Podcasts about grandparents

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  • 2,737EPISODES
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  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 11, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about grandparents

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Latest podcast episodes about grandparents

The Puberty Podcast
The Grandparent Episode with Henry + Zoe Winkler

The Puberty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 63:37


Our episode with Henry + Zoe Winkler is a father/daughter master class on how grandparents play loving, supportive and epicenter-of-fun roles in their grandchildren's lives. If we're lucky, children have grandparents who can act as an extra set of trusted adults,  helping them navigate the twists and turns of childhood. But every parent knows that when it comes to grandparents, the rules tend to get thrown out the window - cake for breakfast anyone? We laughed and cried during this inspirational conversation with a very special family… we think you will, too.   Show Notes: Alien Superstar Book Series This Is About Humanity & Visit OOMLA to shop thoughtfully designed (OOM)Bras!   Produced by Dear Media

Marriage & Real Estate
Not Your Grandparents Marriage Ep. 63

Marriage & Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022


In this episode of Marriage and Real Estate, we discuss having Harriet Tubman Energy! For more information on the E-Book https://www.marriageandrealestate.com/product-page/the-ultimate-guide-to-investing-in-real-estate-for-couples-1 And More! Please Like, Share & Subscribe !!!!!! Follow us on Clubhouse @MarriageandRealestateclub Instagram @marriageandrealestate, @kevanshelton, and @ayeshashelton. Also, you can follow us on Facebook and youtube @marriageandrealestate. Please send us questions and comments to mandrpodcast@kandacompanies.com

True Crime Daily The Podcast
Grandparents shot in Xmas fight over bodybuilder's baby; Girl gone since 2019 just reported missing

True Crime Daily The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 34:38


This week on True Crime Daily The Podcast: A personal trainer in Brooklyn is accused of assaulting and shooting his parents in their Long Island mansion on Christmas in a reported dispute over his 1-year-old child. And police in New Hampshire are asking for the public's help to find a missing 7-year-old girl. She was reported missing last week - but she hasn't been seen since 2019. Why the delay, who's to blame - and where is Harmony Montgomery? Retired police lieutenant Eric Rosoff joins host Ana Garcia. Thanks to our sponsors: HelloFresh.com/TCD16  code TCD16 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RESHAD RADIO
Grandparents & New IHU COVID - GM

RESHAD RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 58:44


Wake up with the best LIVE STREAMING morning show on the planet

Kickass Boomers
#65: Why is homeschooling so helpful in these Covid Times & how many grandparents are helping to homeschool their grandchildren?

Kickass Boomers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 33:37


Our Kickass Boomer of the Day is Michele Holmes, a veteran homeschool mom of 30 years with a desire to help homeschooling parents take on the high school years so they can give their teens a positive and successful high school experience at home. Michele, a mom of 8, has graduated seven kids from her homeschool: Five went on to earn college degrees and 2 more are currently in college. She is currently homeschooling her youngest. Join me in this episode and learn why Michele is a Kickass Boomer!  [00:01 - 05:42] Opening Segment Let's get to know Michele Holmes Why homeschooling should be an option [05:43 - 10:33] Homeschooling 101 Michele talks about her role as parent coach and resource person about homeschooling What Michele learned from being a member of a swimming team The difference between e-learning and homeschooling [10:34 - 20:32] Freedom Brought by Homeschooling Here's how homeschooled kids can achieve more freedom We talk about the usual struggles of elementary school kids Kids with learning disabilities can also learn from homeschooling [20:33 - 31:13] A Grandparent's Role in Homeschooling Why children should join clubs available inside their schools Michele shares her thoughts on the pandemic's effect to children Her important tip for grandparents who homeschool their grandchildren [31:14 - 33:36] Closing Segment Connect with Michele! Links below  Final announcements   Tweetable Quotes: “There's this whole new freedom that comes along with homeschooling.” - Michele Holmes “You as a grandparent, you still have to have a relationship with your adult children and you don't want it to go sideways.” - Michele Holmes   Email michele@homeschooldirective.com to connect with Michele or follow her on Instagram and Facebook. Visit Homeschool Directive to learn your homeschooling needs for your children!   ----- BEE BOLD, NOT OLD.  LEAVE A REVIEW and join me on my journey to become and stay a Kickass Boomer! Visit http://kickassboomers.com/ to listen to the previous episodes. Also check us out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn.   You can also connect with me by emailing terry@kickassboomers.com.

Practicing Uncommon Sense
#16 Mid Life Crisis, Movies, and Family History

Practicing Uncommon Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 83:17


Welcome to 2022 with the first episode of the year with Practicing Uncommon Sense. I try to probe my co-host more about what a mid life crisis is, however he doesn't seem to relate with it. We discuss movies and who are good and bad actors? Is the Jumanji reboot a good movie, or is it terrible? Let us know if you liked the new Jumanji movies or if you prefer the original. We also discuss our family history. Grandparents, parents, and all of the adventures we now know they had. How generations are different with keeping secrets and providing the do as I say not as I do mantra; versus the openness of the current generation. Do your parents or grandparents have crazy and or interesting pasts? Share your stories with us. If you have topics that would like to have some common sense added to, let us know! Contact us at the Email: practiceuncommonsense@gmail.com Find me on social media at Twitter: https://twitter.com/TechNLogic1 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/technlogic18/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg4NBG9q8BuiQXUecvOlLxQ Website/Blog: https://technlogic.tech.blog/ Amazon Affiliate Link: https://amzn.to/2R7MXhV --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/uncommon-sense7/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncommon-sense7/support

Conversations with Toi
Grandparents Love with Gramps Jeffrey

Conversations with Toi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 52:42


Today's episode is with Gramps Jeffrey as he uses his book, "I don't want to turn 3" to help young children with responsibilities and social interaction. His first book, "The Secrets of Retailing...How To Beat Walmart” was written to help entrepreneurs and small businesses compete against the big guys. Here is a little more information about his book: Marc Joseph BookArianna Huffington read his book and then asked him to become a contributor to The Huffington Post. Here is a link to the close to 100 articles he has written for this publication: Huffington Post Articles by Marc JosephThe articles are about small businesses, education, family, the homeless and several other nonprofit topics dear to all of us.You can get his book, "I don't want to turn 3 on Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and on his websiteHe can be found on social media: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and PinterestAs always make sure you do 3 things to support this podcast: subscribe, review, and share.I am on the blog, Toitime and on social media as Toitimeblog

The Daily Boost | Coaching You Need. Success You Deserve.

I can't tell you how many times I've heard somebody say— "If I knew I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself and saved more money." True or true? Modern times are interesting times, and when it comes to living a long life, people either think life is too short or long. If you do things correctly, long enough is the best answer, but 200 years ago, most folks didn't have the luxury of thinking about things like that. If you lived during those times, you lived at a slower and harder pace. And, since time is relative, your perception was slower, as well. Everything was slower. It would be like a two-week, off-the-grid vacation in a mountain cabin without your phone in modern times if you think about it. That used to be daily life. Yes, time-wise, living to the ripe old age of 40 felt like living to 100 today - if something simple didn't take you out sooner.  When California had open land, low-priced real estate, and gold in them-there-hills, almost everybody died much younger than today. Usually from an exotic disease like a toothache.   If you lived a couple of centuries ago, the simple life meant simple goals: Survive childhood. Buy a horse. Get married. Buy another horse. Build your first house on your 40-year old Grandparents' property. Get your kids through 5th grade so they can graduate to help you plow the field. And if you were a planner, plant a tree on the hill a soon as you can so that it is big enough for your kids to bury you under when a toothache took you out. While it's easy to make fun of the old days, one thing rings true— If you lived in the past, wondering what you would do next in your life would never be an option.  Since you have that option, the question is, what are you going to do with it? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Grandparents and Their Vital Role - II

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 25:55


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29 Christian grandparents are the missing puzzle piece in the discipleship of their grandkids. On today's edition of Family Talk, Larry Fowler, founder of the Legacy Coalition, urges grandparents to develop biblically-focused relationships with their grandchildren. Dr. Dobson noted, An inheritance is what you give someone, but a legacy is what you build in someone. Grandparents, what legacy are you placing in your grandchildren?

The Unseen Podcast
Sandy Davidson

The Unseen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 15:35


Day 9 of 12 in our mini series focused on missing people throughout the UK. On the 23rd of April 1976, 3 year old Sandy Davidson was playing in his Grandparents' garden with his sister in Irvine in Ayrshire, Scotland, Their dog Kissy ran out of the newly opened gate and Sandy and his sister ran into the street after the dog. His sister Donna returned but Sandy didn't. He has never been since again since. Important information provided by: https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/sister-missing-scots-toddler-sandy-23484099https://www.scotland.police.uk/what-s-happening/missing-persons/sandy-davidson/https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/police-scotland-ignored-vital-witness-22635443https://www.irvinetimes.com/news/18398108.sister-missing-sandy-davidson-tells-trauma-44-years/https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9065989/sandy-davidson-missing-sister-guilt/https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-36119778https://www.scotsman.com/news/sandy-davidson-fresh-appeal-boy-3-missing-1976-1478116https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/scotland/159682/new-police-appeal-over-1976-disappearance-of-three-year-old-sandy-davidson/https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/14448366.new-appeal-scots-toddler-sandy-davidson-missing-40-years/https://www.missingpeople.org.uk/help-us-find/sandy-davidson-01-007561Music by: www.dl-sounds.comFollow the Unseen Podcast on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-unseen-podcast/id1318473466?uo=4Follow the Unseen Podcast on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0xWK7Mu3bTP6oziZvxrwSK?si=QxvyPkZ2TdCDscnfxyeRawFollow the Unseen Podcast on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-unseen-podcastJoin our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/unseenpodFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theunseenpodFollow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theunseenpod/Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunseenpod?fan_landing=true

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk
Grandparents and Their Vital Role - Part 2

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 25:55


Christian grandparents are the missing puzzle piece in the discipleship of their grandkids. On today's edition of Family Talk, Larry Fowler, founder of the Legacy Coalition, urges grandparents to develop biblically-focused relationships with their grandchildren. Dr. Dobson noted, "An inheritance is what you give someone, but a legacy is what you build in someone." Grandparents, what legacy are you placing in your grandchildren?

Rav Gershon Ribner
Mentality of the youth: Our grandparents are relics of the past

Rav Gershon Ribner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 3:10


Checking In
ARE WE GRANDPARENTS?!? - Checking In Podcast (Ep. #85)

Checking In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 82:30


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Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Grandparents and Their Vital Role - I

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:55


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29 According to research, 3 out of 4 Christian grandparents take on a cultural view of grandparenting rather than a biblical view. When Larry Fowler asked a group of people at a conference how many of them had ever heard a sermon on grandparenting, only three raised their hands. On today's edition of Family Talk, Dr. James Dobson sits down with Larry Fowler, founder of the Legacy Coalition, to discuss the great need for grandparents to be involved in their grandchildren's lives. The most important thing a grandparent can do is live out his or her spiritual walk and testimony. In a rapidly changing society, grandparents are essential!

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk
Grandparents and Their Vital Role - Part 1

Dr. James Dobson's Family Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:55


According to research, 3 out of 4 Christian grandparents take on a cultural view of grandparenting rather than a biblical view. When Larry Fowler asked a group of people at a conference how many of them had ever heard a sermon on grandparenting, only three raised their hands. On today's edition of Family Talk, Dr. James Dobson sits down with Larry Fowler, founder of the Legacy Coalition, to discuss the great need for grandparents to be involved in their grandchildren's lives. The most important thing a grandparent can do is live out his or her spiritual walk and testimony. In a rapidly changing society, grandparents are essential!

Funny Messy Life
My Perfect Christmas - 072

Funny Messy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 15:23


My Perfect Christmas I told you so. I suspect a few of my regular listeners didn't believe me when I said I'd be back to Funny Messy Life after a brief hiatus, but here I am. I've been gone for a few weeks because it's hard to find the time to write out full episodes of this podcast when there are other things that I have to do in place of it, like editing the final draft of a novel, which is what has been going on with this last break. But every break has to come to an end at some point, and while I'm not done with editing Mr. Long Said Nothing because my life is too full with obligations, I've been thinking it's time to get back in the podcast saddle. The question was this: Should I jump on back in now, or give myself the rest of the year and jump back in at the beginning of 2022? I mean, it's only about a week now, right? Then something happened. I received a Christmas card from my friends, the ________, in Minnesota and my heart soared. By the way, _________, I wanted to send you an email to thank you, but I got a fancy pants new iPhone and in the data transfer, I lost your info, so drop me your email address if you don't mind. Anyway, I decided that if someone who knows me through this podcast feels strongly enough to send me a card, then maybe others of you do too … just maybe not as much as the __________'s because they put that they were my biggest fans right there on the envelope, so ……     SO! - without further ado, I'm Michael Blackston and Merry Christmas! Here is the first episode back after my hiatus, and now I present to you, for your holiday pleasure, a few words that describe what I think would be the perfect Christmas in my Funny Messy Life. _________________________ Let us start by jingling all the way back to my childhood in the 1970's and 80's to get the family Christmas tree. In. my extended family, we had a tradition. We always met at my grandma's house on Sunday afternoons for lunch and a few hours of fellowship. The grownups gathered around the kitchen table after the meal, while the kids were expected to go outside and frolick merrily around the property, regardless of whether or not it was 20 degrees, or 150. If it was 150, we came back in at the end of the day with sweaty, gritty dirt lines circling the perimeters of our necks. I may have mentioned before that we called these rings of grime and funk, Granny Beads. If it was twenty degrees outside, we'd still have them, but they'd be frozen into magical frozen filth beads. Either way, the adults would inevitably tell us at the end of the day, after being the very ones to banish us to the hours long whimsy of nature, Y'all smell like the outside! But every year a couple of weeks before Christmas, it was the entire family who got to smell like the outside. Why? Because it was our tradition for everybody to march into the woods together and pick out our Christmas trees from the wild cedars that grew behind Grandma's house. The men took up their saws, we kids ran untethered through the forest like we didn't have no good raisin', and the women kept a keen eye out for the perfect tree when they weren't yelling at us kids. “Quit runnin' around like y'all ain't got no good raisin'!” Every once in a while, one of the young ones would find a tree we wanted to take home. “Let's git thissun, Deddie!” But it was never the right one. It usually had a huge bare spot in the middle, or the top looked like the Jolly Green Giant had used it to scrape the granny beads out of the creases on his jolly green neck. Eventually, the angels would descent, shining a holy light on the perfect tree, and the man who claimed it would begin the arduous task of cussing it down. Did I say cussing it down? Ha ha, no. Of course not. I meant cutting it down with interesting, and quite colorful words as a way to encourage the saw to stop getting stuck in the sap midway through. Once we got the tree home and decorated, the house smelled delightfully of cedar and burning cedar needles as back in those days we thought nothing of stringing a dead tree with huge glass bulbs that got hotter than Satan's armpit. In effect, our house smelt like th'outside! And that's number one on my list of things that would make a perfect Christmas - going outback of Grandma's house with the family just one more time to pick out the Christmas tree. Next, I think I would want the family to gather again a couple of weeks before Christmas at an old southern restaurant that no longer exists, except in our fond memories. I'm not sure who first came up with the idea of everybody going to Swamp Guinea (prounounced SWOMP' - ginny), but they are responsible for some wonderful memories. It became another extended family tradition, and I suspect maybe my Grandpa started it all. Swamp Guinea was an wood cabin sort of place that smelled of fried everything and sweet tea. It was an all-you-can-eat family style gorge-fest where our family met to tear into chicken, shrimp, catfish, hush puppies, cole slaw, and stew like we didn't have no good raisin'. The place is closed now, and this year we tried to re-imagine the tradition with a trip to another similar place called Booty's. I didn't care for it, but we were all together and that's what was important. Well, Grandma wasn't with us for the first time, so I guess that might have had something to do with it not being the same. The thing is, the stew I just mentioned would also always make an appearance at our Christmas Eve gathering. Someone would order a pot of Swamp Guinea stew and bring a loaf of bread to the table. Lately the stew was from a different place, and it's good, but it's not Swamp Guinea. At least we were all together at Grandma's. So for number two, I think just one more meal with the family at Swamp Guinea would help make the perfect Christmas. Stepping back to the tree situation, one of my favorite memories of Christmas was always the family decorating the tree in the middle of Grandma and Grandpa's living room. The box with all the ornaments would be brought in and everyone would be invited to find the ball with their name on it. I think my sister might have started this event years ago because she'd seen them doing on Days Of Our Lives, but it stuck and it became ours as well. The kids hung theirs as high up as they could go, while the teens fought for position at the topmost point of the tree. One of my cousins would never be outdone and to this day, the tree's topmost ornament bears the name, Chuck. It's there again this year, except the tree was brought to my aunt's house because the house we've always known as Grandma's has been sold. New places, new traditions. Never quite the same. Grandma and Grandpa would sit back and watch the crowd laughing and being jolly as we decorated the tree, sometimes so loud it seemed we didn't have no good raisin', and they said few words. They just took it all in. And that's number three for me in my ideal description of the perfect Christmas. Then there's Christmas Eve. After the meal that included all the trimmings, including the stew, we would all retire to the living room to open presents. The kids would have been begging to get to this part for a while now, and having digested, the adults would relent. At that point, a couple of people would be appointed to pass them out from the enormous pile under the tree and the fun would start with everyone ripping up paper and throwing bows into the air with reckless abandon, as if they didn't have no good raisin'. Someone always ended up with a bow on their head, showing it off to everyone like it was the first time anyone had ever thought of it. A lot of time that person has been me. There are a couple of gag gifts that have made their rounds over the years: an old coat that no one wants, and two plastic guitar-shaped popcorn … things with Elvis on the label. These gifts must be kept and regifted the next year. Every year, someone dares someone else to eat the popcorn and we laugh. Once again, the Grandparents, ,and for several years, only Grandma, sat and watched and got showered with gifts, but said little. This was their gift - to see the family they created share a wonderful time. I suspect this description matches a lot of others around the world in cultures that celebrate Christmas, but each one will have their special little things that make it unique to that family. Ours will be different this year. Grandma passed this year and like I said, the house was sold. It's funny, I always call it Grandma's house, but there was Grandpa, too, until he passed. That was his way, though. To quietly sit in the background and enjoy watching the rest of us. When I think back on it, I can still see the look on his face, the slightest upward curl the edges of his mouth, and the twinkle in his eye as his family lived their lives in front of him. That's what he always worked toward. It was his greatest mission - to provide those moments for the rest of us. In the end, it became Grandma's mantle to sit back and watch. The older she got, the less she would say as she sat at the side table in Sundays in the kitchen while the rest of us talked and laughed, and on a rare occasions, argued. I felt bad for her sometimes and didn't want her to feel left out, so I'd ask her … “You okay over there, Grandma?” She would smile and say, “I'm just listening to y'all.” Coming in at number four, one more Christmas with Grandma and Grandpa at their house on the Washington Highway. I want to pull in one more time and see the lone tree out front lit with bright, multicolored lights. I want my headlights to shine just one more time on a sign out front by the road that read, Joseph Mills Photograghy. I want to walk inside and immediately hear gales of laughter and smell the stew. And I want my hug. God, I miss my hug. It's all different now, and I'm settled that the only choice we have is to continue to love, laugh, and live. In those moments, we will usher in new traditions and the world will, as it always has, move on. There are a bunch of other things that would help put the perfect season pin to the season, but this year, these feel like they rank at the top for me. Maybe I'll revisit this list and add to it another time, but for now, it's where it ought to be. As for my Christian brothers and sisters who might ask, Where was Christ in all of this? You never mentioned Christ. I didn't have to. He was always there. He was there when Grandpa and Grandma eloped to be married at 16. He was there at the birth of each of their three daughters, and subsequently every grandchild as the family grew. And Christ was at the very center of every celebration, every tradition, and every memory we made. And now, I guess he's with them in Heaven, three of them holding hands together and smiling, watching with maybe few words, as we continue to live our lives in front of them.   

The Clark Howard Podcast
12.23.21 Teachable Moments: Teens & Money / Know Your Worth in the Marketplace.

The Clark Howard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 32:44


Teenagers are a hot market for fintechs like Square, now opening Cash App to teens. Clark shares ideas for teaching teens about money & payment apps. // Most of us aren't great at advocating for ourselves and negotiating pay - a vital skill. It's important to know what your job is worth and your power as an employee. Tips to help you master the art of negotiation. Ask Clark topics include: New FAFSA Removes Roadblocks for Grandparent 529 Plans / Estate Planning: Living Trusts vs. Simple Wills - Investopedia / How To Open a Roth IRA / How much life insurance do you need? - Life Insurance / Refinance Your Mortgage Want more money advice? Sign up for Clark's free daily newsletter! Free Advice: Clark's Consumer Action Center Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Allusionist
148. Bonus 2021

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 25:24


I've been saving them up all year, and now it's time for the annual selection box of Bonus Bits! Things this year's guests said that couldn't fit into their episode, or weren't related to language, but ARE related to being a bonus bit. We've got percussive pan protests; the mating habits, and male-killing habits, of ladybirds; Icelandic aunts/uncles/cousins/wait which member of the extended family are you referring to?; Morse code machines; and a surprisingly heated topic, the semantics of salad. Links to all the original episodes featuring these guests are at theallusionist.org/bonus2021, plus a transcript and the full dictionary entry for the randomly selected word. The show will return in February 2022, but sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist for patron-exclusive livestreams in January! The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow.  Visit theallusionist.org/merch to obtain your Potato Fugue State sweatshirts and multidenominational Wintervalwear. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs at palebirdmusic.com or search for Pale Bird on Bandcamp and Spotify, and he's @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram.  Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor an episode of the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Catan, the building and trading board game where no two games are the same. Allusionist listeners get 10 percent off the original base game at catanshop.com/allusionist. • BetterHelp, online therapy with licensed professional counsellors. Allusionist listeners get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/allusionist. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist.  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*ck
Patreon Unlock: Living Your Authentic Life with World Traveler Jessica Sueiro

Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*ck

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 55:10


On today's episode, I speak with yet another person I find truly fascinating, Jessica Sueiro. Jessica and her husband, Will, along with their two children, Avalon and Largo, are world traveling, homeschooling, bohemian vagabonds in the best possible way. They have an amazing YouTube channel called World Towning, where they document their full-time travel family adventures and share their passion for dreaming big. Jessica joins me from a boat in Majorca to discuss her family's decision to leave their Boston 2013 in favor of trekking around the world together, how they have thrived throughout their traveling adventures, and the experience of managing homeschool in the process. Jessica talks about overcoming the fear of screwing up your kids or being judged by others to step out of the box and follow your own path. She shares how her family maintains a sense of stability, routine, and deep connection as world travelers, how her children have navigated their social needs through this experience, and her thoughts on minimalism. We chat about the delicate balance of transitioning grandparents away from giving stuff in favor of experiences, and I ask Jessica how she handles being with her kids all day long as a HSP (Highly Sensitive Person). Finally, we discuss the importance of community and asking for help, how traveling makes you a better, more humble person, and Jessica offers her best advice for listeners who are considering a major life change or transition from the norm. For more information about the Sueiro family and their traveling lifestyle, visit WorldTowningVoyages.com or check out their YouTube Channel, which features new videos every Friday. Thank you for your listening! I appreciate your patronage more than I can say. For more information on my potty training and parenting resources, please visit the links below. The Finer Details of This Episode: Jessica and her husband, Will, always wanted to travel with their kids but didn't think it was possible A summer trip to Paris sparked their interest in international travel They realized they all thrived in their travelling adventures and decided to make it happen on their own They wanted to instill a global education for their children, have more time together,  forge a tighter bond as a family, and create memories over buying stuff Most people have a fear of stepping out of the box - accepting that we will f-ck up our kids no matter where we are gives us the freedom to take that leap It took them seven years to finally decide to change their lives - they are planners and it was not an impulsive decision They have a travel-based business, which works for their lifestyle They have maintained a sense of rhythm and routine as travelers by reading at night, eating dinner together, and having consistency as a family Home is in the heart, not the house you're living in They have an ‘open-door policy' where you can always interrupt if you have a question or need emotional support They have always prioritized their children's social components through the homeschooling experience, which has been challenging during the pandemic Her daughter started her own book club, to help meet social needs and connect with friends Listen to your kids' interests, create what you need, and be open-minded about the way kids make friends today Jessica shares how their travels informed a minimalist lifestyle - she is a minimalist by nature For the first three years, they left with eight bags and eight carry-ons, and lived in different countries for nine to twelve months at a time They traveled from Costa Rica to Ecuador to France, then they moved to an RV Their policy was if something came in, something went out Focus is on experiences over stuff Grandparents traditionally show their love through gifts and toys, but Jessica and Will have really tried to transition grandparents to giving experiences instead Grandparents get joy out of watching kids open presents, but Jessica and Will try to bring the focus back to experiences that will give the child joy instead Jessica is a self-proclaimed HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) Being with her kids all day long while also working is all she's ever known and it doesn't bother her They have done the work to create the life they want The importance of community and asking for help Traveling makes you a better person because it's humbling and you become so appreciative If you're looking to make a major transition or change in your life, remember that as a parent, you are tough The worst that can happen is you go back to where you started, but you will have learned and grown so much along the way   Quotes “Will and I had always wanted to travel with the kids. But we were responsible career people. And we had no idea that you could just do this on your own.” “We came out of the summer going, Wow, that was a pretty cool summer. Our kids thrived, our relationship thrived, you're able to work and adventure and parent and do all this kind of stuff. At the same time we realized, Hey, I could probably do this on our own. So why don't we try and do this?” “We wanted to do it for global education for our kids, more family time, tighter bond as a family, and also to be creating memories over buying stuff. And so that's kind of the basis of why we did it.” “The first thing we all need to realize is we're all going to f-ck up our kids. So it doesn't really matter where we are and where we are in the world… Inevitably, if I stay right here, I'm going to do something wrong. And if I go over here, I'm going to do something wrong, too. So why wouldn't you just take that leap?” “Stepping outside of what is normal, it's difficult. There's a lot of criticism, everyone has an opinion, people are going to tell you you're screwing up your life, your career, their American dream that they have for your children. Grandparents, friends - everyone has an opinion. So I think that that's a natural and normal fear. Absolutely hands down. We've definitely had it. But fear is part of life.” “It took us seven years because we were raised in a society and in families where the responsible thing to do was have this career, have the house, follow this path.” “For well over a decade, that was one of our things that connected us as a family, was the reading. We've always had dinner together wherever we are in the world.” “Often our backdrop is ever-changing, our timezone is changing, the language we're navigating is changing, the currency might be changing, but the consistency we keep within our family is always there.” “People will say, Well, there's no stability in the way that you're living your life. And you don't have a home. I'm like, We have a home - we just don't always have a house we put it in. The stability is in these traditions and these rituals that we create as a family to connect us deeper.”  “I found that those times where they can come and know that you're accessible has been really, really helpful for them to have that connection with us.” “Let's talk pandemic and pre-pandemic. The pandemic's been incredibly difficult for them. How we normally navigated social has been thrown out the window.” “It's really important, as well as difficult, for our generation to change our thought process on how kids make friends and how they maintain them. And like you said, we have to contribute to that.” “If you want to choose this different path, it's going to be more work.” “When we left the United States, we left with eight bags, and eight carry-ons. So you get two free checked bags and two carry-ons per person… We left with what seemed like very little, but it's so massive now. We lived in places for nine to twelve months at a time.” “Everybody who listens to me, tries to ask the grandparents for experiences. But the grandparents want the joy of the opening of the present.” “If you ask them why they're buying all this plastic sh-t, and whatever, it brings them joy to do it. But isn't the idea to bring the kid joy?” “Traveling, I always say - it makes you a better person. Because you become so appreciative.” “It's very, very, very humbling to have that assistance and to learn that we all need help.” “If you're looking to transition your life and you're unhappy in your life, like you're saying, go out and find that other life, find that community.” “We need to look at self-care as well as lifestyle choices - just do it. Just make the choice to do it, and then set a date and do it.”   Links: Jamie's Homepage -  http://www.jamieglowacki.com/ Oh Crap! Potty Training – https://www.amazon.com/Crap-Potty-Training-Everything-Parenting-ebook/dp/B00V3L8YSU Oh Crap! I Have A Toddler -  https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Oh-Crap!-I-Have-a-Toddler/Jamie-Glowacki/Oh-Crap-Parenting/9781982109738 Jamie's Patreon Page:  https://www.patreon.com/join/jamieglowacki?

Now or Never
The gift of grandparents

Now or Never

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 48:57


Having elders in your life can be such a beautiful gift. So this week, we're giving you a big dose of that - and hearing from grandparents and grandchildren striving to connect.

HOT 106
What did you watch at your grandparents house growing up?

HOT 106

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:43


Bekah Berger and Mike D ride the nostalgia train. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Tamsin Greig, bell hooks, Grandparents and childcare

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 57:40


Actor Tamsin Greig on starring as the formidable theatrical agent Peggy Ramsay in the revival of ‘Peggy For You', at the Hampstead Theatre. She also talks about her role in “wild” hospital comedy Green Wing, playing Debbie in The Archers since 1991, and Friday Night Dinner. Journalist Ash Sarkar and Professor Heidi Safia Mirza discuss the legacy and significance of the American feminist author and activist bell hooks, who died this week aged 69. Deputy Chief Constable Maggie Blyth - the national police co-ordinator for violence against women and girls - unveils her new strategy and gives her opinion on whether misogyny should be made a hate crime. In November 2020 a family court found that the conservative MP Kate Griffiths' then husband, Andrew Griffiths (also a former conservative MP and former minister) raped, abused & coercively controlled her. These were civil proceedings, so the finding was based on the balance of probabilities, rather than the criminal standard of probable doubt. As is the norm in family cases, this information was private and not made public. But following a successful application by journalists, supported by Kate Griffiths, the details of this case, with both parties' names attached, were published last week. Andrew Griffiths has denied allegations made by his ex-wife and ‘adamantly denied' rape. We hear from Dr Charlotte Proudman, the barrister who represented Kate Griffiths. The company SAGA has decided to give employees who've just become grandparents some special leave. They say it's about helping new grandparents celebrate but also it's to highlight how important older workers are, not just to the company but to families and wider society. One of our listeners, Linda, who looks after two of her grandchildren, talks about her experience. During a recent Business Questions in Parliament Jacob Rees Mogg took a moment to mark the feast of St Æthelgifu, and called the medieval abbess one of Britain's leading saints. But was she? What do we really know about Æthelgifu and the other leading medieval women at this time? We talk to Florence Scott, a historian of early medieval England.

The Daily Good
Episode 435: A new forest being planted for graduates, paid time off for new UK grandparents, Oregon makes one of the best blue cheeses in the world, Phil Rosenthal waxes rhapsodic about travel, Ella swings Frosty the Snowman, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 19:44


Good News: A university in the Netherlands is showing appreciation to its graduating students by planting a forest in their honor, tree by tree for each grad! Link HERE. The Good Word: A lovely thought from the great Mister Rogers. Good To Know: A fun fact about a cheese gift fit for a queen! Good […]

Couples Counseling For Parents
A Lack of Healthy, Involved Grandparents Can Be A Real Strain On A Couple

Couples Counseling For Parents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 33:29


Grandparents can be such a wonderful and vital part of your kids lives! Also, grandparents can be a significant support and help to your couple relationship. The loss of healthy, involved grandparents can be a profound grief for couples. This loss can be due to death, mental illness, distance, toxicity, conflict, etc. Whatever the reason, partners need to understand how this grief impacts them individually and their couple relationship. Without understanding, the grief can create disconnection between partners. As the holidays draw near and idyllic time with family is in every song and movie, this episode can help you and your partner navigate your story of loss. This can help you both feel understood and connected this holiday season. 

Life Matters - ABC RN
Booster update, 'living with 100 grandparents' and insomnia meets sleep apnoea

Life Matters - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 54:26


Australian adults can now get COVID boosters five months after their second vaccine dose. What questions do you have about booster shots or the booster rollout? Also, meet the award-winning 22-year-old who volunteers in aged care. And, what happens when insomnia and sleep apnoea combine?

Human Stories with Jill Hazard Rowe
103. Human Stories: Hunter Hazard and Grandparents

Human Stories with Jill Hazard Rowe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 90:21


Join Jill, her son, Hunter, and Jill's parents, Don and Barbara, to talk about their reflections since Hunter's coming-out a decade ago. This is an enormously important episode to Jill because her advocacy for the LGBTQ+ community began in her home when Hunter came out. Tune in to hear Hunter's reflections and his thoughts about centering the conversation around change and trans advocacy.

WTAW - Infomaniacs
The Infomaniacs: December 13, 2021 (8:00am)

WTAW - Infomaniacs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 37:02


Buy the perfect gift! Grandparents want tech. Winner! Deaths over the weekend. Entertainment tonight. Drinking study. Asking for help. Cookie generator. Olive the other reindeer.

Woman's Hour
Grandparents providing childcare, Kate Griffiths MP's barrister Charlotte Proudman; Under pressure - Fibromyalgia

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 57:22


The company SAGA has decided to give employees who've just become grandparents some special leave. They say it's about helping new grandparents celebrate but also it's to highlight how important older workers are, not just to the company but to families and wider society. So if you're a grandparent providing childcare for your kids, what's the cost? What does it take out of you, time-wise and energy wise? How much are you saving your kids? And do you see it as a precious thing you'll never have the chance to do again, or after a while is it too much pressure? We hear from one of our listeners Linda who looks after two of her grandchildren and Shireen Kanji, a Professor of Work and Organisation at Brunel University. New Covid measures are being introduced across the UK, because of the threat posed by the Omicron variant. In England it's known as Plan B, and mandates mask-wearing, working from home and Covid passports. However, around 75 Conservative MPs are expected to rebel as it's put to a vote in the House of Commons on Tuesday. As parliament debates these new restrictions, where do you stand on taking personal responsibility for containing the virus, and how will it affect your Christmas? To discuss, Emma is joined by Guardian journalist Lucy Mangan and Lucy Fisher, Deputy Political Editor at The Telegraph. In November 2020 a family court found that the conservative MP Kate Griffiths' then husband, Andrew Griffiths (also a former conservative MP for the same Staffordshire seat and former Conservative minister) raped her in her sleep, abused & coercively controlled her. These were civil proceedings, so the finding was based on the balance of probabilities, rather than the criminal standard of probable doubt. As is the norm in family cases, this information was private and not made public. But following a successful application by journalists, supported by Kate Griffiths - the details of this case, with both parties' names attached, were published last Friday. In the recent judgement, judges from the Court of Appeal referred to the ‘mother's right to tell her story.' Andrew Griffiths has denied allegations made by his ex-wife and ‘adamantly denied' rape. Dr Charlotte Proudman, the barrister who represented Kate Griffiths joins Emma. The next in our series Under Pressure which looks at what happens to relationships when life gets in the way. Carla and Brendon met at school. Their lives looked to be on track and then everything changed when Carla was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Jo Morris reports. The nominees for BBC Sports Personality of the Year 2021 have been revealed. There have been 66 recipients of the award, but only 13 of these have been women. Anna Kessel, Women's Sports Editor at The Telegraph talks to Emma about the women on the shortlist and who is favourite to win.

Poetry Unbound
Craig Santos Perez — Rings of Fire

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 14:35


What if the planet were as loved as a child? Taking the story of his daughter's fever when she was one, Craig Santos Perez reflects on everything he did — and would have done — for his daughter's health. Her temperature rose and his love and response did, too. The temperature of the world rises, and he wonders who loves the earth enough to respond, and who doesn't.Craig Santos Peres is an indigenous Chamoru (Chamorro) from the Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam). He is a poet, scholar, editor, publisher, essayist, critic, book reviewer, artist, environmentalist, and political activist. Craig is the author of two spoken word poetry albums, Undercurrent and Crosscurrent, and five books of poetry: from unincorporated territory [hacha], from unincorporated territory [saina], from unincorporated territory [guma'], from unincorporated territory [lukao], and, most recently, Habitat Threshold.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

My Life As Was
The 2000's - One Last Time

My Life As Was

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 18:24


Grandparents, Friends, Reflections --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thomas-stevens5/message

Patriot Pod
Stories with Me: Immigration Story Part 2 -- Grandparents

Patriot Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 9:33


This is a story about my grandparent's immigration journey. Did you listen to part one of Stories with Me? I interviewed my dad and got his perspective of this immigration story! In today's episode, my grandparents will be sharing their perspectives of this story, from moving across the country to finding a new job. The twists and turns are unpredictable! So, click play and enjoy! This episode is brought to you by Leah, and the VPod, a production of Viewpoint's Zero Period Podcasting Class. Transcript available to Viewpoint listeners here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Jd1cLrtVFH_fnKTE8-LxvN2fbA-hTxejwF2Sg5BdasY/edit?usp=sharing

Celebrate Calm
Medication For Behavior Issues? Try These 7 Strategies First.

Celebrate Calm

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 13:52


Christmas Clearance Sale Extended One More Week! You get everything we have ever recorded delivered directly to an app on your iPhone, iPad, Android, or computer. Listen anywhere, anytime. You get 35 hours of practical strategies and concrete examples, along with multiple PDF workbooks. Click here to learn more and take advantage of our Christmas Clearance Sale: https://celebratecalm.com/christmas-clearance/Want to customize a smaller bundle? Email Casey@CelebrateCalm.com or check out our most popular four programs: https://celebratecalm.com/get-the-bag/Want personal mentoring with Kirk via Phone? Click here to learn about mentoring packages.Want to book a LIVE EVENT in 2022?! We are now booking IN PERSON and Zoom events for schools, PTAs, churches, synagogues, corporations, and agencies! Simply email Casey@CelebrateCalm with LIVE in the subject line and he'll share a one-page proposal within hours. It's EASY! PS: If you live in Seattle, Portland, or Vancouver, we have discounted dates available! :) Questions? Need help deciding on the best tools for your family? Email Casey@CelebrateCalm.com and Casey will help you personally! 

Stonebridge UMC
Christmas at Home: Your Grandparents' Homestead - December 12, 2021

Stonebridge UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


“Christmas at Home: Your Grandparents' Homestead” Matthew 1:18-24 Pastor Jeff continues our Christmas at Home series with a look at the Matthew's version of the Christmas story and Jesus' fulfillment to prophecy. Recorded live at Stonebridge United Methodist Church in McKinney, Texas. For more information, please visit www.mysumc.org.

All Home Care Matters
When a Grandparent Moves In

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 17:37


Today, we are going to be talking about having a parent move in with you and your family. First, we'll talk about how your relationship with your parent may change. Then, we'll talk about what steps you need to take to make the transition from your parent living alone to moving in with you. Finally, we'll end the episode on ways you can make the transition easier. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   We're going to start out today's episode with one couple's story of living with an elderly parent. If you would like to read the story for yourself, you can find the link to A Place for Mom in our show notes.   Lynette and Marty Whiteman were getting used to losing sleep. After Lynette's aging mother Mildred moved into their New Jersey home from her retirement community, she regularly woke the couple, asking for help at odd hours. To Mildred, the requests were urgent, but Marty didn't see changing light bulbs or resetting microwave clocks as tasks to crawl out of bed for.   Mildred's increasing care needs — and midnight knocks on the couple's door — were taking a toll on the Whitemans' marriage. Tension over caregiving roles steadily increased, while privacy decreased. Communication broke down, and stress piled up.   The Whitemans, like many adults who choose to care for aging parents, thought having Mildred in the home would not only keep her safe but lend convenience as well. They thought it would be easier than having to travel back and forth between their home and hers. As it turned out, that wasn't the case.   “It was a great idea in concept,” says Lynette. “But we didn't know what we were getting into.”   Caring for Mildred at home wasn't urgent, but it seemed like a good idea to Lynette. Her mom would receive regular social interaction, and they could form a closer relationship together.   Before moving in with her daughter, Mildred had grown depressed and isolated. Her late husband — Lynette's father — had been outgoing, and he kept the couple engaged in community life and social events. Without him around, Lynette was worried: What if Mildred became too lonely? What if she fell while she was alone?   “We figured she'd have somebody if something happened in the middle of the night, and we could help her with her bills,” says Lynette.   So, they built a small, attached apartment with a private kitchen and bathroom using some of Mildred's savings. But the adjustment was more difficult than expected.   At first, Marty and Lynette had trouble accepting the constant late-night interruptions and repetitive dinners at home. It seemed like they'd put their lives — and their marriage — on hold to care for Mildred. However, the couple's situation improved after they agreed to work as a team, make adjustments, and follow a few pieces of caregiver advice:   Don't be afraid to ask for help. Make time for everyone, including yourself. Accept that some things don't change. Set boundaries. Acknowledge that you're doing your best in a tough situation.   The Whiteman's story is something more and more families are becoming familiar with as the aging population rises. This can be an extremely rewarding experience for you and your family, but it can also be extremely difficult. There are many things you need to consider when thinking about having a loved one come live with you.   First, you should be prepared for how your relationship with your loved one will change once they are living with you, especially if you are providing any level of care for them. Cohabitating with a parent for the first time since childhood can be strange for both you and your parent.   Next Avenue says you should avoid parent-child patterns from youth. Just because you're back living under the same roof as your parents, you don't have to share the details of your life the way you may have as a child. Laurel Steinberg, a relationship therapist and psychology professor at Columbia University, cautions adult children to not seek approval for their actions and decisions. You now pay for the roof over your head and are responsible for the day-to-day routines.   She says it's OK to ask a parent for help or for an opinion, but you shouldn't fall into a pattern where a parent dictates how the household should operate or expect to be privy to every decision and detail related to the household. “Parents should only offer advice when adult children ask for it,” she says.   Next Avenue also recommends that you don't ask for permission. Remember that even though you're a grown-up who may have grown kids of your own, to your parent, you'll always be their little boy or girl. That nostalgia can fuel parental expectations that your relationship will revert to what it was decades earlier. Steinberg says that “adult children often fall into the habit of asking for permission when parents live with them.” Gently assert your adult independence by setting boundaries on move-in day. You can politely tell your parent that you will not be reporting in every time you leave the house or take a phone call. The goal is to establish that you're a self-sufficient adult who loves their parent, but has their own, independent life now.”   Prior to your loved one moving in, you need to sit down and have a conversation with them and your family to go over the house rules and any moving logistics, like what your loved one can keep with them and what areas of the house will be reserved for them. You want to make sure everyone living in your house has access to a space just for them, where they can go to be alone and have privacy.   If you have a guest house, an adjoining apartment, or a room with a separate entrance, this would be the perfect place for your parent to move in to, as long as their needs allow them to be in a secluded area by themselves. If you don't have this extra space, you should consider what options you do have. Do you have a guest room or spare room they could use? Would your kids need to share a room? Do you or your parent have funds to build a place for them?   Having an entire living area to themselves, with a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and living area, can help your parent maintain their independence when living with their child, and can help the rest of the family keep more of their normal daily routines the same.   Even with a separate living area, routines will have to change, and communication will be key. Having a weekly schedule can be helpful for busy families. You don't need to tell your parent when you are going to be gone, but writing on a schedule that you will be out on Tuesday and Thursday can be a good way to let your parent, and everyone else, know you will be unavailable. If your parent is unable to drive or doesn't have a car of their own, a schedule can also be useful to know when they will need your assistance to get somewhere, like an appointment or a social gathering.   Alert 1 says that while it may seem overwhelming at first, both you and your loved one will come to love living under the same roof again.   Your parent will be there to help with things around the house so you don't have to worry when you get home from work. They can help get the kids ready for school in the morning and for bed at night. Your pets will enjoy having someone around more often, and your dog can get your loved one outside and exercising.   Even if you don't need the extra babysitting, your parent can still watch the house while you get away for the weekend. They'll be there to listen and give advice when you're feeling lost. Instead of having to hang up the phone, you can end the conversation with a hug.   Living with your parent, you'll be able to support and care for each other while they enjoy their golden years. After all, what else is family for?   Now that we've told you some of the ways your relationship with your parent can change when they move in, let's move on to what steps you should take during this transition.   Before your parent moves in with you, AARP has a list of questions you should ask yourself:   How will the move involve my spouse, children, and siblings? How will my parent's presence affect our family routine, activities, and privacy? Are there any unresolved issues between me and my parent or my spouse and my parent? Does this mean remodeling our house or adding a bedroom or bathroom? Do I expect other family members to pitch in? Can we afford the extra expense? Should part of my parent's income go toward living expenses? Will I need to quit work or alter my schedule? Will we take my parent with us on vacation or get respite care? Are there issues such as smoking, drinking, or pets that we need to work out? Does my parent have any tendencies that bother or upset me? Can they be resolved? How will I establish boundaries? How does my parent feel about moving? How do I feel about accepting this role?   Once you have gone over these questions yourself, you should sit down with your parent and siblings to discuss things prior to the move. According to AARP, you should talk openly about expectations, fears, finances, and any lingering issues. It may make you uneasy, but this is the prime time to work it out or readjust your thinking. Sometimes it's as easy as telling each other what bothers you. The other person may have no idea — and no trouble making a change.   Next Avenue also suggests that you seek outside counseling to help with the transition. “Having a parent age to the point where you are now essentially the ‘parent' can be very powerful and difficult to navigate and trigger a range of emotions,” says Sara Sedlik, a licensed marriage and family therapist in Los Angeles.   You may experience unexpected anger, sadness, dread, or guilt in this situation, which can be overwhelming.   Sedlik also says that “there may also be relief or joy to have your parent close to you. Typically, there is a mix of emotions, which adds to the confusion.”   Without properly addressing these feelings or at least being aware of them, you may experience excess stress that can show up in other areas of your life, including personal or professional relationships, work performance, or even physical health.   Your family may also benefit from a session or two of group therapy. During this time, anyone can bring any grievances or issues they foresee to the rest of the family and have a moderator there to ensure everyone is given a fair amount of time to speak and be heard. If group therapy isn't for you and your family, you can also hold a family meeting on your own and have everyone come prepared with written questions and concerns to discuss. Make sure to include your parent, too. If needed, you can have a few sessions, one with your children, one with your siblings, one with your parent, and one with everyone all together. Breaking into smaller groups can also be beneficial if anyone has any issues they want to bring to your attention without talking to the entire family at once, as that can be intimidating.   After you have met with your family and talked about your loved one moving in with you, you will need to take a look at your current living arrangements and see what all will need to change before your parent moves in.   Alert 1 recommends answering the following questions to see what sort of improvements will need to be made to your home. Do grab bars need to be installed in the bathroom? Does furniture need to be re-arranged to make more space for walking? Do all of the lights work? Do you have nightlights in bathrooms and along hallways? Does your yard have hazards like uneven pavement or overgrown vines?   Before your loved one moves in, you also need to go over their care needs and discuss your boundaries. A Place for Mom says that maybe you're comfortable cooking and doing laundry but are not as comfortable bathing your parent or helping them use the bathroom. If you are not able to provide such care, you should look into professional home care options or assisted living. If your parent doesn't need care when they move in, you should also discuss what you would do if and when they may need care in the future. Would that role fall to you or would you hire outside help?   Once you have established what level of care your loved one needs and who will be doing what, it's time to work on organizing your house and possibly donating items you won't have space for.   Your loved one should have their own bedroom and, if possible, their own living room or living area to arrange as they please. It can be stressful to merge belongings together without a plan, so try to create a clear map and write down where everything will go. Make sure your parent knows beforehand how much space they will have for their belongings.   It's important to remember that your loved one is downsizing to move in with you, so why not do the same for them? Use this time to go through and donate things you don't use or need. This will help free up space for your loved one's belongings and they will feel better knowing they are not alone in having to let go of things.   Once you have the space for your loved one and you have talked about care options, it's time for them to move in! Make sure to keep a positive outlook during this time. It will help ease the transition on your parent, and after all, it should be a positive time! You get to spend more time with your parent and develop an entirely new relationship with them.   Once your parent has settled into their new living space, you can all begin to get comfortable in the new normal. Alert 1 tells us that having someone move in causes a disruption in everyday activity.  If Grandma is active and mobile, add her to the household chore list. She can help out with preparing meals, doing dishes, gardening, and walking the dog. Don't expect her to do any heavy lifting, though. You'll still need to take out the trash and clean out the gutters.   Once your loved one is accustomed to living with you, you can go over your list of household chores and find the best way to divide them up together. You can also revisit this list and make changes as needed. While your loved one is living with you, you should both be able to come to one another and talk about what is or isn't working at any time and make any necessary changes.   While we hope your experience living with your loved one once again goes smoothly, we also want to prepare you for the possibility that it won't work out. According to Aging Care, caregiver guilt can be a significant obstacle for many, regardless of the specifics of your living situation. You feel an obligation to make this work, but when an elder exhibits troublesome dementia-related behaviors, creates unsafe or unsanitary conditions, sets a poor example for your children, interferes with your marriage, or refuses to contribute to the household or see to their own care, it puts a huge strain on your life.   If you're feeling trapped caring for elderly parents in a situation that you cannot escape, it's time to let go of the guilt and make other arrangements. It is time to acknowledge that you did your best and explore other elder care options. These might consist of an adult daycare or professional in-home care for respite or moving your loved one into assisted living, memory care, or a nursing home.   In order to avoid caregiver guilt, an unhappy relationship, a tense household, and an overall bad experience, it's important to make sure you follow the steps we have talked about today. And always remember to take care of yourself and reach out when you need help.   So far, we've talked about how your relationships can change when a parent moves in and what transition steps you should take. Before we close for today, let's talk a little about how you can make the transition easier for your loved one.   According to AARP, your parent may struggle getting acclimated to a new living arrangement and neighborhood. You can be of assistance by helping to locate the local pharmacy, bank, faith community, recreation center, and other services they may use. If your parent is interested in independent daytime activities, you can visit a nearby senior center for information on classes and programs. If your parent requires more intensive care, assess adult daycare centers that provide rehab, meals, counseling, and therapeutic activities. If you are providing full-time care in your home, look into respite or companion services to give you a break and help your parent expand his or her social circle.   If your loved one is moving from a different area, they may need your help keeping in contact with their friends. If your parent isn't technologically savvy, you can help them set up a video call a few times a month to catch up with their friends. If you help them with their technical difficulties, you should also be prepared to help their friends if they need it.   If your loved one is interested in learning more about using technology, you can help them find a technology class at a senior center or library that's geared towards seniors. If you're interested in learning about how you can use technology as a caregiver, you can also check out our episode, Technology Tips for Caregivers. You can find it on our website, our YouTube channel, or wherever you listen to podcasts.   We hope this episode helps you prepare for living with your loved one again. Following the steps and tips we've listed today should help you navigate this time, but don't hesitate to reach out to your support group whenever you need. There will be hard times, just as there are when you are living with anyone else. Be patient, be kind, and have fun. Enjoy getting to spend this extra time with your loved one.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: http://www.ec-online.net/Knowledge/Articles/movingin.html   https://www.alert-1.com/blog/general/when-grandma-moves-in-making-your-house-grandmas-home/5824   https://www.aplaceformom.com/caregiver-resources/articles/living-with-your-aging-parent-doesnt-work   https://www.nextavenue.org/cope-aging-parent-moves-in/   https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2018/living-with-aging-parents.html          

Really! I'm A Grandparent!
Giving Gifts to the Grandparents at Christmas

Really! I'm A Grandparent!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 7:04


James Lott Jr responds to a list in the NY times where they name their 28 Best gifts for Grandparents! He is not too happy!

Christmas Stories
Season 5, Episode 4: We Love Our Grandparents

Christmas Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 23:18


Having grandchildren has a way of bringing things full circle. To help bring a fun perspective on grandparenting, John Fuller talks with Roger and Diane Ingolia about their experiences as grandparents. We'll also hear from children on why they love grandma and grandpa. Get the book "Keeping Christmas: 25 Advent Reflections on a Christmas Carol": https://donate.focusonthefamily.com/christmas-stories-podcast-2021-11-19?refcd=569601 Read the article "No-Stress Grandparenting During the Holidays": https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/no-stress-grandparenting-during-the-holidays/ Read the article "Welcome to Advent 2021": https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/welcome-to-advent-2021/ Get more episode resources: https://bit.ly/3nbMHi0 If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give us your feedback: https://focusonthefamily.com/podcastsurvey/

A Taste of the Past
Forgotten Past of Green Tea in America

A Taste of the Past

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 40:35


It's a little known fact that in the nineteenth century, Americans favored green teas consumed hot with milk and sugar. The teas were imported from China until Japan developed an export industry centered on the U.S. Author Robert Hellyer explores the forgotten American preference and traces the trans-Pacific tea trade from the eighteenth century forward in his book, Green with Milk and Sugar (discount code: cup20). He shares his insights on how the interconnections between Japan and the United States have influenced the daily habits of people in both countries. Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support A Taste of the Past by becoming a member!A Taste of the Past is Powered by Simplecast. 

Longform
Episode 468: Emily Oster

Longform

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 52:24


Emily Oster is an economist, professor, and author. Her new book is The Family Firm. ”[COVID] has been 18 months of being a person who is slightly more public, who is saying things that are somewhat more controversial, where people yell at me a lot. ... I do much less reading of the comments than I did early on because I found that eventually I just got mad and that's not a productive way to interact. And it affects how I think about what I write, and I would like what I write to be the things that I think are true, not the things I think will avoid people being angry.” Show notes: @ProfEmilyOster emilyoster.net "Steve Cohen-Backed Radkl Hires DeFi Trader Aaron Lammer" (Nick Baker • Bloomberg • Nov 2021) Expecting Better (Penguin Books • 2014) Cribsheet (Penguin Books • 2020) The Family Firm (Penguin Books • 2021) Oster's Parent Data newsletter 35:00 "Antibiotics and Allergies, Zika, Travel Baby Carriers..." (Parent Data • Feb 2020) 36:00 "Grandparents & Day Care" (Parent Data • May 2020) 36:00 "She Fought to Reopen Schools, Becoming a Hero and a Villain" (Dana Goldstein • New York Times • Jun 2021) 36:00 "Emily Oster, the Brown Economist, Is Launching a New Data Hub on Schools and the Pandemi." (Dana Goldstein • New York Times • Sept 2021) 36:00 "Schools Aren't Super-Spreaders" (The Atlantic • Oct 2020) 37:00 "Your Unvaccinated Kid Is Like a Vaccinated Grandma" (The Atlantic • Mar 2021) 42:00 Oster's COVID-19 School Response Dashboard 44:00 "Emily Oster Thinks of Herself As an Expert on Data in Parenting, Not Parenting Itself" (Alex Hazlett • The Cut • Aug 2021) 45:00 "Pandemic Schooling Mode and Student Test Scores: Evidence from US States" (Clare Halloran, Rebecca Jack, James Okun, Emily Oster • NBER • Nov 2021) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dermot & Dave
How To Deal With Awkward Relationships At Christmas

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 11:19


While we all think of Christmas dinner as sitting around the table for hours chatting and laughing and of the whole day as being somewhat magical, that's often not the case. [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/12/06122141/LouizeCarroll_0612.mp3"][/audio] For lots of us, getting together with family can be stressful, awkward and upsetting. Whether it's barbed comments from a parent, butting heads with a sibling or even having a difficult chat with a Grandparent, Christmas can be unpleasant for some families. So, how do you avoid it getting to you and ruining the day? Speaking to Dermot and Dave, Louize Carroll from Prism Therapy Online gave her tips to get through the day. You can catch the chat by clicking play above.

Curiosity Continuum
Encore: The Ageless Wisdom of Grandparents

Curiosity Continuum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 20:37


ENCORE: In celebrating our 3rd year of recording, we are presenting encores of some of our most popular episodes from our first two years. They are as relevant as ever and help you get up to speed on where we will go. Enjoy!   What have you learned from the older generations? Josh and Brian discuss their grandparents and what lessons we can glean and apply today.

The Break Room
Grandparent Gift Pressure

The Break Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 17:18


If you have grandchildren do you feel an obligation to spoil the kids during the holidays? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How Ya Livin' ?
Influence

How Ya Livin' ?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 16:48


Having influence is an essential leadership quality. Every effective leader can walk into a room and empower others. They have faith in what they say and know their mission.  But influencing others can be intimidating. You need people to take action and change the way they think.  Influential leaders empower their employees and speed up results. They leave an impact for generations to come. In this episode, you'll learn the three ways to become a more influential and impactful leader today. Show Highlights Include: How simple wisdom nuggets make you a better leader and leave an impact for generations. (2:17) Why sitting next to a Grandparent immediately grows your influence. (5:36) How to keep your life full of inspiration and forward progress using Björn Borg's tennis training. (8:12) The Extreme Ownership Guide for making life more enjoyable and inspiring others. (11:07) Using the ‘Fixed Mindset' to become a more dependable and reliable visionary today. (13:27) Do you want to stop existing and start living your best life right now? Click here to get the first chapter of Dr. Rick's best-selling book, Lessons From a Third Grade Dropout, for free.

Slacker & Steve
GMD - Disney or grandparents

Slacker & Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 15:41


GMD - Disney or grandparents See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
12-02-21 - BR - THU - Half Of Kids Are Not Impressed By Grandparents' Xmas Gifts - Laser Tech Leaves Laser On Woman's Face For Call - AntiPerspirant Recall - Aussie Man Sets Record For Loudest Burp

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 34:26


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Brady Report - Thursday December 2, 2021

Real Ghost Stories Online
Grandparents Visit From The Grave | Real Ghost Stories Extra

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:32


This is a Real Ghost Stories Online - EXTRA! Watch more at: http://www.realghoststoriesonline.com/ If you have a real ghost story or supernatural event to report, please write into our show or call 1-855-853-4802! If you like the show, please help keep us on the air and support the show by becoming an EPP (Extra Podcast Person). We'll give you a BONUS episode every week as a "Thank You" for your support. Become an EPP here: http://www.ghostpodcast.com/?page_id=118 or at or at http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories Follow Tony:  Instagram: HTTP://www.instagram.com/tonybrueski  TikToc: https://www.tiktok.com/@tonybrueski  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tony.brueski

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
11 - 29 - 21 GRANDPARENTS DOING EDIBLES

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 3:54


11 - 29 - 21 GRANDPARENTS DOING EDIBLES by Maine's Coast 93.1

Family Goals with David Pollack and Pastor J
Episode 10: Jeff Foxworthy on Marriage, Parenthood, Being a Grandparent and Finishing the Race

Family Goals with David Pollack and Pastor J

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 28:50


Thanks for joining us! You are listening to David Pollack from ESPN's College Game Day and Jonathan Howes, Lead Pastor of Graystone Church, have a weekly conversation about God, Family, and Sports.

Optimal Relationships Daily
1159: What to Consider if Grandparents Are Buying Too Many Toys by Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life

Optimal Relationships Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 10:52


Renee Benes with The Fun Sized Life tells you what to consider if grandparents are buying too many toys for your kids Episode 1159: What to Consider if Grandparents Are Buying Too Many Toys by Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life Renee is a minimalist mom, blogger, & coach. She and her husband downsized their house, paid off debt, started making money online, and now travel part-time with their kids. Her blog and online coaching is centered around helping other women to create this same lifestyle for themselves, both in their day to day living and in how they manage their money. The original post is located here: https://www.thefunsizedlife.com/grandparents-toys/  BetterHelp online counseling is there for you. Best of all it's a truly affordable option - Optimal Relationship Daily listeners get 10% off your first month with discount code ORD. So why not get started today? Go to BetterHelp.com/ord Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalRelationshipsDailyMarriageParenting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bert Show
There's A Scam Targeting Grandparents That You Need To Know About

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:47


Last week, an 82-year-old woman in Florida lost $700,000 in a "grandparent scam." Apparently, the scammers convinced her that her granddaughter was in legal trouble and needed her help.So what can you do to help your grandparents avoid this scam? Kristin will explain.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.