Podcasts about south africans

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Demographics of South Africa

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Best podcasts about south africans

Show all podcasts related to south africans

Latest podcast episodes about south africans

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 27, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program highlights our regular PANW report with dispatches on the South African government claiming that it is being punished for its scientific discovery of the new Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus; Ethiopia is continuing to mobilize its people in defense of the state against attacks by United States backed rebels; the African Union Peace and Security Council is sending a delegation to Sudan to discuss the political future of the country; and in Burkina Faso police used tear gas against demonstrators protesting the military role of France in West Africa. In the second hour we take up the emergence of the Omicron variant and its impact on Southern Africa and the world. We will hear a briefing as well from the African Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Finally, we will review important issues impacting Africa and the international community.

Newshour
Covid: New race to contain Omicron variant

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 49:05


Countries around the world are racing to introduce travel bans and restrictions on southern African countries in an effort to contain a new variant of Covid-19, called Omicron. The moves come after the variant was officially named by health officials. But there is a huge economic cost – we will speak to the South African tourism minister The legendary US composer and songwriter Stephen Sondheim has died aged 91. Can the Iran nuclear deal be revived? Talks begin again next week – we will hear from the US special envoy for Iran. Also, a report from a rural health clinic in Afghanistan (Photo: Only about 24% of South Africans have been fully vaccinated so far. Credit: Reuters)

Marketplace Morning Report
The debate over vaccine intellectual property rights is heating up

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:03


A new COVID-19 variant is emerging as President Biden faces growing pressure to push for an emergency intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 vaccines. In a letter to Biden, 15 human rights and medical groups called the waiver “a moral imperative” that would help get more doses of the vaccine to low-income countries.  We also look at what Small Business Saturday means for local retailers this year, and how supply chain shortages might actually work in their favor. Plus: how a South African mall is navigating the return to in-person shopping, and why some Americans are opting out of the consumer frenzy — and not just for the holidays.

Marketplace All-in-One
The debate over vaccine intellectual property rights is heating up

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:03


A new COVID-19 variant is emerging as President Biden faces growing pressure to push for an emergency intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 vaccines. In a letter to Biden, 15 human rights and medical groups called the waiver “a moral imperative” that would help get more doses of the vaccine to low-income countries.  We also look at what Small Business Saturday means for local retailers this year, and how supply chain shortages might actually work in their favor. Plus: how a South African mall is navigating the return to in-person shopping, and why some Americans are opting out of the consumer frenzy — and not just for the holidays.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Des & Dawn; Every Day is an Opening Night; Our Journey Together

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 8:08


Guest: South Africa's musical icons, Des Linberg, to discuss the moving literary memoir that has been published this month to recount the musical legacy and unique journey that he shared with his late wife, Dawn Linberg. The original biography manuscript  'Des & Dawn; Every Day is an Opening Night; Our Journey Together' was completed before the tragic loss of Dawn in December 2020.  The book now stands in honour of her life, telling the tale of two pioneers of South African entertainment in their own words.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
South African scientists detect new virus variant amid spike

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 0:43


SBS World News Radio
Australia poised to act if WHO announces 'new variant of concern'

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 3:32


Australian health officials are liaising with their international counterparts about the discovery by South African scientists of a new COVID-19 variant.

Gabriel Gonsalves's Heart Intelligence Podcast
Harnessing your Emotional Power | Weekly Heartstream 24-11-2021

Gabriel Gonsalves's Heart Intelligence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:36


In this week's Heartstream, I spoke about how you can harness the power of your heart in order to fill your own 'love tank'. In the second half, I guided a meditation designed to help you fill your heart with God's love, healing, and understanding. Happy Thanksgiving to all my followers in the US!  If you find my guided meditations, healing circles, and free offerings useful and would like to express your appreciation by making a donation in support of this work, please use the following link: https://www.gabrielgonsalves.com/donate A percentage of the proceeds goes to PATCH, a South African-based organization dedicated to bringing hope and healing to children who have been sexually abused.

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Visions of Freedom w/ Piero Gleijeses Part 2

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 122:27


The second of Dan's two-part interview with Piero Gleijeses on his book Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976–1991. This is the story of Cuba's military defense of the Angolan government against a US and South Africa-backed effort to overthrow the People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA). The future of the entire region was on the line—including the fate of apartheid in South Africa and of Namibia, then a South African colony.Learn Southern African geography by studying these maps: thedigradio.com/visions-of-freedom-mapsSupport The Dig with money at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Dig
Visions of Freedom w/ Piero Gleijeses Part 2

The Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 122:27


The second of Dan's two-part interview with Piero Gleijeses on his book Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976–1991. This is the story of Cuba's military defense of the Angolan government against a US and South Africa-backed effort to overthrow the People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA). The future of the entire region was on the line—including the fate of apartheid in South Africa and of Namibia, then a South African colony. Learn Southern African geography by studying these maps: thedigradio.com/visions-of-freedom-maps Support The Dig with money at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Metro Coalitions; a dramatic shift in South African Politics

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:01


Guest: Tony Leon elaborates on the extent that South Africa's new coalitions and mayoral chains have delivered a poisonous chalice that must be carried forward into a complex political future at a local, municipal and national level.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A brush with...
A brush with... Candice Breitz

A brush with...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 69:55


South African artist Candice Breitz talks to Ben Luke about the artists, writers, musicians, film-makers and other figures that have influenced her and inspire her today, and the cultural experiences that have defined her life and work. Breitz is a film-maker whose work, mostly in the form of video installations, explores selfhood and identity, community, race and gender, and reflects on how mass media like television, cinema and music shape our response to them. Among much else, she discusses her recent work Digest, and how it was influenced by the Middle Eastern folk tales One Thousand and One Nights and On Kawara's Today series, or date paintings. She reflects on the power of Octavia Butler's speculative fiction and her complex response to the South African novelist JM Coetzee. She talks about her video works telling the stories of refugees and sex workers. And she discusses growing up in Apartheid South Africa and its bearing on her choice of subjects and media. This episode is sponsored by Bloomberg Connects. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Up to Par golf podcast
Bryson DeChambeau vs. Brooks Koepka Match, DP World Tour starts South Africa Swing, & Pay Increases for PGA Pros

Up to Par golf podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:14


In this episode we preview the long anticipated Match between rivals Bryson DeChambeau and Brooks Koepka!   The best part may actually be in the broadcast booth with Phil Mickelson and Charles Barkley!  The PGA Tour announced several payout increases for the 2022 season, is this in response to the new professional golf leagues starting up?  Last but not least, the DP World Tour starts the South African swing and 3 golfers will earn a bid to the 2022 Open Championship.  Visit www.uptoparpod.com to subscribe and connect with us on Facebook and Instagram. 

Post Mortem with Mick Garris

South African actress Alice Krige is this week's Post Mortem guest! Having played such iconic roles as The Borg Queen (STAR TREK: FIRST CONTACT) and Sybil Gordan (CHARIOTS OF FIRE), Alice's career for television and silver screen is unlike any others. She discusses her acting roles, life, and beyond.POST MORTEM WITH MICK GARRIS NICE GUY PRODUCTIONS 2021See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 256: In the Sea, Horses Swim Wild

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:37


The Cape Seahorse, also called the Knysna Seahorse, is located off the southern African coast. Sadly, the Cape Seahorse is one of the most endangered species of seahorse found in the world. Off the coast of South Africa, they are located in three small estuaries and due to human activity are heading towards extinction. Fortunately, many organizations, with help from the South African government, are working hard to save these special creatures. Seahorses overall are just an awe inspiring species of fish. They just blew us with their physiology and life cycle. In fact, these by far are some of the most dedicated fathers you will find anywhere across all taxa. In fact, male seahorses "give birth" and with some other facts, make seahorses some of the most unique animals found on our planet.  For one cup of "good" coffee a month you can support your favorite podcast on Patreon and give back to conservation. With your support we are able to send money to conservation organizations monthly chosen by our Patreon supporters. We recently posted a bonus episode, the Blue Footed Booby, for our Patreon only subscribers and will be offering more bonus content soon! Thank you so much for your support and for supporting animal conservation.  Please considering supporting us at Patreon HERE. You can  also visit our website HERE    

Retro Movie Geek
RMG 275 – Lethal Weapon 2 (1989)

Retro Movie Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 91:56


In this episode, the Retro Movie Geek crew is joined by Maggie Kruger, and they're geeking out over Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) and the cast & Richard Donner which Lethal Weapon movie they like best Riggs going feral Riggs and Murtaugh's relationship and much, much more! Synopsis: Badder and madder than ever, reckless Riggs and mellow Murtaugh, return to smash a drug syndicate led by a ruthless South African politician. Hiding behind diplomatic immunity, his arrest seems impossible - a word these detectives refuse to understand. And off they go...into romance, danger and more die-hard action than even THEY can handle! ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: LISTENER FEEDBACK: Leave us your voicemail feedback at (484) 577-3876. Check out Darrell's other cool podcasts here. Check out Peter's Retro Reviews over at ForgottenFlix.com here. Check out The Forgotten Flix Podcast here. Special thanks to Kevin Spencer for the fantastic show logo! Special thanks to Hayden for the use of his fantastic music for our opening theme this episode! You can check out more from this amazing artist here! Special thanks to Retro Promenade for the use of music from the album Carpenter. Music use permitted under a Creative Commons license. CLICK HERE and get a copy of the album and support these fantastic artists!

The Joe Marler Show
About the Autumn Internationals

The Joe Marler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:39


Dan Cole is back to round up the Autumn internationals with Joe and Tom. Well, England against South African at least.Dan gives his insight on Freddie Steward after speaking to him once, Joe is shocked to find out that Tom Curry ended the game as England captain and Joe's outrageous post-match eating habits are revealed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Helen Zille feels that the surprising coalition outcome brings the message that The African National Congress can be beaten.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:32


Guest: Helen Zille joins John to discuss the unexpected results that arose out of the country's 6th municipal elections , the unprecedented coalition negotiations that these imposed on South African politics and her impression of the “extraordinary results” that define where we stand today and ultimately what the municipal elections say about the larger political arena going forward.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rugby Pod
Episode 11 - Raffi Quirke, JDV and a Northern Clean Sweep

The Rugby Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 74:48


After a record-breaking weekend for the Northern Hemisphere, we take you through all the action from the final weekend of the Autumn Nations Series. Goodey and Jim chat with England Scrum Half Raffi Quirke about his match-winning try on Saturday against the Springboks, and find out a little more about life inside Eddie Jones' "New England" camp. We also get a South African perspective from former Springbok captain Jean De Villiers. We round things off with our 3 standout players from the Autumn Internationals and of course The Goode, The Bad and The Ugly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Front Row
The Power of the Dog film review; Turner Prize nominees Cooking Sections; South African literature today

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:22


Jane Campion is famous for The Piano and a baby grand plays a crucial role in her new film The Power of the Dog, in which Benedict Cumberbatch plays a heavy smoking, unwashed and deeply troubled rancher in 1920s Montana. Briony Hanson reviews the film for Front Row and considers the lengths to which actors will go to create a character. All the nominees for this year's Turner Prize are artistic collectives. In the run-up to the award ceremony, Front Row will hear what the prize means to each of them. This evening, we hear from Cooking Sections, an artistic duo who reflect on the climate emergency and how we can make the food we eat more environmentally friendly. When he accepted the Booker Prize earlier this month for his novel The Promise, South African author Damon Galgut said: ‘This has been a great year for African writing and I'd like to accept this on behalf of all the stories told and untold, the writers heard and unheard from the remarkable continent that I'm part of. Please keep listening to us, there's a lot more to come…' Tonight we shine a spotlight on contemporary literature from his home country of South Africa and bring Damon together in conversation from Cape Town with the award-winning debut author of Scatterlings, Rešoketšwe Manenzhe. PRESENTER: Tom Sutcliffe PRODUCER: Olivia Skinner PHOTO: BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH as PHIL BURBANK and GEORGE MASON as CRICKET in THE POWER OF THE DOG. PHOTO CREDIT: KIRSTY GRIFFIN/NETFLIX

The Money Show
The supply chain disruptions are forcing South African retailers to source their goods locally

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 82:31


Evan Walker, portfolio manager at 36ONE asset management explains how local retailers are looking at local manufacturers to supply them with goods due to the supply chain disruptions. Dr Richards Lessells, infectious disease specialist at the KZN Research Innovation and sequencing platform at the University of KwaZulu Natal on data suggesting the looming Covid-19 4th wave. Then on other people's money, Indra Nooyi, former chair and CEO of Pepsi Co talks about her career and her book, My Life in Full: Work, Family, and Our Future See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
South African fishing policy bait is not landing a catch

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:59


Guest: Carmen Mannarino See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
The details in Old City shooting that killed one

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 16:49


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Judah Ari Gross and health and science editor Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg. Gross reports on the terror attack in Jerusalem's Old City Sunday, in which a terrorist with known ties to Hamas, shot and killed a 26-year-old Eliyahu Kay, a South African immigrant and lone soldier who was making his way to work as a professional tour guide at the Western Wall. Jeffay discusses two Israeli scientific findings, one about the scents emitted by babies and how they affect mothers and fathers. The other study has resulted in a method for 'reading' miniscule movements in the face in order to spot fibbers. Discussed articles include: Israeli forces raid neighborhood of J'lem attack terrorist, relatives said arrested Jerusalem terror attack fatality named as South African immigrant Eli Kay Babies emit smell to get aggressively loyal moms and mellow dads, Israeli study says Liar, liar! ‘Reading' faces, Israeli tech spots fibbers with 73% accuracy ‘Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Eliyahu David Kay, killed in a terror attack in Jerusalem on November 21, 2021. (Facebook) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Clement Manyathela Show
State of the South African economy

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:47


Clement speaks to economists, Annabel Bishop, Professor Patrick Bond and Duma Gqubule on the state of the South African economy.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Ass Podcast
DCCLXX. Monager (Mike Figs And Sergio Chicon)

Real Ass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 77:51


Mike Figs and Sergio Chicon join Luis J. Gomez and Zac Amico and they discuss this being a non-white episode, using cologne, Luis trying to get everyone to smell his penis, Sergio's Wild Kingdom with Astro the boa constrictor, which snake makes the best pet, World News with Figs, Does It Live - the South African man shot in a hotel, the Atlanta woman who had "fat" carved into her chest, getting caught cheating, surprise facials and so much more!(Air Date: November 19th, 2021)Support our sponsors!YoKratom.com - Check out Yo Kratom (the home of the $60 kilo) for all your kratom needs!Manscaped.com - Use promo code: RealAss to get 20% off plus free shipping!Send your Be Luis Assistant submissions to RealAssOfficial@gmail.com!Submit to be Luis' sparring partner by sending a video and your information to RealAssOfficial@gmail.com!Real Ass Podcast merchandise is available at https://podcastmerch.com/collections/real-ass-podcastYou can watch Real Ass Podcast LIVE for FREE every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 11am ET at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVEOnce you're there you can sign up at GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code: RAP for a 7-day FREE trial with access to every Real Ass Podcast show ever recorded! On top of that you'll also have the same access to ALL the shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!Follow the whole show on social media!Mike FigsTwitter: https://twitter.com/ComicMikeFigsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/comicmikefigsTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@figgythekidSergio ChiconTwitter: https://twitter.com/sergiochiconInstagram: https://instagram.com/sergiochiconLuis J. GomezTwitter: https://twitter.com/luisjgomezInstagram: https://instagram.com/gomezcomedyYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LuisJGomezComedyTwitch: https://www.twitch.tv/prrattlesnakeWebsite: https://LuisOfSkanks.comZac AmicoTwitter: https://twitter.com/zaspookshowInstagram: https://instagram.com/zacisnotfunnyGaS Digital NetworkTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigital/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 20, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the continuing mobilization in Ethiopia against the United States supported efforts to remove the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed; Sudanese are remaining in the streets demanding the removal of the military junta which staged a coup last month; South African activists are calling for the nation's beauty queen to boycott the Miss Universe pageant being held in occupied Palestine; and in the West African state of Burkina Faso there was a demonstration which blocked a French military convoy operating inside the country. In the second hour we look back at the assassination of Malcolm X (Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) on Feb. 21, 1965 in light of the recent exoneration of two men falsely accused in his killing. Finally, we review some of the most pressing and burning issues of the day in Africa and around the globe.

Think Multifamily Podcast
Think Multifamily Podcast - #095 - M.C. Laubscher

Think Multifamily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:56


Welcome back Investors. Are you looking for opportunities to build wealth through cashflow investing niches? Then you're listening to the right podcast. Today, we're honored to introduce you to, the Cashflow Ninja himself, M.C. Laubscher. A South African native, M.C. bought his first investment property after reading Robert Kiyosaki's purple book, “Rich Dad, Poor Dad.” He recalls being ASTONISHED that the process actually worked and M.C. ended up with money to reinvest! Now, a highly experienced investor with a diverse portfolio, M.C. educates people on advanced cashflow strategies through his top-rated podcasts, “Cashflow Ninja” and “Cashflow Investing Secrets,” as well as his book, “The 21 Best Cashflow Niches.”   THIS EPISODE'S GUEST: M.C. LaubscherCashflowNinja.com Book: The 21 Best Cashflow Niches - CashflowNinja.com/21niches

Africa Today
Data leak reveals public money looting in DR Congo

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 20:48


A document leak showing how the Kabila family and associates looted public money in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A doctor in Khartoum tells us about the human cost of the protests in Sudan. The Finance minister of Djibouti worries his country's GDP might freefall unless security in Ethiopia improves. The Mali government is on a mission to stop informal gold mining. And Eskom, the South African power company says it's discovered evidence of sabotage on its network.

No, I Know
EP#94 The Little Fairleaf

No, I Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:01


I narrated my first audio book in 2005, a very large and little known book called Twilight by Stephenie Meyer, a giant series to kick off my career and here I am 90 books later and I have told many stories, which I love so much. And on this episode we have guest: Jeremy Forsyth,  whom we have had the pleasure of working with and I narrated his book, The Little Fairleaf.  Jeremy Andrew Forsyth is a South African fantasy writer who is based in Johannesburg. Born and bred in the City Of Gold, he is working on carving his name in the literary world. He is the author of the epic fantasy, Upon the Sands, which is set in a fantastic world where mystery and magic come alive. His passion for writing all started at the tender age of 9. Forsyth's late grandmother who was also an author, would often read to him as a child, and those imaginative tales became an integral part of his life. His first writing exploits were immortalized in notebooks and his first cellular device: marking the start of what would later be his career.  Forsyth continues to be inspired by authors such as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Sharon Penman to name a few. These authors' ability to construct creative tales that translate exquisitely to the reader, embolden Forsyth to do the same. He also finds inspiration  in the great outdoors, history, Medieval history - with its plot twists that, even some of the greatest writers could never conjure to fictional life - has continuously fascinated Forsyth.  Forsyth's deep-set love of imaginative worlds, storytelling, reading, as well as his life lived and inspirations, have culminated in this serendipitous career path for him. In addition to “Upon the Sands”, he has also the author of The Sun, Moon, Sand, and Star series, a collection of short stories which include The Evening Tide, The Broken Rose, The Missing, The Raven Heiress, and The Little Fairleaf.   All Music and Lyrics by Ilyana Kadushin and James Harrell.

