ski resorts south of bike park in the summer, which is really cool. So I've got a lot of writing out there. You actually loved it and stayed out there for a bit and then just got kind of a ski bug as well. So we ended up doing ski seasons in New Zealand and then in Europe as well. So I got that. And then, yeah, the passion for cycling, I guess, came back again when I moved back to Scotland from France. And yeah, that's kind of where I really got stuck into cycling. Yeah. [00:06:38] Craig Dalton: And at what point did gravel cycling, intersect with your passion for cycling? [00:06:43] Ed Shoote: I'd always been into mountain biking. And I think what kind of took me that next kind of level of backwards towards kind of gravel riding for mountain biking was contouring and long distance riding. So I got into doing these massive trips. So I had this amazing job, which was eight months of the year, so four months off. So I spent those four months basically doing big tours. So I cycled to estimate. [00:07:02] Craig Dalton: No. [00:07:03] Ed Shoote: It's a three consecutive years. I think it was in a row across Europe. And then in the second year I carried on writing and I was just trying to do that more and more on gravel probable right, routes and gravel tracks. So I could get away from the roads really and get into some more remote places. And it just seemed a great way to explore it. And that was kind of at the same point that manufacturers were getting into this idea of gravel bikes as a thing, and an adventure bikes. And I worked with a UK bike manufacturer. Support them developing one of these kind of gravel adventure bikes as they were at the time. And it just went hand in hand and as I got that bike, it then got me more and more doing these tours pretty much all on gravel roads, gravel tracks in central Asia. A lot of the time as well. I did have about four trips to central Asia. I'm getting kind of stuck into gravel, riding Kurdistan and and places like that. So that's yeah, that's where I got the gravel. But from. [00:07:50] Craig Dalton: Wow. What would that type of touring terrain were you, what type of setup where you creating on your bike? You said you worked with a manufacturer. What was your dream setup for the type of riding that you were doing at that point? [00:08:01] Ed Shoote: well, just before I did that, I was in Canada and I saw the tour divide races and they would just don't use bike back bags and they send a saddle packs and BARR bags which now we see everywhere, but at the time were really caught my eye and I was like, wow that's a solution to kind of the tour. And I'm doing. Ditching the pantyhose, which always break the racks come loose. They wobble, they bounce us. You know, I was looking for something else and I approached 'em to come up with after dura in the UK. I would just kind of design in these bags. One of the first ones was only over here to be doing it. And yeah just seeing the solution to what I was doing. And it means you have to reduce your kid. Cause you've got a saddlebag framed bag and a ball bag. I'm trying to get into some pretty remote places. And as we know now, it can be done about at the time. Head-scratching how you could get your kit. This is almost 10 years ago now Peggy that your get into the small bags and I was kind of looking at different tents and all the sounds that we now take for granted a bit to get it in there. And yeah, it just works so well. And I think that's why it's taken off so much in the kind of 10 years since really. [00:08:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah, a hundred percent. We've had the team at Afra on the podcast before. And. the evolution of bags from when we were kids in terms of pen, years down to what is now on the bikes today is just incredible. The bikes can be so rideable and so much fun with that, with those bags on versus once you put a pannier on back in the day, the bike felt like a different type of beast, and maybe it was good for riding in a straight line, but if you wanted to go off road with it, it became a little bit less. [00:09:28] Ed Shoote: Yeah. I remember the first tour, big tour we did was north to south of New Zealand, which is always good place to start touring as well as a really good country to do. And then I, that cell from Oakland and the bike was so back heavy with the panniers. I couldn't get the front wheel down. It was just wheeling almost down the street. And I was just scratching my head, how I'm going to get this bike around New Zealand. So just that kind of everyone does, I guess when they do the first tour, they have way too much stuff and it was all packed house. Yeah. And that was quite a long time ago. So yeah, each trip you kind of evolved, I guess, in your learning and equipment and set up as well. [00:09:59] Craig Dalton: Yeah, absolutely. And obviously like the equipment with the dyspraxia and the wider tires has really just made the