Podcasts about newfoundland

Province of Canada

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Best podcasts about newfoundland

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Latest podcast episodes about newfoundland

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

When it comes to losing acres of farmland in Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador's in the lead. Since 2001, we've lost about half of our farm land, according to data from Stats Canada. We bring you a breakdown of those numbers.

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell
Adventures in Maritime Canada, Alan Creaser

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 72:27


I met Alan in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, in June of 2022. He sailed soon after to Sable Island and Newfoundland with John Kretschmer. We talk about sailing, radar, safety, fog, Sable Island, passage planning, reefing, marine traffic, a shipwreck he was involved in, commercial fishing, Lunenburg, Tapio Lehtinen's sinking ship, and much more.

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)
Ukrainians preparing for their first winter in Newfoundland

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 11:03


Wintertime in Ukraine. A Ukrainian Arrival in Newfoundland reflects on what will be a challenging winter.

It Slays Podcast
A Wounded Fawn (2022) Featuring Gillian Keats (NOW SLAYING)

It Slays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 41:25


In this episode of NOW SLAYING, Colton, Rowan & Foreign Correspondent Gillian Keats brush up on their Greek mythology with A WOUNDED FAWN (2022). Did Colton stay awake for the whole film? Does Gill think this is a new cult classic? Should Rowan brush up on his Greek history? Listen and find out if we gave this film a NAY, OKAY, YAY, or SLAY!Follow us on all social media:FacebookTwitterInstagramTumblrYoutubeSlasherWant some official Merch?!SHOP HERE!*Intro Music by Rowan Fraser (IG: @biggiehauls)*CHAPTERS:Theme/Intro (00:00:00)Trailer (00:02:18)Bio (00:03:43)Review (Spoiler Free) (00:04:04)Review (SPOILERS) (00:11:20)Rating (00:35:38)Promotions/Outro (00:39:12)Support the show

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)
Garrett Barry visits Newfoundland's swimming phenom Chris Weeks

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 6:14


A swimming phenom is back in the pool, and looking for his next win. We chat with Chris Weeks.

BofC Live
Legal cannabis industry needs ‘immediate financial relief' says Cannabis Council of Canada

BofC Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 3:48


Here's the latest from the "Cannabis Daily" podcast team!!Remember, we're now dropping bonus episodes of the podcast featuring content from our Business of Cannabis: New York live event. Make sure you're following the podcast in your favorite app. Today's stories:Four years on from legalization and Health Canada is in the midst of a review of the Cannabis Act. The Cannabis Council of Canada (C3) has confirmed that they have submitted a response, reports Canadian LawyerThe Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador has lifted the ban it placed on cannabis vape products back in 2019, reports MJBiz Daily.The New York office of cannabis management announced the first retail licenses last month, but they also announced that delivery services may be a way to get the first retailer sales before storefronts appear, reports The City.Tweet us and let us know your thoughts on today's episode, here.Email us about our stories, here.Missed the previous episode? You can catch up with it here. And here's some bonus content we released from the Business of Cannabis: New York Live event. About Cannabis Daily.Cannabis Daily is a cannabis news and interview program from Business of Cannabis. We highlight the companies, brands, people and trends driving the cannabis industry.Business of Cannabis is a cannabis industry platform marrying cannabis news, video and podcast content, newsletters and online and real-world cannabis events.Visit Business of Cannabis online:http://businessofcannabis.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/bofc_mediaLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/businessofcannabisInstagram: https://instagram.com/businessofcannabisFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/bofcmediaSpotify: http://bofc.me/spotifyApple: http://bofc.me/applepodPodcasts Online: https://bofc.me/bofclive

Sounds Atlantic
Episode 217: The Appalachian Road Show, Part I.

Sounds Atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 63:10


(Part I) Interview with Grammy winning fiddler Jim Van Cleve showcasing the “Appalachian Road Show's latest project “Jubilation”. The band's “mission” is to “illuminate the history, challenges, and rewards of life in Appalachia and celebrate the spirit of the Appalachian people who call it home.” (Ed. Note: one of the longest mountain ranges on earth, the Appalachians stretch from the state of Alabama in the southern U.S., north through the eastern seaboard, and the eastern provinces of Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador). “Appalachian Road Show” are: Grammy award winning fiddler Jim Van Cleve along with veterans Barry Abernathy (Mountain Heart), Daryl Webb (Rhonda Vincent, Dailey and Vincent and Michael Cleveland), Todd Phillips (many classic bluegrass bands) and emerging young guitar wizard Zeb Snyder. Bounce to the RhythmPodcast about independent music artists who are worthy of a bigger audience and deserve...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Treatland The podcast where you share your favorite food memories from childhood. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotifyhttps://www.facebook.com/ron.moores.18

Labrador Morning from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)
Nunatsiavut Housing Corporation, making Christmas cards and Gifts for Dads

Labrador Morning from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 57:36


0:00 CBC's new, free streaming channel aims to bring even more original video content to our national audience. Hear from Michael Gruzuk, the Senior Director of CBC News Studios, about CBC News Explore. 07:43 They've made a home in Newfoundland and Labrador but now they feel forced to leave. Why international PhD students are calling for changes. 14:51 Registration closed for communities to sign up for the Labrador Winter Games this week. We'll hear who is signed up and what athletes and spectators can expect this year from Chair Todd Winters. 21:42 If you work in oil and gas, you may be more welcome in renewable energy industries than you think. Jodie Hon of Iron and Earth has the details of a free mentorship program from Iron and Earth. 27:24 The Nunatsiavut Government has a new public agency responsible for housing -- the Nunatsiavut Housing Commission. Hear from the Director of Housing for the government to learn what this means and what is coming next. 36:41 Children are busy making Christmas cards at the Little Tree Family Centre in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. Their wonderfully cheerful creations will be delivered to residents at the long-term care facility. 45:09 Making the season kind one donation at a time! CBC NL is gearing up for Feed NL day. 51:12 Krystal Alexander of Labrador City saw a need in her community for dads and low-income fathers this holiday season. She's now organizing Gifts for Dads.

Middle Aged Man Talk
The End of The Walking Dead???

Middle Aged Man Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 34:04


This week we talk about The End of The Walking Dead and Richard has a blueberry beer from Newfoundland, Canada. Recorded November , 2022.Thank you so much for listening,Brendan and RichardOur theme music is: Welcome to the Show by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4614-welcome-to-the-show License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-licensePlease Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon If you enjoyed our show Please Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon!Support the show

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast
US midterm elections: Market implications

WellSaid – The Wellington Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 22:55


US midterm elections can be pivotal for financial markets, especially when they result in divided government. Macro Strategist Mike Medeiros joins host Thomas Mucha to discuss what 2022's surprise midterm results may mean for equity and bond markets, US foreign and domestic policy, and the 2024 US presidential election.Key topics:1:35 - Midterm results2:45 - Surprise election outcomes4:10 - US domestic policy implications6:50 - US foreign policy impacts10:30 - Divided government's effect on equity and bond markets13:15 - Republicans' lessons from midterm results15:00 - Democrats' lessons from midterm results16:15 - 2024 US Presidential Election outlook----------------------------------------------Views expressed are those of the speaker(s) and are subject to change. Other teams may hold different views and make different investment decisions. For  professional/institutional investors only. Your capital may be at risk. Podcast produced November 2022.Wellington Management Company LLP (WMC) is an independently owned investment adviser registered with the US Securities  and Exchange Commission (SEC). WMC is also registered with the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as a  commodity trading advisor (CTA) and serves as a CTA to certain clients including commodity pools operated by registered  commodity pool operators. WMC provides commodity trading advice to all other clients in reliance on exemptions from CTA  registration. WMC, along with its affiliates (collectively, Wellington Management), provides investment management and  investment advisory services to institutions around the world. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, Wellington Management also  has offices in Chicago, Illinois; Radnor, Pennsylvania; San Francisco, California; Frankfurt; Hong Kong; London; Luxembourg; Milan;  Shanghai; Singapore; Sydney; Tokyo; Toronto; and Zurich.     This material is prepared for, and authorized for internal use by, designated institutional and professional investors and their  consultants or for such other use as may be authorized by Wellington Management. This material and/or its contents are current  at the time of writing and may not be reproduced or distributed in whole or in part, for any purpose, without the express written  consent of Wellington Management. This material is not intended to constitute investment advice or an offer to sell, or the  solicitation of an offer to purchase shares or other securities. Investors should always obtain and read an up-to-date investment  services description or prospectus before deciding whether to appoint an investment manager or to invest in a fund. Any views  expressed herein are those of the author(s), are based on available information, and are subject to change without notice.  Individual portfolio management teams may hold different views and may make different investment decisions for different clients.  In Canada, this material is provided by Wellington Management Canada ULC, a British Columbia unlimited liability company  registered in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia,  Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan in the categories of Portfolio Manager and Exempt Market Dealer.   In Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Switzerland), this material is provided by Wellington Management Europe GmbH  (WME) which is authorized and regulated by the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für  Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht – BaFin). This material may only be used in countries where WME is duly authorized to operate and  is only directed at eligible counterparties or professional clients as defined under the German Securities Trading Act. This material  does not constitute investment advice, a solicitation to invest in financial instruments or information recommending or suggesting  an investment strategy within the meaning of Section 85 of the German Securities Trading Act (Wertpapierhandelsgesetz).   In  the United Kingdom, this material is provided by Wellington Management International Limited (WMIL), a firm authorized and  regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK (Reference number: 208573). This material is directed only at eligible  counterparties or professional clients as defined under the rules of the FCA.   In Switzerland, this material is provided by Wellington Management Switzerland GmbH, a firm registered at the commercial register  of the canton of Zurich with number CH-020.4.050.857-7. This material is directed only at Qualified Investors as defined in the Swiss  Collective Investment Schemes Act and its implementing ordinance.  In Hong Kong, this material is provided to you by Wellington Management Hong Kong Limited (WM Hong Kong), a corporation  licensed by the Securities and Futures Commission to conduct Type 1 (dealing in securities), Type 2 (dealing in futures contracts),  Type 4 (advising on securities), and Type 9 (asset management) regulated activities, on the basis that you are a Professional  Investor as defined in the Securities and Futures Ordinance. By accepting this material you acknowledge and agree that this  material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available to any person.  Wellington Investment Management (Shanghai) Limited is a wholly-owned entity and subsidiary of WM Hong Kong.   In Singapore, this material is provided for your use only by Wellington Management Singapore Pte Ltd (WM Singapore)  (Registration Number 201415544E). WM Singapore is regulated by the Monetary Authority of Singapore under a Capital Markets  Services Licence to conduct fund management activities and is an exempt financial adviser. By accepting this material you  represent that you are a non-retail investor and that you will not copy, distribute or otherwise make this material available to any  person.   In Australia, Wellington Management Australia Pty Ltd (WM Australia) (ABN 19 167 091 090) has authorized the issue of this  material for use solely by wholesale clients (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001). By accepting this material, you acknowledge  and agree that this material is provided for your use only and that you will not distribute or otherwise make this material available  to any person. Wellington Management Company LLP is exempt from the requirement to hold an Australian financial services  licence (AFSL) under the Corporations Act 2001 in respect of financial services provided to wholesale clients in Australia, subject to  certain conditions. Financial services provided by Wellington Management Company LLP are regulated by the SEC under the laws  and regulatory requirements of the United States, which are different from the laws applying in Australia.  In Japan, Wellington Management Japan Pte Ltd (WM Japan) (Registration Number 199504987R) has been registered as a  Financial Instruments Firm with registered number: Director General of Kanto Local Finance Bureau (Kin-Sho) Number 428. WM  Japan is a member of the Japan Investment Advisers Association (JIAA), the Investment Trusts Association, Japan (ITA) and the  Type II Financial Instruments Firms Association (T2FIFA).  WMIL, WM Hong Kong, WM Japan, and WM Singapore are also registered as investment advisers with the SEC; however, they will  comply with the substantive provisions of the US Investment Advisers Act only with respect to their US clients.  ©2022 Wellington Management Company LLP. All rights reserved.  

Self(ish) Confidence
[INTERVIEW] Get clear on your year at Shift w/ Gina Keeping & Emily King

Self(ish) Confidence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 37:01


Today I'm chatting with Emily King + Gina Keeping all about Shift, a personal development event they started in St. John's, Newfoundland that literally changed the game for me and my business in June 2022. Now it's time for round two and I'm getting to head back to Newfoundland, this time as a speaker at the event! In this episode we chat all about where the idea for Shift came from, who needs to be there and how it's changing so many lives!Use promo code 'SELFISH' at checkout for 20% off your Shift ticket! Check out the Shift event online!www.theshiftevent.caor on Instagram:  @theshifteventConnect with Gina on IG:@gina_keepingConnect with Emily IG:@emilyking.caGet your butt to this incredible event!! I can't wait to see you there.Thank you for listening today! If you enjoyed this episode, share it with a friend! Or on your social media and tag me @jess.clerke so I can send you a message to personally thank you! Check out my website at: www.jessicaclerke.com If you're on instagram, come say hi!!

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Six years later, and the case of Jennifer Hillier-Penney's disappearance is still unsolved. We get an update from the RCMP about the missing St. Anthony woman

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 6:13


It was six years ago Wednesday that Jennifer Hillier-Penney of St. Anthony went missing. Since that day in 2016, investigators have been working to solve the case. The RCMP is still hoping someone from the public will come forward with new information. Glenda Power is with the RCMP in Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Debaters
1711: Newfoundland PM & Secrets

The Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 33:37


Should Canada's next prime minister be from Newfoundland? Lisa Baker and Hisham Kelati take a Gander at this idea. Then, Deborah Kimmett and Jon Steinberg decide whether the cat should be let out of the bag in their debate on keeping secrets.

Inside Curling
Welcome to "Way Inside!"

Inside Curling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 3:12


We have a new show in the Inside Curling podcast feed. It's called "Way Inside!" hosted by John Cullen. John is a comedian and a former lead turned lead commentator for Curling Live. This show won't be breaking down what's happening around the curling world, who is upset over the "no tick" rule and when show certain events happen. Way Inside! will talk to people around the game about their superstitious behaviour, pre-match meals, the best bars in Newfoundland and Labrador and why can't teams pick their stone colour.Join John Cullen and his guests every other week on the Inside Curling podcast feed for something a little different.The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.  

One Less Die
(Cthulhu D20) Grumblehammer Esoterica - Episode 11: Welcome to the Umbral

One Less Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 222:44


Session 11: Welcome to the Umbral New semester, old troubles? This time, the August Boys are given some extra curricular activity by Agent Maxxine! They're going on assignment to investigate the astral “umbral” realm of St. John's, Newfoundland. Seems there's a chance Keith Milnarch did some ghost work there in the 80s. What strange ghostly hauntings will the Boys find in one of Canada's oldest Cities? Find out! Cast: Chris - GM Aaron - Ezra O'Connell Dave - Hayden Davenport   Musical Credits:  Sneaky Snitch by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4384-sneaky-snitch  License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license  Static Motion by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4414-static-motion  License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Concussion Talk Podcast
Concussions, Knowledge, Awareness & a Music Career

Concussion Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 58:47


On episode 138, Cassandra of the Newfoundland and Labrador Brain Injury Association (NLBIA) joins me as co-host as we talk to Chris Ryan, a singer/songwriter from NL. Chris has had multiple concussions and we talk about the importance of recognizing the signs and the lasting symptoms. How have concussions effected his music career; including his song writing and live shows? How have concussions affected his life?Check out Chris's music in UPtv's Hallmark movie, Love in Wolf CreekFollow Chris on Instagram Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/concussion-talk-podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Hunter Conservationist Podcast
Round Canada - Ep 40 Canada's Seal Summit 2022 with Romy Vaugeois

The Hunter Conservationist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 29:23


In this special episode Mark is joined by Romy Vaugeois, Program Manager at Seals & Sealing Network. Romy provides a summary of the Seal Summit held in St. John's Newfoundland in early November including who organized the summit, who was in attendance, the main topics that were presented, some actions that came out of the event and what participants thought of the Summit when it was over. Show Notes: https://canadiansealproducts.com/ https://proudlyindigenouscrafts.com

CBC Newfoundland Morning
A delegation from Stephenville town council returned from a conference in Germany last month on a private jet. We'll have more on the CBC Investigates story

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 5:23


Three Stephenville Town Council members and the town manager flew back to Canada on a private jet from Germany last month. They were in Hamburg for a conference on hydrogen energy. The councillors and town manager canceled their commercial reservations to fly on the corporate jet owned by John Risley. He's the billionaire businessman looking to develop energy projects in western Newfoundland. CBC's Troy Turner brought us the story.

Proactive - Interviews for investors
Labrador Gold focused on exploration in Newfoundland

Proactive - Interviews for investors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 4:11


Labrador Gold Corp (TSV-X:LAB) (OTCQC:NKOSF) president and chief executive officer Roger Moss speaks to Proactive at the 2022 edition of Resourcing Tomorrow, brought to you by Mines and Money. Labrador Gold is focusing on Newfoundland and has been drilling non-stop for 18 months, making four discoveries. Extra drilling, Moss said, is well funded. #ProactiveInvestors #LabradorGold #mining #resourcingtomorrow #minesandmoney #investing #investment #investor #stockmarket #stocks #stock #stockmarketnews

Labrador Morning from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)
Nursing program, Traditional Inuit math, and Good Medicine from Sheshatshiu

Labrador Morning from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 49:16


0:00 The first batch of students started their nursing program at the Labrador Campus in Happy Valley-Goose Bay this fall. So how is this new program coming along? We'll hear from the satellite sites associate dean for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program at Memorial University of Newfoundland & Labrador. 5:29 In less than a month, sixteen seniors will be opening up Christmas stockings and the staff at the Harbourview Manor hope they can be filled with little items. They're looking for your help to make that possible. We'll hear from one of the organizers 12:35 An educator in Nain wants to help young learners see themselves in the curriculum and understand that math is everywhere — from making Toutons to komatik boxes. We'll hear from Shannon Dicker, who is working to bring traditional Inuit math skills to the classroom. 24:37 RCMP's First Nations and Inuit Policing Program is coming to Nunavut, but how does that program differ from ordinary policing? And is there any word of the program coming to Labrador? We'll hear from the Government of Nunavut. 32:34 Renewable energy presents a big opportunity for remote northern communities. We'll hear from one man who says it's time to flip the switch and get off diesel. 36:54 The Ottawa bureau chief and Economics columnist for the Toronto Star will bring us the latest from Ottawa, including the Indo-Pacific strategy and the first changes to Employment Insurance 44:46 The series Good Medicine is back in the Big Land. Learn about Georges Nuna in this installment.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Battling mice and a dancing fairy....the story of The Nutcracker is a Christmas classic, and starting Tuesday, a touring production will bring local dancers to a stage near you.

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 6:10


A Newfoundland and Labrador production of The Nutcracker will be touring across the island, starting Tuesday in Stephenville. It's being presented by Kittiwake Dance Theatre from St. John's, and will include local dancers at every stop along the tour. Amira Basha is one of those dancers and is a student at Nomad Stages in Stephenville. Martin Vallee is the Artistic Director of Kittiwake Dance Theatre.

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell
Exploring the Fjords on the South Coast of Newfoundland

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 55:31


This is a talk I gave to the North Florida Cruising Club about my journey to Newfoundland. I talk about sailing, anchoring, fishing, and hiking in the south coast fjords, as well as the sail there and back to Florida.

Better Known
Dean Jobb

Better Known

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 29:32


True crime writer Dean Jobb discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Dean Jobb is award-winning true crime writer and a professor in the School of Journalism, Writing & Publishing at the University of King's College in Halifax, where he teaches in the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Nonfiction program. His latest book, The Case of the Murderous Dr. Cream: The Hunt for a Victorian Era Serial Killer (Algonquin Books), won the inaugural CrimeCon Clue Award for True Crime Book of the Year in 2022 and was longlisted for the American Library Association's Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction. His previous book, Empire of Deception (Algonquin Books), was the Chicago Writers Association Book of the Year, won the Crime Writers of Canada Award for best true crime book, and was a finalist for Canada's Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for nonfiction. Learn more about his work at https://www.deanjobb.com. Jakob Dylan https://www.smh.com.au/culture/music/a-wounded-jakob-dylan-bares-his-scars-in-a-new-album-20210718-p58any.html How to pronounce Newfoundland https://www.elleryqueenmysterymagazine.com/the-crime-scene/stranger-than-fiction-september-2022/ Joseph Bell https://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/b/josephbell.html Where the Cajuns came from https://www.nps.gov/jela/learn/historyculture/from-acadian-to-cajun.htm How to tell a pearl is fake https://www.worldsultimate.net/arthur-barry.htm The first Ponzi https://www.chicagotribune.com/history/ct-opinion-flashback-leo-koretz-ponzi-scheme-20210305-bsqzjlztlrbg5afozquk6ccksm-story.html This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

It Slays Podcast
Ravenous (1999) Featuring Gillian Keats

It Slays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 81:46


The squad and Foreign Correspondent Gillian Keats devour Colton's pick, RAVENOUS (1999). Should Gill feel offended as a vegetarian? Do Colton & Rowan have this score on repeat? Does Mike have a homoerotic reading of this? Of course, he does! Listen to find out if we award this film a NAY, OKAY, YAY, or SLAY!Follow us on all social media:FacebookTwitterInstagramTumblrYoutubeSlasherWant some official Merch?!SHOP HERE!*Intro & Outro Music by Dylan Bailey (IG: @thedylanbailey)* CHAPTERS:Theme/Intro (00:00:00)What We Been Consuming (00:01:20)Trailer (00:17:13)Bio/First Experiences (00:17:43)Review (00:21:44)Rating/What Do You Think? (01:03:07)Horrific Hotline (01:10:15)Promotions (Horrific Hotline/Social Media/It Slays Podcast's Horrific Playlist) (01:16:52)Upcoming Episode/Outro (01:18:43)Support the show

CruxCasts
Exploits Discovery (NFLD) - NFG Neighbour Land Grab

CruxCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 16:28


Exploits Discovery Corp. “Exploits” is a Canadian exploration company with one of the largest and most strategic land packages in Newfoundland, Canada where we are in active pursuit of world-class gold discoveries. Exploits holds 100% interest in seven known exceptional gold projects with geological, geochemical and structural settings comparable to New Found Gold's Queensway discovery (DDH 19m at 92.86 g/t Au); and controls one of the largest land package in Newfoundland with over 200km of interpreted deep regional fault structures which include the Appleton Fault, Dog Bay Line, GRUB Line and the Mt Peyton Linear.

Middle Aged Man Talk
Cheese Snacks Versus Cheeseless Cheese Snacks

Middle Aged Man Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 24:35


This week we talk about weird things on the internet like Rickrolling. Richard seems to know all about these things but Brendan innocently has no idea. We debate Cheese snacks versus Cheeseless Cheese snacks. Richard loves Quidi Vidi Bog & Barrens Imperial Bakeapple Gose beer from Newfoundland, Canada. Recorded November 11, 2022.Thank you so much for listening,Brendan and RichardOur theme music is: Welcome to the Show by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4614-welcome-to-the-show License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-licensePlease Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon If you enjoyed our show Please Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon!Support the show

Writers Festival Radio
S5 E8 Jennie's Boy: A Newfoundland Childhood with Wayne Johnston

Writers Festival Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 51:38


Steven W. Beattie hosts a conversation with consummate storyteller and bestselling novelist Wayne Johnston. His latest, Jennie's Boy, reaches back into his past to bring us a sad, tender and at times extremely funny memoir of his Newfoundland boyhood. "Wayne Johnston's childhood in Newfoundland was full of laughter, pain and poverty. And then laughter again. His memoir, Jennie's Boy, is an uplifting account of a childhood not just survived—he came close to death too many times to count—but triumphed over. Thank god he lived to tell the tale." — Rick Mercer For six months between 1966 and 1967, Wayne Johnston and his family lived in a wreck of a house across from his grandparents in Goulds, Newfoundland. At seven, Wayne was sickly and skinny, unable to keep food down, plagued with insomnia and a relentless cough that no doctor could diagnose, though they had already removed his tonsils, adenoids and appendix. To the neigh­bours, he was known as “Jennie's boy,” a back­handed salute to his tiny, ferocious mother, who felt judged for Wayne's condition at the same time as worried he might never grow up. Jennie's Boy is Wayne's tribute to a family and a community that were simultaneously fiercely protective of him and fed up with having to make allowances for him. His boyhood was full of pain, yes, but also tenderness and Newfoundland wit. By that wit, and through love—often expressed in the most unloving ways—Wayne survived. The Ottawa International Writers Festival is supported by generous individuals like you. Please consider subscribing to our newsletter and making a donation to support our programming and children's literacy initiatives.

Tales with TR: A Hockey Podcast

Join TR as he talks about getting snow in Newfoundland, his life after hockey, and legendary musician Johnny Cash. Welcome to Tales with TR: A Hockey Podcast presented by The Hockey Podcast Network. Join former Montreal Canadiens' first-round draft pick & Shoresy star Terry Ryan, as he talks about the sport of Hockey, brings on various guests, and shares tales of his life and professional hockey career. Host: Terry Ryan @terryryan20  Network: @hockeypodnet Editor: Carter Potts @Carter_Potts_97 Sponsored by Draft Kings - Use promo code THPN at sign-up for exclusive offers. https://tinyurl.com/DRAFTKINGSPROMOTHPN __________________________ If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MI/NJ/PA/TN/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA(select parishes)/MI /NJ/NY/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Void in ONT. Valid 1 per new customer. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 pregame moneyline bet. Bet must win. $150 issued as six (6) $25 free bets. Free Bets are non-cashable and cannot be withdrawn. Free bets must be wagered 1x and stake is not included in any returns or winnings. Free Bets expire 7 days (168 hours) after being awarded. Promotional offer period ends 12/30/22 at 11:59pm ET. See terms at sportsbook.draftkings.com/hockeyterms. NHL and the NHL Shield are registered trademarks of the National Hockey League. © NHL 2022. All Rights Reserved Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cross Talk
Indigenous Storytelling and Genetics in NL

Cross Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 51:21


Today on the show we are talking about genetics and this province. You will hear about the Newfoundland curse, Texas vampires, and the latest from the Provincial Medical Genetics Program. Up first though a conversation about the importance of amplifying Indigenous literary voices and challenging their erasure.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
You could say author Ken Pieroway has a "track" record. His latest photo book about the Newfoundland railway takes us on a photographic journey by rail, from St. John's to Port aux Basques

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 9:14


it's been decades since you could ride the rails in Newfoundland. But that hasn't stopped author Ken Pieroway from writing about the trains of his youth. Pieroway has just put out his third book about the Newfoundland railway. It's called Trains of Newfoundland, and it's full of photos that have never been published until now.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Growing lettuce in Newfoundland all year round. We'll hear from a local lettuce producer trying to get a-head

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 6:32


If you've been shopping for lettuce lately, you're feeling the crunch. Imported lettuce is in short supply, driving prices up while quantities are down. Green Head Growers, at Mainland on the Port au Port Peninsula, has been growing lettuce indoors, using hydroponics, for some time now. The company is expanding its operation to produce a lot more greens. Timothy Collier is a co-owner of Green Head Growers.

Sixteen:Nine
Daniel Smalley, Hologram Expert From BYU

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 37:11


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT I'm not sure why seeing all the product references lately to holograms makes me a little crazy, apart from the simple fact that none of them really meet the definition. It's not like that's the one term marketers abuse. We've seen bezel-less displays that had bezels. MicroLED displays that aren't actually microLED. And on and on. I don't entirely know what really does meet the definition, so I thought I'd ask an expert. Daniel Smalley is an associate professor of electrical engineering at Brigham Young University in Utah, and a genuine expert in the field. He's working, his CV says, to make the 3D displays of science fiction a reality, using "waveguide-based modulators and optical tractor beam technologies." The short summary is that we're not there yet, and in this conversation, we get into why that is - with the biggest reason being bandwidth and the immense computing power needed to genuinely make the holograms of Star Wars and Star Trek actually happen, and work. We also get into a discussion of the various products already on the market that have co-opted the hologram term, and also talk about the real world, practical applications for holograms. Daniel went to MIT and has his masters and a Ph.D, so he's approximately a billion times smarter than me. This talk gets technical in spots, but I tried valiantly to keep up! Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Daniel, thank you for joining me. Can you explain your role at BYU and your interest in holograms?  Daniel Smalley: Certainly, I'm an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering here at Brigham University. My research primarily has to do with advanced 3D displays, including holographic displays and volumetric displays.  Okay, and when you say you're doing research, what does that mean? Daniel Smalley: So it is our group's manifest destiny, as we see it, to recreate the displays of science fiction, specifically the Princess Leia projector from Star Wars and the Holodeck from Star Trek, and so research in my mind is the steps we take to get from where we are to those places  And where are we in those steps?  Daniel Smalley: On the holography end, as we'll talk about, I'm sure, the primary challenge now is that we can make little teeny tiny holographic video displays, but the bandwidth issues, the sheer computational power required to make big displays remain an obstacle. Some estimates have suggested that we will colonize Mars before we have the capacity to easily feed a big holographic display with all the pixels it's hungry for and on the other side, on the Princess Leia projector side, we're in a similar space, but with more hope. That is to say that we can make little teeny tiny Princess Leia projections, but I think we're not far away from getting moderate and maybe even large-size volumetric images in the near future. So let's do a level set here. How do you define holograms and holographic visuals?  Daniel Smalley: Yeah, that's an excellent question. So there have been meetings of the minds where we've discussed and debated what these things mean, and I think the best way to think about the different display families is that there are three of them. So a trifecta of holographic display.  The first is a “ray” family of displays, the second is a “wave” family of displays, and the third is a “point” family of displays. Now the ray displays are the displays we're already familiar with. These are lenticular displays, stuff that you might see at Best Buy or in a magazine. These crisscross rays of light and space form an image point that we perceive, what we would call a real image point. A holographic display is a step up from that. Instead of taking rays and intersecting them in the air, what it will do is it'll take its whole surface, so you'll be gazing at a screen and this whole surface is focusing light, it's curving away in front of a light, in order to focus at a point, and your eye perceives that focal. As a display point. Now the magic of holography is you can take that surface that's shaping light and you can superimpose many such surfaces, one on top of the other, and focus on multiple points and in this way, build up an image in the air, and these images can be optically indistinguishable from real objects.  So if you've seen a really good hologram in a museum, you may be tempted to pick it up and look behind the glass to see if there is a real object behind it. Even a seasoned holographer will occasionally mistake a hologram for a real object. Now it comes with the price of the fact that there is a glass, that you have to be looking through a screen of some type. But the reason for this is that wave shaping is being performed by a pattern of lines, a diffraction pattern, where there are three ways of bending: light, reflection, refraction, and diffraction. And in a hologram, diffraction is the active ingredient in creating this wave shape. So you have to be staring into those lines. You gotta be staring into that pattern if you hope to see something, Now that said, imagery can be very deep. Looking into that hologram, that window, you can see imagery that comes out and tickles your nose or goes way back to infinity, back to the horizon. But you've always gotta be watching it like you watch a television set, even if what you'd prefer to do is watch it like a water fountain, right? Where the aperture is flat and then there's content shooting up out. Then you can walk all around it and see it from every direction. Now, that type of display exists, but it's not a hologram. It's called a point display or a volumetric display, and unlike ray displays and wave displays that require screens, a point display can be screenless.  In fact, maybe the best way to think about it is you take its screen and you grind it up into little pieces and you scatter them into the air, and then each time you're looking at one of those little pieces, you're looking at an image point as well. And that's the technical definition of a point display is that every time you're looking at an image point, you're also looking at a group of atoms, a physical scatterer, which is to say, unlike the ray case, where you're looking at an intersection of photons or the hologram case where you're looking at the focusing of the wavefront, here we're looking at physical atoms scattering light. So in some ways, a volumetric display is a lot like a 3D printer that just destroys the object it's creating every 30th of a second and this endows it with some remarkable properties. So you can make images that you can see from every angle. It can be relatively low bandwidth images if they're sparse and they have what's called perfect accommodation, which means you can focus on them. Your eye believes even if you close one eye, you can focus really tightly on them and have really strong 3D cues. Now, the downside is that with these types of displays, it's hard to achieve the same level of realism that you get with a holographic display, and the reason for this, is you can imagine if you had a jar of fireflies and you're trying to make images out of these fireflies, no matter what, you'd always have this problem where you can the fireflies in the back of your image at the same time, you can see the fireflies at the front of your image and in the result is that everything looks like a ghost or a hole, right? So this problem of self-occlusion is a big one, and it's one it's part of the research we do is try to come overcome these issues so that it can be a complete display of the solution.  In terms of array display, you were describing lenticular. So in the context of this stuff that people listening to this might relate to. Going back a number of years, there were what were called glasses-free 3D displays that were basically LCD displays with a lenticular layer over top of it and if you looked at it from different angles, you would see something was popping up from the screen. Is that basically what a ray display would be?  Daniel Smalley: Absolutely, that's exactly right. The wave display when you were describing that, I was immediately thinking of that little company in Brooklyn called Looking Glass and the little loose-eyed blocks that they have.  Daniel Smalley: So Looking Glass and I don't want to misrepresent them or anything but Looking Glass, I think I will admit they are a ray display technology. If you look at a Looking Glass display and you move left and right, you will see the image change perspective. But if you move up and down, you won't. And that's an indication to the viewer that you're looking through a cylindrical lens as opposed to an array of circular or spherical lenses. Now the difference between them is that if it's a lens-lit array as opposed to a lenticular array, then you can move up and down and you'll also see 3D in that direction. But you can dramatically reduce the information you need by just making it horizontal, parallax only. They're just providing information for the horizontal and your eyes for the most part don't care. They're horizontally separated. You don't do a lot of bobbing up and down, so you get the most bang for your buck with just horizontal parallax.  Yeah I've seen the Looking Glass stuff, I think I might have seen it at a trade show but I was underwhelmed. It's like, I'll shift to my right and I'll shift to my left, and it does seem like the image is subtly different, but it's one of these things where I'm going that's nice, but so what? Daniel Smalley: Yeah, that's true. There is also some fatalism about three 3D displays that when you get really good, you've just now duplicating reality, which is something we're very used to, and it just becomes suddenly banal. It just suddenly looks like everything.  So what would be an example of a wave? Are there real-world examples of a wave family display? Daniel Smalley: A wave display that you could go out and buy today, I don't know, but there are certainly many good static displays. There are certainly commercial companies making an effort to create wave displays. Two approaches that are gaining traction commercially, I think, are holographic displays, which are a pattern of lines that refract light to form a wavefront or a nanophotonic phased array. There is a caveat, there's a merging between the ray and the wave family at the moment when the rays come from emitters that are very small, smaller than a wavelength of light. If those emitters are super small, number one and number two, if all the emitters can see each other, that is to say, they have some fixed phase relationship with each other. The technical term for this is coherence. They act as a team. If all those things are true, then you can start shaping wavefronts with what would've been rays. So essentially if you have a big emitter, the ray comes out like a laser. But as your emitter gets smaller and smaller, the ray doesn't come out like a laser. It comes out more like a, I don't even know how to describe it, a spray, right? It defracts out more and more until now you've got a spherical emitter and all those spherical emitters see each other and they interfere with each other in ways that allow them to create arbitrary wavefronts. Any wavefront you want, you can create from a collection of spherical emitters, assuming they're small enough and assuming they're coherent with each other.  So that's another approach that some people are taking. But the problem is, in each one of these cases you've got just an intractable information problem. For example, any display could be made into a holographic display if its resolution was sufficiently high if it could achieve holographic resolution, which is roughly a thousand pixels per millimeter linear. So imagine taking all the pixels in your computer screen right now and squishing them into a 1:1 millimeter area and then refilling your computer screen at that density. So that's a million times more pixels than what you're currently using to create a display the same size as what you're currently using, and so you're talking about if you wanted a meter-size holographic display updated, at a reasonable refresh rate you're looking at in the neighborhood of hundreds of billions of pixels per second, maybe trillions of pixels per second to create that display. So you've got challenges with computing power, with graphic processing, with bandwidth, and everything else?  Daniel Smalley: Yeah, but primarily bandwidth. The feeling I think, broadly, is that optical electronics is a solvable problem. We might even be able to get pixel densities where we want them, maybe. But that compute power, that remains a big deal.  Now there are shortcuts and workarounds. One particularly good workaround was by SeaReal back in the day, what they would do is they would look at the viewer's eyeballs and they would only shoot light into the eyes, light that was diffracting in other directions they would ignore entirely. It wouldn't compute any of that, so they could dramatically reduce the amount of the information they had to process and they could increase the pixel size because they only needed just a little bit of diffraction, just enough to cover your pupil, and then they were done. It's unfortunate that we haven't seen more from them. They started out with a kind of mechanical version of the display that worked really well, and I think there was a struggle to make something that was solid state. But it was a pretty clever trick to reduce this bandwidth while still preserving the benefits of a wavefront-shaping holographic display and the realism that comes with it. So where do light field displays fall into all this? Are those waves or points?  Daniel Smalley: So this is the most controversial of all of this syntactic infighting that we have right now, because there are displays out there right now trying to commercialize light field displays, and they don't want anyone thinking that they're any less, that consumers are getting anything less than what they might consider being a holographic display. And how they use the term and how we use the term are often very different. So those of us who've gotten together and agreed on this, say a light field display is a ray display. That is to say, it's a pixelated display that's shooting rays in different directions, and it's those intersections that create image points that our brain perceives. Though I know there are displays out there, or at least they're attempting to create coherent Wavefronts, that is to say, these nanophotonic phased arrays. They're trying to create phased array wavefronts potentially, and I can't be sure this is the case, but they do have wavefront shaping capabilities and that's when you've crossed the bridge from ray display to a wave display.  Are hologram and holographic Interchangeable terms or are they different things? Daniel Smalley: So hologram as we see it, the way we decided to specify this term, we define a hologram as the surface with the lines on it that's actually diffracting the light. So if you go to a museum and you see a hologram, the glass plate that you look into, the screen itself, that is the hologram, and the image that's the holographic image. And then the process of creating that is holography. So we use holography to create holograms, and when we illuminate those holograms, they create holographic images.  Is a spinning LED light stick that are these individual sorts of fan blade things and arrays of them that are being called holograms? Are they holograms? Daniel Smalley: No. There's nothing diffracting. So if there's no diffraction, then it can't be a hologram. Now it could be a volumetric image. What's happening with most of these is there is a fan that spins in a single plane, however, if you just move that fan in and out, you just oscillate it in and out, or if you add a bunch of fan blades stacked on top of each other and spin them, now you've created a volumetric display. Now, every time I look at one of those image points, I'm looking at a physical object in a volume and I'm getting a volumetric image and it will have all of the benefits and all the deficiencies of that family of displays, of that point family, but not a hologram.  So when you say it's volumetric, it means if you went off to the side a little bit, it's not just this single flat image, there's a dimension to it or depth to it?  Daniel Smalley: So when I say volumetric, I mean that If you look at an image point, you're looking at a physical object, in this case, an LED. Of course, it's just a flat screen, it's just spinning in a plane.  If it wants to be qualified as a 3D display, then it needs to have pixels or voxels that exist off a plane. So you just need to stack these or move one of them in and out, and then you could achieve this effect of having a volumetric image.  It's yet more moving parts in these things, which would worry me even more.  Daniel Smalley: That's right. If they weren't dangerous enough.  Is a transparent LCD a hologram?  Daniel Smalley: That is a good question. So that depends entirely on what are you displaying. So first of all, it could be a hologram if you're displaying a pattern of lines on your transparent hologram meant to diffract light so that far away it's converging to a point for somebody to observe. That kind of display would not be very useful unless the pixels of this transparent LCD were very tiny. Now, in the case of some microdisplays, for example, there are transparent LCD microdisplays for projectors, that could be a legitimate holographic display that would actually create an image that we would appreciate as a holographic image.  Now, those microdisplays are micro, they're small maybe an inch, maybe one or two inches on a side. So they're not particularly well suited to humans. But they would make great pets or insect displays. The challenge now is to keep that same pixel, those teeny tiny pixels, those teeny tiny transparent LCD pixels, and then scale that size up while keeping the pixel small to something that a human would appreciate, something in the 20-inch diagonal range. So these shower stall dimension displays that are transparent LCDs that are just nicely lit, white screen captured visuals of people who were standing in one place and it's reflected on the transparent LCD inside the shower stall thing, that's being described as a hologram, and when I've written about it I describe it as hologram-ish. But it wouldn't qualify as a hologram, would it?  Daniel Smalley: It would not. But I will say this, I think that the tradeoffs made there are actually pretty compelling. So when it comes to representing full-size humans, we have to recognize that humans are flat, especially if you're looking at somebody standing on a stage, the six inches of depth from the front of their nose to the back of their head is not much in the grand scheme of things, especially if you're looking at them from 50 feet away or a 100 feet away, which is why the two 2Pac “hologram” was so compelling, because the further away you get from an object, the fewer 3D cues your eye is able to use to determine.  So when you go to a play, they can paint the background, the mountains, and the sun, because those things are so far away. The only 3D cues we get are occlusion. The fact that one is in front of the other, but it could be totally flat and those pictorial cues are all we need. As objects get closer, we start adding things like motion parallax. When you're driving down the road, now you see these telephone poles moving with respect to each other, and then as things get a little closer, now you get left eye, right eye disparity, and it's only when they get really close within a few meters does your eye start being able to focus on the near and far parts of that image and you get these accommodation effects, and then when they get within arms reach, you can touch them, and now you have keen aesthetic cues. So it's really when things are up close, within arms reach that you get this rich set of 3D cues, but if you push imagery back far enough, you can really get away with a lot. Things get much cheaper, and much easier, and if the intention for these shower displays as you call them, which I think is a pretty accurate description, if it's just to give the sense of the presence of another human being in a room, and if they're a few feet away, that might be a reasonable trade-off, especially if they're pushing all those resources into creating really high dynamic range, which they do, good color saturation, and high responsibility.  Those things are gonna be much more compelling to a human viewer than those six inches of depth. We're boring as far as 3D is concerned as humans.  Yeah, I've seen light field displays at the SID trade show and I have seen the shower stall devices at different trade shows, and if I think of the two, the light field display is arguably closer to what people are thinking about as a science fiction hologram, but they're also six inches tall, and I suspect that most people having to choose between the two would say, I like the life-size thing a lot more, even if it maybe isn't quite as sophisticated in certain respects. Daniel Smalley: Absolutely!  When I talked to the guy at Portal, David Nussbaum, who founded that company, it used to be called Portal, and that's the shower stall displays. He says, I know it's not a true hologram, but we have to call it something and it's something that consumers have their heads wrapped around so that's why we use that. Is that a fair approach? Daniel Smalley: Yeah, I think so. As I say, we're all very defeated at this point on this. So I think that if you're trying to communicate with humans and it's already entered the vernacular in that way, unless we give them an alternative, then what else is a guy supposed to do?  I'm curious longer term as this technology matures, what are the real-world applications for this? Because, if you're replicating Princess Leia and Star Wars that's a theme park attraction or a museum attraction or something like that. But are there practical business uses for holographic visuals?  I did see a demo from a company up in Newfoundland, called Avalon Holographics and that was for energy exploration and shipping and so on, to show the depth of the ocean and all that, and I thought, that's pretty interesting. So is that kind of the more, the real-world use of this going forward? Daniel Smalley: That's a very good question. I think we have yet to find the killer app for holography,  to be honest. So in any of the scenarios I've been approached with, it seems relatively straightforward to come up with something that's almost as good for much, much cheaper. In the case of oil exploration, they're trying to understand these complicated 3D shapes in the form of oil fields and where to dig and this kind of spatial stuff. But unless time is an important factor and it's not in this case, you can use a really big, nice 2D screen, move your mouse around and rotate around enough to get a real good sense of the 3D shape. People are really good at abstracting from 2D to 3D, and I'm thinking of radiologists in particular who just make this second nature. However, if you were a surgeon and you were trying to thread a catheter through the vasculature of the body, which can get very complicated in 3D, especially as you approach the heart and the brain it might be useful to have a really high fidelity 3D image that you can see as you're pushing this catheter to avoid getting abrasions on the artery surface causing embolism, that sort of thing, and the reason for that is because time is important. You're moving that catheter in time, you're being able to capture the spatial information at the same time you're moving is sensitive. Time is a sensitive part of this process and so maybe in that case. Maybe if you're doing aerospace surveillance, we've got all these extra satellites, thanks to Elon Musk and SpaceX to keep track of and the possibility of conjunction, which is the smashing together of satellites, I think it's greater and greater all the time, and that's more complicated than airplanes smashing into each other because you got these curved orbits and I'm sure there are all sorts of AI and computer analysis, but there's still a human loop, I think in most cases, and they have to make a judgment call about whether these two complicated orbital paths are gonna result in the smashing together of two objects, and if you have that rendered in 3D, you've got this moving spatial situation. I think you could understand what's happening much more viscerally than trying and abstract that from a 2D screen so I see those as two, clear and present applications for a really good holographic system.  Is there a lot of business investment in this or is much of the work involving holography happening in environments such as yours, more on the academic side? Daniel Smalley: Definitely more on the academic side. If you're talking about the display, the real money in holography has never been in the display. It's always been in things like security or photolithography or some of these other fields.  So holography for currency counterfeiting? Daniel Smalley: Yeah, that's exactly right. So I don't imagine that's going to change. My feeling is the display field is just fraught. It's just a terrible market to be in, it is. If you think about the last century, we really only had two dominant display technologies. For the majority of this century, you had CRT displays, and then for the rest you had LCDs, and during this time, big companies were cannibalizing their own technologies. New things were coming on like miniature cathode ray tubes and all sorts of interesting OLEDs, just think how long it took OLEDs to take off even though they were superior in so many ways. It was just, you've got these multi-billion dollar foundries, and fabs, and you're gonna squeeze every last drop out of those displays, and then the margins are so small and yeah, it's just a rough business to be in.  So thelast century in the early part of this one has just been littered with good technologies, good 3D technologies that just couldn't get a foothold. In the 90s we had two excellent 3D displays. We had the Actuality display, which is the spinning paddle which was a very nice display, and then, it had a hundred million pixels, I think, per second, and then we had Sullivan's Crystal display where he had these stacked liquid crystals that he would project on to form a volumetric image, are also excellent and solid state for goodness sake, and that both of those, about the 90s, both of those couldn't quite find a foothold in the market.  Is it the sort of thing that could be revived?  Daniel Smalley: Oh, it has been revived. So there is a version of this type of display, which I called an enclosed volumetric display where you have a diffuser moving up and down inside, what I presume is an evacuated volume, and then you're projecting on that and it looks beautiful, it looks great and they're making a good try. They're making a good effort to get out there and solve some problems.  My feeling with most people who are doing 3D displays is that the targets they're looking at are in entertainment, people who are trying to do VR or something like this, but need some collaborative platform to develop on that, where everybody can gather around and that becomes this volumetric display or in this case, Looking Glass is also good at this, and then I think Sony has another beautiful 3D display auto stereo for the same sort of thing, targeting that same sort of market.  Yeah, I've seen that. Where do you think things will be in 10 years from now? Will there be commercial products out there, or is this still gonna be in the labs?  Daniel Smalley: I guess we have to dig down a little bit on that question. What are we gonna have? Well, we're gonna continue to have better and better displays for sure, and I think we're gonna start making inroads on niche markets. I think we are seeing companies take this tack of hitting premium markets first. So oil exploration will be in there, entertainment will be in there, and hopefully, we'll have a Tesla-like experience where they'll get a nice premium product with lots of really inspiring features. They'll identify a killer app and then the trickle-down will provide the rest of us plebians with a 3D display in the next little bit.  Things are accelerating, lots of technologies are converging. I think it's much more likely that you'll see an everyday volumetric display before you see an everyday holographic display just because the information problem, and the bandwidth problem's not going away. And I say volumetric displays. I should also say that displays like Looking Glass, these light field displays or more correctly, maybe these ray displays are also gonna get better and better, and we'll have to make some decisions about whether we are willing to pay the premium to go from that excellent ray display to a much more expensive holographic display.  This was very helpful, very technical, I even understood some of it. I appreciate you taking the time with me. Daniel Smalley: Yeah, my pleasure. It's my favorite thing to talk about.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
We'll replay part of a conversation with the late Enid Stevenson of Corner Brook, on the occasion of her 100th birthday. The beloved member of the community passed away last Friday, just 11 days before her 102nd birthday

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:28


Corner Brook has lost another of its oldest and most beloved citizens. Enid Stevenson passed away Friday, Nov. 18, just 11 days before her 102nd birthday. She was a war bride from Yorkshire, England, and moved to Newfoundland with her husband, David Stevenson, after the Second World War. Enid Stevenson lived a long and full life, as a wife and mother, as well as a nurse, gardener, avid reader, and environmentalist. Bernice Hillier spoke with Enid Stevenson back in 2020, just before her 100th birthday.

The New Leader with Ian Daley
Leadership Lessons From 108 Countries with Earle G. Hall 089

The New Leader with Ian Daley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 42:36


"Many of us forget to be in service to the most important person in our lives - ourselves." - Earle G. Hall Do you find vulnerability scary? Have you ever been told you need to become more self-aware? Then today's episode is for you! My guest is Earle G. Hall, CEO of AXES.ai, a fintech company present in over 40 countries dedicated to the eradication of money laundering, addictive gambling, and illicit activities. I took furious notes during this interview because when you've traveled to 108 countries like he has, you learn a few things ;) Earle is Vice-Chairman of the International Gaming Standards Association and a Government Blockchain Association board member. He is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada and a Veteran Army Officer. He also holds a master's degree in Public Administration and has undertaken doctoral studies in Organizational Psychology. He hails from my home province of Newfoundland, and in this episode you'll learn: Why one of the greatest qualities a new leader can cultivate is self-awareness, and how to crack that code early in your career The power of humanizing your colleagues in a world of lost connection (hint: it's easier than you think) A life-changing tip he received from General Romeo Dallaire, and how it can help elevate you, too...and more! How Vulnerability Inspires Others The more I showed them my real, authentic, and vulnerable self, the more engaged they became with me and the more productive they became. That's when I learned that there's something more to leadership than just giving direction, orders, and getting things done.   Overcoming your fears and insecurities When you look out to the group and you're trying to guess everything they're judging about you, you're just judging yourself. So what you can do as a new leader is you can take note of everything you think people are judging you about, because all that is is chatter coming out of your brain. It's doubt, lack of confidence, self-esteem, and these are the things that you need to overcome to sit inside yourself and just be authentic.   Making the most out of your new leader role New leaders have a competitive edge. Because when you're a new leader, you know almost nothing, and so you get to ask questions and learn many things. You get to listen actively and engage with people sincerely. And when an employee sees a new leader that is interested, engage, and genuinely wanting to understand, that employee will open up their entire knowledge base and hand it over to you for free.   Links and Resources Connect with Earl: LinkedIn Richard Beckhard books Trello

Talking Radical Radio
Working for a multi-issue "revolution of care" in Newfoundland

Talking Radical Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:17


In episode #497 of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh interviews Kerri Claire Neil. She is an activist in St. John's, Newfoundland, and the co-chair of the Social Justice Co-operative NL, an activist organization whose members work on a wide range of social, political, and environmental issues. They talk about why the group is a co-operative, the many struggles its members are involved in, and their “Revolution of Care Manifesto.” For a more detailed description of this episode, go here: https://talkingradical.ca/2022/11/22/radio-working-for-a-multi-issue-revolution-of-care-in-newfoundland/

CBC Newfoundland Morning
'Tis the season for giving. And people who provide help to families in need say that need has never been greater. The Salvation Army will tell us how you can help

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 7:43


People in Newfoundland and Labrador are already feeling the pinch of inflation. Household budgets are stretched to the limit. And, for many families, the holiday season puts them in an even tighter spot. Some may face a very bleak Christmas as a result, but, of course, food banks and community agencies will step up to try to help. Major Jamie Locke is spokesperson for the Salvation Army in Newfoundland and Labrador.

CBC Newfoundland Morning
A book examines the extraction of fossil fuels in the fragile waters of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. We'll hear from the editors, who are faculty in MUN's English department

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 8:03


For a quarter of a century, Newfoundland and Labrador has been extracting offshore oil from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. It's often framed as a big economic success, producing some of the cleanest oil in the world. But two English professors at Memorial University say there are many ways to look at the impact of offshore oil - here and abroad. Fiona Polack and Danine Farquharson are the editors of a collection of essays, called "Cold Water Oil: Offshore Petroleum Cultures." They told CBC's Melissa Tobin why it's important to look at offshore oil from multiple perspectives.

Hidden Track
Fortunate Ones | Love Is A River

Hidden Track

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 55:38


Newfoundland-based musicians Catherine Allan and Andrew James O'Brien are the couple behind Juno-nominated band Fortunate Ones. The band's latest album, That Was You and Me, released early in June of 2022. Fortunate Ones recently embarked on a tour alongside fellow East Coast artists, The Once and Old Man Luedecke. That tour, dubbed the Anchors Up! Tour finds the band performing shows in Alberta in late November 2022.   The duo behind this incredible folk outlet took time out of their busy tour schedule to chat with Hidden Track host Grant Stovel for a look at their personal and artistic journeys thus far. Andrew and Catherine tell us about how the pandemic caused them to look deep within themselves (and each other) in a whole new way creatively, how the songs on this new record took shape during a secluded summer in a seaside clapboard house, the great Newfoundland tradition of songcraft, staying grounded by running marathons and doing yoga, and the excitement of touring in a bus for the first time ever. 

Middle Aged Man Talk
Hockey Canada?

Middle Aged Man Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 24:03


This week we talk about the perplexing kerfuffle with Hockey Canada. Richard drinks a boomstick. Recorded October 14, 2022.Thank you so much for listening,Brendan and RichardOur theme music is: Welcome to the Show by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4614-welcome-to-the-show License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-licensePlease Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon If you enjoyed our show Please Support Middle Aged Man Talk on Patreon!Support the show

Tarduck's: Escape from Tarkov creators place to share their advice about being on Twitch & YouTube
​ @Upshall comes to Tarducks! Talks about Newfoundland controllers, Fortnite & @Complexity Gaming ​

Tarduck's: Escape from Tarkov creators place to share their advice about being on Twitch & YouTube

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 73:46


Meet Upshall, a successful content creator from a wonderful island called Newfoundland. He shares how he got started on YouTube, early days of videogames and being part of a great org Complexity. He offers advice from many years of creating content and streaming. Make sure you check out his content. https://www.youtube.com/upshallgames https://twitter.com/UpshallGames https://twitter.com/UpshallGames Tarducks http://tarduckspodcast.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgjBTtN1lXno-wID1jjCnXg https://twitter.com/tarducks https://www.twitch.tv/tarducks https://anchor.fm/tarducks-podcast

Grief Stories
64 - Celina Carter

Grief Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 37:03


In this episode, Celina talks about hr work with The Reflection Room. The Reflection Room is an installation by a team of researchers from the SE Research Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland. They are studying whether reflection and storytelling are positive for people who have experienced a death or grief arising from deaths or indeed other kinds of losses including those associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. You can learn more about The Reflection Room at https://thereflectionroom.ca

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)
A Movember fundraiser took a personal turn this year for one of the Newfoundland Growlers players.

The St. John's Morning Show from CBC Radio Nfld. and Labrador (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 9:33


Like a lot of men, Todd Skirving of the Newfoundland Growlers grows a moustache every November, joining in on the Movember campaign to raise money for men's health. His stache is so stylish it even has its own name: the Skirvy. But the annual fundraiser took a personal turn for him this year. Todd Skirving joined us to tell that story and talk about the Skirvy!

California Haunts Radio
Legends of Ghosts and Fairies of Newfoundland with Dale Jarvis

California Haunts Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 478:28


Dale Gilbert Jarvis is a storyteller, author, and folklorist, living and working in Newfoundland, Canada. By day, he works as the Intangible Cultural Heritage Development Officer for the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador, helping communities to safeguard traditional culture, the first full-time provincially funded folklorist position in Canada. Dale holds a BSc in Anthropology/Archaeology from Trent University, and a MA in Folklore from Memorial University. He is a past president of the Newfoundland Historic Trust, and has contributed as a board member and volunteer to many local arts and heritage organizations. He regularly teaches workshops on oral history, cultural documentation, folklore project management, and public folklore programming.By night, Dale is the proprietor of the St. John's Haunted Hike ghost tour and raconteur of local tales. As a storyteller, he performs ghost stories, stories of the fairies and little people, tales of phantom ships and superstitions, and legends and traditional tales from Newfoundland, Labrador and beyond. His repertoire includes long-form folk and fairy tales from the island, with a wide-ranging knowledge of local legends, tall tales and myths. Author of several books on Newfoundland and Labrador ghost stories and folklore, he is a tireless promoter of local culture.Websiteshttp://www.dalejarvis.ca/BooksOn This Day: 365 Tales of History, Mystery, and More. Haunted Ground: Ghost Stories from the Rock Any Mummers 'Lowed In? Christmas Mummering Traditions in Newfoundland and Labrador.Haunted waters: more true ghost stories of Newfoundland and Labrador The golden leg and other ghostly campfire stories. Wonderful strange: ghosts, fairies, and fabulous beasties of Newfoundland and Labrador. Haunted shores: true ghost stories of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Just the Gist
BONUS: Claude Elliott is the REAL Mayor of Gander in Come From Away

Just the Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 84:59


It's another midweek dinner party treat for ya, Gisteners! This time with Claude Elliott, the former Mayor of Gander, Newfoundland. A few months ago we shared the story behind the musical 'Come From Away', when 38 planes, carrying 7,000 people, were grounded in the small town of Gander in the far eastern corner of North America, during 9/11. You loved it, we loved it, and to celebrate the return of Come From Away to Sydney, we sat down with the former Mayor of Gander, Claude Elliott to find out what it was really like on the ground of Gander when the 7,000 plane people arrived. Stick around to the end to hear the original story Jacob shared with Michelle Andrews. Get tickets to Come From Away in Sydney, Newcastle, Adelaide, Perth, Canberra & New Zealand https://comefromaway.com.au/tickets/sydney/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bikerumor Podcast
067 - How to ride the Eastern Divide MTB Trail

Bikerumor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 51:26


With the trails and route still being defined when Eddie O'dea set out to become the first person to complete the new 6,000 mile Eastern Divide Mountain Bike Trail, it was sure to be an adventure. And it was. But after almost three months, 6,223 miles, and 425,967 feet of climbing, he made the self-supported trip from Newfoundland, Canada, to Key West, Florida, on his mountain bike. In this interview, we talk about the experience, the bike and gear he used, and how in the world to plan something so ambitious. You can check out the route, download details and maps, and get more info about the Eastern Divide Trail at Bikepacking.com. And check out Eddie's cycling performance services at CycleTechniques.com. If you'd like to donate to the charity he rode for, head over to GeorgiaCycling.org. And for more pics and details on his bike and the route, check out our story about his ride, too. WANT MORE? Find the Bikerumor Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, and through RSS, or wherever you listen to podcasts! Can't find it? Let us know which players you use so we can get them up to speed! And let us know who you want us to interview. Click that PODCAST link in the menu and send in your suggestions! Hit like, hit subscribe, and hit play. Then just get out and ride! FOLLOW BIKERUMOR Keep tabs on all the latest bikes, wheels, components, gear and tech on The World's Largest Cycling Tech Blog by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. FOLLOW TYLER Like us? Love us? Follow your host, Tyler Benedict, on Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn

The WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour Podcast
WoodSongs #1056: Andrew Farriss Band and Fortunate Ones

The WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 59:00


ANDREW FARRISS is one of Australia's greatest songwriters and a co-founder and main songwriter for multi award winning band INXS. Andrew has spent time writing in Nashville and Australia for the last 10 years, before pursuing a solo career. His new EP, THE LOVE MAKES THE WORLD, will be released in October. FORTUNATE ONES is a Canadian indie folk duo from St. John's, Newfoundland, consisting of Andrew James O'Brien and Catherine Allan. Both sing lead vocals, while James plays guitar, and Catherine plays accordion and keyboards. Their album THE BLISS won the Canadian Folk Music Award for Vocal Group of the Year. Their latest album THAT WAS YOU AND ME was released this summer. Kyle Yang is a 13 year old classical pianist from Lexington, KY.

corpSonore - sound, body, wellness
Interview with Patrick Cashin

corpSonore - sound, body, wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 47:32


This month we had the pleasure of speaking with pianist Patrick Cashin. He shared with us his personal journey through injury, what supported him in his recovery, and how he now helps other pianists prevent injury through a holistic and physiologically informed approach to playing the piano.  Bio: Described by CBC Radio as “a truly original interpretive voice,” pianist Patrick Cashin is becoming known as a distinctive presence on the Canadian music scene. He designs unique recitals centered around the best of the piano repertoire and particularly enjoys playing Mozart piano concertos, in which he improvises and composes cadenzas in the style of Mozart.  Patrick draws from a wide array of experience in both classical and non-classical music, having tried on many musical hats during his formative years in St. John's, Newfoundland. As a student at Memorial University, he won several competitions including the Atlantic Young Artist and Petro-Canada Young Artist Competition, resulting in some early success playing recital tours and concertos with local orchestras.  He left Newfoundland to study for two years at the Glenn Gould School in Toronto, then at the University of Montreal, where he completed his doctorate under the guidance of legendary piano pedagogue Marc Durand.  Over the years, Patrick has studied in master classes with many brilliant musicians of the older generation, including Ferenc Rados, Robert Levin and Leon Fleisher. He leads a busy collaborative career performing with soloists and ensembles in the Montreal area. As a teacher, he is passionate about helping other pianists prevent and recover from piano-related injuries by playing with healthy technique.  Show Notes: Alexander Technique  Glenn Gould School The Université de Montréal Marc Durand Twosetviolin  What Every Pianist Needs to Know About the Body- Thomas Carson Mark Core Performance- Mark Verstegen  Musicians Clinic of Canada  Dr. John Chong

The Immigrant Section
The Real Money Is In God Ft. Amish Patel - 182

The Immigrant Section

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 65:34


I'M TOURING CANADA! GET TICKETS Abbas is joined by Comedian/Podcaster, Amish Patel, and they chat about getting cut out of a scene in Handmaid's Tale, touring in Newfoundland, Sean Penn giving his Oscar to president Zelensky, hustling religion for tax-exempt status, crazy televangelists, and having to go to the Indian embassy. connect with  Abbas / Amish The Immigrant Section is a weekly show where guests join Abbas Wahab, Sudanese-Canadian Standup Comedian, to talk about funny cultural similarities/differences, current events, and sometimes more. It's raw and unfiltered, for your listening pleasure. Enjoy! Support The Show & Get Every Episode TOUR DATES: 11/16 Lethbridge, AB 11/17 Calgary, AB 11/18 Edmonton, AB 11/24 Vancouver, BC 11/25 Gibsons, BC 11/26 Victoria, BC  11/27 Nanaimo, BC 11/28 Tofino, BC 12/09 Toronto, ON 01/20 Kitchener, ON 01/21 Ottawa, ON 01/27 Thunder Bay, ON 01/28 Thunder Bay, ON

Day Fire Podcast
Eddie O'Dea / The Eastern Divide Trail Bikepacking Route

Day Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 63:25


This week Clint and Dawson sat down with Eddie O'Dea. Eddie is the first rider to complete the Eastern Divide Trail bikepacking route. The EDT is a 6000 mile dirt centric route from Cape Spear, Newfoundland to Key West, FL. He did this as a fundraiser for Georgia Cycling Association which is a youth cycling organization that cultivates a passion for the healthy lifestyle of cycling across the state. Eddie is a co-founder of the Georgia Cycling Association and is an accomplished rider with 22 years of racing and cycling adventures under his belt. Eddie has held course records on Trans North Georgia (TNGA), Huracan 300, and Stagecoach 400 routes. In 2017, Eddie completed the Tour Divide. He is also a bike fitter and cycling coach working with clients in around the southeast. Learn more about the Georgia cycling association https://www.georgiacycling.org to support https://www.georgiacycling.org/tackling-the-trail Thanks for listening! Find all our episodes at dayfirepodcast.com This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
3.21 Fall and Rise of China: Second Opium War #3: Battles for the Taku Forts

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 46:03


Last time we spoke the reluctant Lord Elgin took up the job as the new emissary to China. Alongside his french counterpart Baron Gross, both men would overlook their military coalitions expedition in China to force the Qing emperor to abide by their treaty and some new demands. They began with a bombardment and occupation of the grand city of Canton and then Ye Mingchen was hunted down and arrested. Ye was replaced with a puppet named Pih-Kwei who would be nominally controlled by the European forces. Now the coalition would fight their way to Beijing to force an audience with Emperor Xianfeng, but something lied in their way, the famous Taku forts at the mouth of the Bei He River. Could the coalition fight past these legendary forts and strangle Beijing  enough to get their demands met?   Welcome to the Fall and Rise of China Podcast, I am your dutiful host Craig Watson. But, before we start I want to also remind you this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Perhaps you want to learn more about the history of Asia? Kings and Generals have an assortment of episodes on history of asia and much more  so go give them a look over on Youtube. So please subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry for some more history related content, over on my channel, the Pacific War Channel where I cover the history of China and Japan from the 19th century until the end of the Pacific War. #21 This episode is Part 3 of the Second Opium War: battles for the Taku Forts At high tide the Taku Forts were surrounded by water, the Bei He River became something like a natural moat. The entrance to the Bei He River was 200 yards in width, forcing the British and French warships into a bottleneck gauntlet with each shore holding 137 pieces of antiquated artillery. When the invaders arrived, the Qing forces quickly went to work creating earthwork walls with sandbags to bolster the defenses. The Qing forces presumed the European gunboats hulls were too deep and thus they would not risk entering the river until it was very high tide to avoid going aground. That presumption was a grave error as Seymour and Rigault were willing to risk it and mounted a surprise attack at 10am on May 20th. Elgin made one last ditch effort to get Tan to surrender peacefully, but Tan did not even bother to respond to Elgins message. Now in a similar fashion to the first opium war, as you might remember a large problem for the Qing was their outdated artillery. Their cannons were usually immobile, unable to aim at all degrees and angles. The Taku Fort cannons were aimed in such a way to hit warships at high tide, but the British-French force was going to attack during low tide. Alongside the Taku Forts cannons another defensive obstacle was a 7 inch thick boom made out of bamboo. The Europeans opened fire unleashed pure hell upon the forts and when the forts unleashed their own volley, literally all of their shots went over the European masts. To add insult to injury, the British sacrificed one of their ships, the Coromandel to ram into the boom which broke with ease. The Coromandal received a nasty gash in her hull, but the job had been done. As pieces of the boom floated away, the rest of the European armada began to steam through the gap while the Qing helplessly fired their cannons straight over their masts. The French ships Mitraille and Fusee alongside the British Cormorant fired upon 2 of the Taku Forts on the left bank while the French Avalance, Dragonne and British Nimrod fired upon the 3 forts on the right. The Chinese manning Gingalls had much better luck than the cannons, though it also came at the price of making the Europeans laugh watching men fall over from firing each shot. However not all was funny as Gingalls could be properly aimed unlike the cannons and managed to kill 5 British and 6 French while wounding another 61. Then tragedy happened when a gunpowder cache in one of the Taku forts accidentally exploded killing 100 Chinese. Alongside the invaders maelstrom of gunfire and the defenders despair at the futility of their cannons many began to panic. Even before many of the British and French forces began to land ashore, countless Qing forces were deserting the earthen parapet en masse. In desperation seeing his men flee, the Qing commander launched 50 fireboats stuffed with straw at the barbarian ships, only to see the fireships crash into the bank at the bend in the river. Not a single fireship was able to cause damage to the invaders. With the last ditch effort a complete failure, the commander of the Taku Forts went to the Temple of the Sea God and slashed his jugular vein with his sword killing himself.  The Viceroy of Zhili province was banished to the desolate border territory with Russia in the north. As he packed his bags, Emperor Xianfeng condemned the Viceroy's mismanagement of the Taku Fort defense as being “without plan or resource”. Elgin after witnessing the victory over the Taku Forts had a really interesting thing to say “Twenty-four determined men with revolvers, and a sufficient number of cartridges, might walk through China from one end to another.”  Back home in Britain Elgin was being praised and was rewarded likewise with carte blanche for all further military actions and negotiations. The new Prime Minister, Lord Derby, haha looks like those grand speeches worked out for him, well he sent Elgin a congratulatory dispatch “giving me latitude to do anything I choose, if only I will finish the affair.” The very same man who condemned British imperialism the year prior was now a warhawk. Lord Malmesbury became the new foreign minister replacing Lord Clarendon. Back in China, the European gunboats made their way up the Bei He River triumphantly towards the next Qing stronghold, Tianjin. Tianjin was around 30 miles away from Beijing. The 3 Plenipotentiaries stayed further behind at the Taku Forts for their own safety as Seymour and Rigault took the lead. As they steamed up the Bei He River, both the Fusee and Cormorant ran aground numerous time, but the Europeans found some very unlikely allies to help, the local Chinese. Turns out a lot of the populace absolutely hated their Manchu overlords and volunteered their tugboats free of charge to help the Europeans. Apparently when the Europeans tried to pay them many refused if it is to be believed.  On June 4th the European armada arrived at Tianjin without any resistance along the way. The Qing defenders at Tianjin morale was so low they were at the point of surrender. There was also a rumor spreading around that Emperor Xianfeng had been overthrown and replaced by a new dynasty who was willing to simply sign a new treaty with the Europeans. Seymour and Rigault advised Elgin he should stay at the Taku Forts for security, but he disregarded this and came up to the war party on May 26th. Elgin wrote in his diary as he made his way up the river. “Through the night watches, when no Chinaman moves, when the junks cast anchor, we laboured on, cutting ruthlessly and recklessly through that glancing and startled river which, until the last few weeks, no stranger keel had ever furrowed. Whose work are we engaged in, when we burst thus with hideous violence and brutal energy into these darkest and most mysterious recesses of the traditions of the past? I wish I could answer that question in a manner satisfactory to myself. At the same time there is certainly not much to regret in the old civilisation which we are thus scattering to the winds. A dense population, timorous and pauperised, such would seem to be its chief product. “ The Plenipotentiaries were quite surprised when they were met outside Tianjin by a detachment of local Qing officials and merchants who came looking for opium. Yes these were those types of middle men folks who were used to bribes and the lucrative business of moving opium. Despite the rumors, Emperor Xianfeng had not been overthrown, but he was willing to negotiate with the Europeans. Emperor Xianfeng sent commissioners to Tianjin in the hope of stopping the European advance to Beijing. Meanwhile with Tianjin not putting up a fight, Elgin wrote in his diary “[I have] complete military command of the capital of China, without having broken off relations with the neutral powers, and without having interrupted, for a single day, our trade at the different ports of the Empire.” The Europeans were treated with the utmost respect and the lavish temple known as the Supreme Felicity was used as headquarters for the Europeans. The Europeans transformed the temple by creating a bowling alley, they used its myriad of altars for washbasins and placed vanity mirrors in front of statues of the gods. This cultural vandalized would be an appetizer for events in the future. Two emissaries were sent by Emperor Xianfeng, both were commissioners, the first was the 74 year old Guiliang, a senior military officer. The other was a 53 year old Mongolian military officer. They met with the Europeans at the Temple of Oceanic Influences southwest of Tianjin. Elgin arrived on June 4th alongside 50 Royal marines and a band from the warship Calcutta to add some muscle.  The first meeting went…terribly. The commissioners had the authority to negotiate, but lacked carte blanche to finalize any deal. Elgin stormed out of the first meeting, completely blowing off this lavish buffet the Qing had set for the party to celebrate the new peace treaty. Elgin was well known to be courtes, but after spending 6 months in China had quickly learnt the only way to get Qing officials to act was to show some bravado. Elgin even wrote to his wife at the time “I have made up my mind, disgusting as the part is to me, to act the role of the ‘uncontrollably fierce barbarian.'” As Elgin stomped his feet walking off he made a threat that he would soon march upon Beijing, even though in truth the Europeans did not have the land forces to do so. Elgin left his brother to continue negotiations, Lord Frederick Bruce. One of Fredericks interpreters, Horatio Lay decided it was a good idea to use some Sturm und Drang and began to literally scream at the Qing commissioners whenever they talked about clauses in the new treaty. Lay even threatened to lay waste to Beijing and would slap the Emperor himself, this guy had some balls. Lay's abuse of the two commissioners became so bad, the men went around his head to speak to Putiatin and the American envoy William Reed. Reed sent a letter to Elgin asking him to help rein in the tyrannical Lay, but Elgin ignored the letter, wow. Putiatin asked Gros whom he knew had grown very close to Elgin, to intercede, but Gros declined to do so as he feared it would alienate his friendship to Elgin. The Qing then resorted to bribery, they tried to give Lay a horse, but Lay did not change his aggressive stance.  The negotiations were taking very long, it was the typical Chinese strategy of procrastination. Elgin was becoming livid and wrote in his diary about Reed and Putiatin “These sneaking scoundrels do what they can to thwart me and then while affecting to support the Chinese act as their own worst enemies.” Elgin also felt British parliament had failed to back him up. Elgin received a letter from the new Foriegn minister Lord Malmesbury on April the 9th, berating him for not concluding the peace treaty in due time. “A Cabinet has been held today and it is our anxious wish to see this Chinese business settled if it can be done without loss of honour and commercial interests as at present enjoyed. Our reputation is sufficiently vindicated at Canton and we do not look at the chance of a war with the Chinese Empire without much apprehension. I trust therefore that you will not engage us in a contest of this sort if you can possibly avoid it.” The negotiations over the terms of the new treaty stretched for 3 weeks and the Qing were rejecting two clauses the British absolutely wanted: free passage throughout China and for a permanent British and French embassy at the Qing imperial court. The two commissioners stated that accepting either of these would cost the men their lives. Gros and Putiatin began arguing that the permanent embassy point was not critical as long as their ministers had access to Beijing in some form. After much arguing the commissioners conceded to the two points and thus the Treaty of Tianjin was formed. The Europeans made sure to add a clause they henceforth they would no longer be called barbarians in official communications and treaties, though it should be noted the term used by the Chinese literally just meant “those who don't speak Chinese”.  The Treaty of Tianjin opened new ports for trade: Tianjin, Hangzhou and Nanjing. It should be noted the Qing were all too happy to toss Nanjing into the treaty as the Taiping were occupying it as their own capital. Perhaps if they were lucky, the Europeans would go to Nanjing, run into some trouble and attack the Taiping for them! Baron Gros raised concerns over the clauses as he argued Britain would have to bear even more military might to enforce the treaty. As Gros pointed out to Elgin, the Confucious principle, a promise made under duress does not need to be kept. Another item on the treaty clauses was the payment of 2 million taels of silver to Britain for the damage to their factories at Canton and another 2 million in general reparation. The French were to receive 2 million taels as well. Now the warnings Gros made concerned Elgin and he was having second thoughts. One major concern was the idea of extracting he enormous sums of money from what seemed to be an Empire on the verge of Bankruptcy. Elgin wrote back to the foreign minister, concerned that extracting the large sums of money would lead to the toppling of the Manchu rule “Everything we saw around us indicated the penury of the Treasury. To despair, by putting forward pecuniary claims which it could satisfy only by measures that would increase its unpopularity and extend the area of rebellion.” Elgin ended by saying the humiliating treaty would be a large beacon for the Taiping Rebels. William Reed recommended legalizing opium as a clause, arguing the tax revenue from it would benefit the Qing Empire. The British wanted a tariff of only 30 taels and the Cohong merchants supported this. Jardine & Matheson & co released a statement “The use of opium is not a curse, but a comfort and benefit to the hard-working Chinese.” Boy you can't get any more gross than that one. The French for their part performed a study of the opium problem in China. Baron Gros found that users who smoked upto 8 pipes per day had a life expectancy of only 6 years. Casual consumers could expect around 20 years after starting to smoke it, many died around the age of 50 or so. Opium addicts were found to be spending 2/3 ‘s of their income to feed their addiction. The Russians and Americans agreed with the French that the opium trade was horrible. The French however have little to nothing to say about another form of trade they took part in with China, the “pig trade”, that being the enslavement of coolies. Now you have to hear this one, this is so symbolic of the event as a whole. The translator for the treaty took forever because he was an opium addict. You just can't make this stuff up folks. The Russians agreed to the terms first on June 18th Putiantian signed off, making Elgin feel betrayed and abandoned because he still had qualms. What was really important to Russia was the border they shared with the Qing, it had been a source of much conflict. Thus Russia settled with a visiting ambassador to Beijing with no permanent status. Christianity received a formal toleration and the Russians got access to 2 more ports on Taiwan and Hainan. Five days later the Americans signed off on a similar agreement to the Russians. Both the Americans and Russians made sure to include the most favored nations clause in their treaties, which meant that whatever further concessions went to the British and French, they too would enjoy them. Thus the 2 nations who brought zero military aid and did basically nothing reaped the same benefits as the 2 nations shouldering everything, ain't that nice? Putiatin sent Elgin and Gros a copy of Russia's treaty urging them not to topple the manchu rule with too many humiliating concessions. Reed made a similar appeal. Gros reached an agreement on june 23rd and did not hesitate to sign the treaty because he did not want to undercut Elgin's negotiators, preferring to let them finish the job. The French also sought much less than Britain from the Chinese. A week after and the British had still not come to an agreement, Gros became impatient and sent Elgin a letter, that if the British did not sign soon the French would simply sail off. The British were stuck on two key issue; to have a permanent ambassador in Beijing and freedom to travel anywhere in China. The Chinese commissioners desperately sought the aid of Gros and Putiatin, indicating to them the Emperor was going to have them killed if they agreed to the two clauses. Elgin threatened to march on Beijing and it seems the commissioners were forced to give in. On June 26th the British Treaty of Tianjin was ratified. The Chinese would pay 5 million in war reparations, Christian missionaries would be allowed to work unhindered throughout China and 11 ports would be opened for trade. Taxes on imported goods would be set on a follow up meeting at Shanghai, and there 5% was agreed upon. Taxables goods would be silk, brocades and of course opium. The taxation agreement basically made opium legal in China, but without bringing the subject up. The Commissioners signed the treaty, but when they got back to Beijing, take a wild guess, the Emperor rejected the humiliating terms. Now Elgin failed to bring up the issue of the opium trade and its official legalization as were his instructions from Clarendon. Elgin probably felt since Clarendon lost his position he no longer had to respect the order. Clarendons successor Lord Malmesbury did not give a similar order. On July 3rd, 400 men and a naval band serenaded Elgin signing the Treaty of Tianjin at the Temple of Oceanic Influences under some paper lanterns. And despite the fact the commissioners, as they said it, were soon to be beheaded, they invited Elgin to a lavish dinner at the temple after the signing. At the dinner one of the commissioners, Hua Shan gave Elgin copies of some famous poetry. The next day, Baron Gross signed the French treaty but cheekily added some new demands that the commissioners were forced to abide by. He demanded the release of all Chinese christians imprisoned for their faith. Gros sent a triumphant report back home stating “Je suis heureux de pouvoir annoncer aujord-hui à Votre Excellence que la Chine s'ouvre enfin au Christianisme, source réelle de toute civilisation, et au commerce et à l'industrie des nations occidentales.” (“I am happy to be able to announce today to Your Excellence that China has at last opened itself to Christianity, the real source of all civilization, and to trade and the manufactures of the nations of the West.)” Back in Britain Elgins triumph was met with mixed reviews, though most were favorable. Elgins private secretary Laurence Oliphant, noted the impressive cost/benefit ratio of the casualties in his 1860 account of the campaign, ‘Narrative of the Earl of Elgin's Mission to China and Japan': “Hostilities with the Empire of China had terminated with a loss to the British arms of about twenty men killed in action...and a treaty had been signed far more intensive in its scope, and more subversive of imperial prejudices than that concluded fifteen years before, after a bloody and expensive war, which had been protracted over a period of two years.” Karl Marx, yes the Karl Marx, was working at the time as the European correspondent of the New York Tribune wrote a letter to his writing partner Friedrich Engels on some thoughts towards the conflict  “The present Anglo-Chinese Treaty which in my opinion was worked out by Palmerston in conjunction with the Petersburg Cabinet and given to Lord Elgin to take with him on his journey is a mockery from beginning to end.” Karl Marx would have a lot more to say about the Taiping Rebellion, which is quite interesting given the rebellion is considered a proto marxist one. Elgin himself was quite depressed over the ordeal, he wrote this in his diary “I have an instinct in me which loves righteousness and hates iniquity and all this keeps me in a perpetual boil. Though I have been forced to act almost brutally I am China's friend in almost all this.” To try and raise the celebration somewhat, Elgin decided to take 5 ships up the Yangtze River as a demonstration of Britain's naval power and to discourage the Chinese from going back on the new treaty. However news of some raids against Canton forced him to pull be short. The new Viceroy of Canton named Huang had incited a rebellion rallying Canton residents to quote “Go forth in your myriads, then, and take vengeance on the enemies of your Sovereign, imbued with public spirit and fertile in expedients.” In July a group of Cantonese got their hands on some artillery and began to shell the British resident at Whampoa. The Cantonese mob followed this up by performing a raid after they heard about the humiliating terms of the treaty of Tianjin. During a short conference in Shanghai, Elgin demanded Viceroy Huang be removed. On top of the Canton problem, the two commissioners, Guiling and Hua Shan had reneged on the treaty clauses about allowing British ambassadors in Beijing. They sent a letter to Elgin stating that had agreed to such clauses under duress and suggested that future British ambassadors visit Beijing from time to time as diplomatic business warranted. They argued that because of large scale xenophobia in Beijing, they feared for the lives of any British dwelling there. Then 4 days later they added another excuse; they said that to allow British ambassadors to live in Beijing would generate fear and a loss of respect for the Qing government. Such further humiliation might very well topple the Manchu and allow the Taiping to take over. Elgin was somewhat swayed by the Taiping excuse and said he would pass their message onto his foreign officer. Elgin was also in a tough position as the fact a rebellion was occurring in Canton made it seem clear that guaranteeing the safety of British ambassadors in Beijing would not be an easy task. The French concurred with Elgin, that to have ambassadors in Beijing would be dangerous now. In the meantime Elgin had set up a 2 month survey of the Yangtze River using 2 gunboats to demonstrate Britains new right of travel throughout China. The idea had been to see if the local Chinese would obey the treaty clauses. Elgins tour wound up going past the Taiping capital of Nanjing and it is alleged a single cannon perched on a Nanjing wall fired upon Elgin's ships. Elgin's reprisal was pretty brutal, he sent a volley knocking out the Taiping cannon then ordered a 99 minute naval bombardment of Nanjing before sailing on. Eglin had planned to finish the trip by meeting with the Emperor and giving him a letter from Queen Victoria, but the worsening of the Canton situation forced him to pull back south. In February of 1859 Cantonese rebels ambushed and massacred 700 British marines around the countryside of Canton. In retaliation, General van Straubenzee, the military commander of 3000 troops in Canton, hunted down the headquarters of the rebels which they found at Shektsing a few miles south of the city and completely annihilated all those there and razed everything to the ground. The destruction of the rebel camp seems to have worked quite well as suddenly the Emperor sent word to ratify the treaty of Tianjin's clauses and had Huang removed from power and demanded the rebels disband. While Elgin dealt with the renewed China problem, his brother Frederick Bruce returned to Britain with the signed Treaty of Tianjin. Lord Malmesbury rewarded Bruce by naming him the first ambassador to China, a post Elgin would have received, but he was too wary of the post given the circumstances now. Elgin left China in March of 1859, taking the chance to link up and meet his brother in Sri Lanka in April as Bruce was on his way back to China. Now Bruce was not lets say, as great as his brother. He had recently been the Lt-governor of Newfoundland, then the Colonial secretary of Hong Kong. In all honestly a lot of his appointments were merely a result of him being Elgin's brother. But Bruce did have working knowledge of Chinese customs. Bruce arrived back at the mouth of the Bei He River on June 18th of 1859 alongside a force of 16 warships. Admiral Seymour had returned to London and was replaced by Rear-admiral James Hope. Unfortunately it seems Hope was even more racist and hated the Chinese more than Seymour. 3 days later the new American ambassador showed up John E Ward aboard a steamer, the Powhatan. The French representative, Anton de Bourbelon brought 2 warships with him as the French fleet had remained close by in Indo-China. Now Emperor Xianfeng wanted above all else to keep the Europeans the hell out of Beijing. The Emperor suggested right away that they ratify the new treaty at Shanghai, but all 3 of the European powers declined this. Many of the Emperors close advisors wanted to resist the foreigners taking up residence in Beijing. Some of these high ranking officials gave orders for 3 large bamboo booms, 3 feet thick to be strung across the Bei He river to block the foreigners advance. It looked like war was back on the menu and in a vain attempt Bruce tried writing a letter to Beijing politely asking the booms be removed. Well Bruce got no reply and this prompted Admiral Hope to ask permission to blow the booms apart. On June 21st, Hope sent captain Willes aboard a steamer to break through the first boom which went successfully, but the other 2 proved unbreakable. The British tried using some gunpowder but it just couldn't do the job, then to add insult to injury during the night the Qing repaired the first boom.  On June 25th Bruce received a letter from the Viceroy of Zhili, Heng Fu. Heng suggested the ambassadors lodge at Beitang, around 8 miles north of Beijing, basically it was a face saving gesture. The British however were armed to the teeth and had just undergone 3 annoying and long years of negotiations and war and had no patience. Bruce told Admiral Hope to attack the booms again. That afternoon Hope took his flagship Plover and attempted ramming the boom, but this time hit ship was stopped cold. The Qing had learnt a lesson from the previous conflict and this time had made the 2nd and 3rd booms out of full sized tree trunks sling together with heavy chains. As the Plover staled and the other European gunships had to stop just before it, all of a sudden the forts portholes were cast aside to reveal a full complement of 40 cannons and they opened fire. The first salvo took the head right off Plovers bow gunner and 3 other sailors fell wounded. For 3 hours Plover was pulverized. Hope unwisely stood on his deck wearing a gold braid basically showing the Chinese he was a high ranking official. A Qing sharpshooter landed a shot hitting Hope in his thigh. Hope fell on deck and was bound up by a surgeon as the Qing retaliated. For a rather surprising change, the Qing cannons, though still immobile were better aimed and managed to blow Hope's second in command and 8 other sailors to pieces, 22 others were wounded. Plovers hull eventually burst sinking the ship into the mud and this would lead to the deaths of countless crew. Hope believe it or not got up and rowed over to another ship, the Opossum and began standing on its deck in plain sight. Because of his thigh wound he had to hold onto a railing to hold himself upright and that said railing was hit by a Qing cannonball. The railing collapsed and Hope fell breaking several ribs, ouch. This prompted him to turn command over to Captain Shadwell. The Qing volleys managed to disable 5 of the invaders frontal gunships prompting Bruce to order 7 more which were 8 miles away to come forward and replace the damaged ones. By the evening, 5 British warships had been immobilized and 2 had run aground and one was a sitting duck for fort cannons.  The fort guns went silent in the early evening and the British officers took it to mean that the forts garrisons had fled like they had in the previous year. The landing parties surged ahead as planned and that was when disaster struck again. It turned out to be a ruse to entice the landing parties to storm the beach. The landing party soon found out to their horror 2 trenches were dug in front of the walls, filled with water and mud and some large iron spikes behind them. That was bad, but immediately when the marines got off their barges the muddy banks seized their feet leaving them helpless as the forts unleashed carnage upon them. Those lucky enough to make it to the trenches found the muddy water was too thick to swim. Many men in despair clambered beside the base of a fort wall to escape the trenches and gunfire. The Qing began setting off fireworks to illuminate the trapped marines as they fired upon them. Although America said it would remain neutral, Commodore Josiah Tattnall aboard the USS Powhatan was trying to get past the booms as well when he ran into the conflict. Tattnal was a veteran of the war of 1812 and like pretty much any American at the time disliked the British. Tattnal received word that Hope had been shot and upon witnessing the horror show he suddenly cast neutrality to the wind. Tattnal was from Georgia, a loyal southerner with a lets say, strong sense of racial pride…yeah we will call it that. Whatever hate he held for the British was cast aside as he suddenly screamed out “blood is thicker than water, I'd be damned if I stood by and watched white men butchered before my eyes!”. Tattnals charge forward hardly turned the tide of battle, it amount mostly to him towing more British marines forward to their horrific death. Some of his men grabbed and operated some British guns firing at the fort while Tattnall personally tended to Hope. A single american died and the breach of neutrality could have caused a catastrophe, but one thing it did do was set a new tone for British-American friendship. As the London times wrote “Whatever may be the result of the fight, England will never forget the day when the deeds and words of kindly Americans sustained and comforted her stricken warriors on the waters of the Bei He.” Around 7pm, as the Qing set off fireworks to illuminate the area, Captain Shadwell with 50 royal marines and French seamen led by the French commander Tricault landed on some muddy flats outside one of the Taku forts. They clamored through knee deep mud as the defenders rained Gingall fire down upon them at short range. The British-Franco force found themselves literally stuck in the mud, unable to use their wall scaling ladders to get over the fort. Shadwell sent word back to his superior that he and his men were pinned down and requested reinforcements to storm the Taku walls. There was no more fighting men available however, he was eventually order to limp back to the ships. The British and French suffered high casualties. Shadwell was wounded, Tricault was dead, and of the 1000 men who took part in the battle around half were killed or wounded, 29 of them officers. Many men dragged themselves or limped through mud to get back to their ships. A lot of these men were veterans of the Crimean war and had never tasted such defeat. One veteran of the battle of Balaclava said he would rather have relived that battle three times over than suffer the Taku Forts again. The gunboats, Lee, Plover and Cormorant were disabled, the Kestrel sank.  Admiral Hope sent a dispatch to the Admiralty showing his shock at how the Qing performed “Had the opposition they expected been that as usual in Chinese warfare, there is little doubt that the place would have been successfully carried at the point of the bayonet.” To try and save face, Bruce reported back to Britain that the sudden military prowess of the Qing forces at the Taku forts was because Russians were helping them. He alleged based on eyewitness testimony that some men in fur hats and European dress had been seen directing operations atop a Taku fort, it was mere bullshit. The real reason for the Qing victory was because of Prince Senggelinqin. Senggelinqin was a mongol cavalry commander that had helped the Qing crush a large army of Taiping rebels. He was a member of the Borjigin clan and the 26th generation descendant of Qasar, a brother to Genghis Khan. He led Qing forces to smash the Taiping during the Northern Expedition in the southern suburbs of Tianjin. When the Second Opium War broke out he was appointed Imperial commissioner in charge of the defense of Tianjin. Seng rejoiced in his well earned victory. He wrote back to the emperor acknowledging the British and French might return with more ships, but asserted confidently he would thrash them again and again “the pride and vainglory of the barbarians, already under severe trial, will immediately disappear. When that happens, China can then enjoy some decades of peace. The barbarians, already somewhat disillusioned and repentant, may lend themselves to persuasion and be brought under control. If they of their own accord should wholeheartedly become obedient, then peace would be secure and permanent.” The Emperor responded with caution “the foreigners may harbor secret designs and hide themselves around nearby islands, waiting for the arrival of more soldiers and ships for a surprise attack in the night or in a storm” Emperor Xianfeng still shared a sense of relief and expressed hope the foreigners needs for Chinese goods would mean that they could sort out their problems in Shanghai and that there would be no need for ambassadors in Beijing nor new treaties. Seng also pointed out during the battle the Americans got involved. “Although the starting of hostilities was by the English barbarians, France and America's cooperation in the melee is also inescapable.” Seng based his claim off intelligence extracted from a Canadian POW named John Powers. John claimed to be a neutral American in an attempt to escape imprisonment. The Chinese did not free him and instead used him as proof the Americans had abandoned neutrality. Seng much like most Chinese at the time were weak on Western Geography and assumed Canada was part of the United States, sad Canadian noises. At one point an American missionary who spoke Chinese tried to explain to Seng the difference between English and French Canada and the United States, Seng described the experience in a letter to the Qing imperial court. “[The missionary] stated that America contained Englishmen and Frenchmen, and when there was fighting, the flag was the only criterion.” Eventually John was released after a month, the Qing simply did not want to add America to a list of growing enemies. I would like to take this time to remind you all that this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Please go subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry after that, give my personal channel a look over at The Pacific War Channel at Youtube, it would mean a lot to me.  The battle for the Taku Fort was an absolute catastrophe resulting in humiliation for the Europeans for once. Prince Seng had a grand victory, perhaps now the foreign barbarians would learn their lesson and stop their war. Or perhaps the Europeans would like their wounds and come right back.