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Visions of Freedom w/ Piero Gleijeses Part 1

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 111:55


Part one of Dan's two-part interview with Piero Gleijeses on his book Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976–1991. This is the story of Cuba's military defense of the Angolan government against a US and South Africa-backed effort to overthrow the People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA). The future of the entire region was on the line, including the fate of apartheid in South Africa and of Namibia, then a South African colony. Learn Southern African geography by studying these maps: thedigradio.com/visions-of-freedom-mapsSupport The Dig with money at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter. Check out Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why It Matters by Anthea Roberts and Nicolas Lamp hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674245952

The Dig
Visions of Freedom w/ Piero Gleijeses Part 1

The Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 111:55


Part one of Dan's two-part interview with Piero Gleijeses on his book Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976–1991. This is the story of Cuba's military defense of the Angolan government against a US and South Africa-backed effort to overthrow the People's Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA). The future of the entire region was on the line, including the fate of apartheid in South Africa and of Namibia, then a South African colony. Learn Southern African geography by studying these maps: thedigradio.com/visions-of-freedom-maps Support The Dig with money at Patreon.com/TheDig and receive our weekly newsletter. Check out Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why It Matters by Anthea Roberts and Nicolas Lamp hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674245952

The Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Podcast
Episode 24 | Mindfulness and Trauma in South Africa

The Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:24


In this episode, David speaks with Simon Whitesman about mindfulness and trauma in the context of South Africa. They discuss how mindfulness practice can increase the capacity to face historical trauma, the importance of elderhood in contemplative and trauma-healing spaces, the power of non-judgemental awareness in clinical work, and the reason trauma-sensitive mindfulness is so important in a South African context.

Criminal Records Podcast
Nelson Mandela

Criminal Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 70:09


How did one of the most famous political prisoners of all time end up in prison? What system did he have a part in taking down? This week, we discuss the strange legal maneuvers South Africa's racist government used to stay in power, and the court case that changed the way the world reacted to the apartheid system. Content notes: This episode contains discussion of the South African apartheid system, which includes some language in its legal divisions of race which would not be acceptable terms today. Show notes and sources at this link

The SuperNova Podcast with Lena Ski
The Future of the Workplace + 4day Work Week

The SuperNova Podcast with Lena Ski

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:45


Covid hasn't been kind to a #4dayworkweek If anything it's made us restore factory settings and check our notifications. Enter Dion Chang. Dion Chang is a strategic thinker, keynote speaker, walking ideas bank, and professional cage rattler. He is one of South Africa's most respected trend analysts and founder of Flux Trends, which takes the unique view of “trends as business strategy”. ... He is an intrepid traveler, global citizen, and proudly South African. In this conversation, he shares what it took to be the first South African Company to roll out a #4dayworkweek and stick to it. Other talking points include resistance to change, the future of retail space, and rethinking work. If you liked that - you will also like this: https://www.fluxtrends.com/category/observations/ Find out more about the Podcast here: www.lenaski.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-supernova-podcast/message

Dope Black Women
Black Girls Surf too!

Dope Black Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 53:55


This week Leanne chats with Rhonda Harper, Founder of Black Girls Surf and Imani Wilmot, Founder of Surf Girls Jamaica to find out more about the increasing interest of Black Women in surfing. Together, they talk about the importance of representation in surfing, the healing power of being in the water, and the intentions they set for themselves to make history by kicking down closed doors in the industry. @blackgirlssurf @surfgirlsja The Dope Black Women Podcast is all about sharing stories of Black women from around the world. These are our voices, our experiences. Presented by @Leebeeja from Jamaica, South-African born Romantha, and Livs and Shan from the UK. Keep up with everything we do @DopeBlackWomen on Twitter and Facebook, and @DopeBlackWomen1 on Instagram.

Your Brain on Facts
Amazing Races (do-over, ep. 171)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:52


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! From using a train in a car race to marathon doping with deadly poison, there's far more excitement in racing than simply declaring a winner. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website.     Born in New York in 1901, Frank Hayes dreamed of being a race horse jockey.  Though he was short in stature, he was too heavy for the job, so he found himself working as a groom and stablehand instead.  Sadly, Hayes wouldn't live to see himself ride a horse to victory, but he *would win a race.  My name's...   LeMans, Grand Prix, Bathurst, the Indy 500, car races are big business around the world, but there was a time when people believed these new horseless carriages were a novelty item, too flimsy for such an activity.  In 1908, a race was organized to prove otherwise, in which six teams of drivers tried to be the first to get from New York to Paris.  Considering the state of the automobile technology and the lack of road infrastructure at the time, that was no mean feat.  Only three of the six competitors would even complete the course.  The race was a 169-day ordeal, still the longest motorsport event ever held. The starting line was set up in Times Square, on a gray morning, the 12th of February.  The six driving teams competed under four flags, Germany, France, Italy and the United States. The French set off with the highest number of cars, as three distinct automobile manufacturers participated.  The event brought almost 250,000 people on the streets of New York City to witness the start of the contest, considerably more crowd than the very first ball drop in New York at the New Year's Eve celebration, welcoming 1908.  The starter's gun fired at 11:15 AM, 15 minutes late.  Mayor George McClellan was supposed to fire the pistol, but he wasn't there on time and apparently, an impatient bystander did the job and the racers took off.  This was the first of many unexpected challenges.The planned route would take the racers across the United States, north through Canada into Alaska, over the frozen Bering Strait to Siberia, across Russia to Europe and finally to Paris.  The decision to have the race rolling in the midst of winter-time added to the challenges of the racers.  Drivers needed to stop often to repair their cars. They even used locomotive lines when it was impossible to find the road.  Not the rails, though.  The American car straddled the rails, bumping along on the ties for hundreds of miles.  The Italian team complained that this was cheating.  The car that would win had a 4 cylinder, 60 hp engine and a top speed of 60 mph.  Cars of the day offered little in rider comfort or amenities, like a roof.  They drove around the world, fifteen hours a day, in winter, in open-top cars without windshields.  Antifreeze hadn't been invented yet, so the radiators had to be drained each night.    While most teams were made of a driver and a mechanic, some teams included journalists, and even a poet, instead.  The first car, a French Sizaire-Naudin, dropped out after only 96 miles, with a broken differential they could not repair.  Another French team lost a man after they became stuck in the snow and the teammates began to fight.  They were about to duel with pistols, when the mechanic fired his assistant, an Artic travel expert he would be sorely lacking later on.  Not even in Iowa yet, the Italian car had mechanical troubles and the driver tried to cheat by loading the car onto a freight train.  He abandoned the plan when a photographer caught him in the act.  The car's owner then sent him a telegram, received a cable from the owners of his car: “Quit race, sell car and come home.”  The American team, driving a Thomas Flyer, took the lead when crossing the United States. The team managed to arrive in San Francisco in 41 days, 8 hours, and 15 minutes, 9,000 miles ahead of the car in second place.  This was actually the very first crossing of the US by an automobile in winter.  The route then took the drivers to Valdez, Alaska, by ship.  The American driver, George Schuster wasted no time investigating the Valdez-Fairbanks Trail in a single-horse sleigh, and concluded that the only way to cross Alaska in a car would be to dismantle it and ship the parts by dogsled.  The Parisian race committee abandoned the idea of Alaska and the Bering Strait and ordered the Americans to return to Seattle. The new plan was for the cars to sail to Vladivostok and drive to Paris from there.  While the Americans were still at sailing back to Seattle, their competitors arrived there and set sail for Russia. Then the Americans lost time getting their Russian visas in order.  The Flyer had been the first to arrive on the Pacific coast but was now the last to leave, a weeks behind the competition.  The race committee also decided that  the American team was given an allowance of 15 days, meaning the remaining teams could beat them to Paris by two weeks and still lose, *and penalized the team that tried to use a train.    The driving resumed from Vladivostok, but by this point, there were only three competitors left: The German Protos, the Italian Züst, and the Flyer from America.  Not an American Flyer; a little red wagon wouldn't fair well in these conditions.  What do all these cars look like anyway?  I'm glad you asked!  I put pictures in the Vodacast app, partner for this episode.  Vodacast is a brand new podcast player that makes it easy to see all the bonus content the creator wants to show you all in one place.  It even syncs to the audio, so you can see what I'm talking about right then and there!  It's still early-days, but it's going to be a real boon for both listeners and creators.   So the drivers, who you can see on Vodacast, agreed to start again evenly matched.  They had extreme difficulty finding petrol in Siberia, leading the French driver to try to bribe the other teams to let him ride on one of their cars, so he could still at least be *on a winning car.  This prompted his sponsor to pull him from the race.  The two two teams faced another set of major challenges as passing through the tundra realms of Siberia and Manchuria.  The spring thaw turned the Asian plains into a seemingly endless swamp.  Progress measured in *feet per hour, rather than miles.  The driver had to push their cars as much as drive them and even resorted to hitch up teams of horses to pull them along.  They also got lost, a lot.  The racers couldn't ask locals for directions as no one spoke Russian and a wrong turn could cost you 15 hours.  Once they neared Europe, roads improved and the race sped up. The Germans arrived in Paris on July 26, while the Americans were still in Berlin, but the 15 day allowance for the Americans and the 15 day penalty for the Germans meant that the Flyer had a month to drive to the next country.  The American team arrived in Paris on July 30th, 1908, to win the race, having covered approx 16,700 km/10377.  Even though the victor had been declared, the Italians trove on and made it to Paris in September 1908. The victory meant huge recognition for Shuster, who in 2010 was also inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame.  If you're ever in Reno, NV, you can see the Flyer in the National Automobile Museum.   ADS - Podcorn and Healthy Postnatal   America's first Olympics, held in 1904 in St. Louis as part of that year's World's Fair, stand unchallenged for the title of most bizarre.  The Olympics' signal event, the marathon, was conceived to honor the classical heritage of Greece and underscore the connection between the ancient and modern.  The outcome was so scandalous that the event was nearly abolished for good.  A few of the runners were recognized marathoners, rest could be described as “assorted.”  There was a man who did all his training at night because he had a day job as a bricklayer, ten Greeks who had never run a marathon, two men of the Tsuana tribe of South Africa who were in St. Louis as part of the South African World's Fair exhibit and who arrived at the starting line barefoot, and a Cuban mailman named Félix Carbajal, attired in a white, long-sleeved shirt, long, dark pants, a beret and a pair of street shoes, who raised money to come to the States by demonstrating his running prowess by running the length of the island.  Upon his arrival in New Orleans, he lost all his money on a dice game and had to walk and hitchhike to St. Louis.   The race was run on August 30, starting at 3:03 p.m.  If you know anything about daytime temperatures, that's what we call hot time.  Heat and humidity soared into the 90s.  The 24.85-mile course involved roads inches deep in dust, seven hills, varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents, cracked stone strewn across the roadway, the roadway that was still open to traffic, trains, trolley cars and people walking their dogs.  There were only *two places where athletes could secure fresh water, from a water tower at six miles and a roadside well at 12 miles.  Cars carrying coaches and physicians drove alongside the runners, kicking the dust up and launching coughing spells.   William Garcia of California nearly became the first fatality of an Olympic marathon we he collapsed on the side of the road and was hospitalized with hemorrhaging; the dust had coated his esophagus and ripped his stomach lining.  Len Tau, one of the South African participants, was chased a mile off course by wild dogs.  Félix Carvajal trotted along in his cumbersome shoes and billowing shirt, making good time even though he paused to chat with spectators in broken English.  A bit further along the course, he stopped at an orchard and snacked on some apples, which turned out to be rotten. Suffering from stomach cramps, he lay down and took a nap.  At the nine-mile mark cramps plagued Fred Lorz, who decided to hitch a ride in one of the accompanying automobiles, waving at spectators and fellow runners as he passed.   Thomas Hicks, the bricklayer, one of the early American favorites, begged his two-man support crew for a drink at the 10-mile mark. They refused, instead sponging out his mouth with warm distilled water.  (Purposeful dehydration was considered a positive 115 years ago.)  Seven miles from the finish, his handlers fed him a concoction of strychnine and egg whites—the first recorded instance of drug use in the modern Olympics.  Strychnine, in small doses, was commonly used a stimulant.  Hicks' team also carried a flask of French brandy but decided to withhold it until they could gauge his condition.   Meanwhile, Lorz, recovered from his cramps, emerged from his 11-mile ride in the automobile. One of Hicks' handlers saw him and ordered him off the course, but Lorz kept running and finished with a time of just under three hours. The crowd roared and began chanting, “An American won!”  Alice Roosevelt, the 20-year-old daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt, placed a wreath upon Lorz's head and was just about to lower the gold medal around his neck when, one witness reported, “someone called an indignant halt to the proceedings with the charge that Lorz was an impostor.” The cheers turned to boos. Lorz smiled and claimed that he had never intended to accept the honor; he finished only for the sake of a “joke.”  You know, it was just a prank, bro.   Hicks, pumping with strychnine, had grown ashen and limp.  When he heard that Lorz had been disqualified he perked up and forced his legs to keep going.  His trainers gave him another dose of strychnine and egg whites, this time with some brandy to wash it down. They fetched warm water and soaked his body and head.  He began hallucinating, believing that the finish line was still 20 miles away.  In the last mile he begged for something to eat, then he begged to lie down. He was given more brandy and two more egg whites. Swinging into the stadium, he tried to run but was reduced to a graceless shuffle. His trainers carried him over the line, holding him aloft while his feet moved back and forth, and he was declared the winner.   It took four doctors and one hour for Hicks to feel well enough just to leave the grounds. He had lost eight pounds during the course of the race, and declared, “Never in my life have I run such a touch course. The terrific hills simply tear a man to pieces.” Hicks and Lorz would meet again at the Boston Marathon the following year, which Lorz won fair and square.  Bonus fact: The 1904 Olympics also saw gymnast George Eyser earned six medals, including three gold, despite his wooden leg.   MIDROLL  Patreon, names and increase Review and CTA While it's usually easy for humans on a race course to navigate, how then do homing pigeons figure out where they are?  A researcher at the US Geological Survey, Jonathan Hagstrum, has come up with a novel suggestion. It involves, of all things, pigeon races.  In Europe, and to a lesser extent in the US, pigeon racing has become a passionately-followed sport for which birds are carefully bred and trained.  Birds from many lofts are taken to a common distant location, released together, and their return speeds timed.  90% of the birds usually return within a few days, and eventually almost all do.   On Sunday, June 29, 1997, a great race was held to celebrate the centenary of the Royal Pigeon Racing Association.  More than 60,000 homing pigeons were released at 6:30 AM from a field in Nantes in southern France, flying to lofts all over southern England, 400-500mi/640-800km away.  By 11:00 AM, the majority of the racing birds had made it out of France and were over the English Channel.  The fastest birds should have arrived at their lofts by early afternoon. But they didn't.   A few thousand of the birds straggled in over the next few days.  Most were never seen again. The loss of so many birds was a disaster of previously unheard proportions in the pigeon racing world.  One bird could get lost, maybe a hundred, but tens of thousands?   A theory would later emerge.  At the very same time the racing pigeons were crossing the Channel, 11:00 AM, the Concorde supersonic airliner was flying along the Channel on its morning flight from Paris to New York.  In flight, the Concorde generated a shock wave that pounded down toward the earth, a carpet of sound almost a hundred miles wide. The racing pigeons flying below the Concorde could not have escaped the intense wave of sound. The birds that did eventually arrive at their lofts were actually lucky to be more tortoise than hare.  They were still south of the Channel when the SST passed over, ahead of them.  Perhaps racing pigeons locate where they are using atmospheric infrasounds that the Concorde obliterated.  Low frequency sounds can travel thousands of miles from their sources. That's why you can hear distant thunder.  Pigeons can hear these infrasounds very well as they use them for navigation.   What sort of infrasounds do pigeons use for guidance?  All over the world, there is one infrasound, the very low frequency acoustic shock waves generated by ocean waves banging against one another!  Like an acoustic beacon, a constant stream of these tiny seismic waves would always say where the ocean is.  This same infrasound mapping sense may play an important part in the long distance navigation of other creatures. It could explain how Monarch butterflies in the US are able to find one small locality in Mexico, or how Brazilian sea turtles are able to find their way to their homes on tiny Ascension Island a thousand miles out in the Atlantic.  Even more valuable to a racing pigeon looking for home, infrasounds reflect from cliffs, mountains, and other steep-sided features of the earth's surface. Ocean wave infrasounds reflecting off of local terrain could provide a pigeon with a detailed sound picture of its surroundings, near and far.  The enormous wave of infrasound generated by the Concorde's sonic boom would have blotted out all of the normal oceanic infrasound information. Any bird flying in its path would lose its orientation.  The incident is referred to as the Great Pigeon Race Disaster.  The Concorde stopped flying six years later, for reason unrelated to the pigeons. Not every race goes to the swiftest, one was meant to go to the friskiest.  Charles Vance Millar practiced law in Ontario for 45 years until his death in 1926.  He was also a shrewd investor, which meant there was a nice fat bank account before his fatal heart attack.  A lifelong bachelor with no close relatives, Millar wrote up a will that was as mischievous as he had been. For example, Millar would amuse himself by dropping dollar bills on the sidewalk and then watching the expressions of the people who bent to furtively pocket the cash.  In death, Millar outdid himself in roguishness. He wrote “This Will is necessarily uncommon and capricious because I have no dependents or near relations and no duty rests upon me to leave any property at my death and what I do leave is proof of my folly in gathering and retaining more than I required in my lifetime.”  He left the shared tenancy of a Jamaican vacation spot to three men who could not stand the sight of each other.  He tested the resolve of teetotallers by leaving them shares in companies involved in the alcohol business.  The Ontario Jockey Club is an august body whose membership is drawn from society's upper crust, so Millar left shares in the club to an unsavoury character who existing members would find repellent and to two opponents of racetrack gambling.   He parcelled out much of his estate to test his theory that every person had a price; the only mystery being at what level would greed trump principle.  But, it was Clause 9 of the will that caused the most fuss; it was the legacy that triggered a race to conceive.  Simply put, he directed the residue of his estate be given to the Toronto mother who gave birth to the most children in the ten years immediately following his death.  The money involved wasn't chump change. By the time the race came to an end, the total prize was worth $750,000; that would be a bit more than $12 million today.  What came to be called the Stork Derby was on, especially at the three year mark, when the Stock Market Crash of 1929 ushered in the Great Depression.  You might have heard of it. With so many people experiencing unemployment and poverty, the pot of gold offered by Charles Millar was enticing, even if the attempt meant creating a *lot for mouths to feed.   Newspapers followed the fortunes and fecundity of the contestants closely.  It was a welcome distraction from grim reality.  Five women leading the pack, mostly lower income and already with a slew of children, became household names.  Those five of most fruitful loins had delivered 56 kids between them, 32 of which had born by 1933.  From Time Magazine from Christmas Eve 1934: “Last week in Toronto each of the two leading contenders for the prize money bore a child. Mrs. Frances Lillian Kenny, 31, gave birth to a girl, her eleventh child since the race began. Mrs. Grace Bagnato, 41, gave birth to a boy, her ninth ...”  While citizens followed the race keenly, the Ontario provincial government was not amused. It called the maternal marathon “the most revolting and disgusting exhibition ever put on in a civilized country.”   VODACAST   Midnight on Halloween 1936 was the deadline for baby-birthing.  On October 19, The Daily Journal-World of Lawrence, Kansas carried a story that started, “A hesitant stork circled uncertainly today over 1097 West Dundas Street with what looked like a $750,000 baby in his well-worn bill.”  However, the productive resident of that address Grace Bagnato was soon disqualified from the derby; her husband turned out to be an illegal Italian immigrant and that didn't sit well with the authorities. Everything old is new again, eh?  Lillian Kenny, who had ten births to her credit, was also tossed out of the event because she had the misfortune to deliver two stillbirths and that was declared not to count.  Pauline Clarke also gave birth ten times during the competition period but several of her babies were conceived out of wedlock; an activity deeply frowned upon at the time, so they were out.   As the final whistle blew, four women were tied at nine babies each.  Annie Smith, Alice Timleck, Kathleen Nagle, and Isobel MacLean each received $125,000,or about $2mil today.  Lillian Kenny and Pauline Clarke were handed consolation prizes of $12,500 apiece, or $20K.  Mrs. Bagnato, got nothing.   When Millar's law partner found the will he thought it was a joke rather than a legal document. Others thought its purpose was to tie the legal system into knots.  According to The Canadian Encyclopedia, “The question of whether Millar intended his will to take effect or merely to amuse his lawyer friends remains in doubt.”  The Ontario government, which had earlier huffed and puffed about the unseemly nature of the Stork Derby, tried several times to have Charles Millar's will declared null and void. The premier, Mitchell Hepburn, had said it was “the duty of the government to stop this fiasco.”   A few of Millar's *distant relatives popped up to challenge the will; hoping to score the jackpot. But, the will, and its Stork Derby clause, held up and, eventually, the Supreme Court of Canada said it was valid.   It's pleasing to report that the winners handled their legacies sensibly and were able to buy homes and provide an education for their children. The winners, that is.  Nobody knows how many women started the Stork Derby and then dropped out. However, by the end, at least two dozen mothers had produced at least eight babies. This placed an enormous burden on the families who were suffering through the Great Depression with 25% of Toronto families receiving government support in 1935.   The prize money was a direct result of Millar's capricious nature.  He once missed the ferry between Windsor, Canada and Detroit.  This angered him so he bought the property that would eventually be used to construct the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, which put the ferries out of business.  It was money from this investment that largely funded the Stork Derby.   And that's….When Frank Hayes was given the chance to fill in for another jockey, he had to lose a lot of weight fast, like 10 lbs/4kilos in 24 hours, which he probably did by not eating or drinking and possibly sweating or purging.  Doctors then and now think that's why he died suddenly of a heart attack in the second half of the race.  He didn't fall out of the saddle though, even after his horse crossed the finish line first.  He was declared the victor, and remains the only jockey to have ever won while dead.  The horse, Sweet Kiss, was immediately retired, because no one wanted to ride a horse nicknamed Sweet Kiss of Death.  Remember...Thanks    Some races go off the rails, but there are plenty that were made to be weird.  Every year, young women line the streets of Moscow to run for a higher purpose – shopping.  Glamour magazine hosts an annual stiletto race. Young women strap on their tallest heels (3.5”/9cm minimum), and run a 164ft/50 meter course in hopes of winning a $3,000 gift card. Most of the women taped their shoes to their feet, but that did not stop all the trips, slips, and falls.  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   Sources: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/01/01/the-historic-new-york-to-paris-race-in-1908/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-1904-olympic-marathon-may-have-been-the-strangest-ever-14910747/ http://biologywriter.com/on-science/articles/pigeons/ https://owlcation.com/humanities/The-Toronto-Stork-Derby https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/paris-or-bust-the-great-new-york-to-paris-auto-race-of-1908-116784616/  

The Money Show
Spar Group full year earnings up by 5.5% and declares a dividend

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 75:25


Brett Botten, CEO at Spar Group on the company's financial results. Nick Wilkinson, Chairman of SA Olive discusses the story of the South African olive industry. Consumer Ninja Wendy Knowler explains a puzzling case of Capitec's long queues. Charlie Wright, co-founder at Clean my Bed, is our Shapeshifter. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gabriel Gonsalves's Heart Intelligence Podcast
”How to Achieve Emotional Freedom” | WEEKLY HEARTSTREAM 17-11-2021

Gabriel Gonsalves's Heart Intelligence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


In this week's Heartstream, I spoke about what you need to do if you want to experience true emotional freedom. In the second half, I guided a meditation designed to fill your heart with greater strength, light and love. If you find my guided meditations, healing circles, and free offerings useful and would like to express your appreciation by making a donation in support of this work, please use the following link: https://www.gabrielgonsalves.com/donate A percentage of the proceeds goes to PATCH, a South African-based organization dedicated to bringing hope and healing to children who have been sexually abused.

Unknown Passage
Episode 115: Carla Van Eeden - South African Found Dead In The Bahamas In 2018

Unknown Passage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 82:28


May, 2018. South African Carla Van Eeden, 25, is found dead in her hotel room in a five star resort in the Bahamas. Carla's death is quickly marked a suicide, but as the investigation unfolds, doubt is shed on this narrative. Was Carla murdered? Theme music: ⁣ Undertow by Scott Buckley | https://soundcloud.com/scottbuckley⁣ Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com⁣ Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)⁣ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

New Books in Caribbean Studies
James G. Cantres, "Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:10


Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres' Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain. Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain. Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books in History
James G. Cantres, "Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:10


Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres' Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain. Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain. Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
James G. Cantres, "Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:10


Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres' Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain. Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain. Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
James G. Cantres, "Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:10


Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres' Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain. Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain. Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in African American Studies
James G. Cantres, "Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:10


Covering the period from the interwar years through the arrival of the steamship SS Empire Windrush from Jamaica in 1948 and culminating in the period of decolonization in the British Caribbean by the early 1970s, James Cantres' Blackening Britain: Caribbean Radicalism from Windrush to Decolonization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020) situates the development of networks of communication, categories of identification, and Caribbean radical politics both in the metropole and abroad. Cantres explores how articulations of Caribbean identity formation corresponded to the following themes: organic collective action, political mobilization, cultural expressions of shared consciousness, and novel patterns of communication. Blackening Britain shows how colonial migrants developed tools of resistance in the imperial center predicated on their racialized consciousness that emerged from their experiences of alienation and discrimination in Britain. Blackening Britain interrogates the ways in which prominent West Indian activists, intellectuals, political actors, and artists conceived of their relationship to Britain. Ultimately, this work shows a move away from British identity and a radical, revolutionary consciousness rooted in the West Indian background and forged in the contentious space of metropolitan Britain. Purchase a copy of Blackening Britain: From Windrush to Decolonization through January 8, 2022, using the Promo code: 21JOYSALE for 35% off at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the Black-led grassroots movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

The Jake Bowtell Football Experience
The JBSE - T20 World Cup Final & Niemand's Triple Ton

The Jake Bowtell Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:26


Jake is back, and he's ready to ramble on about some cricket! First up it's Australia's victory in the T20 World Cup Final against New Zealand (cue sad music), and then it's onto South African domestic cricket and a brilliant triple hundred scored by Eastern Cape Iinyathi's Jason Niemand. Please consider sharing The Jake Bowtell Sports Experience with your friends and family! I don't wanna do the Facebook thing, so word of mouth recommendation will be the lifeblood of the podcast! If you like it, please tell somebody! :)

The Michael Brooks Show
TMBS ReAir: 24 - The First Red Century & History On Fire ft. Bhaskar Sunkara & Daniele Bolelli

The Michael Brooks Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 99:24


TMBS episode 24 first aired on January 16th, 2018. Here is the episode recap: Michael explains the different ways US presidents have been disparaging and degrading Haiti long before Trump dreamed of running for office. Shoutout to NUMSA the largest metal workers union in South Africa, a radical union that is directly fighting against the neoliberal policies imposed by the South African government. Daniele Bolelli (@DBolelli) joins us to talk history, Taoism, and martial arts. The pyramid is back and we target one of the world's largest financial institutions. Bhaskar Sunkara (@sunraysunray) is studio to talk about primitive accumulation, Bolshevism, and his journey to socialism. Michael explains the different ways US presidents have been disparaging and degrading Haiti long before Trump dreamed of running for office. Shoutout to NUMSA the largest metal workers union in South Africa, a radical union that is directly fighting against the neoliberal policies imposed by the South African government. Daniele Bolelli (@DBolelli) joins us to talk history, Taoism, and martial arts. The pyramid is back and we target one of the world's largest financial institutions. Bhaskar Sunkara (@sunraysunray) is studio to talk about primitive accumulation, Bolshevism, and his journey to socialism. TMBS re-aired episodes come out every Tuesday at 7PM EST here on your podcast app & on The Michael Brooks Show Channel. This program has been put together by The Michael Brooks Legacy Project. To learn more and rewatch the postgame content visit https://www.patreon.com/TMBS

Out To Lunch with Jay Rayner

On hunting down two South African neo-Nazi terrorists, entering the most dangerous prison in the world with a bishop for protection, and being asked to infiltrate Al-Qaeda, author, journalist, and documentary filmmaker Simon Reeve weighs up the value of these high adrenaline adventures against the reality of leaving his son for weeks at a time, when he goes out to lunch with Jay Rayner.  Simon Reeve and Jay enjoy a delicious steak at Gaucho, London Bridge: https://gauchorestaurants.com/restaurants/tower-bridge/  For official show merch, head to: https://kontraband.shop/collections/out-to-lunch  Out To Lunch is a Somethin' Else and Jay Rayner Production.  If you loved the show, follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Crew Reviews Podcast
TCR Episode #102 | Simon Gervais - THE LAST PROTECTOR

The Crew Reviews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 57:18


In this episode, the Crew goes behind the scenes with New York Times and #1 Amazon bestselling author Simon Gervais to discuss his latest thriller, The Last Protector. Simon spent several years in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police protecting visiting heads of state, such as Queen Elizabeth II and former US president Barack Obama, and his expertise shows on the pages of this explosive new thriller. Praise for The Last Protector: “Gervais's brisk series kickoff, which jumps around the world, is built on the tension underlying the tenuous alliances among the sort of power-hungry villains who will stop at nothing. Well-modulated action scenes alternate with showdowns that reposition the pawns.” —Kirkus Reviews “[A] solid thriller from Gervais…” —Publishers Weekly “A thrill ride from the first page to the last! Simon Gervais is coming in hot with The Last Protector. Looking for action, intrigue, and suspense? This is your novel! Move it to the top of your list!” —Jack Carr, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Devil's Hand In The Last Protector, we are introduced to former US Air Force combat rescue officer turned Secret Service agent Clayton “Clay” White. When he is assigned a routine protection assignment for the US vice president elect, Clay thinks his days on the front lines are over. But all too soon he is thrown into a vast conspiracy that lands the love of his life—the daughter of the vice president elect—in the crosshairs. Pitted against the power-hungry politicians of DC and deadly South African mercenaries, Clay will stop at nothing to protect her. You can learn more about Simon by visiting https://simongervaisbooks.com/ And don't forget to subscribe to The Crew Reviews, hit the "LIKE" button, and leave a comment. And if you want to learn more about the guys from The Crew or see additional author interviews, visit us at http://www.thecrewreviews.com Follow us on social media Twitter | https://twitter.com/CREWbookreviews Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/thecrewreviews Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/thecrewreviews/

The History Hour
The South African football star murdered for being a lesbian

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 50:08


In 2008, the brutal murder of Eudy Simelane shocked South Africa and highlighted the widespread violence faced by South African women and members of the LGTBI community. But has anything changed? We hear from a friend of Eudy and speak to Sibongile Ndashe, a South African lawyer and human rights activist. Plus, we look back at the massive oil fires in Kuwait in 1991, battling racial discrimination in British schools in the 1960s, Cold War intelligence gathering in East Germany and the invention of Chanel No.5, 100 years ago. Photo: Eudy Simelane's parents sat at the bridge named in their daughter's honour. Credit: BBC

Global News Podcast
Poland deploys thousands of troops on the border with Belarus

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 31:45


Poland has accused Belarus of encouraging people to enter the country illegally. Also: Obama tells young people to stay angry on climate, and the South African authorities say the convicted murderer and former Paralympic star, Oscar Pistorius, is to be considered eligible for parole.