overall experience so much better. [00:10:09] Ed Shoote: yeah, for me, I'm pretty tall. So I'm six or four. So I, I know when there's a headwind as well. It's fair to say. So given the drop bars on the gravel bike, Huge difference for me to get that kind of tuck in. And then you kind of tucking in behind the bar bag and the Saddleback everything's in line and yeah, it's one of those central Asian trips. We've had ridiculous headwinds and it feels like with pioneers of the first trips we did, it kind of felt like it was literally pushing it backwards. You weren't making progress. So having these drop bars, these bags and me kind of like getting in an arrow, tuck in, cut in the middle of nowhere, it was such a better way. [00:10:42] Craig Dalton: right. Right. And when did you ultimately end up settling in Scotland? [00:10:48] Ed Shoote: Yeah, so I did a quite few of these trips. Like I said, I was working, it was actually out France in the end. When the UK was part of the EU and we could work in France easily get into that. And then I moved back to Scotland to get a job in another job, actually. No, I think that to Scotland. Get a bit homesick, I guess I've been in the UK. So we came back and set up where I am now in the tables in the south of Scotland, because it's like, it's really good here. Yeah just stuff that we needed to kind of change and to come back. And my wife was looking for a different job as well, to be honest. So, so we got here in the, yeah. And then we've just kind of loved Scotland and the writing we can do here. [00:11:23] Craig Dalton: And were you starting to see the rise of, in terms of the number of gravel, cyclists in Scotland? [00:11:30] Ed Shoote: Yeah, I think so. I'm trying to think of when we moved back in about 20, 20, 15. And I could go out and I wouldn't see a soul on these riots and I ended up, I was quite sick coming back, so I trained for kind of 24 hour racing and stuff like that. So I was doing a lot of miles and I would rarely see anyone. And it was a novelty to see type. And definitely over the next kind of five years, I've gone from feeling like I'm the only one doing this, to see entire tracks to meet you too, you know, meeting people now. And everyone's on gravel bikes pretty much on these as well. And yeah, it's just been great to see. And the the opportunities I guess, has gotten as well. Like I had a year where I did a different link from my door pretty much every day, same trails, possibly, but in different variations with different variations of them. And I just kind of. Change, I guess in like variation, I don't like riding the same route. And I think having that here is what's attracted me. And obviously that's attracting loads of writers as well to come and come at school. This is tracks that weren't really being used. I guess. [00:12:27] Craig Dalton: Yeah. From looking at your book, grab a ride, Scotland. The terrain just looks amazing. There's a lot of great photography in there. What inspired you to write this book? And why is it important to you? [00:12:43] Ed Shoote: I like to have some great story about it. I just don't say no to stuff generally when someone asks me to do it and I said yeah, why not? I'll write a book on gravel riding. I know a lot of good routes. So, so I went for an yeah, that's kind of where I am now, but it didn't take much because I've been doing so much writing. It kind of came naturally as to where I thought it should be. And the plan behind it form quite quickly. I really wanted destinations within Scotland for gravel line. So there's one here where I am, because there's so much gravel writing and there's about six or seven in the book based around these kinds of hubs of where I think there's a really good cost as a gravel rights. And that came together quite quickly. And I was really kind of passionate about this idea of centers of gravel writing centers of excellence. You could call it kind of a gravel riding and getting these routes around those. And yeah, I was really keen to covet that kind of mix between a guide traditional guide, but you put in your pocket and a coffee table kind of inspiration. Based cause I already want to get someone with photography, which is something I've kind of done over the trips for the last 10 years or so kind of worked up top skills through all those kind of adventures. Yeah. It just, it really nicely together and yeah, it's just got more and more excited about it. I guess as a side thing. [00:13:44] Craig Dalton: So as you started to sort of divide up the country or those geographic areas that, that the chapters are in effectively, are those oriented around like where the terrain is or those areas of Scotland that everybody talks about? [00:13:57] Ed Shoote: Yeah it's an interesting one because gravel riding doesn't necessarily fit with where the hot spots soar as a Mar in Scotland. So the west coast and the islands are really beautiful and stunning. Yeah. Partly the weather and the climate and the Rocky landscape there, you often find that the gravel tracks are really quite rough and hard work. The tracks often go one way. So they go to a beach or they go to a farm or a hilltops econ linked together. So actually some of the natural destinations has gotten don't work for gravel to the south where I am now works really well because we've got an abundance of forests, more land or drove roads where the cattle used to be. Driven into markets 200 years ago. It's just some really good historical roots as well. And that's kind of, yeah, I guess, reflected across Scotland. So, they're not your traditional kind of places to go. It's gone, but there's still amazing places. They've got castles. They've got locks, they've got mountains, but they're not the kind of hotspots that you might come over if you're doing like a must do tour of Scotland. So I think there's, yeah, it's nice for people coming over to get, to see a little bit more and as cheesy going real Scotland, you know, a little bit away from. Get out your car and take a photo of this announcing that everyone does in Scotland. So, yeah, [00:15:05] Craig Dalton: I mean, I think that was gravel, cyclists. That's something we all appreciate. Just even in our own backyard, just being able to see things that the majority of people aren't ever visiting, just because of the range in which we get with these bikes, if you've got a good sense of address. One of the things I, one of the things I liked about the book was there was a couple of pages on sort of the history of gravel in Scotland, not the sport of gravel cycling, but just gravel in general. And as a, as an American, I just thought it was really interesting to read about how these roads. Arrived in Scotland and what they were for originally. Do you want to spend a couple of minutes just talking about briefly that the history, because I think it's a novel from a us perspective anyway. [00:15:49] Ed Shoote: Yeah, I really enjoyed putting that in and I think yeah, I, yeah, it's inspired people because each Scrabble track has a story behind the hair and I guess they all do, but here in particular, they can be kind of categorized into these time periods. And we go back to the Roman theories when the Romans invaded the U S. They built these classic Roman roads, which are all in straight lines and some of those kind of cross into Scotland. And that's where the history of gravel starts in this book. So we're talking about the surface, as you say, rich. So, so these were kind of gravel, early gravel, Roman gravel roads and the legacy of those still exist today. So some of the routes will follow. Dear street is one of the famous Roman roads as straight up north. So that's kind of where we kind of start with the history of it. The next key kind of development, I guess, is what I touched on before is these drove roads, which is it's mind boggling really it's where they took the cattle from the Highlands or from the fells to the market. But we're not talking say a 10, 10 mile trip. We're talking the length of the country, which I know in the U S is probably not massive, but they drove them down to London from Scotland, which is, I dunno, 5, 6, 700 miles. They were walking with cattle to sell them at the market and they'd walk. And they did that on these routes across the Highlands, essentially all the way. And these became established trading routes. They got better surfaced and a lot of them still exists. A lot of them are tarmacked into two main routes road routes, but a lot of them existed these gravel roads. So, Grover tracks. So yeah, I think there's quite a few points out in the book. The next kind of stage is Scotland's history. It's where. The English. I'm trying to choose my words carefully here as an English, but when the English basically came up and impose their rule, let's say to joint by the union to Scotland became part of the United Kingdom. And to do that, there was the kind of uprisings against it from the Scots and the English bill, quite a lot of military roads to kind of question this in the 17 hundreds. And a lot of those were built a very good standard and starting bridges across rivers and. Widespread on the maps and they are generally the backbone, a lot of the big gravel routes that, that we now ride in Scotland. Again, a lot of them up on Altamont roads, but a lot of them still exist in pretty similar form to what they were like two, 300 years ago. And you can kind of imagine these kinds of lesions of soldiers muscling through the myths and the folk from ruined Fort to ruin castle it's quite evocative. It's yeah, it's an interesting time in Scottish history, really. And gravel was at the heart of it. The next thing really is the big estates we have here. So we call them a states that kind of landed Gentry in the upper class. What huge swaves of Scotland to go basically hunting and shooting as a, as recreation, and to do that. They defiling clearances. They basically pushed out all the Scots and the love of the locals who lived there. And a lot of them then immigrated up to north America and lost their homes and livelihood. Chapter and Scottish history. And from that, a lot of tracks were lost because the houses in the villages went, but actually the new estates put in a lot of tracks. And we're seeing that again, more recently coming up to two kind of modern day, they're putting a lot of land rovers tracks with Jeep tracks to, to access the states for shooting still. And that's controversial in some courses, but for gravel riding, it just opens up miles and miles of these. We have the right to access and Scotland, which is another key factor. So we have an open access code, which allows us to respond to the access pretty much any track we see so long as it's not conflicting, kind of with the land use or kind of industry that's operating on its own. So that basically means we can go anywhere. So all these tracks exist and we can put them and ride them, which is really good. So yeah. [00:19:13] Craig Dalton: I saw that. I saw that legal note in the book and found that fascinating again as a north American. And I remember also experiencing this in New Zealand. It's just, it makes so much sense if there's land and you're using it responsibly, you're welcome to enjoy it. And there's no impediments across the board. [00:19:29] Ed Shoote: Yeah, it's one of the reasons I moved to Scotland because in England, you don't have that in England. We have it in Scotland. And yeah it's responsible access. So it's thinking about kind of your actions and. Taking note of what countryside is being useful, but yeah it's amazing. Yeah, I, couldn't not live somewhere where we can do that. I think you just take it for granted. [00:19:48] Craig Dalton: Yeah. When you think about inviting people to Scotland to ride, what type of equipment do you think is best? Does it, you know, in the U S I think it varies so dramatically. Like you can, you know, you can be in Florida, riding dirt roads and be on a glorified road bike versus, you know, here in Marin county, I want big tires and frankly, I'm a fan of suspension on gravel bikes. [00:20:09] Ed Shoote: I think generally expect a little bit rougher than what I think you're used to over there. Cause I think our kind of dream gravel is probably more your standard gravel where it's smooth and Nazi bumpy. It's generally a bit more Rocky, a bit coarser. And in the book I grade it from one to five, one being kind of your smooth gravel grinding kind of race tracks that you've got to think of as there's loads of long races. Whereas we could generally sit in the middle where we have a ton of Clayton, slightly coarser, gravel, which is rougher on the upper body. So putting in some kind of suspension, isn't a bad idea. It's not essential, but they're getting those tires up to at least. If I didn't have to in the book 42 millimeters as a minimum on a six 50 or 700 seat setup, but I generally run nearer 47 to 50 millimeter tire, to be honest. Just to give that a bit more. And comfort. I don't have suspension on my bike, but unimodal people are kind of putting the stems and the forks on as well. Just to give them a little bit more give on some of the rougher stuff, but yeah, that's probably the key that [00:21:06] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And on, on the roots, are you what type of climbing do you experience in Scotland? [00:21:11] Ed Shoote: It's all relative. It's quite steep Hills can be quite, I'm quite sure. And they can go on as well. So it gets the highest kind of point is around 700 and the meters, I think of off the top of my head in the book. So that's probably about, it could be up to five or 600 meter climb. In Longo, it's pretty unusual to do that sized climate generally around 300 meters at time. But actually it can be pretty relentless because you're going up and down throughout the rights of the, yeah, the usually over a thousand. Climbing her route for a kind of the average would say and some of them are too like couple of thousand as well. So yeah, quite a lot of climbing. And I think the gear ratios are recommended as well as is had something below a one-to-one ratio. Just to give you a bit of help of the Hills as well, because they are quite steep in places. [00:21:55] Craig Dalton: as you were designing routes, did you spend a year traveling through Scotland and riding every road you. [00:22:02] Ed Shoote: yeah. When it was a COVID kind of project. So, as well, so we went into lockdown. I could kind of get out on my own often easier. So I was doing a lot of on my own and writing big routes, Lincoln, as many as I could together. And then you have a weekend where nothing works and you've tried all these new routes and they're just not quite up to scratch. Or you have a weekend where you get three out of it and think, well, these three are brilliant individual routes. And I kind of combined a few of them into which I think is a beauty of the book as well, actually is you can combine them into bypass and routes quite easily. So the clusters of routes across. It's pretty obvious. And it does give tips on how he's blinking together. And I actually researched quite a lot by linking them into my backpack and bike bags on, and that's spent I spent a long weekend riding them all together to kind of get a feel for them. And again, we Scott any can wild camp, you know, you're free to wild. Come on that route wherever you find a nice spot as well, which [00:22:48] Craig Dalton: We discovering sort of tidbits of GPX files and different things online to give you a hint that this area of Scotland might be right for your exploration. [00:22:58] Ed Shoote: I've really tried not to. And I, it's funny because I get accused sometimes on online. I noticed when I read some of the kind of review comments and things oh, he's stolen my route and I'm really, I really didn't stay here. It's just a coincidence because I tried really hard to kind of look at the base maps from scratch and not look at routes. So I did something different. Yeah. As a result of that. Yeah. It's obviously overlap with stuff that's already out there, but it's quite a lot of different twists and things as well, because I tried to do it from scratch, but I had a lot of time during lockdown as well. So I did a lot of Mac. [00:23:31] Craig Dalton: Right. And you touched on this before. It wasn't that you wanted to methodically go through the entire country of Scotland and throw your bike on every mile or kilometer. You were really just focusing on what are the best areas to ride and what are going to be the best experiences for riders coming to Scotland. [00:23:50] Ed Shoote: Yeah, I think I wouldn't call it the very best 28 routes in older Scotland because these people would be one in the far north, but that isn't. I just don't think that you'd get a guidebook when adopted all over the country. You never going to ride more, actually view, stay for a weekend, a long weekend, or even a week in some places you write all of those routes. So you'll get somewhere else and you write all of those routes and you'll actually write all the routes in the book probably quite easily. And if you're dotting them all over, you won't. So, so yeah, it was a deliberate kind of focus not to explore every hidden corner of Scotland, but focus on where I thought the best stuff was going to be for people coming to. [00:24:22] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And in your mind, you know, what is a great Scottish root? What are some come to the few of the check marks you would love to see if you were bringing someone on their only ride they're going to do in Scott? [00:24:32] Ed Shoote: Good question. I the one that seems to be going down pretty well so far is something called that the calendar monster loop, which is a 128 kilometers, and it's got a bit of everything. It's got steep climbs. It's got really remote tracks that go past coffees. It's a kind of. Overnight shelters, roll cottages. So taking some of that kind of heritage comes down to some of the big locks in the middle of the country. And then you get some great views on the bigger mountains and Mon as we call them, which are generally above a thousand meters in height. So yeah, it takes in a bit of everything and 128 kilometers is it's I think it's the longest day route in the book. So yeah, it's a challenge. It's rough. It's long. It's. So, yeah, that's gone down, it has a bit of everything. So it's gone down really well. I think yeah I just really enjoyed some of the hidden gems where I didn't expect there to be such good writing and such history and things along the way. So there's other routes where you've got castles. I never knew existed done. There may. There's a, there's an amazing atmospheric castle that I never knew was there and it's just in the malls and the track is perfect to it. So, so yeah, there's also hidden gems in there, but I think, yeah, having a little bit of everything in there is great. [00:25:35] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. As a north American, I think coming over there, anytime you kind of come across a dilapidated castle or an overnight rock structure, or even those stone bridges, you mentioned in the history of the development of gravel, I think it was just, for me, it would be super novel to just be riding those pop past those types of bits of history. [00:25:56] Ed Shoote: Yeah. Yeah. And now we take that for granted, I guess. Oh, there's a cost of just never there yet. 15 hundreds, monastery just opposite my house, where the monks used to live in like 500 years ago. And it's just like, oh yeah, it's just where the kids play. It's quite, it's got Cooley [00:26:11] Craig Dalton: offline. We were talking about how Scotland is home to some dramatic