Podcasts about Butter

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

dairy product

  • 4,478PODCASTS
  • 6,538EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
Butter

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Butter

Show all podcasts related to butter

Latest podcast episodes about Butter

You're Gonna Love Me with Katie Maloney

It's time for another round of Ask Me Anything! Katie is answering all of your burning questions on today's episode. Even some questions she didn't want to answer like would she consider getting married again? And some more light hearted questions like if Gordo and Butter had human jobs what would they be? Plus she is Raging with you on your on submission of personal rage!  Visit www.Talkspace.com and use code loveme to get #100 off of your first month. Visit www.eatdeux.com for an exclusive discount of 20% off and free shipping with code LOVEME Visit www.stevemadden.com and use code LOVEME20 for 20% off your next purchase. Produced by Dear Media

Bite Me: The Show About Edibles

This episode was inspired by the Ganja Mama and listener Steve. I loved the the Ganja Mama's lunch and how she used infused butters & sauces as a means to allow guests to medicate themselves during the meal. Then Steve emailed to say that he too, would love to see recipes like this on the show. It seems the people have spoken and an infused maple butter is a great place to start! Quick, easy and tasty, I used a potent cannabis oil to infuse this butter and keep the taste true. Is marijuana addictive? Yes in the sense that most of the really pleasant things in life and worth endlessly repeating. Richard Neville - British authorLunch with the Ganja Mama episodeSecrets of Hosting with Chef Brandon Allen episodeMaple Butter recipe on Simple Eats website - for ideas on how to use + variationsSugar Free BBQ Sauce episode Magic Mayo episodeMaple Butter recipeThat's it for this week friends.  Please email me any questions, comments, pictures of your creations or anything else, I love hearing from listeners!  Direct messages to bitemepodcast@fastmail.com or leave me a voice message.  You can also support the show by subscribing, sharing episodes, leaving a review or buying me a cookie!  Whatever way you choose, I'm grateful that you're listening.  Stay high,MargeVisit Paracanna.com and use code BITEME at checkout for 15% off your order! I'm giving away a tCheck 2 Potency Tester + Expansion Kit at the end of August. Head over to the Bite Me website to find all the ways you can earn entries! The winning name will be chosen August 31, 2022 by 5pm EST.tCheck Test the potency of infusions at home with tCheck. Use code BITEMEPODCAST at checkout for $25 off.Support the show

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 08/11 - Bog Butter Blogs & Predator's Food Vlog

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 17:55


The science and history of bog butter–––still edible butter buried in Irish bogs thousands of years ago. Plus, the first-ever feature film dubbed entirely in the Comanche language, and more cool takeaways from the latest Predator installment. A Lyme disease vaccine has just entered its final stage of clinical trials. And a new weird Coke flavor just dropped. Sponsors:Indeed, Get a free $75 credit PLUS earn up to $500 extra in sponsored job credits with Indeed's Virtual Interviews at Indeed.com/goodnewsBambee, Schedule a conversation at bambee.com/coolLinks:I Can't Believe It's Butter That Was Buried in a Bog! (Atlas Obscura)How do bogs keep things fresh? (Slate, 2006)Tollund Man (Wikipedia)Underwater storage techniques used by early North American hunters preserve meat for at least six months (University of Michigan, 1995)Mon. 08/01 - Early Europeans Drank Milk Despite Lactose Intolerance; Ancient Humans, They're Just Like Us! (Cool Stuff Ride Home) Prey Is Officially the Predator Franchise's Most Critically Acclaimed Film (CBR)Prey Star Amber Midthunder on Indigenous Representation in the Predator Movie (The Hollywood Reporter)The Historic Power of Prey Is in Your Ears (Vulture)Does an animal die in Prey? (DoesTheDogDie.com) Prey's Predator used to be an Anthony Bourdain-inspired food vlogger (Gizmodo)Former Basketball Player Finds His Niche in Hollywood (NY Times)A Lyme disease vaccine is in its final clinical trial (NPR)Coke's latest bizarre flavor is here (CNN)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
The Perfect Roast Chicken Does Not Exist.

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 44:16


Today, Virginia is chatting with Julia Turshen. Julia is a New York Times best-selling cookbook author. Her latest book is Simply Julia, she writes a fantastic newsletter, and she’s the host and producer of the podcast, Keep Calm and Cook On. Julia lives in the Hudson Valley, with her spouse Grace and their pets. And she teaches live cooking classes every Sunday afternoon. Follow her on Instagram: @Turshen.If you'd like to support the show, please rate and review us in your podcast player! And considering becoming a paid Burnt Toast subscriber. It's just $5 per month or $50 for the year. Producing a weekly podcast requires a significant investment of time and resources from several talented people. Paid subscriptions make all of our work possible and enable me to offer an honorarium to expert guests, which is key to centering marginalized voices in this space.BUTTER & OTHER LINKSVirginia and Julia talk about a presentation that Julia recently gave at the Culinary Institute of America about fatphobia and diet culture in the food industry.Julia's Butter is the Body Liberation Hiking Club. Find them on Instagram and Facebook. Virginia's Butter is cutting up the cheese before you serve it, the way Julia taught her. CREDITSThe Burnt Toast Podcast is produced and hosted by Virginia Sole-Smith. Follow Virginia on Instagram or Twitter.Burnt Toast transcripts and essays are edited and formatted by Corinne Fay, who runs @SellTradePlus, an Instagram account where you can buy and sell plus size clothing.The Burnt Toast logo is by Deanna Lowe.Our theme music is by Jeff Bailey and Chris Maxwell.Tommy Harron is our audio engineer.Thanks for listening and for supporting independent anti-diet journalism. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

FM4 Mit Akzent
Die Banitza des Patrioten

FM4 Mit Akzent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 2:39


Die Banitza ist ein traditionelles bulgarisches Frühstück. Man macht sie aus dünnem Blätterteig, den man rollt und mit einer Mischung aus Käse und Eiern füllt. Danach wird sie mit Butter übergossen. "Mit Akzent", eine Kolumne von Todor Ovtcharov.

The Brand is Female
Tiffani Young | Founder, Natural Butter Bar Cosmetics | Launching All-Natural Line of Hair Products and Soaps

The Brand is Female

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:53


This week, on the podcast, host Eva Hartling speaks with Tiffani Young, Founder of Natural Butter Bar Cosmetics. The brand was created from Tiffani's own personal hair journey and out of a desire to help people learn how to use high quality natural ingredients in their self-care hair routine. What started as a homemade product soon turned into a thriving business. Today, Tiffani's line has grown to include products for both hair and skin all made from ethically-sourced and fair trade ingredients. Tiffani is now partnered with Dalhousie University for the launch of an all-natural new line of hair products and soaps. ........This season of our podcast is brought to you by @td_canada Women in Enterprise. TD is proud to support women entrepreneurs and help them achieve success and growth through its program of educational workshops, financing and mentorship opportunities! Find out how you can benefit from their support! Visit: TBIF: thebrandisfemale.com // TD Women in Enterprise: td.com/ca/en/business-banking/small-business/women-in-business // Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/thebrandisfemale

City Cast Chicago
Butter Cows, Kissing Babies, and Piglet Parades: The Illinois State Fair is Back

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 17:55


The Illinois State Fair kicks off on Thursday. It's meant to highlight the importance of agriculture in Illinois, but it's also where politicians schmooze with voters and other members of their party. Host Jacoby Cochran talks to politics reporter Amanda Vinicky on what to expect, especially since we're just a few months out from the election. Some Good News: Karaoke Storytellers The Moth Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm Call or Text Us: (773) 780-0246 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The PUSH Performance Podcast

We're back. And this episode goes everywhere. Today, we have a whole crew including: Founder DJ Edwards, Throwing Trainer Andrew Amato, Strength Coach Dalton Hurd, New Throwing Trainer Daulton Barry, and one of our athletes Mike Byrne.  We cover: Which tools actually matter and can help you for specific goals? How to keep what is most familiar and most game-like in your hitting training. Training athletes for what they need, no matter what.  How to change your mindset, from the athlete's perspective.  Introducing the new faces at Push and learn why Dalton H. Is anti-butter.  Don't forget to rate and subscribe to get new baseball development content.  Head to https://my.captivate.fm/pushperformancegym.com (pushperformancegym.com) for more information about our comprehensive baseball/softball development programs or to learn about our culture. Instagram/Twitter: @pushperformco

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast
Friday Favorites: Is Butter Really Back? What the Science Says

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 7:40


Is butter—and other saturated fats—bad for you or not?

Sharp & Benning
August 5 Seg 10 The Superiority of Restaurant Salads and Bread & Butter

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 4:49


Cinnamon Honey Butter, need we say more?

Jump Street Podcast
Ep. 131 with JP Primiano AKA Butter TV

Jump Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 111:33


JP is the man behind Butter TV. We talk bout the value of documentary style videos, the struggle of portraying contest vibes in an edit, what projects he's focusing on for the future, and more.

KIDZ BOP Daily
KIDZ BOP Daily - Thursday, August 4

KIDZ BOP Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 1:04


Giavanni from the KIDZ BOP Kids shares today's KIDZ BOP Daily update for Thursday, August 4. It's Thursday – which means it's time for Throwback Thursday! Today's kids' song of the day is "Butter" by the KIDZ BOP Kids!

The Art & Science of Learning
88. How to Build Thriving Learning Communities at Work (Anamaria Dorgo)

The Art & Science of Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:23


Creating and fostering effective learning communities in the workplace requires a lot of skill, particularly in a hybrid world. There are many strategies, tools, and platforms that can help support learning communities, but it's important to know how to use them effectively. In this episode I speak with a fantastic community builder who creates and fosters vibrant global learning communities. We discuss why it's important to have learning communities in the workplace, how to create them, and she shares many wonderful tips from her extensive experience in the field. Anamaria Dorgo is the Head of Community at Butter, a platform for planning and hosting collaborative sessions, and the founder of L&D Shakers, an international learning community for L&D professionals. With degrees in psychology and human resources, as well as being a true lifelong learner, she creates engaging learning experiences for a global community. Together with a core team, she has grown L&D Shakers to over 2,000 members from all over the world in the past two years. The community is fully members-led, and it's a breeding ground for collaborative learning projects and experiments. In 2021, Anamaria joined the team at Butter and has built the community from the ground up into a place where facilitators, trainers, consultants, designers, and educators gather to hone their facilitation skills and learn more about Butter. Anamaria is also advising companies and NGOs on how to build their internal communities of practice to boost their learning culture, innovation, employee engagement, and sense of belonging, as well as driving change from within. Anamaria Dorgo LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/anamariadorgo/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnamariaDorgo L&D Shakers: https://www.notion.so/Welcome-to-the-L-D-Shakers-23972fa0a18f419a9abe1bd59cb174c0 Butter Community: https://community.butter.us/c/start-here/our-mission-vision-and-values Butter: https://www.butter.us Resources mentioned: Drive by Daniel Pink The Learning Communities Handbook by Louise Wilson and Dr. Toby Lowe The Art of Community by Charles Vogl The CMX YouTube channel

Kevin and Cory
Browned Butter Bacsik

Kevin and Cory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:08


In the 10 a.m. hour of the K&C Masterpiece, the guys honor National Chocolate Cookie Day with the Combo Platter, chat with DalalsCowboys.com writer Mickey Spagnola, and ponder Chris Woodward's job security in Baseball Nuggets

Podcast ohne (richtigen) Namen
#181: Essig im Periodensystem

Podcast ohne (richtigen) Namen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 72:55


Etienne will wissen was Essig ist und wie man Butter macht. Da können George und Jochen natürlich helfen! Obendrein erklären wir Euch noch, was der Unterschied zwischen Klavier und Flügel ist.

Dark History
48: Blood, Butter, and BEHEADINGS?!?!?: Popcorn's Dark Past

Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 51:25 Very Popular


Welcome to the Dark History podcast.  People used to be sacrificed for popcorn. Yep. The buttery goodness that you finish eating before the trailers are even over at the movies. Now you may be thinking “how in the heck does that make any sense?” Because, honestly, that was also my initial reaction. But let me tell you, the history of popcorn is WILD. And we're getting into all of it on today's episode. So buckle in babe. Episode Advertisers Include:   Apostrophe, Liquid IV, and Express VPN. Learn more during the podcast about special offers!

The Music Box
Pass The Melted Butter! Polyrhythms and Polymeters

The Music Box

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 13:27


Have you ever tried to count rhythms with an apple or a pineapple? Tried to pass the melted butter? Maybe a hot cup of tea? Find out what all these wacky expressions mean on this episode of The Music Box. We're exploring all things polymeters (and their super fun mnemonic devices!) This episode is recommended for grades K-5, but everyone can join in on the polyrhythmic groove. Additional lessons and resources at musicboxpod.org.

SideDish
Shout Out to Butter!

SideDish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 46:25


Without a guest, the gang goes down the dangerous road of riffing on major league baseball rules,  golf courses, and sports that are growing in audience.  Longmont news includes the renovations going on at the Old Chicago restaurant location, Splish Splash (pastry shop?) coming to Main Street, Landline Doughnuts awing and signage, The Honey Shack, Morocan Rugs and Gifts, Fettle & Fire, the re-opening of Quality Liquors and the Boulder County Fair.Mentions include:Old ChicagoSplish SplashLandline DoughnutsHoney ShackMoroccan Rugs and GiftsFettle & FireQuality Liquors - "Little selection owner had no knowledge of alcohol kept pushing cheap beer" - YelpDickens PrimeSeinfeld - Yada YadaEventsBoulder County FairFood Truck Fiesta - Latino Chamber - September 17thThanks to Andy Eppler for "Nothing but the Rain" as our IntroSend Off MusicThanks to David Cutter Music for "Float Away

Shad Devenpour's Local History Podcast
Memaw's Futon & The Butter Song

Shad Devenpour's Local History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 26:06


Memaw was ready to redecorate until she wadn't. Mort got a delivery from Lady & the Trampoline. The Tavin Dillard Podcast shirt: https://www.rockcityoutfitters.com/collections/tavin-dillard/products/tavins-podcast-tee Text me: 501-322-6249 Email me: tavindillard@gmail.com All my shirts and hats: https://www.rockcityoutfitters.com/collections/tavin-dillard

Bearded Adventures With Fable Beard Co
A Quick Lesson on Oil, Butter, and Balm: by The Teacher

Bearded Adventures With Fable Beard Co

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:01


Fable Beard Co - Beard Oil, Balm, and Grooming Supplies For The Storytellers In All Of Us -http://fablebeardco.comWatch more videos from Fable Beard Co!How-To Beard Videos: Tips and Tricks For Beardsmenhttps://bit.ly/2MHUsadPromo Videos: Sales, Giveaways, and Fable Newshttps://bit.ly/2KEsO0fFables: The Stories Behind The Beardshttps://bit.ly/2MFAtckFollow our social mediahttps://www.facebook.com/FableBeardCohttps://www.instagram.com/FableBeardCohttps://www.twitter.com/FableBeardCoCheckout Our Podcast!https://apple.co/2DQtr1xJoin Our Facebook Group!https://www.facebook.com/groups/Fablebeardcostorytellers

ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe
ReddX's Full Saga of Smiling Kevin: This Kevin is the worst waiter in the world... Hired and fired!!

ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 53:05


evin isn't very bright... But sometimes we can work around that fact. But this particular Kevin is so deficient that nobody seems to want him around... And who could blame them, honestly?? Stories about Kevin brings the heavy cringe!YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/reddxyDiscord: https://discord.gg/reddxPayPal: https://www.paypal.me/daytondoesPatreon: http://patreon.com/daytondoesTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/daytondoesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReddXD/

KAREN-HOPE'S 15 MINUTES OF SOLID INSPIRATION

Good miraculous day! Thank you for making the time to listen to today's heartfelt episode. Oh yes. Indeed! Tune in right now to see what I mean and then let's go have a snack of crackers and butter. If we never thought of them as a meal befire, it is meal and a good one. God is good. Talk to y'all soon! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Toby Foster Podcast
I can't believe it's not butter, 22nd July 22

The Toby Foster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:54


Toby's got a paddling pool and Chelsey's trying to make butter.

Yeah I Said It
PLAY STUPID GAMES WIN STUPID PRIZES, WHERE'S ELMO WHEN YOU NEED HIM, BROOKLYN BANDITS, GET YOUR COCOA BUTTER READY, RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES

Yeah I Said It

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 68:41


 We discuss a white man in Mississippi that tried to run over black kids on bikes, Sesame Place employee discriminating against black kids, a bishop in Brooklyn gets robbed, and monkey attacks in Japan!

CORE
Texas Butter Todd Balke

CORE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 54:53


You might have seen Texas Butter Todd Balke on stage with a number of acts including Walt Hamburger. He is a member of the blues driven rock band North Wind and the Sun as well as the blues folk rock band Actual Siblings. If you haven't already, please subscribe to Fox Cities Core on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcvk... You can find out more information about upcoming shows by liking Code Zero Radio on Facebook and checking out our website at: live.codezeroradio.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/foxcitiescore/message

Cooking with Paula McIntyre
Grilled Chicken Fillets with Basil Butter and Tuscan Bean Salad

Cooking with Paula McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 11:06


Grilled chicken fillets with basil butter and Tuscan bean salad

WDR 5 Alles in Butter
Leckere Spirituosen ohne Alkohol

WDR 5 Alles in Butter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 43:04


"Alles in Butter" ist das Magazin fürs Genießen. Und wer sagt eigentlich, dass Longdrinks und Co. ohne Alkohol kein Genuss sein können? Wir jedenfalls nicht. Und liefern jede Menge Beispiele für Drinks mit tollem Geschmack. Moderation: Uwe Schulz und Genussexperte Helmut Gote Von Helmut Gote ;Uwe Schulz.

The Cooking Show
Episode 10: Bread & Butter Pickles

The Cooking Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 15:04


Imgur AlbumSpecial Ingredients: NoneSpecial Equipment: Ikea Bowl Mandoline Ingredients:5lbs Cucumbers2-3 Yellow Onions 1/2 cup of pickling salt or kosher salt, but NOT iodized table salt. Also avoid other salts with aesthetic impurities like Himalayan, sea, or black salt. 2.5 cups white vinegar2 cups apple cider vinegar4.5 cups white sugar2tbsp mustard seeds1tsp turmeric1tbsp allspice berries1tbsp whole clove1tbsp crushed red pepper flakes1tsp celery seed2-3 whole cinnamon sticks plus 1 cinnamon stick per jar of finished pickles (this part isn't super important, but if you get a container of cinnamon sticks, it ought to have enough for you to have a decorative one in each jar)6-8 wide mouth pint jars with lids and ringsSlice the cucumbers to a medium thickness and the onions very thin. Toss these together by hand with all of the salt, cover with Saran Wrap, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, but up to 12 hours. Then, pour off the accumulated water and rinse twice with the full volume of the bowl of cold tap water.Add all of the other ingredients to a large pot, bring to a boil, and stir with a whisk until all of the sugar has dissolved. Add the cucumbers and onions and bring the syrup to a boil again. Pack the cucumbers and onions into prepared jars, inserting a whole cinnamon stick in each jar. Either process the jars in a hot water bath or refrigerate the jars if left unprocessed.

Point Forward
Trade Leaks, 1996 Bulls vs. 2017 Warriors Debate + Sacramento Kings Owner Vivek Ranadive

Point Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 87:32


This week Andre & Evan kick off the show examining leaked trade rumors and discussing the rumor around Kevin Durant's potential trade to the Celtics and Kyler Murray's reported contractual obligations (0:59), after which the guys have a spirited debate about which team would win a match up between the 1996 Chicago Bulls & the 2017 Golden State Warriors (18:23). Later in the Guns & Butter segment, they look at India's biggest sport, cricket, and the continually rising revenues from a captive television audience (29:59). Finally, Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive joins the show to chat about his origins in tech, how he fell in love with basketball, moving the Kings to "Basketball 3.0", the power of fiction as it relates to cryptocurrency and his place as having coined the phrase "positionless basketball" (39:44). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
POINT FORWARD - Trade Leaks, 1996 Bulls vs. 2017 Warriors Debate + Sacramento Kings Owner Vivek Ranadive

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 87:32


This week Andre & Evan kick off the show examining leaked trade rumors and discussing the rumor around Kevin Durant's potential trade to the Celtics and Kyler Murray's reported contractual obligations (0:59), after which the guys have a spirited debate about which team would win a match up between the 1996 Chicago Bulls & the 2017 Golden State Warriors (18:23). Later in the Guns & Butter segment, they look at India's biggest sport, cricket, and the continually rising revenues from a captive television audience (29:59). Finally, Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive joins the show to chat about his origins in tech, how he fell in love with basketball, moving the Kings to "Basketball 3.0", the power of fiction as it relates to cryptocurrency and his place as having coined the phrase "positionless basketball" (39:44). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
"The Way Our Hair Grows Out of Our Heads is a Problem for People."

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 26:42 Very Popular


I think it's important for people to recognize that no matter how fascinated you might be by a Black person’s hair, we are not an exhibit or curiosity.You're listening to Burnt Toast. This is the podcast about diet culture, fatphobia, parenting, and health. I’m Virginia Sole-Smith, and I also write the Burnt Toast newsletter.Today I am speaking with anti-racism activist, writer, and educator Sharon Hurley Hall. Sharon is firmly committed to doing her part to eliminate racism as the founder and curator in chief of Sharon's Anti-Racism Newsletter, one of my favorite Substacks. Sharon writes about existing while Black in majority white spaces and amplifies the voices of other anti-racism activists. Sharon is also the head of anti-racism and a special advisor for the Diverse Leaders Group. I asked Sharon to come on the podcast to talk about a piece she wrote on the newsletter a few weeks ago about the CROWN act, Black hair, and the ways in which white people perpetrate racism against Black people for their hair. We also get into how to talk about hair and skin color differences with your kids, which I found super, super helpful and I think you will, too. If you enjoy this episode, please subscribe, rate and review us in your podcast player! It’s free and a great way to help more folks find the show.And! It’s time to decide what we should read for the next Burnt Toast Book Club! I’ve culled through all of your suggestions and narrowed it down to these five (mostly because the Substack poll-maker limits me to five choices). I was going to stick with fiction because it’s summer and I’m in beach read mode, but I made an exception for Angela Garbes because, it’s Angela Garbes. (Which is to say, if we don’t pick her for August, we’ll do it for September or October!) You have until the end of this week to vote. I’ll announce the pick on Tuesday. (The discussion thread will go live Wednesday, August 31 at 12pm Eastern!) Episode 54 TranscriptVirginiaHi Sharon! Why don't we start by having you tell my listeners a little more about yourself and your work?SharonOkay, so I am an anti-racism writer and educator, a former journalist, and I have been writing about anti-racism-related stuff for longer than it appears. I actually wrote my first article in 2016, but I wasn't doing it consistently. I launched an anti-racism newsletter in 2020. So it's just been going for just about two years now. In it, I share my perspectives as a global citizen. I was born in England, I grew up in the Caribbean, I lived in England as an adult. I visited the US. I lived in France. I've been in a lot of places, and I've experienced racism everywhere. And so I bring that lens to what I write about. You know, quite often we think what we're experiencing is the only way it's being experienced or is unique to the location that we're in. And my experience is that there's a lot of commonality in how these things operate in different places. VirginiaOh, that's so interesting. I have British and American citizenship, but I've lived my whole life in America. And I definitely tend to think of racism as this very American issue. But as you're saying that, I'm realizing how incredibly reductive that is. Although Americans certainly are a big part of the problem. SharonYes, but—or yes and, I suppose. Let's not forget that all of this started with the British people—well, British and Europeans—who colonized everywhere.VirginiaSure did. Yup. Absolutely. SharonThere are many places besides the USA that share this history of enslavement. Barbados and the Caribbean being among those places. So there are similarities, there are commonalities, I think. It operates in a particularly American way, but it doesn't mean that it doesn't exist in other places. Because it does. It's sometimes less visible. And of course, because so many other places don't have a gun culture, you're less likely to end up dead as a Black person, even if people are being racist towards you. VirginiaYes. We add that extra layer of things. Well, I am having you here today to talk about a piece of American legislation because you wrote a really excellent piece for your newsletter. I want everyone to subscribe to your newsletter and to be supporting your work. Often you're putting things on my radar that I have missed and I just really appreciate the education that you do. This was a piece you wrote recently on the CROWN Act, which I have to admit I wasn't even aware of as something that was happening. So for starters, for folks who aren't who aren't familiar with this, can you tell us a little bit about what the CROWN act is and what inspired it? SharonThe CROWN Act stands for Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural hair. I believe it was (first) sponsored by State Senator Holly Mitchell from California. And then other states have since passed similar laws. There is also a federal act, which was passed by the House earlier this year. The idea is that Black people should be able to wear their natural hair, and not have it be a problem. In all post-enslavement societies, in all post-colonial societies, in many white majority places, the way that our hair grows out of our head is a problem for people. It can be seen as not professional. There are all sorts of ancient ideas about what Black people's hair is and isn't, that play into the way that it is treated. It's not just about being able to wear your hair, the respect piece is important as well. Because you'd be surprised how often—I mean, I worked in England for 15 years and there were people that would come and say, “Ooh, your hair! Let me…” (For those listening, I am running my hands through my hair.) “Your hair,” you know, “It feels so different. Let me…” VirginiaLike it’s okay to touch you. SharonIt's okay to just touch my hair. So there has historically been this thing where Black people's natural hair, and all the various styles that we put our hair in, were not seen as worthy of respect, were not seen as professional, were not seen as acceptable. All of that comes out of that whole white supremacist ideology.VirginiaWhat I really appreciated in your piece is you explain why the ability to have legal redress for microaggressions is obviously really important, given this really problematic history that you've just sketched out for us. But you also wrote, “Why the hell do we need to legislate for Black people to enjoy autonomy over our hair?” So, talk a little more about that piece. SharonWhite supremacy has weaponized Black hair in many ways. It's been a matter of control that extended to using hair as evidence of the reasons why Black people deserve to be enslaved, because our hair was seen as like wool, animal-like, somehow bestial, somehow not right. You could think of the Tignon Laws, which I think were in Louisiana, where Black women's hair was supposed to be covered. Because otherwise the white guys would not be able to control themselves. There was this idea of overt sexuality, as well.VirginiaThat being your problem to control as opposed to… SharonYes, our problem that they needed to control. Black women and Black people being what they are, we've made lemonade out of lemons. That's why you get these fabulous headdresses and head ties and so on. They look absolutely wonderful. But you know, the the original idea was to control it, to cover it up, to hide anything that would make us look more human and more beautiful. Often in the past, women have been encouraged to cover themselves up so that they don't get assaulted. This is another facet of that. As I've said, I don't know any Black person who's worked in a white majority space, especially a woman, who has not had some white person in their office space, make free with their hair. And you know, I would not do the same if the situation were reversed. I want to add something here, which is that a lot of white people say, “Oh, I went to a country in Asia, and people were fascinated by my straight blonde hair.” And I say, that is not the same thing, because the history is different. The agency that you have historically had over your own body is different. Coming out of a culture where we have not had that agency, somebody putting their hands in our hair lands very differently. VirginiaYeah, absolutely. It's always going to be a different experience. But you're right, people do make that comparison. I would imagine also there's some comparisons to when you're pregnant and people feel like they can touch your stomach. And that is also very violating. But that's a finite experience. You're only going to be in that mode for nine months. I'm not saying it's okay that it happens, it shouldn't happen. But this is something Black people are being asked to navigate daily, without other people adjusting. SharonI just actually want to address that particular because: Imagine if you're a Black pregnant woman.VirginiaOh god, yes.SharonBecause I was a Black pregnant woman. So people would be putting their hands in my hair, but they'd also be touching my belly. That felt extremely violating. VirginiaYes, it is. I mean, it just is.SharonAnd in a way that I couldn't even fully articulate at the time as to why it bothered me so much. But I know now why it bothered me so much. VirginiaDo you mind sharing a little bit about how you do navigate those moments? SharonAt the time when it used to happen most often, I was not often in a position to navigate that safely. Because people would then regard me as being the problem, regard me as being the angry Black woman, regard me as making something out of nothing. Now I would be in a position to say something like, “Because of the history of enslavement, this does not feel good to me. This feels like a violation.” And I could say it as plainly as that. And I think if you said it like that people would would pause and think about it. I've not often had the chance to do that, but it's definitely something that I would do the next time it happens. And of course, you know, the other weapon is a glare. A glare, the right kind of glare. Sometimes you can see someone coming towards you and you just give them that look and they think better of it. It's the bomb look, the look that you give your kid when they're about to do something that's really problematic and you don't even want to have to talk about it and it stops them in their tracks. Sometimes you need to pull that look out.VirginiaYou need that look. I mean, and again, not to equate the experiences, but I did notice that getting touched while pregnant happened much less the second time. I think because I had learned that look a little. I think I was much clearer with the nope, you're not allowed in this space. I was wondering if we could also talk a bit about texturism, that’s a concept you hit on in that piece as well. How do white people perpetrate this, and also how does it play out within the Black community?SharonOkay, so I'm going to start with the second question first. This is another offshoot of enslavement, of that white supremacist ideal and ideology. The societies that we grew up in that say that “white is right” and that's what you aspire to. And it is true that in those times and even subsequently, if you had lighter skin, if you were closer to looking European, you had more opportunities open to you. One of the ways this revealed itself was in your hair. So you will hear people—I mean, I certainly did when I was growing up. I would hear older people talk about good hair, right? And good hair meant it had a little wave in it, it was closer to what they would think of as European hair. This happens in Black majority Caribbean countries, in Black communities all around the world, and in so many post-colonial spaces. What is also interesting is that many white people feel more comfortable with those people that they see as having more proximity to them, than the people that are darker skinned, that they see as having less proximity to them. I'm not sure they're always consciously aware of it, but I know that it does happen. For example, you can look at things like casting in films and TV series, and who gets what kind of roles. Where are the darker skinned people? What kind of roles do they get? What do the lighter skinned people with the wavy hair get? Who are the people that are representing Black people in the ads? Who are the models? I mean, it's not 100 percent that way, but if you were to look at it, you would see that there's definitely this idea that having that wavy hair texture, and that lighter skin can buy you some additional visibility and acceptability. So, it plays out in what hair is deemed acceptable and professional within the Black community and beyond the Black community. VirginiaI'm thinking, as you mentioned casting, how even when a very dark-skinned Black person is cast in a role, it's then the subject of, “look at how we're breaking ground, look at what a big deal this is.” It has to be this huge conversation because it's so rare. So the assumptions prove the rule here, because you're still in a place where that's news, when that shouldn't be news. I'm hoping we can also talk a little bit about how to navigate this conversation with our kids, because I do think hair—and of course skin color, as well—is often one of those physical differences that little kids—I'm thinking like three, five, seven year olds—will notice and point out about people when they meet them. And often white parents have this instinct to rush in with, “That's not nice, don't say anything.” And, maybe they're speaking in terms of “don't comment on that person's body, because that's rude.” But it also reinforces to white kids, that there's something wrong with Black hair, that this is something we can't talk about, that this is off limits in some way. SharonI remember when I was living in France and I was driving somewhere with a white friend and her kid who was maybe three or four at the time. He was fascinated by the fact that my skin was a different color. So he asked if I'd stayed out in the sun too long. And his mother was absolutely mortified. And I laughed, because, you know, he was three or four, he wasn't coming at it from a hurtful point of view. And I explained that people had different skin color. That's just how we are. I often think when you're dealing with these things, going with the factual is the way to go. A recognition that the differences exist, but no suggestion that they mean something positive or negative in terms of how we interact with those people, you know? You have to, at the same time, avoid suggesting that there's something negative about having darker skin or Black skin, but also avoid suggesting that there's something particularly positive about having white skin. You have to do both things. Because kids are going to notice, kids are going to see it. I think for young, very young kids, that kind of thing doesn't matter to them. We have to not shy away from the fact that there are aspects of society that are going to see these things as major differences and treat people differently. But we can also teach them that this is not something that they themselves have to do or perpetuate. VirginiaSo in that moment, what would you have wished your friend had said to her kid? It sounds like you handled it beautifully, but it shouldn't be your job to handle it. What do you want white parents to be doing?SharonDefinitely not to come down on the kid like a ton of bricks, suggesting that they've done something wrong in even asking the question. Possibly reframing the question. Parents have to educate themselves so that when they get these questions, they have the answers. Because I don't know that that particular parent would have even known what to say or how to explain it. VirginiaI think often, the reason we panic is because we are having our own stuff called out, we're suddenly realizing, Oh, I don't have the right language for this. And that's on me. I should have done that work. SharonIf you're going to raise anti-racist kids, you have to be an anti-racist parent. And that doesn't mean that you're not going to make mistakes. It means that you recognize that this is the route that we have to travel for all our humanity. And for equality and equity for all.VirginiaAnother way I get asked this question often is how to respond if your three year old says, “Why is that lady so fat?” You know, comments on body size, and I always go with something like, “Bodies come in all different shapes and sizes—”Sharon—And colors!VirginiaAnd colors! Hair comes in all different colors and styles and, you know, hair comes in different textures. You can just normalize that without getting into some intense thing about it. SharonEspecially for young kids. You have different conversations with your kids about things like this at different ages. If your kid is three, you don't necessarily have to give them the whole history of colonialism, you know? If your kid is 12, that might be different. VirginiaYou should be doing that, absolutely. SharonExactly. Because we we teach our kids at a very young age about stranger danger and unwanted touching. And it's a good time to say that that also extends to touching people's skin and hair when they have not asked for it. I think that is something that would fit very nicely with that lesson, right? VirginiaYeah, to just say, “No one can touch your body without permission. You don't touch other people's bodies without permission.”SharonExactly. VirginiaAnd fortunately, young children will give you plenty of opportunities to reinforce that.Sharon Because they're curious. They're always, you know, sticking their hands in things. VirginiaBlack hair is obviously such a huge topic. What haven't I asked you that you think is really important for us to be thinking about? SharonI think it's important for people to recognize that no matter how fascinated you might be by a Black person’s hair, we are not an exhibit or curiosity. Just don't touch the hair. You know, just don't touch the hair. Some people are so traumatized by it, even if you asked to touch the hair, they'd still be upset. We're coming out of a history where Black people for centuries had no agency. Where in some countries, we were put on display. And those very features that you now want to treat as a curiosity were the things that were displayed. So, it's not just about it being wrong in this moment, it's all the generational trauma that is awakened by that. So it's really best avoided. Google is available, if you want to find out more. If you have a real Black friend—and I'm not talking about somebody you work with that you don't even sit with at lunchtime. I'm talking about somebody that's actually in your life—then maybe you can have those more in depth conversations with that person. But if we're talking about your colleagues and casual acquaintances, for best results, just keep your hands out of their hair. I was just going to add that from the point of view of your workplace, what you can do is you can look at what your policies say and make sure that they are equitable in terms of what's seen as professional. Do your bit to change things where you are. VirginiaThat's a great idea. And I just wanted to share your rage for a moment that it is 2022 and we are having to say don't touch people's hair. And we are having to pass laws to protect people from this. I mean, it is astounding to me that body autonomy is not more of a—well, I live in the United States where they're taking bodily autonomy away in so many different ways right now. SharonYou know, if you think about how the country started, it started by taking stuff away from the people that were here. It started by taking autonomy away from the Black people they brought in. It started in a time when women didn't have very many rights at all. Yeah, and all of this was still the case at the point when the country became the country.VirginiaRight. SharonSo maybe it's time to rethink what the country is and should be and could be, instead of going back to what was the norm in 1776.Virginia Which protected only one type of person. SharonI mean, exactly, exactly. It's the 21st century, we should be beyond that. VirginiaDefinitely. Well, I so appreciate you giving us this education, taking the time to talk through this issue more. I think it's one that all of us can be doing better on. And encouraging us to think about how it's playing out in our workplaces, and our kids’ schools, all of that. Butter for Your Burnt ToastVirginiaWe wrap up every podcast with my butter for your burnt toast segment. This is where we give a fun recommendation of something we are loving or learning from right now. So Sharon, what's your butter?SharonWell, the funny thing about it, it's a little bit of a self promotion, in a way, because I've just started a new gig at Diverse Leaders Group, a brand new startup as the head of anti-racism. Our aim is to identify development support leaders at all levels. That's anyone wanting to lead the way to equality in their own lives and for their communities. We're starting with anti-racist leaders. So I'm pumped about developing community support and educational resources to help people really live anti-racism and create a more equal world for everybody. VirginiaThat's fantastic. My recommendation, related to our conversation about Black hair, is a kid's book that my both my daughters have really loved over the years called Don't Touch My Hair by Sharee Miller. It is a great story of a Black girl who has amazing hair and everybody when she walks down the street wants to touch it, and she doesn't like it. She uses her voice to tell people to stop and they have to listen. We talked about how with your three year old, you're not gonna explain all of colonialism, but you can start to talk to your three and four year old about how Black kids have to deal with this and your straight hair doesn't attract the same attention. So that was a conversation I wanted to be having with them. But they also relate so deeply to this experience of a kid getting unwanted attention, and how do you sort of say your body is yours, and so there's certainly a universal theme, as well as it being a great way to have this conversation and help kids understand this issue. So I wanted to recommend that. Sharon, tell everyone the name of your newsletter and anything else you want us to be following?. How can we support you? SharonMy newsletter is Sharon's Anti Racism Newsletter. You can support me by taking a paid subscription because one day I would like to run the newsletter full time. And you could also join the Anti-Racist Leaders Association, which I mentioned earlier and take the lead in fighting racism wherever you are. VirginiaAmazing. Thank you so much for being here. I really loved this conversation. SharonThank you, Virginia. I enjoyed it, too. Thanks so much for inviting me.Thanks so much for listening to Burnt Toast! If you’d like to support the show, please subscribe for free in your podcast player and tell a friend about this episode.The Burnt Toast Podcast is produced and hosted by me, Virginia Sole-Smith. You can follow me on Instagram or Twitter.Burnt Toast transcripts and essays are edited and formatted by Corinne Fay, who runs @SellTradePlus, an Instagram account where you can buy and sell plus size clothing.The Burnt Toast logo is by Deanna Lowe.Our theme music is by Jeff Bailey and Chris Maxwell.Tommy Harron is our audio engineer.Thanks for listening and for supporting independent anti-diet journalism. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

看理想电台
260. 对话扶霞:包容与偏见,两个精神成都人的饮食漫谈

看理想电台

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 64:28


这期嘉宾是我非常喜欢的美食作家扶霞。 因为《鱼翅与花椒》太受欢迎,国内读者说到扶霞,总是把她和四川、川菜绑定在一起,但其实她在2021年也出版过另一本关于江南菜的《鱼米之乡》。 2018年,单向空间爱琴海店《鱼翅与花椒》新书分享会 我很佩服扶霞的一点是,她在饮食上的包容开放、没有偏见。她关注的不仅是食物,更是我们与世界的关系,是文化多样性与生活方式多样性。 今年4月份扶霞在上海译文出版社出版了她的新书《寻味东西》,雨珈翻译,陈晓卿老师作序。 《寻味东西》与译者何雨珈的猫Butter 这是一本借饮食文化聊东西方舌尖偏见的随笔集,也让我在故事之外看到了更多扶霞关于东西方饮食文化的观察和思考。 这一期我和人在英国的扶霞远程连线,从她的这本新书说起,聊了聊疫情这几年在英国的生活,以及她如何看待我们现在这种离厨房有点远,离外卖和预制菜越来越近的生活。 2018年,扶霞和朋友们在成都某餐馆吃饭 本期歌单 Grant Lee Phillips - The Sun Shines On Jupiter 本期嘉宾 扶霞·邓洛普(Fuchsia Dunlop),美食作家,毕业于剑桥大学,著有《鱼翅与花椒》等 工作人员 主播 | 颠颠 文案 | 颠颠 制作 | 颠颠 商务合作 bd@vistopia.com.cn 互动微博 @看理想电台要放飞自我

Wieder was gelernt - Ein ntv-Podcast
Teure Lebensmittel? "Kosten werden definitiv steigen"

Wieder was gelernt - Ein ntv-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 9:54


Butter für drei, Hackfleisch für fünf Euro: Die Lebensmittelpreise steigen und steigen. Der Ukraine-Krieg und die hohen Energiekosten sind aber nicht die einzigen Gründe. Die Lebensmittelproduzenten werden auch von den großen Lebensmittelketten unter Druck gesetzt.Mit Stefanie Sabet, Geschäftsführerin der Bundesvereinigung der Deutschen Ernährungsindustrie.Sie haben Fragen, Anmerkungen oder Ideen? Schreiben Sie eine E-Mail an podcasts@n-tv.de

Like Riding A Fish
Chapter 109: I Feel You W/ Butter Nan

Like Riding A Fish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 33:23


We are back with Butter Nan this week to talk about all things Empathy! Are we all rare empaths or have we learned the skill of empathy? Does being empathetic come with its own challenges? What are some key reminders that are necessary to remember when practicing empathy? We try to answer all these questions and more! Go listen!   Follow Butter Nan on Instagram: @visualsxverses   Our Website: https://www.likeridingafish.com Instagram/Twitter: @likeridingafish   Music from https://filmmusic.io "Feelin Good" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Grindcast
Episode #463: Dog Butter

Grindcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 73:23


Welcome to a brand new episode of Grindcast! This time around, Will, Jason, and Matt sit down and watch a few episodes of the Netflix Resident Evil series and discuss their thoughts.

Let it Roll: Big Gets and Big Takes
131 - Season 3, GP11 Qualifiers: #IDontWantFourth

Let it Roll: Big Gets and Big Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 39:17


GP11 Qualifiers at #MidnightBay is in the books and we're here to chat about it! The third iteration of this track is looking amazing, join us while we break it down and give our predictions for tomorrows P E N U L T I M A T E race! This is THE Number 1 Podcast in Marble Sports, Let it Roll!Follow us on Twitter:Dekker: https://twitter.com/DoubleDekksHector: https://twitter.com/hwalkermusicTerm: https://twitter.com/BigGetsBigTermSky: https://twitter.com/Skyfall_707Nonagon: https://twitter.com/Nonagon_Violet---------------------------------If you have a big take of your own you can email the show at biggetsbigtakes@gmail.com,find us on Twitter: (https://t.co/OhU31PKZw0)YouTube: (https://www.youtube.com/c/biggetsbigt...)iTunes: (https://t.co/hLrQK71k4z)Spotify: (https://t.co/dFsujO5h5v)

WDR 5 Alles in Butter
Die kulinarische Qualität veganer Küche

WDR 5 Alles in Butter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 44:19


Vegan ist Trend - keine Frage. Aber was ist dran am Hype, also kulinarisch gesehen? Alles in Butter respektiert ja grundsätzlich alle Ernährungsformen, hat aber Ansprüche an Genuss. Daher prüfen wir heute den genießerischen Aspekt der rein pflanzlichen Küche. Moderation: Carolin Courts und Genussexperte Helmut Gote Von Helmut Gote ;Carolin Courts.

Learning The Tropes: A Podcast for Romance Novel Veterans and Virgins
Interview: Erin La Rosa (Author of For Butter or Worse)

Learning The Tropes: A Podcast for Romance Novel Veterans and Virgins

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 55:10


In this special Bonus Episode we talk to Erin La Rosa about her debut Romance Novel For Butter or Worse.   Pre-Order For Butter or Worse: Amazon Harper Collins BookShop   Find Erin La Rosa: Instagram @ErinLaRosaLit Twitter @ErinLaRosaLit TikTok @erinlarosawrites Website: ErinLaRosaCreative   Join Patreon now to get our Patreon Exclusive Blue & Red Logo Sticker: https://www.patreon.com/learningthetropes   Please Rate, Review and Follow us on Apple Podcasts. It helps the podcast grow.   Rate us Five Stars on Spotify!   WE HAVE MERCH! Go to Tee-Public to get T-Shirts, Totes, Onesies and MORE: http://tee.pub/lic/learningthetropes   Find us- TikTok @learningthetropespodcast Instagram @learningthetropes Twitter @learningtropes Facebook Learning The Tropes Podcast Join The Learning The Tropes Troop! email: learningthetropespodcast@gmail.com

Point Forward
ESPYs Talk, Juan Soto + an interview with Bennedict Mathurin

Point Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 57:33


This week Andre & Evan recap the ESPYs in LA in all of its Warriors-laden glory (1:00). Later Juan Soto is the topic for Guns & Butter as the guys analyze just what would possess someone to turn down a $440 million dollar contract (9:46). Andre & Evan shout out Desus & Mero as the duo split up (20:30) and finally, Ben Mathurin joins the show to talk about his origins in basketball, hoops influences, becoming business savvy in the league, and back-up his Lebron comments as Andre & Evan both share gems with the rookie along the way (24:24). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
POINT FORWARD - ESPYs Talk, Juan Soto + an interview with Bennedict Mathurin

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 57:33


This week Andre & Evan recap the ESPYs in LA in all of its Warriors-laden glory (1:00). Later Juan Soto is the topic for Guns & Butter as the guys analyze just what would possess someone to turn down a $440 million dollar contract (9:46). Andre & Evan shout out Desus & Mero as the duo split up (20:30) and finally, Ben Mathurin joins the show to talk about his origins in basketball, hoops influences, becoming business savvy in the league, and back-up his Lebron comments as Andre & Evan both share gems with the rookie along the way (24:24). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
"Well, if we have to break the law, how are we going to do it?"

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 40:59 Very Popular


People don’t have a choice about whether or not to fight these things. You have to keep learning all you can, you have to keep finding the allies you can. And to despair is to abandon all the people who need us most.You’re listening to Burnt Toast. This is the podcast about diet culture, fatphobia, parenting, and health. I’m Virginia Sole-Smith, and I also write the Burnt Toast newsletter. Today is a very special episode because I am interviewing one of my very favorite people in the world: My stepmother, Mary Summers. Mary is a Senior Fellow in the Fox Leadership Program and a lecturer in political science at the University of Pennsylvania. She’s also a former physician assistant, political speechwriter, and a lifelong activist. And 52 years ago, she and three other activists made a 28 minute black and white film about what it was like to live in a country where abortions were illegal. (Watch it and get involved!) This was in 1970. The Roe v Wade Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion throughout the country was three years in the future. And of the approximately 800,000 abortions performed in 1970, only 1% were obtained legally. 300,000 resulted in complications and 8000 resulted in death. We are now living in post-Roe America. There is much about this fight that has changed in the past 52 years, but also much that stays the same. So, I asked Mary to come chat with me about her work on the film as well as what we can learn from the people who fought for legal abortion before as we begin to do it again. PS. Mary was delighted to donate her $100 podcast honorarium to the National Network of Abortion Funds. Thank you to the Burnt Toast paid subscribers who made that possible! And big news: The Burnt Toast Giving Circle has exceeded our goal! We’ve raised $20,111 and counting for Arizona state legislature races. You can join us here, and read more about why that helps in the fight to legalize abortion here. Episode 53 TranscriptVirginiaLet’s start by telling listeners a little bit about you and about your work.MaryI am a senior fellow with the Robert Fox Leadership Program at the University of Pennsylvania. I’ve been, for the last 20 years, a lecturer in political science, teaching service learning courses on the politics of food and agriculture and on schools as sites where inequalities and economic status and and health, health especially, can either be addressed or reproduced. My students, as well as being in class with me, are working in schools and after-school programs and food stamp snap enrollment campaigns and programs like that, so that they’re learning about institutions on the ground as well as in the classroom.VirginiaAnd that just one of many things you have done in your life. Do you want to also just go back a little further and tell us what you did, especially around the time you made the film?MaryI got involved in making the film right as I was graduating from college in 1970 I was at Radcliffe. And I had gotten interested in film, and interested in the women’s movement. That period at Harvard was the height of the anti-war movement. We basically were on strike most spring semesters that I was there. Especially the Harvard strike of 1969 was really important to me, seeing the entire university mobilized around stopping ROTC on campus. People who had been meeting in tiny rooms trying to organize, by the end of that strike, were meeting in the football stadium. Faculty and students were working together, voting on the demands of the strike and passing them overwhelmingly and the administration basically conceding everything we were fighting for. That gave me a real sense that we could change the world. In the years both prior to and after graduation, I was also getting more interested in the women’s movement as one more important way of thinking about relationships within the anti-war movement, within the student movement, and in society as a whole. Men were clearly very dominant. And women were starting to be very interested in talking to each other, about everything from clitoral orgasms to shared housekeeping in ways that were exciting and interesting. And then, a person I was taking some classes from told me about a group of women who were making a film about abortion. So I contacted them. They originally started out of the same group of women who eventually would become the founders of Our Bodies Ourselves. It was a big Bread and Roses office that was generating all this activity around women’s health and consciousness raising groups and just lots of excitement about thinking about the inequalities of gender roles, and how could we address that. So I wrote a little grant to a program called Education for Action that that gave me funding to join this group of four women who were making this film on abortion. It had originally been inspired, I think, by Jane Pincus, the person who made it possible to make a film because her husband was a documentary filmmaker then at MIT and we were able to use the MIT film lab equipment, and both cameras and editing. She had been listening to what was then the equivalent of NPR, about efforts to get the Massachusetts legislature to legalize abortion, and just couldn’t believe that the only voices you could hear debating it were men’s voices. So she thought, well, if we could make a film that would raise up women’s stories and voices that would make a big difference in these debates. And that made a lot of sense to me. VirginiaCan you talk a little more about why the conversation on abortion in particular was being only had by men? MaryLiterally, the Massachusetts legislature was all men. I mean, if there were any women in it, they, their voices were not on the radio. And really, that was a time when electoral politics was overwhelmingly dominated by white men.VirginiaLet’s also be clear, this was three years before Roe, so abortion was illegal, which was why you were doing the film. How did you think about the potential risks you were facing by doing this work? MaryThis was a period in which it looked as if the way we would win abortion rights was state by state, with the legislatures passing it. Hawaii had legalized abortion before we started, but that, it’s so far away.VirginiaRight, not very helpful.MaryPeople were not going to Hawaii for abortions. Then the big question was that a lot of states were starting to legalize abortion, but you had to get permission from a doctor, meet with a psychiatrist. Abortion on demand sounded like a very, very radical idea to a lot of people. So, we were very interested in making a film that would say that should be the norm, that women should get to decide if they needed an abortion. Obviously, you can understand why people who are fighting just within state legislatures were feeling like, we aren’t going to be able to get any legalization at all, unless we allow for all these permissions and doctor involvement, “it has to be between a woman and her doctor” kind of talk.VirginiaThey were taking a kind of incremental approach.MaryRight. So it seemed really important to have more pressure and organizing outside the legislatures and the courts that would help push the idea that this should be women’s decisions. Now on the question of risk—there was certainly a lot of stigma. But there was also tremendous pent up trauma that women did want a chance to talk about. I mean, that was what was so exciting about the women’s movement at that time, was all these women who had experienced a whole range of different types of very real oppression, either in their own homes or in—I mean, I went to my college infirmary and asked for birth control and they wouldn’t give it to me. The range of humiliating experiences women had been through, much less the women who had been through illegal abortions, which for many were so terrifying and so scary. There was this lovely doctor in the hills of Pennsylvania that apparently gave many women very good abortion experiences, but there were a lot of people who did not have that. So, for some of them, just being able to tell their stories was huge, even if they didn’t want their name associated with it. We started receiving tapes of women wanting to tell their stories and several of the filmmakers had stories that they taped. So I think more we were really excited and energized about doing this work. I mean, there was a lot of debate about whether we wanted our names on the movie. So in that sense, there was worry about stigma, I would say.VirginiaIt’s so moving to think about all those women sending in those tapes. Like pre-internet, that’s a lot of work, right? You’ve have to get a tape made, put it in the mail. It’s just, it’s amazing.MaryThat’s one of the things I remember, is trying to splice those tapes together and you know my technical skills! To create the story in the first part of the film. I do want to emphasize that all around the country there were women who were who were becoming amazingly strong and militant around the fact that they weren’t going to put up with this anymore. We knew about the Janes in Chicago—which I think a lot of your listeners are going to know about—where women had trained themselves to do abortions on kitchen tables. To me, at least, that seemed extraordinary and, and really scary. I was like, well, thank goodness, I’m just making a film. Because that was also risking very long term prison sentences. Both, you know, could you harm somebody and could you go to prison for this. Both of those things seemed much more scary than anything we were doing.VirginiaAs you mentioned, the original goal as activists was to work towards passing abortion laws, state by state, that’s where you were when Roe happened. I would love for you to talk a little bit about how that conversation shifted. Was there a feeling that like, we really still need to do the state work? Or did it feel like okay, now that conversation is over?MaryWell, a couple of things were going on. I think in terms of the bigger political picture, there was this sense of, Oh, okay. We’ve won this in the courts. That’s where we’re going to be protected. No matter what happens in the state legislature, the Supreme Court has given us this right. So, I think especially for the the people who are devoting their lives to winning abortion rights, that that just made sense. I did think grassroots organizing and changing people’s hearts and minds, and reaching out to people with women’s stories was very, very, very important. That, to me, was the way you could make more fundamental and more lasting political change. I mean, it was incredibly important to protect women’s individual rights. But to me, we needed these bigger social and political changes that weren’t going to happen through the courts. So that was the bigger political picture.The personal picture was: It took us almost a year longer to finish this film than we thought it would. We weren’t getting any funding. We had been this very small, intense group of women, trying to figure out how to make this film, how to tell these stories, how to guarantee that it would put abortion in a broader context in a way that we all felt proud of. Some of the major forces funding the push to win abortion rights were associated with organizations like Zero Population Growth, that had this big push on, we can solve poverty by making sure poor women don’t have children. We didn’t want our film to be used by people who had a class perspective that we thought was wrong. But it was really hard to figure out how to how to do that. So there were a lot of tensions among ourselves as we were figuring all that out. And we had to get out of the MIT Film Studio! So, we finished it quite abruptly. There were a couple of showings and we each tried to arrange other showings. My parents were in Rochester then and I went off to show it at the University of Rochester and RIT and a former professor had me come show it at Mount Holyoke. Meanwhile, we needed to get jobs, we needed to move on with our lives. And, and it was very clear that now that abortion was legal— our film was mainly about how incredibly frightening illegal abortions were, which was not the main message that young women should be hearing. What they needed was assurance that legal abortions are safe. And so like the Guttmacher Institute, folks, for example, were kind of horrified by our film. VirginiaPlus, the abortion pill was not an option back then. MaryThe only thing was a D&C. VirginiaAnd that does change even what a legal abortion looks like now.MaryIn fact, legal D&Cs were not the intense, scary, painful experience that the film portrays. The broader issues that we wanted to address in the film were about the huge percentage of the people that were actually dying from illegal abortions being Black and poor women. They were also the people with the higher maternal mortality rates. Our eagerness was to address issues of inequality with regard to race and class and women’s health. Clearly all that was still very relevant. Winning abortion rights didn’t mean winning abortion access.Virginia Right. You see abortion as just one piece of this much larger puzzle. And at times, this has put you at odds with other feminists who’ve taken a single issue approach to this topic. So let’s talk a little bit about why it is so important to connect abortion to other issues, especially poverty, and how that helps work towards building these broader movements.MaryI’m somewhat reluctant to be critical, because I’m old enough now and also have studied history enough to be able to see, again and again, that what happens when you have these big broad movements trying to fight for social justice is: We never win everything we’re fighting for. And there’s a tendency afterwards to blame the people fighting for not having won it all, as opposed to blaming their opponents. One reason I want people to see the film is because I think there is this impression of “Oh, those second wave feminists, all they cared about was middle class white women,” and you can see from the film how concerned we were that that the people who were dying were Black. And how concerned we were about forced sterilization. We did not succeed in raising up those issues in ways where we won but we were raising them up. I do think the important thing to remember is that Roe v. Wade is won in 73. And throughout the 70s, going into the 80s, we have an increasing reaction against these efforts to fight for greater equality and to use government to protect people’s rights. There’s a growing reaction against the civil rights movement, against the women’s movement, against the environmental movement. I mean, they’re achieving their greatest victories. But the reaction against them is growing and is fully articulated when Ronald Reagan gets elected and is saying, the problem is government. The world in which you grew up is a world in which everybody was being told governments, our bureaucracy, they don’t do anybody any good. We need to work with markets to make the world a better place. That that became the mantra, which worked very well for people who had enough money. I mean, it didn’t work, it wasn’t even great for them, but it was way better for them than for people who didn’t have enough money to participate in markets. But that was the world in which people were still trying to fight for women’s equality. So the definition of equality became narrower and narrower. It was like, we need for women to get to be part of that narrow group of elites that are dominating this economy.VirginiaIt was just about accessing the white man’s power, it wasn’t redefining it.MaryWell, and only a very few white men’s power. Wealthy white men’s power. Very well educated and professional white men’s power. So that is happening at the same time that millions and millions and millions of white men and women and people of color, who throughout the 60s and 70s, had lived in an economy of greater equality, higher wages, jobs with benefits, pensions, funded pensions, are losing all of that. So you can completely understand why if we’re going to live in a world dominated by wealthy elites, it should seem right that women and black people should be part of those elites. You can understand why those struggles became narrowly focused. But it also then lost you the broad base that you need to sustain a greater social movement for a vision of social justice that that speaks to more people.VirginiaI think it’s important for folks doing this work now to understand that second wave feminists weren’t all working under the Betty Friedan model. That there was the Johnnie Tillman model (as I discussed with Angela Garbes), and this focus on what if we were dismantling this whole system of elitism as opposed to just getting a couple people promoted?MaryWhich we thought we were doing! We won significant victories. I don’t want to lose track of that. It means a tremendous amount that we are not in the same place in this struggle that we were when I was young, much less when my mother was young. She couldn’t get a diaphragm until Massachusetts passed laws saying married couples could get birth control. So the victories we won were really significant. But the Reagan Revolution was really significant in ways that I see as resulting in the election of Donald Trump, which is why we lost abortion.VirginiaAnd right now, as we’re all reeling from everything, there’s this new, divisive conversation emerging. I think there’s value to this push on using inclusive language around abortion to acknowledge that people of all genders have abortions. And then we’re hearing from folks like Pamela Paul—you and I talked about her op-ed—saying we have to keep this as a women’s issue. I think you are such a great example of someone who has been through all the different iterations of this, who has embraced inclusive language. I’d love you to talk a little bit about how you see that piece of it. What can we learn from that conversation? What do we need to be doing? MaryI think of social and political movements as as playing several different functions, all of which are really important. And one is, they get their strength, from the fact of people recognizing their own experience, you know, “oh my gosh, I’ve been living with this, you’ve been living with this.” We can say out loud what was terrible about this, and we can name it, we could say how horrible it was that our husbands thought they don’t even have to do the dishes, much less share the cooking. Obviously, this was going to make our husbands defensive. But it was still so important for us that we do this. And I just think that’s always true. We need to recognize the needs of people to speak to their own experience, to name it, and to name it in ways that may make others uncomfortable. At the same time, I just so deeply believe that most of us want the same things. We all want clean air, we all want a planet that’s not going to burn to a crisp, we want our kids to go to schools—VirginiaAnd not get shot at.MaryWhere they’re not killed and where they’re nurtured, where they learn stuff.VirginiaOh so, raising the bar a little higher even than not getting killed. Sure. I like how you dream big, Mary. MaryWe want to live in safe neighborhoods. All of these are things that all of us want and right now, the politics of this country do not reflect that. Issues have been defined in ways where we just need to do a lot, a lot. Those of us who can stand to, those of us who aren’t too hurt by what we’ve been through—I don’t think any of us should be trying to force anybody who’s been through something horrendous that makes them not want to talk to anybody who sounds homophobic or sounds anti-trans. People need to be safe and to be in community. There’s so much work to be done, that no matter what your trauma, you can be doing something really useful to help others who suffered trauma like yours, right? But those of us who have led pretty protected, privileged lives—and many extraordinarily strong and amazing people who haven’t— I do think we need to be doing everything we can to be reaching out and to be listening and to not limiting our language. We need to be able to talk to all kinds of different people who use all kinds of different language. I do think it’s important to be able to say to our trans brothers and sisters, “There are times I want to talk about women because this is so overwhelmingly a women’s experience and this is an audience I need to reach.” But to me, it’s also very liberating to go back to being able to speak very generally about people.  The issues that are affecting Black lives are the same issues of health care, and housing, and jobs, and global warming, pollution. These all have more impact on Black lives than on white lives. But to address those issues, we need movements that speak to white people, too. For a long time, in the women’s movement, we sort of weren’t speaking to men at all. And that wasn’t a way to win.VirginiaRight, that just made everything very easy to dismiss as a women’s issue. That’s why we’ve made no progress on paid leave, because it’s only women who need to take paid leave, because it’s only women who have the babies. We’re not going to get anywhere on a lot of this until it matters to men.MaryThat’s why I think it’s actually quite exciting to challenge gender roles. Let’s speak to “people.” VirginiaRight, let’s talk about how people have abortions, and people are impacted by abortion.MaryYeah. And obviously, you know, there can be grammatical issues. I’m sort of against people getting too self righteous about the grammar either way. I remember a time when amazing civil rights leaders didn’t want to start saying “African American” or “Black,” who were sticking with Negro. And they had led extraordinary struggles and then started to get dissed by militant young Black leaders. Those stories happen again and again, in our movements. I do think it’s very understandable how and why it happens. The more we say, the more voices we have speaking in as many languages as possible about how most of us want the same thing, the better. Let’s make good faith efforts to get there. Let’s not attack each other. Let’s try to listen. Let’s try to understand why people are hurt and acknowledge that. And let’s follow leadership’s that’s getting us where we want to go.VirginiaAnd as you said, those of us with privileged lives, who can do more work, we can do this work of learning new language. This is not the hardest thing anyone’s been asked to do! If this makes things safer and more comfortable for more people to participate, then we should be doing it.MaryWhat bothers me about the Pamela Paul piece is: No one is saying to her, don’t go out there and speak to women. She’s the one who’s choosing—Virginia—to feel attacked by other people’s choices. Other people’s language doesn’t actually have to impact her at all. So, here we are post-Roe. You and I spent the week together after the decision was announced and I think I cried every day. People who know you and know your work were saying to me, “Isn’t your stepmom just devastated by what’s happening right now?” But you were one of the people giving me a lot of hope. So I would love for you to share some of that. We had a whole thread discussion here, and I was hearing from lawyers who were feeling like they had to question their careers, like, how do I keep doing this work? I was hearing from health care providers, from parents, everybody is very scared right now. And I think, pretty depressed, in my generation.MaryI do understand how and why people decided to rely on the courts to protect abortion and I want us to pass laws that will allow us to do that again. I see abortion rights and access as critical to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I think we have to get the majority of Americans to see that that’s the case and pass laws that will protect all of us. I understand that when it looked like you could just get those rights protected without getting people to vote for them, why people went in that direction, even though it meant giving up on building on the hearts and minds. It seemed like a safer way to go, right?VirginiaEven though there were big trade offs to it.MaryThe truth is that 50 years ago, we probably could have won. Before there was 50 years of anti-abortion organizing. We could have won hearts and minds more easily than we’re going to do now. 50 years of anti abortion organizing, 50 years of people’s becoming increasingly embattled and increasingly embittered by losing so much. Which has given the people that call themselves right to life their power. They seem to be the ones that are standing for principle and reaching out to others and saying, “We have principles, we value life, you know, and we may lose everything else, but we’re going to stand up for life.” And those of us who want better lives for all people can’t allow them to be the ones in that position. I do think we need to reach out to all the presumably good hearted people who are embracing that. If they want to support women and having children, we need to say, “Okay, work with us to support healthcare for all, the Child Tax allowance…”VirginiaPaid leave, day care…MaryI do think that’s one front we need to move on. We need to embrace a broader truly pro-life agenda. There’s so much work to be done to promote access, that actually people have had to be working on all these years ever since Medicaid stopped paying, much less people who don’t have access to Medicaid. People have been doing amazing work at that. They now need even more support, there’s all the work to support individual women directly. And then there’s the broader, how do we change the politics of this? And then, obviously, we’ve got to continue the court battles. We need people passionately defending freedom of speech in the states where doctors and health care providers are being told, you have to tell patients lies. Either they’re being forbidden from talking to people about abortions at all, or they’re being told they have to read scripts where abortions are associated with breast cancer and suicide.VirginiaNone of which is true.MaryIt’s completely false science! It’s just a correlation of the fact that it’s the poor people and people of color who are an overwhelming number of the people who need abortions, and they’re also the people who face the worst health consequences on every issue. That correlation is being read as if it’s a scientific thing that has to be read to patients. Every law school in the country should be helping people think, how do we challenge this? And every medical and nursing student school should be thinking, how do we help? I am very interested in how this is all going to play out in terms of thinking, how can we support people legally? Because we do need all these organizations that are trying to provide abortion rights and access. We can’t have them all go under. I think a lot of them do have to follow whatever the law is, and provide whatever help they can. I think a whole lot of the rest of us do need to be like the Janes in the 70s, thinking, Well, if you have to break the law in order to help women, how are we going to do it? How are we going to do it in ways that makes the law unenforceable in the ways that civil rights people did? I mean, I think there are enormous challenges. But we have to meet them. I have to say the one other thing that really keeps me going is thinking about history. When you think about all that Black people went through after Reconstruction. People don’t have a choice about whether or not to fight these things. You have to keep learning all you can you have to keep finding the allies you can. To despair is to abandon all the people who need us most.VirginiaWell, now I’m going to cry again. Yes, you’re right. You’re right! It’s just, it’s hard. It’s scary. We have a lot of lives at stake and I think just sometimes I have to sit with that for a minute. But I appreciate you sketching out what these different fights are going to look like. I think it helps us all think about how we’re going to contribute. MaryAnd the sense of solidarity you can feel once you’re working with other people does support you. It’s very important not to do this work in ways that make you feel burned out or under attack in ways that you can’t handle. You have to find what works for you. And the community that can support you and the ways in which you can support yourself.VirginiaWe should say, too, there is a very robust reproductive justice movement. There are people who have been planning for this, who knew this was coming. Our work is to figure out how to support them. There was an initial response on social media, of people posting things about like, “you can come stay in my guest room if you need an abortion in my state!” And we may come to that, but there are also systems in place that we can be supporting. Individual acts of heroism going rogue is not going to be how we get this done. MaryAnd there are organizations organizing the guest rooms! People have been doing that all along because because for all these decades many women have been lacking access and then having to come to other states.Butter For Your Burnt ToastVirginiaWell, on the note of figuring out how to do this work without burning out, we can turn to our Butter for Burnt Toast segment where we give a recommendation. I would love to know what you were doing to take care of yourself right now?MaryWhat do I do every day, or try to do every day, it is to have breakfast on my porch, where I get the look at my garden, and read the paper. And talk to my husband, to the extent that he’s willing to have breakfast on the porch! He’s more willing on weekends, sometimes weekdays, as well. It’s a way of sharing the news, even when it’s really bad news, getting to talk about it together makes you feel more in control. And then, the way the sunlight hits the trees around my garden, that early in the morning is just so beautiful. And then I take the time to make myself a breakfast with yogurt and fruit and granola. It’s sort of the food preparation I most enjoy and enjoy eating.VirginiaPeople should know that Mary is not someone who enjoys cooking dinner, certainly not on a nightly basis. All of the other conversations we’ve had about mental loads of planning meals, and all of that come directly from lived experience! But yes, breakfast preparation. I also enjoy that for myself, not for other people. I have the same breakfast ritual, except I do it before anyone else is awake in our house so that I can just sit out on the porch and look at the flowers and the trees and rage about the news. And sometimes text Dad my Spelling Bee score, even though he’s probably already done it. It is really important to have that quiet time at the beginning of the day. It is really lovely. Well, Mary, thank you so much. This was a really helpful conversation. I hope it helps people feel clearer on what we’re doing. And you know what this work needs to look like now, and I want to make sure people watch the film and get involved. So let’s wrap up by telling people where to find the film.MaryYou can see the film for free at our website Abortion and Women’s Rights 1970. We really hope people will find it helpful for thinking talking and organizing around abortion rights and access. It’s 28 minutes long. It’s a good length for either a public screening or inviting some friends over to watch it and discuss it over coffee or a glass of wine. And the website’s “get involved” page provides links to organizations that they can work with or donate to, which support individuals in need of abortion care, helping people access medication abortions, as well as organizing and lobbying at local, state, national, and international levels. We would really love for that the link to that website in the film to be widely shared and posted!Thanks so much for listening to Burnt Toast! If you’d like to support the show, please subscribe for free in your podcast player and tell a friend about this episode.The Burnt Toast Podcast is produced and hosted by me, Virginia Sole-Smith. You can follow me on Instagram or Twitter.Burnt Toast transcripts and essays are edited and formatted by Corinne Fay, who runs @SellTradePlus, an Instagram account where you can buy and sell plus size clothing.The Burnt Toast logo is by Deanna Lowe.Our theme music is by Jeff Bailey and Chris Maxwell.Tommy Harron is our audio engineer.Thanks for listening and for supporting independent anti-diet journalism. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore
908: Liz Solomon Dwyer Founder & CEO at King David Tacos

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 128:21


Liz Solomon Dwyer is the Founder and CEO od King David Tacos. Known for Austin-style breakfast tacos at carts and cafes across the city, King David Tacos was founded by Austin, TX native Liz Solomon Dwyer. She applied her decade of experience in advertising to launch King David Tacos in 2016—inspired by her Austin upbringing, Jewish heritage and her late father, fondly known as “King David”—and she leads the business full-time. King David Tacos recently launched its first brick + mortar location and headquarters at 611 Bergen St in Brooklyn's Prospect Heights, enabling its network of over 80 cafe retailers around the city; newly sustainable, zero-emissions  taco + coffee carts (now Powered by Blank Street); as well as its recent launch into select NYC area Whole Foods Markets in the prepared foods section. Today's feature affiliate: Bentobox. In need of a restaurant website? Click this link to find out why so many of my guests use Bentobox! Show notes… Calls to ACTION!!! Join Restaurant Unstoppable Network and get your first 30 days on me!  Connect with my past guest and a community of superfans. Subscribe to the Restaurant Unstoppable YouTube Channel Join the private Unstoppable Facebook Group Join the email list! (Scroll Down to get the Vendor List!) Favorite success quote or mantra: "If it was easy, everyone would be doing it." In this episode with Liz Solomon Dwyer we will discuss: Marketing and advertising Trust and partnerships Dealing with difficult people and situations Social and emotional intelligence Establishing an LLC Pop ups and catering How to name your restaurant/branding Scaling and growth Consulting, mentorship Food carts Retail Wholesale Today's sponsor: At Popmenu, we know that in today's world, a great hospitality experience usually begins online. Keeping the conversation with guests going beyond the meal also requires simple, powerful, fun technology capable of expression through all kinds of channels. Our team takes pride in helping restaurants put their best foot forward digitally so they can focus on what they do best. We think PDF menus are super boring, we believe 3rd party platforms have had too much say in how consumers find their next dining experience and we deeply feel that sharing your beautiful menu doesn't have to be so difficult, time-consuming and expensive. As a listener of the Restaurant Unstoppable, you'll receive $100 off your first month of Popmenu!   7shifts is a modern labor management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. Effectively labor management is more important than ever to ensure profitability and restaurant success. Trusted by over 400,000 restaurant professionals, 7shifts gives you the tools you need to streamline labor operations, communicate with your team, and retain your talent. Best of all 7shifts integrates with the POS and Payroll systems you already use and trust (like Toast!) turning labor into a competitive advantage for your business. Restaurant Unstoppable members get 3 months, absolutely free. Real hospitality and restaurant industry veterans, the My Restaurant CFO team understands the daily frustrations restaurant owners experience managing their establishments. By partnering to create a custom solution, we streamline your flow of financial information, create a clear picture of your overall financial health, use your historical data to forecast your financial needs, and suggest ways to cut costs and increase revenue. My Restaurant CFO - Let us help you achieve your goals. Knowledge bombs Which "it factor" habit, trait, or characteristic you believe most contributes to your success? I don't accept the status quo What is your biggest weakness? Impatience What's one question you ask or thing you look for during an interview? The desire to make things better and not accept the status quo What's a current challenge? How are you dealing with it? Figuring out how to get out of my own way Share one code of conduct or behavior you teach your team. Treat others how you'd like to be treated What is one uncommon standard of service you teach your staff? Recognizing regulars, have conversations with guests What's one book we must read to become a better person or restaurant owner? Blood, Bones, and Butter by Gabrielle Hamilton GET THIS BOOK FOR FREE AT AUDIBLE.COM  What's one piece of technology you've adopted within your restaurant walls and how has it influence operations? OptimoRoute - Online Route Planner Name one service you've hired. Totrillas - Fiesta Tortillas in Austin, TX If you got the news that you'd be leaving this world tomorrow and all memories of you, your work, and your restaurants would be lost with your departure with the exception of 3 pieces of wisdom you could leave behind for the good of humanity, what would they be? Take time off Eat good food Don't be too hard on yourself Contact info: Instagram: @kingdavidtacos Website: http://kingdavidtacos.com Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for joining today! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, please leave an honest review for the Restaurant Unstoppable Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. Huge thanks to Liz Solomon Dwyer for joining me for another awesome episode. Until next time! Restaurant Unstoppable is a free podcast. One of the ways I'm able to make it free is by earning a commission when sharing certain products with you. I've made it a core value to only share tools, resources, and services my guest mentors have recommend, first. If you're finding value in my podcast, please use my links!

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over
Not My Circus (Rebroadcast) - 18 July 2022

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 53:45


Throwing cheese and shaky cheese are two very different things. In baseball, hard cheese refers to a powerful fastball, and probably comes from a similar-sounding word in Farsi, Urdu, and Hindi. Shaky cheese, on the other hand, is a slang term for Parmesan cheese, which many of us grew up shaking out of a can. Also, why is a movie preview called a trailer when it comes at the beginning of a film, not the end? And: if you want to say that something's not your responsibility, there's always the handy phrase Not my circus, not my monkey. Plus, cocktail party effect, all my put-togethers, bedroom suite vs. bedroom suit, Alles im Butter, pes anserinus, fastuous, bursa, bummer, and too much sand for my little truck. Read full show notes, hear hundreds of free episodes, send your thoughts and questions, and learn more on the A Way with Words website: https://waywordradio.org/contact. Be a part of the show: call 1 (877) 929-9673 toll-free in the United States and Canada; worldwide, call or text/SMS +1 (619) 800-4443. Email words@waywordradio.org. Twitter @wayword. Copyright Wayword, Inc., a 501(c)(3) corporation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Forget what you've been told. Eating butter may actually help you lose weight. Dr. Berg's Keto and IF Lab: https://www.facebook.com/groups/drbergslab/ How to Bulletproof your Immune System FREE Course: https://bit.ly/39Ry3s2 FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Find Your Body Type: https://www.drberg.com/body-type-quiz Eating Fat Doesn't Increase Your blood Fat: https://bit.ly/2EwqCX1 Talk to a Product Advisor to find the best product for you! Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Dr. Berg's products. Product Advisors are available Monday through Friday 8 am - 6 pm and Saturday 9 am - 5 pm EST. At this time, we no longer offer Keto Consulting and our Product Advisors will only be advising on which product is best for you and advise on how to take them. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/drericberg/

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: KyivPOV: "Somehow, the choice was never made (in Europe) between guns and butter." Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 12:44


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. Brussels 1884 @Batchelorshow #Ukraine: KyivPOV:  "Somehow, the choice was never made (in Europe) between guns and butter." Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/ukraine-fears-western-capitulation-on-russia-as-cracks-emerge/ar-AAZDAa2

Le Batard & Friends Network
POINT FORWARD - A Winning Combination (feat. Joe Lacob)

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 81:00


We have been celebrating the Warriors all summer and this week is no different. Andre & Evan kick off the show by recapping their recent trip to NBA Summer League in Las Vegas and asking, "Does Summer League even matter anymore?" Later Andre & Evan debate T-Pain's commentary about whether Tupac would be a top emcee in today's music. And for the Guns & Butter segment, Andre explains the recent merging of his favorite worlds as an increasing number or sports leagues begin to allow venture capital firms to finally invest in their teams. Lastly, Warriors owner Joe Lacob joins the show to talk about building a dynasty, how he accumulated wealth in business after a long stint in the sciences, his maniacal focus on winning, how to build a thriving team and how he really feels about the lightyear comments. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pop Culture Happy Hour
BTS

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 22:39 Very Popular


The Korean pop sensation BTS recently announced that its members are taking a break to pursue solo projects. The band has had massive success in the U.S. with songs like "Dynamite" and "Butter", but their discography is farther-reaching than casual fans might think. So we thought now would be a good time to showcase some of the best deep cuts in the BTS catalog.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
07-12-22 - BR - TUE - It's Amazon Prime Day And Cold Cold Butter Ads - Barrel Of Scotch Sells For Million Making John Think Brady Was Good At Word Problems - Cali Doc Suggests Floating Abortion Clinics In International Waters Like Dolly Steamboat

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 27:00


The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
POINT FORWARD - Run it Back (feat. Andrew Wiggins)

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 73:05 Very Popular


As we proceed to celebrate Warriors season, Andre & Evan discuss all things Kevin Durant & Kyrie Irving (1:05) . Later the topic of conversation shifts to Nick Kyrgios and the psychology of trash talk in the NBA as compared to tennis (15:49). Then for the Guns & Butter segment, Andre dives deep into the impact that the massive decline in value of cryptocurrency has had on Black investors (25:59). Finally, NBA Champion and All-Star starter Andrew Wiggins joins the show to talk about the stellar year he's had, putting on for Canadian basketball, shares a few draft stories and talks about the unbelievable feeling that accompanies being an NBA champion (37:14). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices