Podcasts about Prince Edward Island

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Best podcasts about Prince Edward Island

Latest podcast episodes about Prince Edward Island

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
US midterm elections: Market implications

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 22:55


US midterm elections can be pivotal for financial markets, especially when they result in divided government. Macro Strategist Mike Medeiros joins host Thomas Mucha to discuss what 2022's surprise midterm results may mean for equity and bond markets, US foreign and domestic policy, and the 2024 US presidential election.Key topics:1:35 - Midterm results2:45 - Surprise election outcomes4:10 - US domestic policy implications6:50 - US foreign policy impacts10:30 - Divided government's effect on equity and bond markets13:15 - Republicans' lessons from midterm results15:00 - Democrats' lessons from midterm results16:15 - 2024 US Presidential Election outlook----------------------------------------------Views expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. Podcast produced November 2022.Wellington Management Company LLP (WMC) is an independently owned investment adviser registered with the US Securities  and Exchange Commission (SEC). WMC is also registered with the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as a  commodity trading advisor (CTA) and serves as a CTA to certain clients including commodity pools operated by registered  commodity pool operators. WMC provides commodity trading advice to all other clients in reliance on exemptions from CTA  registration. WMC, along with its affiliates (collectively, Wellington Management), provides investment management and  investment advisory services to institutions around the world. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, Wellington Management also  has offices in Chicago, Illinois; Radnor, Pennsylvania; San Francisco, California; Frankfurt; Hong Kong; London; Luxembourg; Milan;  Shanghai; Singapore; Sydney; Tokyo; Toronto; and Zurich.     This material is prepared for, and authorized for internal use by, designated institutional and professional investors and their  consultants or for such other use as may be authorized by Wellington Management. This material and/or its contents are current  at the time of writing and may not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, for any purpose, without the express written  consent of Wellington Management. This material is not intended to constitute investment advice or an offer to sell, or the  solicitation of an offer to purchase shares or other securities. Investors should always obtain and read an up-to-date investment  services description or prospectus before deciding whether to appoint an investment manager or to invest in a fund. Any views  expressed herein are those of the author(s), are based on available information, and are subject to change without notice.  Individual portfolio management teams may hold different views and may make different investment decisions for different clients.  In Canada, this material is provided by Wellington Management Canada ULC, a British Columbia unlimited liability company  registered in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia,  Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan in the categories of Portfolio Manager and Exempt Market Dealer.   In Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Switzerland), this material is provided by Wellington Management Europe GmbH  (WME) which is authorized and regulated by the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für  Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht – BaFin). This material may only be used in countries where WME is duly authorized to operate and  is only directed at eligible counterparties or professional clients as defined under the German Securities Trading Act. This material  does not constitute investment advice, a solicitation to invest in financial instruments or information recommending or suggesting  an investment strategy within the meaning of Section 85 of the German Securities Trading Act (Wertpapierhandelsgesetz).   In  the United Kingdom, this material is provided by Wellington Management International Limited (WMIL), a firm authorized and  regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK (Reference number: 208573). This material is directed only at eligible  counterparties or professional clients as defined under the rules of the FCA.   In Switzerland, this material is provided by Wellington Management Switzerland GmbH, a firm registered at the commercial register  of the canton of Zurich with number CH-020.4.050.857-7. This material is directed only at Qualified Investors as defined in the Swiss  Collective Investment Schemes Act and its implementing ordinance.  In Hong Kong, this material is provided to you by Wellington Management Hong Kong Limited (WM Hong Kong), a corporation  licensed by the Securities and Futures Commission to conduct Type 1 (dealing in securities), Type 2 (dealing in futures contracts),  Type 4 (advising on securities), and Type 9 (asset management) regulated activities, on the basis that you are a Professional  Investor as defined in the Securities and Futures Ordinance. By accepting this material you acknowledge and agree that this  material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available to any person.  Wellington Investment Management (Shanghai) Limited is a wholly-owned entity and subsidiary of WM Hong Kong.   In Singapore, this material is provided for your use only by Wellington Management Singapore Pte Ltd (WM Singapore)  (Registration Number 201415544E). WM Singapore is regulated by the Monetary Authority of Singapore under a Capital Markets  Services Licence to conduct fund management activities and is an exempt financial adviser. By accepting this material you  represent that you are a non-retail investor and that you will not copy, distribute or otherwise make this material available to any  person.   In Australia, Wellington Management Australia Pty Ltd (WM Australia) (ABN 19 167 091 090) has authorized the issue of this  material for use solely by wholesale clients (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001). By accepting this material, you acknowledge  and agree that this material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available  to any person. Wellington Management Company LLP is exempt from the requirement to hold an Australian financial services  licence (AFSL) under the Corporations Act 2001 in respect of financial services provided to wholesale clients in Australia, subject to  certain conditions. Financial services provided by Wellington Management Company LLP are regulated by the SEC under the laws  and regulatory requirements of the United States, which are different from the laws applying in Australia.  In Japan, Wellington Management Japan Pte Ltd (WM Japan) (Registration Number 199504987R) has been registered as a  Financial Instruments Firm with registered number: Director General of Kanto Local Finance Bureau (Kin-Sho) Number 428. WM  Japan is a member of the Japan Investment Advisers Association (JIAA), the Investment Trusts Association, Japan (ITA) and the  Type II Financial Instruments Firms Association (T2FIFA).  WMIL, WM Hong Kong, WM Japan, and WM Singapore are also registered as investment advisers with the SEC; however, they will  comply with the substantive provisions of the US Investment Advisers Act only with respect to their US clients.  ©2022 Wellington Management Company LLP. All rights reserved.  

The Daily Gardener
November 30, 2022 Martha Ballard, Mark Twain, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Frank Nicholas Meyer, The Wood by John Lewis-Stempel, and the Crystal Palace Fire

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:41


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1791 On this day, Martha Ballard recorded her work as an herbalist and midwife. For 27 years, Martha kept a journal of her work as the town healer and midwife for Hallowell, Maine. In all, Martha assisted with 816 births. Today, Martha's marvelous journal gives us a glimpse into the plants she regularly used and how she applied them medicinally. As for how Martha sourced her plants, she raised them in her garden or foraged them in the wild. As the village apothecary, Martha found her ingredients and personally made all of her herbal remedies. Two hundred twenty-nine years ago today, Martha recorded her work to help her sick daughter. She wrote, My daughter Hannah is very unwell this evening. I gave her some Chamomile & Camphor.   Today we know that Chamomile has a calming effect, and Camphor can help treat skin conditions, improve respiratory function, and relieve pain.   1835 Birth of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (known by his pen name Mark Twain), American writer and humorist. Samuel used the garden and garden imagery to convey his wit and satire. In 1874, Samuel's sister, Susan, and her husband built a shed for him to write in. They surprised him with it when Samuel visited their farm in upstate New York. The garden shed was ideally situated on a hilltop overlooking the Chemung ("Sha-mung") River Valley. Like Roald Dahl, Samuel smoked as he wrote, and his sister despised his incessant pipe smoking. In this little octagonal garden/writing shed, Samuel wrote significant sections of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Life on the Mississippi, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, The Prince and the Pauper, A Tramp Abroad, and many other short works. And in 1952, Samuel's octagonal shed was relocated to Elmira College ("EI-MEER-ah") campus in Elmira, New York. Today, people can visit the garden shed with student guides daily throughout the summer and by appointment in the off-season. Here are some garden-related thoughts by Mark Twain. Climate is what we expect; the weather is what we get. It was a soft, reposeful summer landscape, as lovely as a dream and as lonesome as Sunday. To get the full value of joy You must have someone to divide it with. After all these years, I see that I was mistaken about Eve in the beginning; it is better to live outside the garden with her than inside it without her.   1874 Birth of Lucy Maud Montgomery, Canadian writer and author of the Anne of Green Gables series. Lucy was born on Prince Edward Island and was almost two years old when her mother died. Like her character in Ann of Green Gables, Lucy had an unconventional upbringing when her father left her to be raised by her grandparents. Despite being a Canadian literary icon and loved worldwide, Lucy's personal life was marred by loneliness, death, and depression. Historians now believe she may have ended her own life. Yet we know that flowers and gardening were a balm to Lucy. She grew lettuce, peas, carrots, radish, and herbs in her kitchen garden. And Lucy had a habit of going to the garden after finishing her writing and chores about the house. Today in Norval, a place Lucy lived in her adult life, the Lucy Maud Montgomery Sensory Garden is next to the public school. The Landscape Architect, Eileen Foley, created the garden, which features an analemmatic (horizontal sundial), a butterfly and bird garden, a children's vegetable garden, a log bridge, and a woodland trail. It was Lucy Maud Montgomery, who wrote, I love my garden, and I love working in it. To potter with green growing things, watching each day to see the dear, new sprouts come up, is like taking a hand in creation, I think. Just now, my garden is like faith, the substance of things hoped for.   1875 Birth of Frank Nicholas Meyer, Dutch-American plant explorer. Frank worked as an intrepid explorer for the USDA, and he traveled to Asia to find and collect new plant specimens. His work netted 2,500 new plants, including the beautiful Korean Lilac, Soybeans, Asparagus, Chinese Horse Chestnut, Water Chestnut, Oats, Wild Pears, Ginkgo Biloba, and Persimmons, to name a few. Today, Frank is most remembered for a bit of fruit named in his honor - the Meyer Lemon. Frank found it growing in the doorway to a family home in Peking. The Lemon is suspected to be a hybrid of a standard lemon and mandarin orange. Early on in his career, Frank was known as a rambler and a bit of a loner.  Frank once confessed in an October 11, 1901, letter to a friend, I am pessimistic by nature and have not found a road which leads to relaxation. I withdraw from humanity and try to find relaxation with plants.   Frank was indeed more enthusiastic about plants than his fellow humans. He even named his plants and talked to them. Once he arrived in China, Frank was overwhelmed by the flora. A believer in reincarnation, Frank wrote to David Fairchild in May 1907: [One] short life will never be long enough to find out all about this mighty land. When I think about all these unexplored areas, I get fairly dazzled... I will have to roam around in my next life.   While China offered a dazzling landscape of new plant discoveries, the risks and realities of exploration were hazardous. Edward B. Clark spoke of Frank's difficulties in Technical World in July 1911. He said, Frank has frozen and melted alternately as the altitudes have changed. He has encountered wild beasts and men nearly as wild. He has scaled glaciers and crossed chasms of dizzying depths. He has been the subject of the always-alert suspicions of government officials and strange peoples - jealous of intrusions into their land, but he has found what he was sent for.   Frank improved the diversity and quality of American crops with his exceptional ability to source plants that would grow in the various growing regions of the United States. He was known for his incredible stamina. Unlike many of his peers who were carried in sedan chairs, Frank walked on his own accord for tens of miles daily. And his ability to walk for long distances allowed him to access many of the most treacherous and inaccessible parts of interior Asia - including China, Korea, Manchuria, and Russia. Frank died on his trip home to America. He had boarded a steamer and sailed down the Yangtze River. His body was found days later floating in the river. To this day, his death remains a mystery. But his final letters home expressed loneliness, sadness, and exhaustion. He wrote that his responsibilities seemed "heavier and heavier." The life of a Plant Explorer was anything but easy.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Wood by John Lewis-Stempel  This book came out in 2019, and the subtitle is The Life and Times of Cockshutt Wood. John Lewis-Stempel is a farmer and a countryside writer - he prefers that title to 'nature writer.' The Times calls him Britain's finest living nature writer. Country Life calls him "one of the best nature writers of his generation.' His books include the Sunday Times bestsellers The Running Hare and The Wood. He is the only person to have won the Wainwright Prize for Nature Writing twice, with Meadowland and Where Poppies Blow. In 2016 he was Magazine Columnist of the Year for his column in Country Life. He lives in Herefordshire ("heh-ruh-frd-shr") with his wife and two children. And The Wood was a BBC Radio 4 'Book of the Week'  The Wood is written in diary format, making the whole reading experience more intimate and lyrical. John shares his take on all four seasons in the English woodlands, along with lots of wonderful nuggets culled from history and experience. And I might add that John is a kindred spirit in his love of poetry and folklore. John spent four years managing Cockshutt wood - three and a half acres of mixed woodland in southwest Herefordshire. The job entailed pruning trees and raising livestock (pigs and cows roam free in the woods).  John wrote of the peace and privacy afforded him by his time in the woods. Cockshutt was a sanctuary for me too; a place of ceaseless seasonal wonder where I withdrew into tranquility. No one comes looking for you in wood.   The Woods covers John's last year as the manager of Cockshutt. The publisher writes,  [By then], he had come to know it from the bottom of its beech roots to the tip of its oaks, and to know all the animals that lived there the fox, the pheasants, the wood mice, the tawny owl - and where the best bluebells grew.  For many fauna and flora, woods like Cockshutt are the last refuge. It proves a sanctuary for John too. To read The Wood is to be amongst its trees as the seasons change, following an easy path until, suddenly the view is broken by a screen of leaves, or your foot catches on a root, or bird startles overhead. This is a wood you will never want to leave.   The Wood starts in December - making it the perfect holiday gift or winter gift. John writes about the bare trees and the gently falling snow. The landscape becomes still and silent.  John writes, Oddly aware, walking through the wood this afternoon, that it is dormant rather than dead. How the seeds. the trees and hibernating animals....are locked in a safe sleep against the coldand wet.   By January, the Wood stirs to life with the arrival of snowdrops. If snowdrops are appearing, then the earth must be wakening. Of all our wildflowers the white hells are the purest, the most ethereal. the most chaste... Whatever: the snowdrop says that winter is not forever.   As The Wood takes you through an entire year, the book ends as another winter approaches. The trees are losing their leaves. Animals are preparing for their long sleep. John is preparing to leave the woods for his next chapter as well. Looking back, he writes,  I thought the trees and the birds belonged to me. But now I  realize that I belonged to them.   This book is 304 pages of a joyful, poetic, and soul-stirring time in the woods with the elegantly articulate John Lewis-Stempel as your guide - he's part forest sprite with a dash of delightful nature-soaked tidbits. You can get a copy of The Wood by John Lewis-Stempel and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $6.   Botanic Spark 1936 On this day, the Crystal Palace in London was destroyed by fire. The spectacular blaze was seen from miles away.  Joseph Paxton, the English gardener, architect, and Member of Parliament designed the Crystal Palace, aka the People's Palace, for the first World's Fair - the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joseph had built four elaborate glass greenhouses for the Duke of Devonshire in Chatsworth, which provided valuable experience for creating the Crystal Palace.  The Joseph Paxton biographer Kate Colquhoun wrote about the immensity of the Palace: "[Paxton's] design, initially doodled on a piece of blotting paper, was the architectural triumph of its time. Two thousand men worked for eight months to complete it. It was six times the size of St Paul's Cathedral, enclosed 18 acres, and entertained six million visitors."   The Crystal Place was an extraordinary and revolutionary building. Joseph found extra inspiration for the Palace in the natural architecture of the giant water lily. Instead of creating just a large empty warehouse for the exhibits, Joseph essentially built a massive greenhouse over the existing Hyde Park. The high central arch of the Palace - the grand barrel vault you see in all the old postcards and images of the Crystal Palace - accommodated full-sized trees that Joseph built around. Another innovative aspect of the Crystal Palace was the large beautiful columns. Joseph designed them with a purpose: drainage. By all accounts, the Crystal Palace was an enormous success until the fire started around 7 pm on this day. The manager, Sir Henry Buckland, had brought his little daughter, ironically named Chrystal, with him on his rounds of the building when he spied a small fire on one end of the Palace. Newspaper reports say the flames fanned wind through the Handel organ as the Palace burned to the ground. A sorrowful song to accompany the end of an era in plant exhibition.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Girls Just Wanna Fly & Tuesday Night Hangouts
#63 - JUST WANNA FLY - Martin Hathaway - Crocodile STOMP? PPG Pilot from Casselberry Florida

Girls Just Wanna Fly & Tuesday Night Hangouts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 73:57


Who doesn't know MARTIN HATHAWAY... www.TomahawkTees.com I learned from Eric's Dufour in 2003 at Flyby Ranch, in Wildwood Fl. I have flown Ppg in Prince Edward Island and lots of states Cape Cod to Salton Sea , Ca. , Glamis, Sedona, to name just a few Change of plans, as work had to cancel Sean Reeds special night, so Martin Hathaway was willing to step it up for us. So we can keep talking paramotor flying tonight, and he can show you some of the carbon fiber fenders and shrouds he has made for other paramotor fliers. Let's ask him about the Crocodile Stomp that some Floridians have done in the past!! #paramotor #paramotoring #trikeflying #flysafe #aviation #ppg #florida #wisconsin #mississippi #nebraska #podcasting #podcast #gators #justwannafly #paramotorgirl --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jade-lear/message

Gale Force Wins
#140 Doug Russell - stand up paddle boarder circumnavigated PEI

Gale Force Wins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 25:53


This past summer, Doug Russell completed a 600km, paddle around Prince Edward Island, Canada on his Standup Paddleboard. To his knowledge, the circumnavigation of PEI on a SUP has never been attempted. This adventure was many months in the making and Doug has decided to use the trip to raise money for a very important cause, Soldier On, a charity that supports ill and injured military veterans. As Doug finished his trip the day before we had a chance to chat with him on the adventure to come.#galeforcewins is an inspirational podcast with New episodes every Tuesday evening on Youtube or wherever you get your podcasts.You can also visit https://galeforcewins.com/To message Gerry visit: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gerrycarew/To message Allan visit: https://www.linkedin.com/in/allanadale/

Idaho Ag Today
Potato warts

Idaho Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022


The USDA's Animal Plant Health Inspection Service has released a report on an investigation of the potato wart crisis on Canada's Prince Edward Island.

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
Fintech market in 2023: The intersection of disruption and dispersion

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 34:50


Portfolio Manager Matt Lipton and Global Industry Analyst Matt Ross join host Thomas Mucha to discuss their outlook for fintech in today's environment, exploring the recent pullback in the sector, disruptive fintech innovations, potential regulation, and much more.2:10 – Fintech market overview4:20 – Fintech opportunities and risks for 20236:45 – Buy now, pay later9:30 – Cryptocurrencies and digital assets11:30 – Regulation and geopolitics17:50 – Fintech in a recession22:20 – Long-term COVID impacts25:00 – ESG in fintech28:00 – Collaboration and research process   Views expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. Podcast produced November 2022.Wellington Management Company LLP (WMC) is an independently owned investment adviser registered with the US Securities  and Exchange Commission (SEC). WMC is also registered with the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as a  commodity trading advisor (CTA) and serves as a CTA to certain clients including commodity pools operated by registered  commodity pool operators. WMC provides commodity trading advice to all other clients in reliance on exemptions from CTA  registration. WMC, along with its affiliates (collectively, Wellington Management), provides investment management and  investment advisory services to institutions around the world. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, Wellington Management also  has offices in Chicago, Illinois; Radnor, Pennsylvania; San Francisco, California; Frankfurt; Hong Kong; London; Luxembourg; Milan;  Shanghai; Singapore; Sydney; Tokyo; Toronto; and Zurich.     This material is prepared for, and authorized for internal use by, designated institutional and professional investors and their  consultants or for such other use as may be authorized by Wellington Management. This material and/or its contents are current  at the time of writing and may not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, for any purpose, without the express written  consent of Wellington Management. This material is not intended to constitute investment advice or an offer to sell, or the  solicitation of an offer to purchase shares or other securities. Investors should always obtain and read an up-to-date investment  services description or prospectus before deciding whether to appoint an investment manager or to invest in a fund. Any views  expressed herein are those of the author(s), are based on available information, and are subject to change without notice.  Individual portfolio management teams may hold different views and may make different investment decisions for different clients.  In Canada, this material is provided by Wellington Management Canada ULC, a British Columbia unlimited liability company  registered in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia,  Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan in the categories of Portfolio Manager and Exempt Market Dealer.   In Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Switzerland), this material is provided by Wellington Management Europe GmbH  (WME) which is authorized and regulated by the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für  Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht – BaFin). This material may only be used in countries where WME is duly authorized to operate and  is only directed at eligible counterparties or professional clients as defined under the German Securities Trading Act. This material  does not constitute investment advice, a solicitation to invest in financial instruments or information recommending or suggesting  an investment strategy within the meaning of Section 85 of the German Securities Trading Act (Wertpapierhandelsgesetz).   In  the United Kingdom, this material is provided by Wellington Management International Limited (WMIL), a firm authorized and  regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK (Reference number: 208573). This material is directed only at eligible  counterparties or professional clients as defined under the rules of the FCA.   In Switzerland, this material is provided by Wellington Management Switzerland GmbH, a firm registered at the commercial register  of the canton of Zurich with number CH-020.4.050.857-7. This material is directed only at Qualified Investors as defined in the Swiss  Collective Investment Schemes Act and its implementing ordinance.  In Hong Kong, this material is provided to you by Wellington Management Hong Kong Limited (WM Hong Kong), a corporation  licensed by the Securities and Futures Commission to conduct Type 1 (dealing in securities), Type 2 (dealing in futures contracts),  Type 4 (advising on securities), and Type 9 (asset management) regulated activities, on the basis that you are a Professional  Investor as defined in the Securities and Futures Ordinance. By accepting this material you acknowledge and agree that this  material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available to any person.  Wellington Investment Management (Shanghai) Limited is a wholly-owned entity and subsidiary of WM Hong Kong.   In Singapore, this material is provided for your use only by Wellington Management Singapore Pte Ltd (WM Singapore)  (Registration Number 201415544E). WM Singapore is regulated by the Monetary Authority of Singapore under a Capital Markets  Services Licence to conduct fund management activities and is an exempt financial adviser. By accepting this material you  represent that you are a non-retail investor and that you will not copy, distribute or otherwise make this material available to any  person.   In Australia, Wellington Management Australia Pty Ltd (WM Australia) (ABN 19 167 091 090) has authorized the issue of this  material for use solely by wholesale clients (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001). By accepting this material, you acknowledge  and agree that this material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available  to any person. Wellington Management Company LLP is exempt from the requirement to hold an Australian financial services  licence (AFSL) under the Corporations Act 2001 in respect of financial services provided to wholesale clients in Australia, subject to  certain conditions. Financial services provided by Wellington Management Company LLP are regulated by the SEC under the laws  and regulatory requirements of the United States, which are different from the laws applying in Australia.  In Japan, Wellington Management Japan Pte Ltd (WM Japan) (Registration Number 199504987R) has been registered as a  Financial Instruments Firm with registered number: Director General of Kanto Local Finance Bureau (Kin-Sho) Number 428. WM  Japan is a member of the Japan Investment Advisers Association (JIAA), the Investment Trusts Association, Japan (ITA) and the  Type II Financial Instruments Firms Association (T2FIFA).  WMIL, WM Hong Kong, WM Japan, and WM Singapore are also registered as investment advisers with the SEC; however, they will  comply with the substantive provisions of the US Investment Advisers Act only with respect to their US clients.  ©2022 Wellington Management Company LLP. All rights reserved.  

From John To Justin
Neil McLeod

From John To Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 7:54


The fifth premier of Prince Edward Island, Neil McLeod had a 14 year career in the Legislature, including a brief period as premier, before returned to his first love...the law. Support: patreon.com/canadaehx Merch: www.canadaehx.com/shop Donate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate) E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com Twitter: twitter.com/craigbaird Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehx YouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Life With Francy
Life With Ann Visser - Speaker and Trainer , Co-founder of 4 Better 4 Ever and a certified John Maxwell coach,

Life With Francy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 32:40


On today's episode I have the pleasure of talking to Speaker and Trainer , Co-founder of 4 Better 4 Ever and certified John Maxwell coach, Ann Visser. For over 20 years, she has been empowering and equipping individuals and organizations to communicate clearly to build close connections because effective communication is essential for every healthy relationship. She has been married to her high school sweetheart for 42 years where they farm on beautiful Prince Edward Island. They have 5 married children and 11 grandchildren. Follow her using the ff links Email- ann@4better4ever.co FB- https://www.facebook.com/4better4ever Website- https://www.4better4ever.com/ FREE weekly NEWSLETTER - Tuesday Brew with Ann - https://4better4ever.com/#signup Join her Membersip waitlist with other like-minded women who want to grow in their faith https://www.4better4ever.com/sisterhoodjourneywait/ If you've found the Life With Francy podcast helpful Follow, Rate, & Review on Apple Podcasts Like this Show? Please Leave us a review here - even one sentence helps! Post a screenshot of you listening on Instagram & Tag us so we can Thank you Personally! STAY IN TOUCH LINKTREE INSTRAGRAM FACEBOOK Sign Up with Podmatch using this Link or paste this URL https://podmatch.com/signup/lifewithfrancy Hope you have a blessed day. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/francelyn-devarie/support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/francelyn-devarie/support

Sounds Atlantic
Episode 213: Fretboard Journey with Duane Andrews

Sounds Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 77:39


Fretboard Journey features four of Newfoundland and Labrador's finest guitarists, Duane Andrews, Craig Young, Sandy Morris and Gordon Quinton who will take you down the line from Western Swing to Newfoundland Jigs with all stops in between.Bounce to the RhythmPodcast about independent music artists who are worthy of a bigger audience and deserve...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Treatland The podcast where you share your favorite food memories from childhood. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotifyhttps://www.facebook.com/ron.moores.18

American Ag Network
A Conversation with National Potato Council CEO Kam Quarles

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 9:48


Jesse Allen is joined by Kam Quarles, National Potato Council CEO, to discuss a bunch of topics. We discus the potato wart issues on Prince Edward Island in Canada, Farm Bill, the upcoming election and more. Learn more online at https://www.nationalpotatocouncil.org.

Market Talk
Thursday, November 3rd, 2022- Bryan Doherty and Kam Quarles

Market Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 39:52


Markets were mixed to mostly lower on Thursday as the U.S. dollar was higher which created headwinds for commodities. Weekly export sales were strong for soybeans again and strong for pork but that's about it. We discuss the market trade action with Bryan Doherty of Total Farm Marketing on today's show. Learn more online by going to https://www.totalfarmmarketing.com. Jesse Allen is joined by Kam Quarles, National Potato Council CEO, to discuss a bunch of topics. We discus the potato wart issues on Prince Edward Island in Canada, Farm Bill, the upcoming election and more. Learn more online at https://www.nationalpotatocouncil.org. Today's show is brought to you in part by Growmark/FS; learn more at https://www.growmark.com.

Jasmine and Gracie Explore the USA
Jasmine and Gracie Explore Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island

Jasmine and Gracie Explore the USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 11:38


Yes, Jasmine and Gracie fans, we have explored the USA and are moving on to the world and beyond.  We are starting out with our friendly neighbor to the north, Canada!!  This week Jasmine and Gracie explore the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the home of Anne of Green Gables on Prince Edward Island.  They have also fundy at the Bay of Fundy!  Ha Ha  Join them!

Business Class: The Tourism Academy Podcast
Explore Summerside - A Small Destination Attracting Big Names with Rose Dennis

Business Class: The Tourism Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 25:34


Summerside, Prince Edward Island is an incredibly charming and unexpectedly fascinating destination year-round. Join the nonprofit Tourism Academy | tourismacademy.org's Stephen Ekstrom for this chat with Rose Dennis, Executive Director of Explore Summerside. She explains how they're able to punch way above their weight class for sports, leisure & business travelers, drawing the likes of Elton John, James Taylor, Reba McEntire, Sting and more. Business Class is brought to you by The Tourism Academy - harnessing the power of science, business psychology and adult education to advance the tourism industry and build sustainable economies. Learn how to engage your community, win over stakeholders and get more visitors at tourismacademy.org. Support the show

From John To Justin
William Wilfrid Sullivan

From John To Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 9:16


The first PEI premier to serve longer than three years, the fourth premier of the island province would bring many changes to the province during his time as premier. William Sullivan would then serve as the Chief Justice of Prince Edward Island and be knighted. Support: patreon.com/canadaehx Donate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigU Donate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate) E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com Twitter: twitter.com/craigbaird Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehx YouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sounds Atlantic
Episode 212: Newfoundland-Labradorian Guitarist Extraordinaire Duane Andrews showcases “Djangology”.

Sounds Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 78:48


Award winning guitarist extraordinaire, composer, producer and international performer Duane Andrews showcases his brand new release “Djangology”. Bounce to the RhythmPodcast about independent music artists who are worthy of a bigger audience and deserve...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Treatland The podcast where you share your favorite food memories from childhood. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotifyhttps://www.facebook.com/ron.moores.18

Unreserved
Scary stories from Indigenous country

Unreserved

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 54:09


It's the spooky season! Time for jack-o-lanterns, tons of candy and stories to terrify. Indigenous people have told scary stories for generations to pass on important lessons. Tlicho Dene author, Richard Van Camp loves nothing more than hearing ghost stories around a campfire and he grew up watching 80's horror movies. Richard is working on a graphic novel about a deadly monster called Wheetago, one of the many creatures that's tormented Indigenous peoples on Turtle Island since before anyone can remember. He loves the creepy, the chilling and what these eerie stories teach us. Anishinaabe storyteller, artist and musician Isaac Murdoch shares a Wendigo story that will scare the wits out of you! Julie Pellissier-Lush is Prince Edward Island's current poet laureate. When the Mi'kmaq storyteller is not creating poetry, she explores the paranormal. She is working on a book about the spirits that remain after death, still wandering the shores of PEI, including the witch of Port-La-Joye. Who you gonna call when you hear a bump in the night? Six Nations Investigating Paranormal Encounters, or SNIPE of course. These ghost hunters live for a good scare! But Haudenosaunee group member Artie Martin's first night out with SNIPE at the Mohawk Institute Residential School left him with chills. For Dan SaSuweh Jones, a writer and artist from the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, places like cemeteries are haunted for a reason and the stories we tell about them can serve some surprising purposes. He visited Indigenous communities across the United States and gathered stories about their ghosts, witches and supernatural beings.

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
How sustainable financing is reshaping emerging markets

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 33:23


The market for sustainable credit in emerging markets is exploding. What's driving that growth? What are the challenges and opportunities? Veteran fixed income credit analyst Sam Epee-Bounya joins host Thomas Mucha to explore the rapidly changing environment for ESG and sustainable finance in Latin America and Africa. 1:45        Sustainable finance growth drivers4:20        ESG differences with EM investing6:55        Examples of real-world improvements9:50        How Sam's African background influences his research11:50     Sam's collaborative approach to engagement  14:35     EM challenges and opportunities ahead18:20     Why changes will be incremental    21:10     Navigating geopolitical and macro risks29:20     Reading recommendations and personal observationsViews expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. Podcast produced October 2022.Wellington Management Company LLP (WMC) is an independently owned investment adviser registered with the US Securities  and Exchange Commission (SEC). WMC is also registered with the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as a  commodity trading advisor (CTA) and serves as a CTA to certain clients including commodity pools operated by registered  commodity pool operators. WMC provides commodity trading advice to all other clients in reliance on exemptions from CTA  registration. WMC, along with its affiliates (collectively, Wellington Management), provides investment management and  investment advisory services to institutions around the world. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, Wellington Management also  has offices in Chicago, Illinois; Radnor, Pennsylvania; San Francisco, California; Frankfurt; Hong Kong; London; Luxembourg; Milan;  Shanghai; Singapore; Sydney; Tokyo; Toronto; and Zurich.     This material is prepared for, and authorized for internal use by, designated institutional and professional investors and their  consultants or for such other use as may be authorized by Wellington Management. This material and/or its contents are current  at the time of writing and may not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, for any purpose, without the express written  consent of Wellington Management. This material is not intended to constitute investment advice or an offer to sell, or the  solicitation of an offer to purchase shares or other securities. Investors should always obtain and read an up-to-date investment  services description or prospectus before deciding whether to appoint an investment manager or to invest in a fund. Any views  expressed herein are those of the author(s), are based on available information, and are subject to change without notice.  Individual portfolio management teams may hold different views and may make different investment decisions for different clients.  In Canada, this material is provided by Wellington Management Canada ULC, a British Columbia unlimited liability company  registered in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia,  Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan in the categories of Portfolio Manager and Exempt Market Dealer.   In Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Switzerland), this material is provided by Wellington Management Europe GmbH  (WME) which is authorized and regulated by the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für  Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht – BaFin). This material may only be used in countries where WME is duly authorized to operate and  is only directed at eligible counterparties or professional clients as defined under the German Securities Trading Act. This material  does not constitute investment advice, a solicitation to invest in financial instruments or information recommending or suggesting  an investment strategy within the meaning of Section 85 of the German Securities Trading Act (Wertpapierhandelsgesetz).   In  the United Kingdom, this material is provided by Wellington Management International Limited (WMIL), a firm authorized and  regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK (Reference number: 208573). This material is directed only at eligible  counterparties or professional clients as defined under the rules of the FCA.   In Switzerland, this material is provided by Wellington Management Switzerland GmbH, a firm registered at the commercial register  of the canton of Zurich with number CH-020.4.050.857-7. This material is directed only at Qualified Investors as defined in the Swiss  Collective Investment Schemes Act and its implementing ordinance.  In Hong Kong, this material is provided to you by Wellington Management Hong Kong Limited (WM Hong Kong), a corporation  licensed by the Securities and Futures Commission to conduct Type 1 (dealing in securities), Type 2 (dealing in futures contracts),  Type 4 (advising on securities), and Type 9 (asset management) regulated activities, on the basis that you are a Professional  Investor as defined in the Securities and Futures Ordinance. By accepting this material you acknowledge and agree that this  material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available to any person.  Wellington Investment Management (Shanghai) Limited is a wholly-owned entity and subsidiary of WM Hong Kong.   In Singapore, this material is provided for your use only by Wellington Management Singapore Pte Ltd (WM Singapore)  (Registration Number 201415544E). WM Singapore is regulated by the Monetary Authority of Singapore under a Capital Markets  Services Licence to conduct fund management activities and is an exempt financial adviser. By accepting this material you  represent that you are a non-retail investor and that you will not copy, distribute or otherwise make this material available to any  person.   In Australia, Wellington Management Australia Pty Ltd (WM Australia) (ABN 19 167 091 090) has authorized the issue of this  material for use solely by wholesale clients (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001). By accepting this material, you acknowledge  and agree that this material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available  to any person. Wellington Management Company LLP is exempt from the requirement to hold an Australian financial services  licence (AFSL) under the Corporations Act 2001 in respect of financial services provided to wholesale clients in Australia, subject to  certain conditions. Financial services provided by Wellington Management Company LLP are regulated by the SEC under the laws  and regulatory requirements of the United States, which are different from the laws applying in Australia.  In Japan, Wellington Management Japan Pte Ltd (WM Japan) (Registration Number 199504987R) has been registered as a  Financial Instruments Firm with registered number: Director General of Kanto Local Finance Bureau (Kin-Sho) Number 428. WM  Japan is a member of the Japan Investment Advisers Association (JIAA), the Investment Trusts Association, Japan (ITA) and the  Type II Financial Instruments Firms Association (T2FIFA).  WMIL, WM Hong Kong, WM Japan, and WM Singapore are also registered as investment advisers with the SEC; however, they will  comply with the substantive provisions of the US Investment Advisers Act only with respect to their US clients.  ©2022 Wellington Management Company LLP. All rights reserved.  

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #93: Raising Voices, Spirits, and Data through the SingWell Project: In conversation with Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 48:43


Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist at the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and a member of the Aphasia Access Podcast Working Group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources. I'm today's hosts for an episode featuring Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson.        We will discuss the SingWell Project and the role of aphasia choirs from a bio-psychosocial model. Today's shows features the following gap areas from the Aphasia Access State of Aphasia Report authored by Nina Simmons-Mackie:  Gap area #3: insufficient availability of communication intervention for people with aphasia, or the need for services.  Gap area #8: insufficient attention to depression and low mood across the continuum of care.  Gap area #5: insufficient attention to life participation across the continuum of care. Guest Bios: Dr. Arla Good is the Co-director and Chief Researcher of the SingWell Project, an initiative uniting over 20 choirs for communication challenges around the world. Dr. Good is a member of the Science of Music, Auditory Research and Technology or SMART lab at Toronto Metropolitan University, formerly Ryerson University. Much of her work over the last decade has sought to identify and optimize music based interventions that can contribute to psychological and social well-being in a variety of different populations.  Dr. Jessica Richardson is an associate professor and speech-language pathologist at the University of New Mexico in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and the Center for Brain Recovery and Repair. She is director of the UN M brain scouts lab and the stable and progressive aphasia center or space. Her research interest is recovering from acquired brain injury with a specific focus on aphasia, recovery, and management of primary progressive aphasia. She focuses on innovations in assessment and treatment with a focus on outcome measures that predict real world communication abilities, and life participation. Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn about the SingWell Project model of supporting choirs and research around the world Learn which five clinical populations are the initial targets of the SingWell Project Discover how the SingWell Project is challenging the stigma about disability and singing Learn about some of the biopsychosocial measures being used to capture choir outcomes Transcript edited for conciseness Show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  02:58 I'm going to admit that aphasia choirs have long been one of my clinical passions. I'm really excited and honored to host this episode today. I'd like to just start with a question or two that will help our listeners get to know you both a little better. So Arla, is it okay, if I start with you? Would you share what motivated you to focus your research on music-based interventions? Do you have a personal connection to music?   Arla Good  03:29 I feel like I could do a whole podcast on how I ended up in this field.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:33 That'd be fun.   Arla Good  03:34 There's just so many anecdotes on how music can be a powerful tool. I've experienced it in my own life, and I've witnessed it in other lives. I'll share one example. My grandfather had aphasia and at my convocation when I was graduating in the Department of Psychology with a BA, despite not being able to communicate and express himself, he sang the Canadian National Anthem, perfect pitch-- all of the words. It's just an accumulation of anecdotes like that, that brought me to study music psychology. And over the course of my graduate studies, I came to see how it can be super beneficial for specific populations like aphasia.    So, I do have a quote from one of our choir participants that really sparked the whole idea of SingWell. It was a Parkinson's choir that we were working with. And she says, “At this point, I don't feel like my Parkinson's defines me as much as it used to. Now that I've been singing with the group for a while, I feel that I'm also a singer who is part of a vibrant community.” And that really just encapsulates what it is and why I'm excited to be doing what I'm doing--  to be bringing more positivity and the identity and strength into these different communities.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:49 Yes, the development of positive self-identity in the face of facing adversity is such an important contribution to what we do and thank you for sharing that personal journey. That was really beautiful.  Jessica, I'm hoping to get to hear a little bit about why what your personal connection is to aphasia choirs and music.   Jessica Richardson  05:12 Again, so many things. I grew up in a musical household. Everyone in my family sings and harmonizes and it's just beautiful. But a lot of my motivation for music and groups came from first just seeing groups. So some early experience with groups at the VA. Seeing Dr. Audrey Holland in action, of course, at the University of Arizona-that's where I did my training. Dr. Elman, you, of course, so many great examples that led to the development of lots of groups. We do virtual online groups for different treatments, different therapies. We have space exploration. We have space teams, which is communication partner instruction that's virtual. So we do lots of groups. And of course, we have a neuro choir here in New Mexico. Now, I'm just so excited that there's so much research that's coming out to support it.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:03 Jessica, can I just give you a little shout out? Because you were visionary. You actually created these amazing YouTube videos of your choir singing virtually, even before COVID. And you came out with the first virtual aphasia choir. I remember just sitting there and just watching it and being amazed. And little did we know. I guess you knew! Do you want to just take a moment because I want to put those links in our show notes and encourage every listener to watch these beautiful virtual choir songs that you've done. You've done two right?   Jessica Richardson  06:44 Yes. And I could not have done it, I need to make sure I give a shout out to my choir director, Nicole Larson, who's now Nicole Larson Vegas. She was an amazing person to work with on those things. She also now has opened a branch neuro choir, just one town over. We're in Albuquerque and she's in Corrales and our members can go to either one. We coordinate our songs.    I'd really like to start coordinating worldwide, Ellen. We can share resources and do virtual choirs worldwide and with Aphasia Choirs Go Global. But I definitely want to give her a shout out. And then of course our members. I mean, they were really brave to do that. Because there was nothing I could point them to online already to say, “Hey, people are doing this. You do it.” So they were really courageous to be some of the first.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:36 Do you want to mention the two songs so people know what to look for? And just throw in the name of your choir.   Jessica Richardson  07:42 We're just the UNM neuro choir as part of the UNM Brain Scouts. The first song was The Rose. The second song was This is Me from the Greatest Showman. And the song journal that you could wait for in the future is going to be Don't Give Up On Me by Andy Grammer.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  08:01 Beautiful! I can hardly wait. And there are some endeavors and efforts being made to create these international groups. Thank you for doing a shout out to Aphasia Choirs Go Global, which is a Facebook group to support people who are involved in neuro and aphasia choirs. I'll give a shout out to Bron Jones who helped start it and Alli Talmage from New Zealand who has worked really hard to build a community there. It's been really wonderful to have a place where we can throw out questions to each other and ask for opinions and actually dig into some interesting questions like, “What measures are you using to capture X, Y, or Z?” I think we'll get to talk about some of that today, actually. So thank you.    I encourage our listeners to listen to those two YouTube videos we'll put in the show notes. But Jessica, I'm going to give you a twofer here. I've been following your amazing work for many years, but the first time I got to meet you in person was at an Aphasia Access Leadership Summit. I wanted to ask you as an Aphasia Access member, if you have any particular Aphasia Access memories that you could share with our listeners?   Jessica Richardson  09:09 Well, it was actually that memory. So, I would say my all-time favorite collection of Aphasia Access moments, really was working with my amazing colleague, Dr. Katerina Haley. She's at UNC Chapel Hil. We were co-program chairs for the Aphasia Access 2017 summit in Florida. The whole summit, I still think back on it and just smile so wide. And you know, we went to the museum, we were at the Aphasia House, just so many wonderful things. All of the round tables and the presentations, they just rocked my world. And it's just something I'm super proud to have been a part of behind the scenes making it happen. And I also remember that you wrote me the nicest note afterwards.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  09:54 It was just because it impacted me, too. Personally, I felt like it just cracked open such a world of being able to have engaging discussions with colleagues. Tom Sather, really named it the other day (at IARC) when he quoted Emile Durkheim's work on collective effervescence, the sense of being together with a community. I'm seeing Arla, nodding her head too.   Arla Good Yeah, I like that.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Yeah, there was a lot of effervescing at these Leadership Summits, and we have one coming up in 2023. I'm really excited about it and hope to get more information out to our listeners about that. So I'll just say stay tuned. And you'll be hearing more, definitely.   I just want to do one more shout out. And that is, you mentioned international collaboration. I'd like to do a quick shout out to Dr. Gillian Velmer who has been doing the International Aphasia Choirs. I'll gather a couple of links to a couple of songs that she's helped produce with people around the world with aphasia singing together. So there's just some great efforts being done.    That's why I'm excited about launching into these questions. I want to start with an introduction of SingWell. Arla, would you like to get the ball rolling on that one?   Arla Good  11:09 For sure. SingWell began with my co-director, Frank Russo, and myself being inspired by that quote I shared at the beginning about singing doing something really special for these communities. We applied for a Government of Canada grant and we received what's called a Partnership grant. It really expanded well beyond just me and Frank, and it became a network of over 50 researchers, practitioners, national provincial support organizations, and it continues growing.    It's really about creating a flow of information from academia to the community, and then back to academia. So understanding what research questions are coming up in these communities of interests. And what information can we, as researchers, share with these communities? That's SingWell, I'll get into the research questions.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:03 Let's dive in a little bit deeper. What is SingWell's primary aim?  That's something you describe really well in an article we'll talk about a little later.   Arla Good  12:15 So our aim is to document, to understand, group singing as a strategy, as a way to address the psychosocial well-being and communication for people who are living with communication challenges. SingWell, we're defining a communication challenge as a condition that affects an individual's ability to produce, perceive or understand speech. We're working with populations like aphasia, but also people living with hearing loss, lung disease, stuttering. I hope, I don't forget anybody. There are five populations. Parkinson's, of course.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:53 Perfect. So that's your primary aim. Do you want to speak to any secondary or additional goals for your project?   Arla Good  13:03 The second major pillar of this grant is to advocate and share the information with these communities. So, how can we facilitate the transfer of this knowledge? We've started a TikTok channel, so you can watch videos. We have a newsletter and a website that's continuously being updated with all the new information. We want to develop best practice guides to share with these communities about what we've learned and how these types of choirs can be run. And really, just mobilize the network of partners so that we're ensuring the information is getting to the right community.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:35 Wow. Well, I mentioned a moment ago that there's a 2020 article that you wrote with your colleagues, Kreutz, Choma, Fiocco, and Russo that describes the SingWell project protocol. It  lays out your long term goals. Do you want to add anything else to what you've said about where this project is headed?   Arla Good  13:54 Sure, the big picture of this project is that we have a network of choirs that are able to address the needs of these different populations. I want the network to be dense and thriving. The home of the grant is Canada. But of course, we have partners in the states, like Jessica, and in Europe and in New Zealand. So to have this global network of choirs that people can have access to, and to advocate for a social prescription model in healthcare. Have doctors prescribing these choirs, and this network is available for doctors to see, okay, here's the closest choir to you. So, in some ways, this is a third goal of the project is to be building this case for the social prescription of singing.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  14:41 Before we go too much further, I want to acknowledge that you picked a wonderful aphasia lead, Dr. Jessica Richardson. That's your role, right? We haven't given you a chance to explain your role with SingWell. Do you want to say anything about that Jessica?   Jessica Richardson  14:58 Yeah, sure. I'm still learning about my role. Overall, I know theme leaders, in general, were charged with overseeing research directions for their theme. Aphasias, the theme that I'm leader of, and then monitoring progress of research projects and the direction of that. So far, it's mostly involved some advising of team members and reviewing and giving feedback of grant applications. I'm supposed to be doing more on the social and networking end and I hope to be able to make more that more of a priority next year, but I do think this podcast counts. So thank you for that.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  15:33 Well, you did a wonderful presentation. I should be transparent, I was invited to be on the Advisory Committee of SingWell, and I got to hear your first presentation at the first project meeting where each team leader explained their focus and endeavor. I was so excited to hear the way you presented the information on aphasia, because again, we know that for some people, aphasia is not a well-known name or word. And even though this is a very educated group, and I think everybody, all the leaders know about aphasia, but it was nice to see you present and put on the table some of the challenges and importance of doing this research.    One of the things that really attracted me when reading about that 2020 article is that you talk about SingWell having an ability versus disability focus early, Arla, could you elaborate on that?   Arla Good  16:22 Our groups are open to anybody, regardless of their musical, vocal or hearing abilities. And we compare it often to the typical talk-based support groups that focuses on challenges and deficits. Of course, there's a time and place, these can provide a lot of benefit for people living in these communities. So, this isn't a replacement for these types of support groups,  But, singing is a strength-based activity. They're working together to create a beautiful sound and there's often a performance at the end that they're very proud of. We're challenging stigma, especially in a population like aphasia, where it would seem like, oh, you have aphasia, you can't sing? But, of course they can. We're challenging that stigma of who can sing and who can't sing. We find that it's just so enjoyable for these people to be coming and doing something strength- based and feeling good. Going back to that, quote I said at the beginning, right? To feel like there's more to their identity than a diagnosis. This is what keeps them coming back.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  17:22 Beautifully said, and I can't help but think how that really connects with the life participation approach. There's no one better than Jessica, for me to throw that back out to her, and ask how she sees the connection between that.   Jessica Richardson  17:37 Yes, absolutely. Their focus on ability and fighting loneliness and isolation and on social well-being is right in line with it. Because LPAA is really focusing on reengagement in life, on competence, rather than deficits, on inclusion, and also on raising the status of well-being measures to be just as important as other communication outcomes.    I want to make sure we also bring up something from our Australian and New Zealand colleagues, the living successfully with aphasia framework, because it is also in line with LPAA and SingWell. I can say they have this alternative framework. They also don't want to talk about the deficit or disability. It doesn't try to ignore or even minimize the aphasia, but it emphasizes positive factors, like independence, meaningful relationships, meaningful contributions, like you know that performance. So there's just so much value and so much alignment with what Aphasia Access listeners and members really care about.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:44 That's a great transition for what I was thinking about next. I was very excited to see people talking about the 2018 review by Baker, Worrall, Rose and colleagues that identifies aphasia choirs as a level one treatment in the step psychological care model for managing depression in aphasia. So that's really powerful to me, and we're starting to see more research come out looking at the impact of participating in aphasia choirs. I'm really excited to see some of this initial research coming out.    Maybe you can address what some of the gaps in the literature might be when it comes to group singing? And its impact on well-being. Maybe Arla, we can start with that and then Jessica, you can jump in and address specifically communication and aphasia choirs. Arla, do you want to start out?   Arla Good  19:35 This is a very exciting time, like you said, there is research that is starting to come out. People are starting to study choirs as a way of achieving social well-being, psychological well-being and so the field is ripe and ready for some good robust scientific research.    Most of the studies that are coming out have really small sample sizes. It's hard to get groups together, and they often lack comparison groups. So what I think SingWell is going to do is help understand the mechanisms and what is so great about singing and what singing contributes. The other thing I'd like to mention is that with SingWell, our approach is a bit unique compared to what some of the other research researchers are doing, in that we're adopting a very hands-off approach to choir. So we're letting choir directors have the autonomy to organize based on their own philosophies, their expertise, and the context of their choirs. So we call it choir in its natural habitat.   And this is giving us the opportunity to explore group effects. What approach is the choir director taking and what's working, what's not working? And to have this large sample of different types of choirs, we can learn a lot from this number, this type of research project as well.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:54 What I really love about that is getting to know some of these wonderful colleagues through Aphasia Choirs Go Global and hearing about what their rehearsals and goals look like. There are some amazing similarities, just like saying, “You're doing that in Hungary? But we're doing that here, too.”  And there are some wonderful differences. I really firmly believe that there are a variety of ways to do this very successfully, just like there are a variety of ways to run successful aphasia groups, but there's going to be some core ingredients that we need to understand better.    Just before I go too far away from this, how about you? Do you want to speak to anything we need to learn in the literature about aphasia choirs?   Jessica Richardson  21:35 Yeah, I mean, I don't think I'm saying too much different than Arla. Arla, may want to follow up. But the main gap is that we just don't have enough evidence. And we don't have enough, like she said, solid methodology, high fidelity, to even support its efficacy to convince stakeholders, third party payers, etc. Anecdotal evidence is great, and YouTube videos that we create are also great, but it's not enough. And even more and more choirs popping up around the world, it's not enough.   We need that strong research base to convince the people that need convincing. SingWell is hoping to add to that through its pilot grants, through its methodology that they share for people to use. And I'm hopeful that other organizations, you know, like Aphasia Choirs Go Global, can link up at some point with saying, “Well, I'm excited about communities like that that are also supportive of researching choirs.” Arla, think I saw you're wanting to follow up.   Arla Good  22:31 I just wanted to add to something that Ellen had said about the power and diversity and having these different perspectives. And another goal of SingWell is to create, and it's up on the website already, it's a work in progress, it's going to continue growing, but a menu of options for choir directors who are looking to start a choir like this. Like if you want this kind of goal, here are some tips. So, if it's a social choir, you might want to configure the room in a circle. But if you have musical goals, maybe you want to separate your sopranos, your altos, tenors, and your bass. It's not one prescribed method. It's a menu of items that we're hoping we can through, this diversity of our network, that we can clarify for people who are trying to start a choir for themselves.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:19 I love that because I can hear in my head right now, Aura Kagan saying over and over again that the life participation approach is not a prescriptive approach. But rather, you're always looking at what is the best fit for your needs. Jessica, your head is nodding, so do you want to add anything?   Jessica Richardson  23:37 It's a way to shift your whole entire perspective and your framework. And that's what I love about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:44 We'll just go back to that 2020 article for a moment because I really liked that article. You and your authors describe four measures of well-being and there are potential neuroendocrinological, that's really a lot of syllables in here, but I'll try to say it again, neuroendocrinological underpinnings,    Arla Good   The hormones---   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Oh, that's better, thank you, the hormones, too. Could you just take a moment and please share what these four measures of well-being and their hormonal underpinnings might be?   Arla Good  24:11 For sure. The first one is connection, the connectedness outcome. So we're asking self-report measures of how connected people feel. But we're also measuring oxytocin, which is a hormone that's typically associated with social bonding.    The second measure is stress. And again, we're asking self-report measures, but we're also looking at cortisol, which is a hormone associated with stress.    The third measure is pain. And this one's a little bit more complex, because we're measuring pain thresholds. Really, it sounds scary, but what we do is apply pressure to the finger and people tell us when it feels uncomfortable. So it's actually well before anyone's experiencing pain. But we're thinking that this might be a proxy for beta endorphin release. So that's the underpinning there.    And then the last outcome is mood. This is also a self-report measure. And one of the types of analyses that we're running is we want to see what's contributing to an improved mood. Is it about the cortisol? Is it about just like deep breathing and feeling relaxed? Is it that or is there something special happening when they feel the rush of oxytocin and social connectedness? The jury's still out. These are super preliminary data at this point, especially with oxytocin, there's so much to learn. But those are some of the hormones, the sociobiological underpinnings that we're exploring.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  25:31 That makes for some really exciting research and the way you frame things, SingWell is supporting grants, maybe you could comment on how its biopsychosocial framework influences the methods and outcome measures that you want to adopt.   Arla Good  25:48 Sure, we do provide guidelines and suggestions for measures. Jessica alluded to this. We have it all up on the website, if anyone else wants to run a study like this. And then we have some that we're requiring of any study that's going to be funded through SingWell. And this is so we can address this small sample size problem in the literature. So the grant runs for six more years. It's a seven year grant. And at the end, we're going to merge all the data together for one mega study. We want to have some consistency across the studies, so we do have some that are required. And then we have this typical SingWell design. We're offering support for our research team, from what a project could look like.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  26:28 Well, this podcast typically has a wonderful diverse demographic, but it includes researchers. and clinical researchers who collaborate. So, let's take a moment and have you describe the grant review process and the dates for the next cycle, just in case people want to learn more.   Arla Good  26:45 Sure, so we are accepting grants from SingWell members. So the first step is to become a SingWell member. There is an application process on the website. We have an executive committee that reviews the applications twice a year, the next one is in scheduled for November. There's some time to get the application together. Once you're in as a member, the application for receiving funding is actually quite simple. It's basically just an explanation of the project and then it will undergo a review process. Jessica is actually one of our reviewers, so she can speak to what it was like to be a reviewer,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:21 That would be great because, Jessica, when you and I chatted about it briefly, I've never heard a reviewer be so excited about being supportive in this process. So please share a little bit more because I thought your perspective was so refreshing and positive.    Jessica Richardson  27:36 I have to say too, I have definitely benefited from having some amazing reviewers in my own lifetime. I definitely have to point out one who was so impactful, Mary Boyle, her review, it was so thorough, and it was so intense, but it elevated one of my first endeavors into discourse analysis to just like a different level. And just the way that she treated it as a way to help shape, she was so invested, in just making sure that we were the best product out there. I learned what the world needed to learn. I definitely learned a lot from that experience and from other reviewers like her that I've benefited from.    As a reviewer, whenever I review anything, I try to keep that same spirit. So when I was doing SingWell reviews, I made sure that I revisited the parent grant. I did a really good, thorough reread. I provided feedback and critiques from the lens of how does this fit with SingWell's aims? And, how can it be shaped to serve those aims if it isn't quite there yet? So it's never like, “Ah, no, this is so far off”, it was just like, “Oh, where can we make a connection to help it fit?” Then trying to provide a review that would be a recipe for success, if not for this submission cycle, then for the next.    And as a submitter, even though I mean, we didn't have a meeting to like all take this approach. But I felt that the feedback that I received was really in that same spirit. And so I love feedback in general. I don't always love the rejection that comes with it. But I do love stepping outside of myself and learning from that different perspective. And I've really just felt that this thing while reviewers were invested, and were really just interested in shaping submissions to success,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  29:24 That's really worthwhile, right? So you get something, even if you're not going to get funding. You still get to come away with something that's valuable, which is that feedback.    We've been talking about measures and I'm really interested in that as a topic. Jessica, could you take a moment and share a little bit about how SingWell's pre/post measures are being adopted for aphasia?  We all know that's some of the challenges. Sometimes, some of the measures that we use for mood, connectivity, or stress are not always aphasia-friendly. So what does that process look like?   Jessica Richardson  29:59 I will say they did their homework at the top end, even before the proposal was submitted. Really having you on the advisory board, and I was able to give some feedback on some of the measures. Some of the measures they've already selected were specific to aphasia. For Parkinson's disease, there are Parkinson's disease specific measures and for stuttering, specific measures. And for aphasia, they picked ones that are already aphasia-friendly. What I was super excited about too, is that they included discourse without me asking. It was already there. I think we helped build it to be a better discourse sample and we've added our own. So it's already in there as their set of required and preferred measures. But the other thing is that the investigator, or investigators, have a lot of latitude, according to your knowledge of the clinical population that you're working with, to add outcomes that you feel are relevant. That's a pretty exciting aspect of getting these pilot funds.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:58 So there's both some core suggested measures, but there's a lot of latitude for making sure that you're picking measures that will capture and are appropriate to your particular focus of your projects. That's great. Absolutely.   Jessica Richardson  31:09 I definitely feel that if there were any big issue that we needed to bring up, we would just talk to Arla and Frank, and they would be receptive.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:20 I've been very intrigued and interested in attempts to measure social connectedness as an outcome measure. You speak about it in your article, about the value of social bonding and the way music seems to be a really good mechanism to efficiently create social bonding. Is there something about choir that makes this factor, this social connectedness, different from being part of other groups? How are you going to even capture this this factor? Who wants to take that one?     Arla Good  31:50 I do, I can talk, we can do another podcast on this one.   Jessica Richardson  31:55 It's my turn, Arla. I'm just kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:01 You can both have a turn. You go first, Arla,  And then Jessica, I think you will probably add,   Jessica Richardson  32:04 I'm totally kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:06 Go ahead, Arla.   Arla Good  32:07 This is what I did my dissertation on. I truly believe in the power of group music making. So singing is just an easy, accessible, scalable way to get people to move together. It's consistent with an evolutionary account that song and dance was used by small groups to promote social bonding and group resiliency. I've seen the term collective effervescence in these types of writings.    When we moved together, it was like a replacement for in our great ape ancestors, they were one on one grooming, picking up the nits in each other's fur. Human groups became too large and too complex to do one on one ways of social bonding. And so we needed to develop a way to bond larger groups rapidly.    And the idea here is that movement synchrony, so moving together in precise time, was one way of connecting individuals, creating a group bond. Singing is just a fun way of doing that. I've been studying this for about 15 years and trying to understand. We've pared it down, right down to just tapping along with a metronome, and seeing these types of cooperation outcomes and feelings of social bonding, connectedness. I do think there's something special, maybe not singing specifically, but activities that involve movement synchrony. We could talk about drumming, we could talk about dance, I think that there is a special ingredient in these types of activities that promote social bonds.   Jessica Richardson  33:37 There's been some of us even looking at chanting, there's research about that as well.    Arla Good   We should do a SingWell study on chanting!   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:43 Jessica, what else do you want to add about what is important about capturing social connectedness? Or, how do we capture social connectedness?     Jessica Richardson  33:53 I think I'll answer the first part, which is, what is special about thinking about it and capturing it. It's something that we've slowly lost over decades and generations, the communal supports. Our communities are weakened, we're more spread out. It's also a way of bringing something back that has been so essential for so long. We've weakened it with technology, with just all the progress that we've made. It's a way to bring something that is very primitive and very essential back. So, that doesn't totally answer your question, though.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:31 When we think about the isolation related to aphasia and the loss of friendship, and some of the wonderful research that's coming out about the value and impact of friendship on aphasia, and then, you think about choirs and some of this research--I believe choir is identified as the number one most popular adult hobby/activity. I think more people are involved in choirs as an adult. It's not the only meaningful activity, but it's a very long standing, well developed one,   Jessica Richardson  35:03 We have to figure out how to get the people though who will not touch a choir with a 10 foot pole?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:08 Well, we will continue to do the work on the other groups, right, that suits them very well. You know, be it a book club, or a gardening group, or a pottery class, or many, many, many other choices.   Jessica Richardson  35:21 Or a bell choir?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:24 Bell choirs are great, too.    Do either of you want to speak to what type of measures captures social connectedness or what you're using, or suggesting people try to use, for SingWell projects?   Jessica Richardson  35:38 I think Arla already captured some of those with those markers that she was talking about earlier. Hormonal markers. But the self-report questionnaires, and that perspective. There's other biomarkers that can very easily be obtained, just from your spirit. So I think that's going in the right direction, for sure.   Arla Good  35:59 Yeah, we've also looked at behavioral measures in the past like strategic decision making games, economic decision making games, and just seeing if people trust each other, and whether they're willing to share with each other. We've asked people how attractive they think the other people are. Questions like this that are capturing the formation of a group, whether they're willing to share with their in-group.  It's a question of in-group and out-group, and what are some of the effects of the in-group.     Jessica Richardson  36:26 And we're definitely exploring too, because we do a lot of neurophysiological recording in my lab. Is there a place for EEG here? Is there a place for fNIRS, especially with fNIRS, because they can actually be doing these things. They can be participating in choir, we can be measuring things in real time. While they're doing that, with the fNIRS-like sports packs, so sorry, fNIRS is functional near-infrared spectroscopy in case some of the listeners aren't sure.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  36:52 I needed help with that one too. Thank you.    I'm thinking about some of the work done by Tom Sather that talks about the sense of flow and its contribution to eudaimonic well-being, right? I think that's a key piece of what SingWell is looking at as well. It's exciting to look at all these different measures, and all these different pillars that you are presenting today.    And if people want to find out more about SingWell, do you want to say something about your website, what they might find if they were to go there?   Arla Good  37:25 Yes, go to the website, SingWell.org, pretty easy to remember. And on the website, you'll find all the resources to run a research study, to apply to be a member. We have resources for choir directors who are looking to start their own choir, we have opportunities to get involved as research participants if you're someone living with aphasia, or other communication challenges. There's lots of opportunities to get involved on the website. And you can sign up for our newsletter and receive the updates as they come and check out our website.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  37:57 That's great. I certainly have been watching it develop. And I think it has a lot of really helpful resources. I appreciate the work that's been put into that. How do people get involved in the SingWell project? You mentioned earlier about becoming a member. Is there anything else you want to add about becoming engaged with SingWell?    Arla Good  38:18 I think the ways to become involved, either becoming a member or starting a choir using the resources, or like I said, signing up for the newsletter just to stay engaged. And as a participant, of course, doing the surveys or signing up for a choir if you're one of the participants called.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  38:35 Thank you. I'm was wondering if you'd share with the listeners any sample projects that are underway.    Arla Good  38:46 For sure. So we have five funded studies this year. We have one ChantWell, which Jessica spoke about, assessing the benefits of chanting for breathing disorders. That's taking place in Australia. The effects of online group singing program for older adults with breathing disorders on their lung health, functional capacity, cognition, quality of life, communication skills and social inclusion. That is in Quebec, Canada. The third study, the group singing to support well-being and communication members of Treble Tremors. That's a Parkinson's choir taking place in Prince Edward Island, Canada. The fourth is how important is the group in group singing, so more of a theoretical question looking at group singing versus individual singing, an unbiased investigation of group singing benefits for well-being and that's also in Quebec. And then last but not least, I saved it for last, is our very own Jessica Richardson's group singing to improve communication and well-being for persons with aphasia or Parkinson's disease. So I thought I might let Jessica share, if she's open to sharing some of what the research study will entail.   Jessica Richardson  39:53 Oh, yes, thank you. When we first started our neuro choir, I had envisioned it as being an aphasia choir. And we had so much need in the community, from people with other types of brain injury. Our Parkinson's Disease Association, too, has really been reaching out ever since I've moved here. They have a group actually, they're called the Movers and Shakers, which I really love. So, we have a pretty healthy aphasia cohort of people who are interested, who also, you know, taking a break and only doing things virtually if they are interested, you know, since COVID. And then we have our Parkinson's cohort here as well, the Movers and Shakers, were following the suggested study design, it's a 12 week group singing intervention. They have suggestions for different outcome measures at different timescales, we're following that and adding our own outcome measures that we also feel are relevant. So we have those measures for communication and well-being, including the well-being biomarkers through the saliva. As she mentioned, already, we have latitude for the choir director, like who we want to pick and what she or he wants to do. We already have that person picked out. And we already know, and have all of that stuff figured out. There is some guidance, but again, flexibility for our session programming. And we have the choices over the homework programming, as well. We are really looking at this choir in the wild, and looking at those outcomes with their measures. So we're excited about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:22 I think you've just thought of a great name for a future aphasia choir, which is a “neuro choir choir in the wild”   Jessica Richardson  41:30 Well, out here, we're a choir in the wild, wild west.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:34 There you go. Absolutely. What have been some of the most surprising findings of the benefits of singing so far that have come in through the SingWell project? Either of you want to take that on?   Arla Good  41:46 I don't know if it's the most surprising, but it's definitely the most exciting. I'm excited to continue unpacking what's happening with oxytocin, I think it's a pretty exciting hormone, it's pretty hot right now. It's typically associated with being like a love hormone. They call it associated with sex, and it's associated with mother-infant bonding. If we can find a way that's not mother-infant or pair bonding to release oxytocin, that's very exciting. If group singing is one of those ways to promote this sense of “I don't know where I end and you begin, and we're one” and all those loving feelings. As Jessica mentioned, the missing piece, and how we relate to each other in a society, choir might be an answer to that. I'm really excited about the oxytocin outcome measure. Again, it's still very early, I don't want to say definitively what's happening, but it's a pretty exciting piece.   Jessica Richardson  42:45 I have a future doctoral student that's going to be working on this. That is the part she's most interested in as well..   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  42:52 So there are some really good things that, hopefully, will continue to tell us what some of these benefits are and that it's important to fund and connect people to these types of activities. You said, this is like year one or two of a 6 year project, was that right? Or is it seven year?   Arla Good  43:09 It's seven year.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:10 So what is your hope for the future of the SingWell project?   Arla Good  43:15 The secondary goals would be the hope for the future, of actually creating change in the communities and getting people to think outside the box of providing care. Is there a choir that can be prescribed nearby? Is there a way to train these choir directors so that they have the correct training for this specific population? So drawing from the knowledge from speech- language therapy, from choir direction, from music therapy-   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:42 Music therapy, right.   Arla Good  43:43 Of course, of course. So creating an accreditation program and training choir directors to lead choirs like this, and having this army of choir directors around the world that are doing this. So, this is a big goal. But that's what I hope to see.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  44:00 That's fantastic. And I think there's some researchers who are really working hard at looking at protocols and asking these questions. And I know, I've been inspired by some of the work that Ali Talmage is doing in New Zealand that's looking at some of these questions. And, Jessica, do you want to add what's your hope is as aphasia lead? Or, what you're thinking about for the SingWell project that you're excited about?   Jessica Richardson  44:21 We have to generate that evidence that we need and mentioning again, those 10 foot pole people, to reach out to let people know that choirs aren't just for people who think that they can sing. We definitely have had some very energetic and enthusiastic choir members who think that they can sing and cannot, and they're still showing up. Maybe you're the one who thinks that choirs aren't for you. If we can generate enough energy, inertia, and evidence to convince those that it might be worth giving a try. I think some of them are going to be surprised that they enjoy it and “oh, I can sing.” So I think that to me is a future hoped for outcome.    And then again, seeing it spread out to other gardening groups, other yoga groups, all these other things that we know are happening within Aphasia Access members and beyond to see, okay, there's this methodology. This is what's used to study something like this, let's apply it also so that its efficacy data for these other approaches that we know and we see can be helpful, but we don't have enough proof to have someone prescribe it and to get those stakeholders involved.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  45:33 Yes. And we talked about the importance of some of the work that's being done with mental health and aphasia and how some of the information that you're pursuing could really tie in and help us support and get more work in that area as well. So really exciting.    I can't believe we have to wrap up already. I agree with you all, that we could just keep talking on this one. But let's just end on this note, I would like to find out from both of you. If you had to pick just one thing that we need to achieve urgently as a community of providers and professionals, what would that one thing be? What would you like to speak to? At the end of this discussion we've had today and Arla, you get to go first again.   Arla Good  46:15 The one thing we need to achieve urgently is to find a way to address people's needs in a more holistic way. And to see the human as a whole, that it's not just this piece and this piece and this piece, but all of it together? And how can we do that? How can we communicate better as practitioners, as researchers, so that we can address these needs more holistically?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  46:36 Thank you. Thank you. And Jessica, what would you like to say?   Jessica Richardson  46:41 I could just say ditto. I totally agree. So the end.    But I think the other part is from a clinician standpoint. What I hear most from colleagues that are out there in the wild, and former students, is that they want the “How to” info which is perfect, because, SingWell has a knowledge mobilization aim, and the exact aim of that is to develop and share best practice guides, which you know, are already mentioned, choir sustainability guides, how to fund it, how to keep it going. Really important. And they're going to update these regularly. It's going to be available in lots of languages. So that's something I'm especially excited for, for our community, because I know so many people who want to start a choir, but it feels too big and intimidating, and maybe they don't feel like they have the musical chops. But this will really help them get over that hump to get started and will address that need. And that desire, that's already there, in a big way.        Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  47:42 Thank you. I'm so appreciative that you both made this happen today. It was complicated schedules. And I just really, really appreciate want to thank you for being our guests for this podcast. It was so much fun. I'm excited to follow the SingWell project over the next seven years and see what continues to grow and develop.    So for more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, just email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org And thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access. Arla, Jessica, thank you so much. Thank you.    References and Resources  UNM Neuro Choir: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQuamJgTVj8&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guU_uRaFbHI&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=6 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4_0Xd7HNoM&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=7   www.singwell.org Good, A., Kreutz, G., Choma, B., Fiocco, A., Russo, F., & World Health Organization. (2020). The SingWell project protocol: the road to understanding the benefits of group singing in older adults. Public Health Panorama, 6(1), 141-146. Good, A., & Russo, F. A. (2022). Changes in mood, oxytocin, and cortisol following group and individual singing: A pilot study. Psychology of Music, 50(4), 1340-1347.    

From John To Justin
Louis Henry Davies

From John To Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 15:36


The third premier of Prince Edward Island, he would also serve in Parliament for 19 years, and on the Supreme Court of Canada for 23 years. To date, he is the only Chief Justice to have held elected office, or to have been born in Prince Edward Island. Support: patreon.com/canadaehx Donate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigU Donate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate) E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com Twitter: twitter.com/craigbaird Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehx YouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast
224. High On The Hog Smokin' BBQ

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 34:25


Show Notes Air Date: October 26, 2022 Welcome to Episode 224 of the podcast. We're back out in Prince Edward Island this week as bbq food truck operator Mitchell Arsenault from High On The Hog Smokin' BBQ in Summerside, PEI joins me. The truck is open on the waterfront in Summerside during the summer season and you can find updates on Facebook & Instagram @highonthehogfoodbus This episode has been brought to you by: Motley Que's 2022 Competition Bounty Program. In 2022, when you use Motley Que products and win a category or a G.C. you'll get some extra jangle in your pockets! Visit www.motleyque.ca and click on the BBQ Bounty Program tab at the top of the screen to get all the details. Township 27 develops, produces, distributes and sells the highest quality Pantry Spices, Herbs, Spice Blends, Sauces, Salad Dressings and Condiments for People Who Love Food! If you are looking for the best in spices, blends, sauces and condiments, whether it be retail, wholesale, or bulk, check us out at www.township27.com and follow them on Instagram and Facebook. And The Barrel Boss Q, a family owned and operated small business in Leduc County, AB and the manufacturer of the Original Canadian Charcoal Drum Smoker. Visit them at www.barrelbossq.ca to see the whole lineup and follow them on Facebook & Instagram. All music on The Eat More Barbecue podcast has been graciously provided by Alan Horabin. Search Alan Horabin on YouTube to check out his new music. Eat More Barbecue can be found online at www.eatmorebarbecue.ca & www.albertabbqtail.ca and my email is eatmorebarbecue@gmail.com Social media links: Facebook & Instagram at eat_more_barbecue Twitter @eatmorebarbecue Thanks for listening. Please subscribe, rate and review. This podcast is a production of Eat More Barbecue Digital Media.

The Decibel
Recovery stalls in Prince Edward Island a month after Fiona

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 18:03


It's been a month since post-tropical storm Fiona slammed into Atlantic Canada, causing huge amounts of devastation. In Prince Edward Island, thousands of trees came down, houses were destroyed, and people remained without power for weeks. Amidst a labour shortage, recovery efforts in the province are moving slowly.The Globe's Greg Mercer visited PEI recently and spoke to people picking up the pieces after Fiona about what comes next.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at thedecibel@globeandmail.com

Sounds Atlantic
Episode 211: Interview with Newfoundland-Labradorian singer –songwriter Craig Young.

Sounds Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 69:30


Interview with Newfoundland-Labradorian singer –songwriter Craig Young.Bounce to the RhythmPodcast about independent music artists who are worthy of a bigger audience and deserve...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Treatland The podcast where you share your favorite food memories from childhood. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotifyhttps://www.facebook.com/ron.moores.18

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Hear about P.E.I.'s ban on the misuse of Non-Disclosure Agreements

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 9:29


Nova Scotia's government has said that creating legislation to ban the misuse of NDAs isn't a priority. The province's justice minister is waiting to see what happens with the ban Prince Edward Island introduced last year. We hear from the MLA who wrote P.E.I.'s law.

Kelly and Company
CAMH Hal-Dart's 24th Annual Mosaic for Mental Health Art Sale

Kelly and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 13:05


Ryan Delehanty highlights CMHA Halifax-Dartmouth's 24th annual Mosaic for Mental Health art sale. Plus, we hear about support groups helping neurodiverse individuals in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Kelly and Company
Full Episode - 1426

Kelly and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 104:08


Why is Ontario reducing doctors' payments for one-off virtual appointments? And, what do you do when you get 7 hours of sleep and still feel sluggish? Reporter Grant Hardy discusses the latest health headlines. Greg David stops by to scare up some of this year's spooky favourites available on TV and streaming services. Ryan Delehanty highlights CMHA Halifax-Dartmouth's 24th annual Mosaic for Mental Health art sale. Plus, we hear about support groups helping neurodiverse individuals in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. World Mental Health Day was October 10, and we learn about new data regarding mental health in the workplace with Evangeline Berube, VP of Strategic Accounts at Robert Half. On a bonus Know Your Rights conversation, Danielle McLaughlin discusses Bill 124 and collective bargaining right for nurses and other government regulated health care professions.

Strong Sense of Place
LoLT: The Island Walk on PEI & New Books

Strong Sense of Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 6:40 Very Popular


In this episode, we get excited about two new books: 'The Sleeping Car Porter' by Suzette Mayr and 'Such Sharp Teeth' by Rachel Harrison. Then Dave explains why we should all book a trip asap to Prince Edward Island to explore The Island Walk.  BOOKS The Sleeping Car Porter by Suzette Mayr https://bit.ly/3TmZjQB The Widows by Suzette Mayr https://amzn.to/3CxEwmf Venous Hum by Suzette Mayr https://bit.ly/3eqHq4j Such Sharp Teeth by Rachel Harrison https://bit.ly/3T8QFVE Cackle by Rachel Harrison https://bit.ly/3g09BHQ DISTRACTION OF THE WEEK The Island Walk https://theislandwalk.ca/ Travel & Leisure review https://bit.ly/3yxUsUn SSoP Ep. 42 — Atlantic Canada: For There Blow Some Cold Nor'westers on the Banks of Newfoundland https://bit.ly/3RW7uSv Transcript of this episode https://bit.ly/3EEN51t The Library of Lost Time is a Strong Sense of Place Production! https://strongsenseofplace.com Do you enjoy our show? Want access to fun bonus content? Please support our work on Patreon. Every little bit helps us keep the show going and makes us feel warm and fuzzy inside - https://www.patreon.com/strongsenseofplace As always, you can follow us at: Our web site at Strong Sense of Place Patreon Twitter  Instagram Facebook

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
Economic impact of the war in Ukraine

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 33:00


Macro strategist Gillian Edgeworth joins host Thomas Mucha to continue our discussion on the macro and market implications of the war in Ukraine, including the conflict's impacts on energy, food, and geopolitics. 2:10 - Update on the war in Ukraine5:20 - Oil price cap and the future of the Russian economy8:30 - Russia's economic relationship with China12:00 - India's and Turkey's relationship with Russia and the West16:20 - Positive developments in Ukrainian food exports18:10 - Investment implications of the war in Ukraine23:20 - Insights from 14 years analyzing the Russian market25:30 - Collaborative research approach------Views expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. 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Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 66 – Unstoppable Blind Therapist with Delmar MacLean

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 66:17


Yes, our guest on this episode, Delmar MacLean, happens to be blind. Does it really matter if Delmar is blind or not? No not at all. Some may ask then why I even mention blindness? It is because Delmar typifies the fact that happening to be blind does not in any way define him. Delmar's philosophy is that while he has a disability, he is not disabled.   Delmar completed a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in psychology and Religious Studies in 1998 and an honors thesis in psychology in 2001. He went on to complete a Master of Social Work degree at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo Ontario in 2003.   Since securing his Master's degree he has held several jobs he will discuss during our conversation. Today he works as a tele-counsellor for an international company helping employees dealing with issues about well-being.   What strikes me most about Delmar is that he has one of the most positive attitudes I have encountered not only about being blind, but about life in general. I believe you will find his thoughts and observations inspiring and thought-provoking. Please let me know what you think after listening to our episode.   About the Guest: Delmar MacLean, MSW, RSW.   Delmar MacLean was born and raised in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.  Although Delmar has had vision loss since birth, he has never let his vision loss hold him back.  Delmar's philosophy is that while he has a disability, he is not disabled.  Delmar believes in the social model of disability and that disability is just something that you work around.  Delmar completed a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in psychology and Religious Studies in 1998 and an honours thesis in psychology in 2001, both at the University of Prince Edward Island.  Delmar went on to complete a Master of Social Work degree at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo Ontario in 2003, specializing in clinical social work.  Since completing his master's degree in 2003, Delmar has worked in a variety of social service settings.  Delmar has lived and worked in a several different Canadian communities, including Halifax, Nova Scotia, Calgary, Alberta, Kitchener, Ontario, Waterloo, Ontario, and Barrie Ontario.  Delmar worked as a Service Coordinator for Vision Loss Rehabilitation Canada from 2008 to 2019.  Since 2019, Delmar has worked as a tele-Counsellor for LifeWorks, a multinational wellbeing platform that improves employee's individual, social, financial, and metal wellbeing.  Delmar currently lives in Barrie Ontario, Canada.             About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, hi, wherever you may be, this is Mike Hingson. And welcome back to unstoppable mindset where you're glad you're here. And we have a guest Delmar MacLean today Delmar has a master's in social welfare work. And he is also a person who happens to be blind. So we have some things in common there and Delmar has had his share of life experiences and adventures and we'll get to talk about some of those. And you'll get to meet him and kind of learn about him and maybe he'll inspire you a little bit so Delmar, welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad you're with us.   Delmar MacLean  01:56 Oh, thank you very much. It's great to be here. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  02:00 Well, tell me a little bit about your life growing up and were you born without sight Were you born blind.   Delmar MacLean  02:07 I actually I was I was born. I was born blind. I had what I was told anyways, and I had congenital cataracts and other issues. Now, the congenital cataracts they weren't dealt with in the same way when I was young as they are now of course, I was born in 1973. And I had, I had basically up until about 1977, or 78, I had five operations, you know, in five I operations within that period. And that allowed me to obtain partial vision in one eye. So So technically, I'm not totally blind. Now, obviously, I have enough vision right now that I can, you know, I can get around. I, you know, I can take public transit, I can walk I you know, read large print, I have larger fonts on my computer. But to give you a context there, I had my first i operation, I think it was in January of 1974. So, yeah, so between 74 and 77 or 78, that's when I had my series of five eye operations. And I had one last eye surgery in 2011 wherein I, there was a an inter ocular lens implanted in my better seeing IRA because, when I had my surgeries back in the early 70s the process at least as I understand it for children was not to take out you know, the the lens that was that had the cataract and right and replace it with anything, right? They would just remove the lenses and then often you would, they would use, you know, glasses right with with strong magnification to you know, if there was any vision to that could be maximized.   Michael Hingson  04:08 So how, yeah, so how is cataract surgery changed over the years?   Delmar MacLean  04:13 Well, I think nowadays, you know, you can have the the inter ocular lenses putting your eyes in often you know, a person can have fairly normal vision, you know, like, it's a result of the surgeries but because of the type of surgeries they did when I was younger, you know, there was I think I'm not not a medical expert so cracked it I mean, I don't I have to be careful what I say here, but I think that it was more of a risk of you know, scar tissue being left behind. And that's what happened in my other eye, which I sent for the see blur, right? I prayed. I pretty much consider myself as being blind in that eye because it's really there's nothing there to use, you know? to do anything, and that's what happened there, there was, there was some scar tissue that was left behind that the surgeon couldn't get in. And, you know you in in 2011, the surgeon that was that I was working with, he said, yeah, there is no in no real sense, you know, trying to do anything once and I, he said I could we could try to implant a lamp lens in there. But he said, I don't think it would really make a difference, it wouldn't really give give you anything. So,   Michael Hingson  05:31 of course surgery, and I'm not a medical expert, either by any standard, but I would think that surgery has changed now to where there is a lot more specific pinpoint surgery they can do and a lot that they can do with lasers that they weren't able to do 4050 years ago.   Delmar MacLean  05:49 Yeah, but just in my case. So they're saying at this point, it's not, it wouldn't give me anything more than what I have. As it was, in 2011, when I had the lens put in my, in my seeing eye, so to speak, the dot one of the physician's assistants, when I went for my post surgical checkup, he said, Oh, I'm sorry, the surgery failed, you know, and your vision. So poor. Meanwhile, I thought it was great, because I had been wearing really thick glasses, you know, for most of my life. And now, of course, I feel like I have a little bit more vision than what I had with the thick glasses. So so to me, it's an improvement. They're telling me basically now, getting any type of eyeglasses won't really help me. But I think it's kind of great not to have to wear to wear glasses. And it's weird, because now sometimes people don't even know that I have you know that I have low vision. And so I'm kind of excited that I can walk around without glasses, and I don't I don't, you know, consider it a failure. So I guess it's all perspective.   Michael Hingson  07:02 It is one of the constant things that we tend to see. And you you summarized it very well with what that woman told you, which is, I'm sorry that we failed, and you can't have more vision. And the problem in the medical the optical industry is it's a failure if they can't restore your eyesight rather than recognizing that eyesight is not the only game in town. Yeah, it makes it it makes it so unfortunate that we see that so much. And that contributes to the myth that if you're blind, you can't do anything. And that'd be my question to you. What if you tomorrow lost the rest of your eyesight?   Delmar MacLean  07:44 Yeah, I mean, I think I mean, I can't say that I wouldn't be, you know, have some measure of disappointment for sure. I'd be but but I feel in, in my, my view, and this, of course, probably, I have worked for cniv, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, their vision loss rehabilitation area. So I worked for them for a number of years. And so I'm, you know, I'm well aware of how one can compensate for partial vision, no vision, you know, there's ways to work around it. So of course, I, I think I would have some measure of disappointment, because I don't, I don't actually remember having no vision because I was so young. But I know that I could work around like I don't think, to me, it doesn't have to be, oh, my goodness, I'm blind, I might, you know, I'm life's not worth living. And trust me, I have worked with people who were at that point, you know, where they thought, you know, the idea of going blind, it would be the worst thing ever, or even, you know, having partial vision that will walk can you do when you're blind, you know, it's over? Right? Where so I certainly don't think that way, my view of disability is, you know, it's something that you you can work around, right, that you have to look at strategies that help you just to go around, you know, kind of like you might have to go around, you know, a fork in the road, right or an obstacle in the road, you know, in in in people. I think we all function differently. To a degree anyway. Right? So, like you said, it's it does, having no vision or less vision, it doesn't have to be thought of as a deficit. You know, it's,   Michael Hingson  09:34 well, the problem is that society treats it as a deficit. And so let me let me suggest this and we've talked about this on unstoppable mindset before my proposal and my submission is everyone has a disability. And the fact is that people with eyesight all have a disability and to use your terminology, they've worked around it that is their light dependent, and they don't know how to function without light, Thomas Edison and the people who invented the electric light bulb, worked around their disability, but make no mistake, it's still there. And as soon as you as soon as you lose power, as soon as you learn light and lose lights, people run for candles, flashlights and other things, so that they can see what to do, which they may or may not be able to find technology to temporarily offset that disability. It's there. But we don't we we don't make the leap to say okay, but there are people who are that way all the time. Why should we treat them different?   Delmar MacLean  10:38 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, no, um, and I as human as we're, as we're talking with that, I can think of instances where I've, let's say, I've come home to my condo with a friend who's totally sighted, right, and we go into the, in the doorway, you know, when it's dark in there, I noticed they're having a fit, because, oh, you put the lights on, right. And I'm kind of just, you know, walking, walking around my condo in the dark, you know, until I until I eventually get to where the, you know, light sources and turn the switch on, right. But I noticed they're, they're panicking, you know, there's no light, there's no plate, right? And I'm kind of chuckling to myself, you know, these guys really need light. It's not that hard to get around, you know, like dark gray, you can feel your way. And of course, you know, pretty familiar with with my own house, right? So I know where things are. Yeah. But I know what you're saying society has this idea that you especially with, with vision, right, that you can't do anything without vision Corps, I think those of us who have vision loss, or really any type, any type of disability know that we can, we can work around if we're creative. And that's, I had a colleague at CNN, IB years ago, who would say that, you know, we have to be creative if we have a loss, you know, to work around, and he was totally blind. And he actually said it was honorable that I remember he said, it was honorable to have vision loss. That is to say,   Michael Hingson  12:11 Well, the problem is, I suppose I'll put it that way, we do have to be creative, because society has as yet not chosen to be inclusive. And the fact is that society should recognize that we all need different tools to function in life. And the fact that I may need some slightly different tools than a totally sighted person might need doesn't change the fact. And we can't seem to get away from that. So we're forced to oftentimes be a lot more creative than we otherwise might need to be. And we have to go do things differently, like on the internet, it is it is a challenge to go to a lot of websites that aren't very accessible. And one of the reasons I joined accessibility in 2021 was to help promote a concept that as it increased and improved and was enhanced, would make more websites accessible in a very scalable way. But the fact is that websites can be made accessible, whether it be through artificial intelligence, and remediation, or just manual coding. And even so less than 2% of all websites are accessible today, because it reflects the attitudes of the society.   Delmar MacLean  13:28 Right? I find we, and I'm not before I say this, I'm not saying this is easy, but I think we, as people with vision loss have to be continually advocating for ourselves and others, I think we have to be willing to speak up and say, you know, this, this, the way we're doing things right now isn't working. But here are some solutions that we can use. And I know that that sometimes people get offended by that, or they you know, they they they get a little bit a little bit defensive, right, when we're when we're trying to say that something isn't working, and here's a better way. But I think that's the only way to help things to move forward as if we continually, you know, continually being vocal, and advocating and trying to educate people in terms of what can be done in the fact that vision loss doesn't have to be a total obstacle in that you can work around it. And we all do. I mean, we   Michael Hingson  14:31 all and we all have to Yeah, advocacy is is something that more and more we all have to do to to get things done. In this country. There are lots of political debates raging. And you've got a lot of evidence that most of society may view things one way, and Congress views it another way. And even advocacy to tends to have major challenges because you've got 500 up to 537 people that just have decided no, this is the way it's going to be no matter what 80 or 90% of the population believes. And at the same time, we can't give up advocating for ourselves and advocating for what we need to have, because it's the only way that we're going to make any progress and get to be part of the dialogue by society.   Delmar MacLean  15:29 It sounds like Canada, right where I am. I mean, not not, you know, a little bit different political structure. Right. But a similar issues, you know, I think,   Michael Hingson  15:37 yeah, it is. It is the same sort of thing. And yeah, the political structure is different to a degree, but the, the political leaders, sometimes in quotes, don't listen to people, and they think they know more. And you know, that is true down the line, as you said, Some people can get offended when you advocate and say, well, this system isn't working for a person who happens to be blind, here's a better way. And they get offended by that, because they don't think that we really know or can know, what we need for ourselves, because obviously, we're blind. We don't know anything.   Delmar MacLean  16:20 And the other thing, though, I think the other factor is that they have a different lived experience, because they they often they don't have a disability they've not maybe not associated with people with disabilities. So they don't really know what's possible. I actually had a professor, when I was in University suggests to me that there is no discrimination toward people with disabilities, because we have government legislation to prevent that. And I had to really try not to just sort of laugh in his face, I was really trying to bite my tongue and think, What the heck is this guy talking? I'm sure I know, he meant well, but really, you can see, do you really think that just because government enacts legislation that that things go away? Like so for example, if government enacts legislation, does discrimination, you know, toward persons of color go away, you know, does our, you know, issues of poverty immediately solve because the government enacts legislation? To me that's such a crazy, naive idea. But that, to me, that was because he didn't have lived experience of, you know, living with a disability, right, and trying to navigate various aspects of society. Various.   Michael Hingson  17:38 One of the things that we, one of the things that we tried to do with this podcast is to stir people's curiosity to maybe look at some of the things that we talked about, like what you're you're talking about, and your professor is an interesting example. And it's all too often the case, oh, there's no real discrimination, because there are laws tell that to women who aren't hired for positions or tell it to the women Professional Soccer League, in this country that works as hard as men, and just now has pushed to get a contract that says that they're going to get equal pay anything visibility? That is discriminatory as he gets, and that that there wasn't a contract for all these years. And the reality is that it it does go back to societal attitudes. And you're right, a lot of people tend not to have the life experiences that some of us do. But their life experiences also teach them, they have the answers, and that's what needs to change. True.   Delmar MacLean  18:51 I agree. I agree. And your idea, you know, as he said earlier, that people with vision loss or with disabilities in general, don't know what they need, right? Because we're, we're somehow, you know, we have this deficit, right. And we need to be taken care of, I mean, I think that that needs to be changed. I know that. I don't know what your experience has been. But But I know, sometimes when you know, people find out that I that I have a graduate degree and that I own my own place and that I you know, I live on my own you know, people are, say things like, Oh, that's wonderful. You have a you know, you have a job and you live on your own and you own your home, in but they always have to attach on the end of that, given your challenges every year. I'm thinking like, what the heck does that mean? I had a doctor who, while I was doing my, actually when I was doing my last eye surgery in 2011. And he told me that once I had the lens implant, my life I'd have a normal life. And I thought to myself, What the heck is this guy talking about? You know, because even at that time, obviously I was, you know, I had my master's I was working full time. Let me know, I remind you, I didn't know in my own home at that time, but you know, things come along, right. I mean, but otherwise, you know, my life was, I thought fairly normal. So I again, I had to bite my tongue and, and try not to laugh at this guy, what the heck? Are you talking about normal life? You know? And sometimes I feel like saying to them, Wow, that's wonderful. You went to medical school? You know, how did you do that? You know?   Michael Hingson  20:24 Yeah. No, it is amazing. So what was it like growing up on Prince Edward Island where you're from? It was   Delmar MacLean  20:32 it was interesting. Pei. It's, it's very community oriented. And I guess, both in good and maybe bad ways. The good, of course, is that you always have, I think, support your friends and family. And it's, it's fairly apparent fairly tight knit type of community. Now, the challenges there, of course, are that you, you have to be careful that you, you if you do something that Peeves someone off, right, or like, especially for example, in your, in the business world, it's going to really come back to, to hurt you because of because of the smallness of the community, we're, of course, talking to a province of, I think it's 150,000 Now, I believe is what the population is. So if you do something, that, that, you know, you have a bad experience in an employment setting, and you're, you know, you're looking for other jobs, that's probably going to make it hard for you to, to move ahead in terms of your career, right, because so many people know one another. So that's a little bit a little bit of a drawback there. But overall, I, you know, I, I found growing up there to be to be, I guess, successful for me, I mean, I didn't really have any major drawbacks. Now, I think when I was growing up, I really didn't think that Pei was any different from any other place. I didn't understand the fact that, you know, there wasn't much anonymity there, you know, given the small size of the population. For example, when I left the island, a was hard at first to get used to living in, in larger centers where, you know, people don't really get as much involved in your life, you know, they're not looking at what the neighbors do. Because I noticed, like, if I go back east to visit back home to visit, because of the smallness people are more interested in, you know, and what their neighbors are doing, or if their neighbors are having trouble, you know, and, and sometimes, there might be a little more of a tendency to, you know, to talk about your neighbors, right, whereas, I don't know, that happens as much in bigger centers. And I don't say that I don't mean to poopoo PII in any in any way. It's a it's a great place in many ways. But I also recognize that there are some limitations given its size.   Michael Hingson  23:11 It's small, and the size is what it is, it is an island. Yes, it is. Yes, yes. There walk too far in one direction, or you'd be in trouble. Well, I   Delmar MacLean  23:20 mean, yeah, I mean, you have to hit Santos still does take several hours, you know, to drive across it. So. Yeah, so but I mean, you're you're talking about, so the main urban area, there, of course, is Charlottetown. And I think it's about 60,000 people now. And that's what that's where most of the population lives. So other than that, it's, there's another small city, I think that's around 15,000. That's Summerside. But other than that, there are a lot of, you know, rural towns. And so it is very much a rural, rural province. None, you know, nothing wrong with that, right. It just just, I think it's just accepting what it is right? When, right, wherever you are, right, accepting what it is. Now, one other challenge that I've had that I did find growing up there, of course, was in relation to having a disability, right, there aren't as many accessible features that you would find in larger centers. We do have a transportation system now in Charlottetown. But once you get outside of that, you know, when you're having to use a car, so if you can't drive or you, you know, don't have a partner who drives you're going to want to, you're going to pretty much be staying in Charlotte him. So like, I think, you know, I just, you know, I still love the place because I mean, obviously, I grew up there and I still have that attachment to it, but I also recognize the limitations that it presents for me in terms of what I want to do in my life. Do you still have family there? I have some cousins. Is there but mostly like, my parents are gone, you know, sisters and their sisters and brothers. There are some of the some sisters and brothers of my father's family that are still around, but, but my parents had me when they were older. So like they were in their early 40s When they had me.   Michael Hingson  25:22 So, did you have any siblings? No, no. So you were an only child? Yes. Yeah. Which also had its experiences and in your in challenges and, and blessings, I suppose, in a way?   Delmar MacLean  25:34 Well, I used to joke that. And I mean, don't don't take this really seriously. But I'd say, in a funny way, the well, being an only child, I tended to get, I tended to get what I wanted, right, because I didn't have any siblings to compete against. I remember. My, my friend and his brother, you know, they sometimes will they fought over things. I would think, man, I'm glad I'm an only child. And I don't mean when I say that I got what I wanted. I don't mean that I was spoiled, spoiled and demanded a lot. Right. But it's just that I, you know, I didn't have to, I figured I didn't have to worry about a brother or sister and then you know, fighting with them.   Michael Hingson  26:15 Well, you went to college, and did all those things.   Delmar MacLean  26:19 Yes, yes. Yes, I did my my undergraduate degree in actually psychology and world religions. For a while I was having trouble deciding whether I wanted to exclusively do psychology or world world religions, which I was also interested in. So I decided to do a double major. I did that at the course at the University of Prince Edward Island. And then, after I finished my honours in psychology, I went off to do my master's in social work from Wilfrid Laurier University, which is in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.   Michael Hingson  26:56 What What made you go into social work and get a, an advanced degree in MSW?   Delmar MacLean  27:01 Well, when I was going on social work, yes, well, when I was growing up, when I was in the ball, I was of course, a client of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, and they hooked me up. This is how I remember and anyway, it was, it was pretty young, probably 10 or 11. Maybe they hooked me up with a gentleman who was totally blind through a summer program. And of course, we became, we became good friends. He, as an adult, retrained to become a social worker. And well, I was his friend. And, you know, he was mentoring me, he, he went back to school, he finished his, his is psychology degree, I believe it was he was studying and also then he did his master's in social work. And, you know, during that time, obviously, I was thinking about, Okay, what could I be when I when I grew up, you know, and I knew that I, you know, I couldn't do something where I'd have to drive a car, right? I couldn't be a boss driver, I wouldn't be an airline pilot or something like that. But I think my through my friendship with him, I saw him you know, doing his doing his university degrees and you know, in working and I thought, Well, gee, you know, here's a guy that has, they can't see anything, right. And he's doing all these things. So obviously, if he can do it, I can do it. And I don't know I think just through his mentoring and learning about what he did, I figured that's that's what I wanted to do. So   Michael Hingson  28:31 of course now with societal attitudes slowly changing. Maybe you could at least if you were living down here you could go off and be a bus driver or whatever you're given the way most people drive down here I don't see the problem.   Delmar MacLean  28:43 Yeah, well I sometimes think that here where I am to and in Barry you know, sometimes I'm crossing the street you know, and I of course have the green light and I see someone barrel through the intersection. I'm thinking gee, do you not know that when someone the pedestrians in the crosswalk you you're supposed to stop? Or you better go back and take your driving past again? Especially when the light is in your favor? Yeah, yeah, yeah. So you but you still obviously you know, have to be careful about because I guess not everybody obeys the traffic laws even if they happen to have a driving license My   Michael Hingson  29:17 point exactly. And it seems to be happening more and more people are impatient. People want to do what they want to do when they want to do it and everything else be damned as it were. An unfortunate in your Well, you're not maybe not old enough to have may have lived in a time to hear the terms of things like defensive driving where people really looked out for each other but that is that is a concept that it seems to have dropped by the wayside over the   Delmar MacLean  29:48 No I do remember that con concept because I was thinking that the other day here when I was walking I said wow, these drivers are really offensive now you know, they're, they're, they're they You want to get to where they want to go? And then that's, you know, that's That's it. Yeah. And I think they might drive. You know, I shouldn't say this, but part of me was thinking, you know, perhaps they would just run if you were in the way their way, they would just run into you and keep going, Oh, well, I've got to get here. So, no, I mean, that's maybe a little bit. I shouldn't say that's a little bit extreme.   Michael Hingson  30:22 I'm not sure that's always true. Yeah. Things things can happen. But you got your master's in social work. Yes. And what did you then do? Ah,   Delmar MacLean  30:34 well, I, you know, of course, I spent a little bit of time looking for work. It was a little bit challenging initially. I, I nomadically, if you will, moved around the country a little bit. I started of course, in Kitchener Waterloo where I got my masters. No, I'm sorry. I actually went I actually briefly went back to Pei tried to get work there. It just wasn't happening. So that I, I decided I'd go back to Kitchener Waterloo and I did that. I worked for a really small agency for a few months, which base basically as a human, sorry, what am I I'm trying to remember what the title of my my job was sort of like an information resource type of worker where I help people with disabilities to access resources. And you know, and I helped him with issues around advocacy. I did that was a very, very, very small agency. So I worked there. And when was that? Oh, it was way back in 2004. Okay. So I did that for a little bit. And then I got a job with a community counseling agency. They're a contract position, and I was there for about a year. And then after that, I, I decided I try Calgary, Alberta. So I moved there. I worked for a bit, or an employment counseling agency. That was interesting. And then I actually I ended up back, I ended up back in Kitchener for a while. And then I ended up in Halifax where Halifax is in Nova Scotia is where I, I started with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. So I was there for a while, which led me actually to Barry, where I continued to work for cniv for about 11 years, until unfortunately, I should mention that when I was up seeing IB, I was doing mostly service coordination and counseling work, you know, dealing with clients who were new to vision loss, right. So, so helping them adjusted to vision loss, and access appropriate rehabilitation services. So I did that up until 2019. And unfortunately, I was I was part of a union. And there was a cot made to a certain position in you know, when someone else was allowed to take my position it was, you know, I guess they call it pumping. So, so then I, yeah, so then I had to, to look for something else. And I started working with the company I'm with now, which is LifeWorks. And they're a they're an international EAP company apply Employment Assistance Program. And I do, I'm a counselor with them. So did telephone counseling. So I've been there now. Well, actually, it'll be next month, it'll be three years.   Michael Hingson  33:43 So the union didn't tend to protect you much.   Delmar MacLean  33:45 No, no. And I think, yeah, and, of course, where I am now doesn't have a union. And, you know, it's funny, because before I got a unionized job, I thought, oh, you know, unions, great unions. Great. Right. And you often hear that, that, you know, the union is the be all and end all but yeah, but it just goes to show that you can your job is still not guaranteed. Absolutely. 100% If you're in the union, of course, you have union dues, and all of that, too. I'm not saying you know that unions are totally bad either, right? I'm just saying, there's no guarantee 100% You know, just because you have a union that your your job is your job is what's the word I'm looking for, you know that you can never Yeah, 100% secure that you can never lose it.   Michael Hingson  34:35 And it probably shouldn't be that way because if somebody was, I'm not saying is true for you, but if somebody isn't doing a good job, we hear a lot of times that they they tend to get protected a lot. And you know, we look at look at the George Floyd case and the police cases and a lot of the things that have happened down here, where clearly someone did something they weren't supposed to do How can unions defend it no matter what. Right? Where do you where do you draw the line on that too?   Delmar MacLean  35:07 Right. And the other thing I find, too, sometimes with the unions is, some employees will just say, Well, you know, that's my job. And that's it. I'm not doing anything else that's, you know, leaving a little bit outside of the scope of my job, you know, I'm just doing what I have to do. This is what the union says I have to do. And sometimes, I think that in the old days, you know, we we really, maybe we really needed the protection of unions, but sometimes, sometimes, you know, unions can, can we, you know, they can ask for maybe more than what's what's really needed. You know, there can be some, some, a little bit of greed there, too, not saying I'm not saying that all unions are bad. I don't want to I don't want to generalize, but certainly challenges, right?   Michael Hingson  35:59 No, absolutely not. You don't want to do that. Because unions can be very, and are very helpful in a lot of ways. There's a lot out there, does. We, you have lived in a lot of places in Canada, what's your favorite place to live?   Delmar MacLean  36:14 I knew you're gonna ask me that. And everybody asked me that. And what I would say that it's really hard to pick one place and say, That's my favorite place. I think every place I've lived, as had things that I really liked, and then things that maybe I didn't like as much. And I think that what I learned from that is that no matter where you are, there are going to be positives and negatives. You know, there's never there's never a perfect, you know, you can have your cake and eat it and every everything's, everything's roses, right? I mean, I think wherever you are, it's what it's what you you make it, you know, if you look at making your life positive, and having a positive attitude, you'll succeed. But if you if you say, Oh, this isn't like where I was before, why did he do these things this way, and not the way it was done in my hometown, and this is wrong. And, you know, and he, you're and you're not going to endear yourself to the people there. Right, and you're going to you're going to have trouble acclimating and into the society. So I think it's just what I've learned is every, like I say, every place has positives, and every place, you know, things that you really like, right? And then there's going to be drawbacks, things that you that maybe you're not as fond of in every place and just, yeah, just have a good attitude and be happy where you are and try to align yourself with some things, but the things that you like and, and just try to have an open mind and you'll, you know, you'll you'll have a good good experience there. I like living in different places and seeing different things.   Michael Hingson  37:55 I hear exactly what you're saying. I grew up in a little town about 55 miles from where I live now. I grew up in a town called Palmdale, California, okay, right in the Mojave Desert, Southern California. And it was a small town, we only had about 26 2700 people in the town. Oh, and as we drove around Southern California occasionally we went through this little town called Victorville, which was hardly even a blip on a radar scope compared to Palmdale is 2700 people when I grew up and went to the University of California at Irvine have lived in a number of places. And, and they have good memories of Palmdale, but also never wanted really to move back there. Because I found other places that I enjoyed well, and ultimately, in 2014, we were living in the San Francisco area in a town called Novato, which is in actually Marin County, just north of San Francisco. And because of an illness my wife had and so on, we decided to move closer to family. And we ended up finding property and building a home in Victorville California, which used to be a blip on the radar scope. But when we came to Victorville in 2014, there were 115,000 people living here. Okay, well, as I said, is 55 miles from where I grew up. And you know, there are there things that are good about Victorville, and things that that we don't tend to like. But there are things that we do like, and most important of all, we have a nice home here. We built a home because it's easier to when you have property to do it build a home, when you need to make it wheelchair accessible, which we needed to do for Karen. Because if you buy a home and modify it, it's so expensive. So every place you go is what you make of it. And I hear people talking all the time about how horrible New York is, and they wouldn't want to live there. And they say the New York cabbies are dangerous and so on. My wife actually pointed out once when we were in New York and We were in our car with a friend. And Karen said to our friend, look at the New York cabs, you never see any of them with dented fenders and all dinged up. The reality is they're good drivers. Now they honk their horns and they get impatient. And that's part of the New York Mystique, I suppose. But they don't. They don't tend to crash their cabs and have all sorts of dinged up cabs, they're taking care of, and they drive. They really drive pretty well. Now, that was a while ago, and I don't know about today. But the best thing to do in New York is to take public transportation anyway.   Delmar MacLean  40:39 I've never been to New York, my mother was and she, my mother didn't really like big cities. So I asked her about New York, no big city, you know. I don't know. I mean, I think that's someplace I would like to go someday, I'd like to see, I'd really like to see Madison Square Garden, because my, one of my my favorite rock band Led Zeppelin played there. And in 19, seven, while he played there a lot in the 70s. Right, but I'd love to see the cmst. And I don't know, I think I think it'd be neat just to, you know, walk amongst the tall buildings there. And the excitement, there's a lot going on. So I think eventually, eventually, at some point in my life, I'll probably, you know, go there for a visit,   Michael Hingson  41:23 there is a lot going on there. It's a wonderful place to be. And Karen said, If we ever had to move back to the New York area, although we lived in Westfield, New Jersey for six years, so we're about 40 miles from New York and took the trains in. Although when she went in, she drove, said if I wanted to, had to live back there, I'd want to live in New York City, and maybe expensive, but rent an apartment because you don't need a car to get around. And even she in a wheelchair doesn't need a car, because public transportation is accessible, but there is so much there. And so close, there's a lot of culture in New York City, and I lived.   Delmar MacLean  42:02 I just gonna say, like, then see, that's, I think that's, I think, not to keep dwelling on, you know, disability related issues. But I feel like, as a person with a disability, I value being in a large center, where there's really good trends and like you say, where you don't need a car where you can, you know, hop on a bus or subway or whatnot, and, you know, in go ease, move easily between destinations. And that's, for example, PII, right, you don't have that because it's small. And I think what happens is, when you try to point that out to people who live there who say don't have a disability, they don't really get it, and they think they may be taken, as you know, like you're putting their place down while being one, because you're pointing out that it doesn't have a lot of transportation, because they can hop in a car, right, and they can drive long distances between venues. So for them, maybe they think all the big city, it's, you know, too noisy, there's too many people and there's too many big buildings, and everything's congested together, right. Whereas, you know, I guess, to us, right, we see the value of, Wow, you can, you know, you can, you can get to so many places so quickly and with so much ease, and you don't need to own a vehicle or worry about driving. I just wanted to add that in there. I didn't mean to interrupt you.   Michael Hingson  43:20 And those big buildings. If you walk around a lot in a city like New York, then you start to wonder what's going on in there, I want to go see. And it's a lot of fun. But you know, not every large city has the same level of access and public transportation. And sometimes there's strong resistance. I remember when I moved to Westfield, we moved just before they started modifying the train station in Westfield to make it wheelchair accessible. So when we first moved there, you would if you were at the train station waiting for the train, the only way to get on the train is they have built in stairs on the train, they're very steep, you go up three steps that take you probably up over four, well, not up over four feet, but close to it. Three feet or so no more than that. And you get on the train. So wheelchair access didn't exist there. And when the New Jersey Transit organization said, We're gonna make this accessible, there was a lot of opposition to a Why don't you just hire people to be at each station in case somebody in a wheelchair comes in, you lift them on the train, forget the liability and the dangers of doing that, especially in the rain. And, and other things. There was a lot of opposition to it, even though it was the right thing to do. And one of the arguments was, well, if you put in these ramps and so on that we have to run up the ramp and run across the sidewalk and get on a train. And if we're there at the last second, we might miss the train. I mean, there were all sorts of excuses, right? Right, that people would give rather than saying, why don't we want to be inclusive. And the reality is that it didn't make a difference to people's access to the train. From a standpoint of the average walking person getting on the train, they still got on the train, they made it. But it also, once it was done, made it possible for people in chairs, to get on the train, and be just as accommodated as everyone else was.   Delmar MacLean  45:30 Yeah, well, it's like, if that's the same thing as if you look at the slope curbs, you know, the street corners, I like, it doesn't just benefit someone in a wheelchair, it's easier for a walker. So you're not stepping down like a steep curb really abruptly, you know, or or, you know, a parent with a child in a stroller, you know, he can roll up and down those easily, like, so really? It really benefits everybody, right?   Michael Hingson  45:53 Sure it does. And the reality is, that is so often the case, and a lot of the technologies that blind people use could certainly benefit other segments of society. But we tend not to think about that. Why are we using VoiceOver and the voice technology and iPhones a lot more in vehicles than we do to make us not need to look at touchscreens and so on. There are so many examples that that are out there well, and on one of the episodes of unstoppable mindset, we interviewed a woman. She's known as the blind history lady, Peggy Chung, and she told the story of how the typewriter was originally invented for a blind Countess, to be able to communicate privately write an interesting story. And there are a lot of examples of that kind of thing.   Delmar MacLean  46:44 For sure. And I was, I was also thinking of just how, you know, most transit authorities now, you know, you have the automated announcing on the bus, you know, announcing the stops, right. And of course, originally, of course, we're thinking that people with vision loss, but that also, I think convenor can benefit people, maybe who's, you know, maybe, you know, English isn't their first language, and maybe they struggle a little bit with reading English, right, but they're better at hearing it, you know, and people that are just more auditory in terms of perception, right? It can be, you can be beneficial for them, you know, maybe even people who, you know, can't read, right, but they can, but they can hear the stop Oh, here, you know, a, you know, I get off now. Right. So, right. So yeah, it's beneficial to more, you know, to all kinds of segments and in society. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  47:39 So, what is the for you from a standpoint of having a master's in social work, and so on? What's the most challenging part of being a therapist?   Delmar MacLean  47:48 I think, the most challenging part, I think is, um, you know, when learning to do to do this, what am I trying to say here? I'm better in terms of doing this. And I wasn't actually but I think the most challenging part is not to think that you have to give the person all the answers. It's really, you know, you, you, you listen to what they say, You, you, you know, you're reflecting back to them, what you hear them, saying their concerns are, you know, you're making suggestions about things that could be helpful. But in the end, it's for them to do the work, you know, and if they don't do the work, you have to be careful not to take the blame for that. Because sometimes people will try to project that blame back on you, you know, if they, if they don't do the work they need to do you know, they might say, you know, they might come back to you and say, Oh, I'm still, you know, I'm feeling I'm still feeling stressed. My you know, I'm not, I'm not finding any answers here, you know, what kind of a therapist, are you? Right? I mean, they might not, you know, directly come out and say that so much, maybe that's an extreme example, but sometimes people will try to put the blame on you if they haven't moved forward. And it's because they they haven't, they haven't done the work, you know, for example, if you talk about self care, sometimes, you know, person will be really stressed out, right, and they won't have a very good balance between work and personal life. And you'll suggest to them, you know, the importance of taking time to take care of themselves, you know, do things they find that are relaxing and enjoyable. So they're, so they get some diversion from the stress of work, but then they don't do it right. And then they come back with you with the same, the same challenges, you know, but they they get, sometimes people can get it because they get frustrated with you, but they haven't really tried to put the strategies in place that you've, you've suggested, so you have to be just careful. Not to take that on. So I think as a therapist who I really have to know how to take care of myself, right how to make sure that I'm that I'm getting some diversion from my work, right when I'm not working so that I so that I don't burn out. Does that? Does that make sense? What I'm saying?   Michael Hingson  50:20 It does? It does. And you do have to really take care of yourself to in all that. Yeah. Yeah, you need to step back yourself sometimes and look at how is this affecting me? And how do I deal with   Delmar MacLean  50:34 it? Right. And I think the only thing I've noticed as, again, as a person with with vision loss is I've had to find a creative way to, you know, to work within the electronic structures that they have, you know, for important note taking and effective ways to do my notes. And, for example, you know, as talented, as challenging as it can be, I make notes while I'm talking to people, you know, and I halfway done have my, you know, my notes when I'm done sessions, so then I just have to edit things, because it tends to take me longer to do paperwork. So I can't necessarily leave all my paperwork till after my sessions, because then you know, I'd be working all the time, right? Have you looked at?   Michael Hingson  51:15 Have you looked at doing things like recording sessions, or maybe having a microphone and laying a computer? transcribe the conversations?   Delmar MacLean  51:23 I thought about that. I mean, it's, yeah, I'm still some of that's, I guess, still a work in progress. But yeah, those are things I have thought about. So far, what I'm doing seems to be working for me. But like, I'm not my mind isn't isn't close to, to alternative suggestions like that.   Michael Hingson  51:46 You've said, and some of the information we've learned about you, and so on, and looking at your bow that you subscribe to the social model of disabilities. Can you tell me more about that? Sure. So, basically, so historically, right, I   Delmar MacLean  52:02 think we've we we sit, we subscribe to the, the medical individual model of disability, right? Where, where a person is seen as having deficits, right? And then the deficits are kind of their problem, right to deal with, right? That per, you know, for example, well, you know, that, that, that that person, you know, is in a wheelchair, that's, you know, that's too bad, right? But that's, you know, that's their, that's the deficit they have, right, or that person's blind or so on, right. Whereas the, the social model of disability, I first learned about that, you know, in in graduate school, I was reading works by all all Alden Alden. Chadwick in the UK, and he was talking about the social model of disability where disability, if seen more as a reflection of the, you know, the limitations in society, right to barriers in society. So, someone you know, wheelchairs is considered disabled, if there isn't a ramp to allow them to get into the building, right? Or, or someone who is blind, right? Well, there, we, they would be considered more disabled within the context. So, you know, if there's not voice to tech software, I just thought that maybe they're the, you know, the company that they're working, that they want to work for they they won't offer them jobs, right Job asked access with speech, you know, so they can, you know, use the computer just like someone who has total vision. So in other words, so the disability is more of a more of a reflection of the limitations in society than it is the, the, the physical limitations, right. Right. So that's why I like that model.   Michael Hingson  53:57 Well, you know, and as we advance in technology, we're, we're finding more and more ways to address some of that if people will choose to do it. So for example, for blind people, probably one of the more significant overall technologies in the last seven or eight years is Ira, I don't know whether you're familiar with Ira. I've heard of it, but I'm not as familiar with it. So I resent what's called a visual interpreter. And the the way Ira works is that you run an app on your phone, which activates a connection with a trained agent. And the operative part about that is trained. The agent can see whatever the phone camera sees, there are other technologies that you can add to it like if you're sitting at your your, your desktop or laptop, you can activate something called TeamViewer. The Ira agent can actually work on your computer and fill out forms. But the idea of IRA is that what you're able to do Who is when something is visual and you can't use, you can't do it yourself. There is a way to activate a technology that allows someone with eyesight who is trained to come essentially in and help you, which means you still get to do things on your own terms, or going through airports and traveling around can be very helpful. There are other technologies like Be My Eyes that   Delmar MacLean  55:24 mentioned that one. Yeah, that's the one I was, as you were talking about that, that was the one I was thinking of.   Michael Hingson  55:29 Except the problem with Be My Eyes is that the agents are our volunteers. And there's not the level of training. Whereas with Ira, not only are agents trained and hired because they demonstrate an incredible aptitude to be able to describe read maps and other things, but they sign nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements so that blind people using IRA can do tax work, they can use IRA, in doing work on their jobs, there are lawyers who use IRA to look at documents for discovery. An IRA is okay for that because of the level of confidentiality and absolute restrictions that agents are under. So what happens that IRA stays on Ira if you will, right, but But it means that I have access that I never used to have, which is really kind of cool. And then you've got access, and you've got technologies like accessibility, which uses in large part in artificial intelligence, which that can help make a website a lot more usable than it otherwise would. It's not the total solution for complicated websites, but the technologies are making things better, which is really cool. Yeah, and what we need to do is to get society to accept more of it,   Delmar MacLean  56:46 I just gotta say that to you know, to, to educate people more about these things and get them to accept it. So. So you don't hear things like well, you know, a blind or partially sighted person couldn't do this job, right? Because, you know, then they just, sometimes you hear things like that, oh, no, you know, that person couldn't do this job, right? Because they don't, they don't know. But all these technologies that are available, and that it's actually not a really costly Big Deal thing, you know, to to make the the work environment more accessible.   Michael Hingson  57:18 I have used IRA to interact with touchscreens, right? So the agent can direct me as to exactly where to push to activate something that's on a touchscreen, which is cool. Able to get hot chocolate out of a fancy coffee, hot chocolate tea machine, you know, for example, right? So you have hobbies, I assume, like anyone else, what type of last question for you is, what's your hobby?   Delmar MacLean  57:42 Oh, well, one of my hobbies is, I like to fool around on the guitar.   Michael Hingson  57:47 Of course, you like Frank Zappa? What else could you do?   Delmar MacLean  57:52 Well, I make noise and mostly right. I mean, I, I can't say that I'm a really proficient musician, but I just, I just like to play to play around with it just to relax. I'm also also, not currently, but I have in the past, and I tend to return to this as I've been a member of Toastmasters International. So enjoy, I enjoy public speaking. And so So Toastmasters International, it's a program where you learn leadership skills, you know, like public speaking, meeting presentations, you know, organizing different projects. But what I really like about that is the mentoring aspect of it, helping others in improve their public speaking skills and leadership skills, guiding others. So that's another hobby that I that I've had and I plan to return to that I kind of drifted away a little bit during the pandemic, because they, you know, they were doing a lot of remote meetings, and I don't know, I prefer I prefer in person. I found that after sitting on a computer all day for work, I didn't feel like doing. But I didn't know. Yeah. I also, let's see, what else am I into now? I, I like to do volunteer work. I'm on the accessibility Advisory Committee for one of my local school boards. And, of course, what we do is work with the school board to help to improve accessibility for students and staff who have disabilities, you know, within within the schools, the school board. So that does, that's interesting. We have several meetings each year and we also do during non pandemic times, right? We do audits in the school board within the schools, right. So we tour schools and we, we help to point out areas where you Um, things could be made more accessible. You know, like, for example, color contrast the gun steps, making washrooms more physically accessible for students and staff and you know, using wheelchairs or, you know, canes or walkers, things like that. You know, so it's, that that also keeps me busy too, in my spare time I enjoy that   Michael Hingson  1:00:25 keeps you out of trouble.   Delmar MacLean  1:00:28 know for sure. Some of the simpler things I enjoy. I love to walk, right. So I love to be I always it's funny, my friends always want to offer me rides here and there, right. But so I just, I just liked the simple thing of being Oh, walking to the grocery store, walking on air and just going for walks I like to, I like to you talked earlier about, you know, looking at buildings and wondering what people are doing in there. I do that when sometimes when I just, there's some apartment buildings in my in my neighborhood here. And I I walk by these high rises and then think, oh, who lives in there? And what are they doing? You know, the same thing with the houses. They're just, you know, you hear the birds, right? And you you see people driving by in their cars. And I don't know, I like just I just like to notice those things. It's relaxing.   Michael Hingson  1:01:20 They're driving and they don't take time to smell the roses as it were.   Delmar MacLean  1:01:23 Well, you know, and that's funny, because I think that, you know, when I think about the fact that I did, I can't drive I think some ways I think I'm lucky, right? Because I noticed my driving grams. That's all they do, right? They drive everywhere. And then it's like, oh, I have to go to the gym. But I figure I do so much walking. That's my that's my exercise. I feel like I'm I'm healthier. There you go. Sorry. You see it as positive?   Michael Hingson  1:01:46 Well, it is. And there's there's a lot to be said for walking and slowing down sometimes to when not rushing everywhere. I wish we all would do sometimes a little bit more than that. Well, this has been fun. If people want to reach out to you and maybe engage in more of a chat or learn more about what you do. How can they do that?   Delmar MacLean  1:02:08 Sure. Well, you could reach out to me, my my email addresses, Delmar D E L M A R ,M A C L E A N  so Delmar mclean@gmail.com. Or you can find me on Facebook, if you like I'm on there. I can't say I'm not on Twitter or any of these other social media platforms. I always joke I'm I'm almost 50 So I'm a little bit old school. So mostly it's the email or the Facebook, you know, you can certainly reach out to me, if you like,   Michael Hingson  1:02:39 yeah. Hey, whatever works? For sure. For sure. Well, Delmar, thank you very much for joining us today and giving us lots of insights. I hope that people have found this interesting and that people will reach out. And my   Delmar MacLean  1:02:53 pleasure, Michael, thank you for having me. It's been it's been fun.   1:02:57 I think we've all gotten a lot to think about from it. You know, you and me and everyone listening and I hope lots of people are. As always, I would appreciate it if after this episode, you give us a five star rating. And if you'd like to reach out to me, whoever you are, feel free to do so by writing me at Michaelhi@accessibe.com. That's M I C H A E L H I  at Accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. Go and listen or go look at our podcast page. Michael hingson.com/podcast. And Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N .com/podcast. But again, wherever you listen to this, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate it. Because of all of your comments. We were the February 2022. Podcast magazine's Editor's Choice and I want to again, thank everyone for that. And Delmar especially, I really appreciate the opportunity to have met you and to have you on the podcast and really appreciate you being here.   Delmar MacLean  1:04:00 Yes. And it was an honor for me. I thank you for or asking me to, you know, to come on i I've really I've really enjoyed it. And then in the end it was a pleasure.   Michael Hingson  1:04:10 My pleasure as well. And let's stay in touch.   Delmar MacLean  1:04:13 We will. All right. Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:04:19 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast
222. PEI's Pleasant Pork

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 32:02


Air Date: October 13, 2022 Welcome to Episode 222 of the podcast. This week takes us all the way out to beautiful Prince Edward Island for a visit with farmer Ranald MacFarlane of Fernwood, PEI. Ranald raises pasture fed pork, has a small dairy cattle operation and is a steward of the land. Give him a follow on Twitter @pleasantpork This episode has been brought to you by: Motley Que's 2022 Competition Bounty Program. In 2022, when you use Motley Que products and win a category or a G.C. you'll get some extra jangle in your pockets! Visit www.motleyque.ca and click on the BBQ Bounty Program tab at the top of the screen to get all the details. Township 27 develops, produces, distributes and sells the highest quality Pantry Spices, Herbs, Spice Blends, Sauces, Salad Dressings and Condiments for People Who Love Food! If you are looking for the best in spices, blends, sauces and condiments, whether it be retail, wholesale, or bulk, check us out at www.township27.com and follow them on Instagram and Facebook. And The Barrel Boss Q, a family owned and operated small business in Leduc County, AB and the manufacturer of the Original Canadian Charcoal Drum Smoker. Visit them at www.barrelbossq.ca to see the whole lineup and follow them on Facebook & Instagram. All music on The Eat More Barbecue podcast has been graciously provided by Alan Horabin. Search Alan Horabin on YouTube to check out his new music. Eat More Barbecue can be found online at www.eatmorebarbecue.ca & www.albertabbqtail.ca and my email is eatmorebarbecue@gmail.com Social media links: Facebook & Instagram at eat_more_barbecue Twitter @eatmorebarbecue Thanks for listening. Please subscribe, rate and review. This podcast is a production of Eat More Barbecue Digital Media.

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History)
No Booze and No Dogs: A History of Tourism in Prince Edward Island

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 36:47


In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Alan MacEachern and Edward MacDonald, the co-authors of a new book on the history of tourism in Canada's smallest province. The Summer Trade: A History of Tourism on Prince Edward Island was published by McGill=Queen's University Press in 2022. This book covers the various stages in the history of tourism from its early beginnings in the late nineteenth century to its mass commercialization in the postwar era. The land of Anne of Green Gables has been a favourite destination for generations of visitors seeking peace in an idyllic and timeless setting. Alan MacEachern is a professor of history at the University of Western Ontario who has published widely on Canadian environmental history. He is joined by Edward MacDonald, a professor of history at the University of Prince Edward Island who has also written on environmental history. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt. If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society's mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada's past.

The Nations of Canada
Episode 111: Prince Edward Island

The Nations of Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 40:55


The British experiment with new methods of colonization on an island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

From John To Justin
James Colledge Pope

From John To Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 18:45


The first premier of Prince Edward Island sought his gold fortune in California, was premier three times, bankrupted the island with a railroad and didn't support joining Confederation until he had no choice. Support: patreon.com/canadaehx Donate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigU Donate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate) E-mail: craig@canadaehx.com Twitter: twitter.com/craigbaird Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehx YouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Current
Tracking erosion along Canada's coasts — and how climate change might make it worse

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 22:30


Erosion along Canada's coasts could worsen with more extreme weather events related to climate change. We discuss efforts to track that erosion and prepare for its impact with Stephanie Arnold, a researcher at the University of Prince Edward Island's Climate Research Lab; and Ashley Smith, owner and managing director of climate consulting company Fundamental Inc.

Sounds Atlantic
Episode 208: Newfoundland Singer Songwriter Larry Foley and the 8 Track Favourites.

Sounds Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 60:13


Encore Newfoundland and Labrador singer-songwriter and radio host Larry Foley (“8 Track Favourites”/”The Punters”) visits to talk about his country music cover group “ 8 Track Favourites”).

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
Eyes on Ukraine: Europe's energy crisis

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 25:30


The war continues to exacerbate the twin crises of energy availability and affordability. We explore how the situation may take shape from here. 2:00 Availability crisis7:30 Demand-reduction measures9:25 Affordability crisis11:10 Effects on domestic politics and policy 17:30 Effects on geopolitical friction20:00 Effects on research and collaboration process ------Views expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. Podcast produced September 2022.Wellington Management Company LLP (WMC) is an independently owned investment adviser registered with the US Securities  and Exchange Commission (SEC). 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