weather. What's the best time of year. If you're recommending someone from the outside to come over to Scotland, what's the best time of year to do some Scottish. [00:26:21] Ed Shoote: Wait. Kind of in it, to be honest, I think may into June is usually good weather. It's long days, long, long daylight hours you know, can be riding in the north till midnight, almost. Which is great. The midges haven't come out, which is a key consideration. So they're not mosquitoes. This is a smaller, it's just a nuisance really, rather than anything, but they do come out in force in the summer. So this time of year is quieter for that. Yeah, the daylight, the warmth, the sunshine, I guess it's usually pretty reliable. The mid July time is I was gonna say monsoon season, but it's not quite it's just where to generally in July and August in Scotland. So, yeah. And you've got the majors. You can get a little bit oppressive, like a little bit of plumbing. We don't get heat, I should say as well compared to what you guys get, but you know, it can be kind of close and niches and things. So it's not quite as nice as it's fresh in the spring time. This spring. [00:27:07] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. And I realize this next question may be akin to choosing your favorite. But if you had to point to three or four routes in the book that you really believe are our must do's. If you're visiting Scotland, what would they be? And give us a little bit of the geography of where in the country, relatively though they would sit. [00:27:28] Ed Shoote: so the Northeast, the Eric or the Ken national park is definitely a must visit for gravel writers because it's. Absolutely stunning. It's got a lot of native Caledonian pine forest. And in between it there's this court sand like white yellowy kind of tracks that glimmer in the sunshine as you go across. And it's actually beautiful. And it goes past the Royal families, Highlander state at Balmoral, which is pristine and like the tracks on that state of pristine as well. And you can ride right on those tracks and you might bump into kind of the Royal land Rover as you go past sometimes. It's just beautiful. And the work they've done to preserve the find forest service. There's lots of wildlife as well. So the kangaroo has got about three routes up there and I think they're all up to practice to be honest. It's definitely up there. I'm trying to think where else there's too many options. It's [00:28:12] Craig Dalton: Because you've got 28 routes. Was it in the book? [00:28:15] Ed Shoote: yeah, I'm trying to think. I'm trying to pick another, I'm biased to where I am in the south. It's off the kind of normal track was people had north, but here we've got this kind of really quiet, empty, relatively isolated kind of feeling in the Hills down here, which is just south of Edinburgh. And there's a couple of routes here, which take you through some kind of really nice that it's simply less steep and kind of more rolling, but equally beautiful and like quite a lot of, like I say, castles and heritage along the way as well. So just a few routes here. I would definitely cause it's quite easy to get to as well. If you're flying into Edinburgh it's quite quick. It's 20 miles, 20 miles away. So it's not far at all. So [00:28:52] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that sounds good to say, if you're coming to Scotland, chances are, you're going to want to visit Edinburgh if you hadn't already, because it's such an amazing city. So to be able to pop out and do a little riding there, and what would you take a train to get up to the sort of the north, if you had your bike? [00:29:06] Ed Shoote: Yeah. W coming here to the south, our buses, that kind of scheduled buses, which. Run pretty ready to take bikes. So they have spike spaces within the bus. You're not going to on the back, you just roll them in the bus and then take your bikes down, which is really cool. But yeah, north to the Highlands. Yeah. Trains are your best bet. You have a word of warning, usually at the Brooklyn, minivans just warn, but we're getting better and better. We're getting more dedicated bike characters come in and Scotland, which is really cool to see. So after 20 spaces, the character going to dedicate to just by. So that's, yeah, it's getting easier and easier, but yeah, the trains are in a good way. [00:29:38] Craig Dalton: Yeah, exciting. What's next for you? Do you have any more writing projects ahead of you or any frankly, any adventures on the bike that you're able to go off on and [00:29:47] Ed Shoote: Well, I'm enjoying talking about bikes cause I've actually had quite a nasty injury in my shoulder. So I've been off the bike for two months now kind of a year, a fractured collarbone and AC joint dislocation. So yeah, it's it's got a, quite a lot of metalwork in there which is trying to heal. I'm planning a lot of things and the book has gone down really well. I'm really pleased with how it's gone down. So the publishers are saying, what do you want to do next? So I'm thinking of different things to do around a different version probably of gravel rights as well. And yeah, probably later in the year of like packing trips somewhere, probably in Europe, probably to, towards this Lele somewhere six is kind of on the horizon. So, [00:30:22] Craig Dalton: Do you think your next gravel book would be about? I continue to be about the, you know, the UK or would you, I know you've been all over the world. [00:30:30] Ed Shoote: well, the publisher's telling me that my central Asian travels are too niche, but I might self publish a book come out anyway. Cause I think it's quite cool that I just love that area of the world. So, so I think there's one there. In terms of what did Scotland, I think there's probably a longer section, longer routes would be cool to do so bypassing routes that aren't currently. Official ones. I think that's what I've kind of got in mind to start working on them, starting to plot a few ideas around that as well. So I think from a book point of view, that's going to be next, but I'm keen to get on an adventure and I've missed, as I said, the best time of year in Scotland as well, seeing it's in talking about bikes and write about bikes, which is I'm keen to gallery. [00:31:07] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Awesome. Well, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for putting the effort into putting this book out there. As I mentioned offline, I'm a big fan of the idea of gravel travel and without guide books like this, that help just give you a starting point for what regions you should look at and give you a little bit of information. It's just hard to get off the dime. So hopefully this is going to bring a lot more riders to Scotland to enjoy the beautiful country there. [00:31:32] Ed Shoote: Yeah. Thanks. Thanks telling me you want it. It's great to talk to you about that Scotland and grow a lot in general. So, yeah. Thanks. [00:31:37] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So that's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel rod podcast. Big, thanks to ed chute for talking to us about gravel riding in Scotland. I'm super intrigued. But what he had to say. Big, thanks to our friends at athletic greens for supporting the show. Remember, visit athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. To get a free one year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership. It's our free global cycling community. That's www.theridership.com. And if you're able to support the show financially, please visit buy me a coffee. Dot com slash the gravel ride. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

Morning Wire
Widespread Blackouts & ‘Un-Woke' Companies | 6.4.22

Morning Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 14:34 Very Popular


Officials warn that widespread blackouts are coming, food processing plants hit with a series of accidents, and some big companies appear to be going “un-woke.” Get the facts first on Morning Wire.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Morning Wire
Widespread Blackouts & ‘Un-Woke' Companies | 6.4.22

Morning Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 14:34


Officials warn that widespread blackouts are coming, food processing plants hit with a series of accidents, and some big companies appear to be going “un-woke.” Get the facts first on Morning Wire.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Global Food Crisis and Widespread Riots Will Happen If Deal Isn't Made Soon, Says Jacob Shapiro (Preview)

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 1:30


Jun 2 – Jacob Shapiro, Director of Geopolitical Analysis at Cognitive Investments, explains the dire situation the globe faces with food prices climbing at the fastest pace in recent history and says... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

Ancient Warfare Podcast
AWA201 - How widespread was the use of Hamippoi in 5th BC Greece?

Ancient Warfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 10:42


Murray is on his own this week. He answers this question sent in from patron of the podcast, Greg; 'How widespread was the use of Hamippoi in 5th BC Greece?' Patreon: patreon.com/theancientwarfarpodcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Report details widespread cover-up of sexual abuse among Southern Baptist leaders

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 6:41


A new independent report documents in devastating detail how the past leadership of the Southern Baptist Convention ignored sexual abuse allegations for the better part of two decades, and sometimes silenced or tried to discredit accusers. Anne Marie Miller, a survivor of the abuse and author of "Healing Together: A Guide to Supporting Sexual Abuse Survivors," joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders