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Latest podcast episodes about Bondi Beach

The Squidge Rugby World Cup Retrospective
1987 #32 - Bronze Final: Wales 22-21 Australia (with Josh Gardner)

The Squidge Rugby World Cup Retrospective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 105:25 Very Popular


Our resident Third Place Playoff expert and co-host of the Blood & Mud Rugby Podcast, Josh Gardner, returns to the pod for yet another Wales v Australia Bronze Final. Josh indulges us in chat about Pokemon, Chris Rea, Tomorrow's World and Bondi Beach.Thanks to Josh (@joshgardner or @rucked_mag on Twitter) for joining us. You can listen to the Blood & Mud Podcast on all podcast providers, and support them at https://www.patreon.com/bloodandmud . Thanks also to Tom Rosenthal for our theme music.Apologies for the poor audio quality on this episode - rest assured it's a one-off! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 169 Part 1: How Four Winds Gallery Brought Native American Jewelry to Australia

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 26:10


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Native American jewelry has struck a chord with Australian shoppers Why jewelry is so important to Native American cultures, and the history of jewelry making in the Southwest Which characteristics to look for in distinct varieties of turquoise How to make the most of a trip to Indian Market Which Native American jewelry artists are ones to watch About Jennifer Cullen Jennifer Cullen is the owner of Four Winds Gallery, a jewelry gallery in Double Bay, Australia that focuses on jewelry of the American Southwest. Established in 1981, Four Winds boasts a collector's standard of traditional and contemporary North American Indian jewelry, pottery, sculptures, graphics and textiles. The gallery is the culmination of a long-term interest and passion for Jennifer.  Photos available on TheJewelryJourney.com Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Transcript: The suburbs of Sydney, Australia might be the last place you'd expect to find a Native American jewelry gallery, but that's exactly what makes Jennifer Cullen's Four Winds Gallery so special. After a lifelong love affair with the jewelry of the American Southwest, Jennifer opened her gallery in Double Bay, a Sydney suburb known for its high-end shopping. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history behind Native American silversmithing; how she educated Australian collectors about Southwestern jewelry; and why turquoise is the most personal gemstone. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today, my guest is Jennifer Cullen of Four Winds Gallery, an unusual jewelry gallery located in Double Bay, Australia. Jennifer is talking with us from Australia today. I say this is an unusual gallery because it focuses on Native American jewelry and jewelry of the Southwest. When I look at the jewelry, I immediately think of Santa Fe, New Mexico. I love the jewelry. Santa Fe happens to be one of my favorite places. I saw these pieces on Instagram and I was blown away because I thought, “How can this be in Australia?” She has this gallery in Australia with these beautiful Native American pieces. I'm looking forward to hearing Jennifer's jewelry journey today. Jennifer, welcome to the program.   Jennifer: Good morning from Double Bay, Sidney, Australia. I'm sure it's a good evening over there. It's so fun to talk with you.   Sharon: It's great to talk with you. You were just telling me about your jewelry journey, and I want to hear more about it.    Jennifer: Turquoise is my birthstone. This is how this whole thing started for me, back when I was teenager, born in December, being a Sagittarian. Australia doesn't really create turquoise as a birthstone here. We have little pockets of it, but it's waste. It's never looked at in the jewelry format. America is the land of fabulous turquoise. When I finished high school, my father happened to be CEO for Westinghouse, an American company. So, the family headed to the East Coast, as you would say. Westinghouse headquarters at the time was in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. When I went to the States, I put my university degree on hold here in Sidney and followed my parents. I wanted to buy some turquoise jewelry, and the first stop as a family traveling from Australia to America for the first time was Disneyland in California. We went to the gift shop in Frontierland, and I bought a great, big, funny turquoise, which I loved. My mother found it very curious, because my other jewelry was fine jewelry or gold jewelry that they had given me as they had gotten older. I loved it.    We made it to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which is where my dad worked. I did classical ballet and psychology part-time at the local Pitt University to fill my time. One afternoon after university, I went to the bathroom and took my ring off to wash my hands. When I walked out, I forgot to put the ring back on. I went back in, and it was gone. I was devastated. My parents said, “Don't worry. There's a nice gallery in Pittsburgh. They have American Indian jewelry. Go check it out.” So, I went and found Four Winds Gallery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and fell in love with the culture. The jewelry, the textiles, the pottery, everything American Indian and Southwestern that was in the gallery, I loved. I bought a new ring on layaway, as you call it. I spent a lot of time there talking about the jewelry with a guy named John Krena who runs and owns the place. He opened it in 1974. He taught me a lot about it and helped me understand it.    After two years, we moved back to Sidney. I didn't want to finish my university degree; I wanted to stay involved in and surrounded by the beauty of the artwork that comes from the Southwest done by American artists, who are quite gifted. I was interested in old jewelry and new, as well as paintings and artifacts and pottery and textiles to a degree, but the focus has always been the body adornment, the wearable art.   In 1981, I set up a tiny store in Double Bay in Sidney. People would come and say, “Oh, hi sweetie, what's all this blue stuff? Do you make it?” “Well, no. I wish I was so clever, but it's turquoise. It comes from the Southwest of the USA. It's made by multiple American Indian artists.” That's where it started. 41 years later, in 2022, I've changed stores a couple of times. I bought this store 3½ years ago. We're at it again, but it's been a journey, a hobby, a passion, a lifestyle and an income. It's something that I've enjoyed all my life.    The gallery has four exhibitions a year. I try to fly out artists for two of those exhibitions to meet my clients, because people like to meet the people who make the things and understand where it comes from. They are always contemporary artists. A big part of the gallery as well is the historical worth of vintage and antique jewelry. When I went on buying trips, which were every August and February up until Covid, I would come back and have a “return from a buying trip” exhibition. That would be a general exhibition in August of all the treasures I found on that adventure of three or four weeks in Santa Fe, Gallup, Scottsdale, Zuni, the Pueblos and various shows and things I've been exposed to. So, that's a general show.   During the year, I'd have a specific show for one of the great artists I represent, like Mike Bird-Romero. McKee Platero was out here one time. Cody Sanderson has been out many times. These are all Southwestern artists. Denise Wallace of the Wallace family, I've adored and represented her work for many, many years now. I also represented her husband before he suddenly passed away some time ago, and her daughter, Dawn, and son, David. They're Alaskan. Their work is fossilized marine ivory with scrimshaw set in beautiful silver and gold housings. The Southwestern jewelry is turquoise and coral and lapis and cream clamshells and all the various materials that hail from that kind of jewelry more predominantly.   Sharon: All of your jewelry is beautiful and instantly recognizable, but the Denise Wallace is so different than the other stuff.   Jennifer: Oh, absolutely.   Sharon: You just look at go, “Wow.”   Jennifer: And it reflects the Alaskan culture. She and her husband, Samuel, were obviously inspired a lot by her Alaskan heritage and where she comes from. The materials they work with are entirely made of silver and turquoise and whatnot, but in the museums over there, they'll start with masks and carvings that were done in the 1800s and early 1900s, and some earlier if you can find them in the different regions up there. She will study those and get inspired to turn the walrus mask, for instance, into a beautiful, big brooch.    I have a whole collection of her jewelry all in creams as well. It's a beautiful, soft coloring. It's all creams and yellows and a brownish caramel color, which is nice to wear with clothes because we really have a long summer in Australia. It's warm here from about the end of October through April, so you tend to wear paler clothing and lighter clothing, and I like to wear more jewelry at work. So, her work is really lovely to combine since you're able to put it on all the time during the hot summer months. It's very nice. I like all the very early works of the Pueblo artists called heishi. It's cream, and it goes beautifully with that as well.    But yeah, Denise's work represents the Alaskan culture and what goes on up there. Whereas in Southwestern culture, there are hundreds and hundreds of great jewelers who are doing beautiful silversmithing and lapidary. It's a very unique art form. Her son, David, I think he's one to watch. Dawn is already established as a great jeweler, and she's been working with him off and on for a long time. David is kind of quiet, and he doesn't like to get out in the public, but he's a great carver. I'm excited to watch him and see where he goes.   Sharon: When I go to Santa Fe, I love the Native American jewelry, but I have to temper myself because it's very easy to come back with all the Southwestern jewelry and artwork and go—   Jennifer: It's not relevant when you've gotten home and you're not going to put it in your home. Is that what you mean?   Sharon: I'll wear it. Here and there, I'll definitely wear it, but it's like, “Why did I buy 25 pieces? I'm not going to wear that all the time.”   Jennifer: That's interesting. I dress as a city woman. I don't wear satin and lace. Maybe I do occasionally, but I wear fine wool things in winter, cashmere, black. I dress as a city woman, which I always have done; I'm from Sydney, for goodness sake. In Double Bay, it's like the heart of cosmopolitan. It's like being in New York or Chicago or any city environment. That is where I grew up. So, this is the way I am, but for some reason, I just love wearing interesting sculptural jewelry that is not traditional gold and diamonds, fine chains and little bits and pieces and pearls. I think that's very pretty, but it doesn't make a difference when you put it on. It's pretty and you can wear it with anything, which I guess is a good thing. You can wear it with any kind of clothing.    This jewelry is a piece of wearable sculpture to me. It has impact. It has size. It has color. It has form. It has metal. It just makes me feel right when I wear it, and I wear it all the time. Even when I go to Pilates or I'm walking my dog, or when I'm down at the beach house, I wear a little pair of turquoise earrings. I always take a selection of blue turquoise pieces, maybe some green turquoise pieces to add to my orange oyster shell collection or my red coral collection. I always take plain silver. It's like a little black dress because it will go with anything. To me, it's worth putting on every day. It's to improve the way I feel and the way I look. As I get older, I like to wear even more pieces because I'm comfortable to do it. As I've grown up, the jewelry has become better, more significant, higher-end, and I don't worry anymore about, “Oh, what are people going to think if I wear this?” I just love it and I wear it.   I have a big following now nationally in Australia since the internet came to be and I got my website and all that business happened. When was that? In the early 2000s or something. You worry. You think, “Oh my gosh, now everyone can see what I'm doing. There's a whole load of beautiful galleries in America. Maybe business will change because everyone can look globally at everything.” But it actually just reinforces that if you do something well and focus on the best, and if you're knowledgeable about it and you have great quality pieces that are beautiful and aesthetically pleasing, it holds its own. My business has gone from strength to strength since then. We're open six days a week, 10:00 to 5:00. I'm in here three or four days a week. I'm in the States usually all of August. It used to be two weeks in February, but after Covid, we'll see whether that's still happening. That was more on the West Coast, in the San Francisco region. Sometimes if I had enough time, I would go down to the Heard Museum afterwards in March.   Sharon: The Heard Museum?   Jennifer: Yeah, the Heard Museum. I'd see the show there with all the current artists. It's expensive being away from the gallery, with international airfares, hotel accommodations, car rentals. I'll take my manager with me, Leslie, who's been with me for 20 years. He's very supportive and helps me keep going when you're in the rental car driving and saying, “Well, I think I should go check these out.” I wouldn't want to do it by myself. I've taken all of my daughters. They've been with me a few times. I have three daughters. They've all been with me. My sister's been with me. My mother's been with me. My father's been with me. Some girlfriends have been with me. My ex-husband has been with me a few times, but that didn't work too well. I never drive by myself. I like to travel with someone.   The whole overseas adventure is a very expensive one, to go there and spend a number of weeks and then come back again, but I have to go. I love to go. I like driving around over there, doing the reservations and getting out of the plane at Albuquerque, getting the rental car, driving into Gallop, going on the reservation, going out to Zuni, meeting different artists then ending up back in Santa Fe. I like going to all the old shows, meeting all the people that also love to collect and handle and look for this material, going to Indian markets, seeing more of the artists I've been representing for years who are all gathered together in the plaza for two days. It makes it easier for me to visit everyone.    It's been a great lifestyle. I've thoroughly enjoyed it, and it is an oddity. Dealing in North American Indian art on the other side of the world, it's a very established business. I've built incredible relationships. I had hoped one of my daughters might step into it and continue the Four Winds, not that I have any intention of retiring any time soon. My middle daughter points out to me repeatedly, “What? Working for my mom?” I'm like, “Well, it would be nice to keep the operation going forever.”   Sharon: Looking at the map, Double Bay isn't too far from Bondi Beach, is it?    Jennifer: Oh no, it's probably 10 minutes by car. Bondi Beach is on the coast on the ocean, and Double Bay is on Sidney Harbor. It's kind of an elegant, harbor side, upmarket, expensive little shopping area that's also probably five to 10 minutes from the city. The city is on the harbor. Double Bay is also farther away on the harbor going towards the coast. Then there's a little finger of land that runs up and down, and then on the other side of the little finger of land is Bondi Beach. So, it's very close to Bondi Beach.    People who come from other states and internationally stay in Double Bay in one of the hotels, or they stay in the city. We're very close to the city. They'll get a taxi or an Uber, or you can get a train or a bus; public transport here is really good. So, you're smack bang between the ocean coast and the city. I'm about halfway between. It's a very, very pretty harborside shopping area. I'm trying to think—you know Carmel—   Sharon: Yes, Carmel.   Jennifer: —in California, that feeling that you're not on a cliff; you're down on sea level.   Sharon: Are you near Sidney? When you say the city, is that Sidney?   Jennifer: It's Sidney. Double Bay is one of those smaller suburbs of Sidney. Sidney's a very big town. I think we have about six million people in Sidney. Double Bay is a five- or 10-minute cab ride from downtown Sidney. You can still call Double Bay Sidney, but it's a suburb of Double Tree close to Sidney. Most of my clients actually come from New South Wales, which is the state that Sidney is in. We have more clients from Australia now, New Zealand, South Africa, Paris, England, America, scattered all over the place. It's fun. A lot of people from France and England and New Zealand and different places come to Sidney in January, which is the peak of our summer, to get out of the winter or to visit family or friends they have in Australia. Or they come to see Australia. They visit and travel around.   Sharon: Do Australians wander into your shop and say, “Oh my God, what is this?” What's the reaction?   Jennifer: Yes, exactly. Back in the early days in the 80s, they would wander in. I was 21 years old back then, and the counter belt is at least $2,500. People would say, “Where do you sell these blue things? Do you make it?” I'd say, “I wish I was so clever. It's turquoise. It's made by artists from the Southwest of the USA,” and the talking and educating would go on. We're starting from there. A lot of them would come in and go, “What is all this stuff, really?”    Then I would get the odd person who was a big collector who would find me. He'd go, “I can't believe you're doing this in Sidney, Australia. I'm from London, and I'm collecting the Southwest,” or “They've got a gallery where I buy things in London.” You would get some people that knew about it who were already collectors. Then they would talk to other people and say, “Go to that store, the Four Winds Gallery down in Sidney. She has really good material. She's quite authentic.” It was word of mouth for a long time, doing my shows, plugging away, talking, working six days a week, having no staff. It's the energy of a 21-year-old woman building a following for it.    Now, 41 years later, I am in Double Bay. I've been around. I've expanded the gallery. I've owned a store, and I've been here as a very established business for a long time. Everyone in this region knows me. Anybody who knows anything about turquoise will be out in a restaurant in the city, and if somebody has something turquoise on, they'll say, “Oh, did you get that at Four Winds?” It's either, “Yeah,” or, “No, I went on a holiday to Santa Fe.” It's a commonly used reference point now. You still get the odd person walking in now, but it was more in the first 10 years of having the business that people would walk in who'd never been in before or never heard of it and say, “What's going on here? What is this all about?”    American Indian jewelry has become more internationally and globally known with the internet, with social media, with all the things that are going on in America, the mining rights and water rights, going to reservations, the interviews that come on NBC or the radio stations or TV stations in America. I do interviews and stories on what's happening on the tribal reservations and the injustices that are happening. It brings it more to the spotlight, and then it melds into the artwork and what's going on. So, the beautiful Southwestern American Indian artwork is not as unheard of now as it was in the 80s in Sidney, Australia, when no one on earth knew what any of it was. It's been a progress of education.   Sharon: That's interesting. I remember ages ago buying one turquoise ring. Everybody had to have one turquoise ring, and that was it.   Jennifer: Also, when you look at the 70s and the hippie phase and the bikers and flower power, there was all that association with turquoise, bear claws and feathers, which was fun, but that was kind of insane. A lot of people didn't identify with that, right or wrong. It was like, “We're going to get into the hippie jewelry.” But I think having all of that and recognizing it as fine art, the labeling doesn't matter, actually. Yes, it is Southwest and yes, it is Native American Indian. It is fabulous both historically and recently made. But it is a fine art form if you look at how it's made, how the silver is executed, how the lapidary is done, the history they've inherited for generations about how to work with metal or cut stone or drill shells. As a tribal jewelry form, it's the most sophisticated tribal jewelry form in the world, bar none to any other tribal group. It's just amazing as an art form.    I like to think that you don't have to resonate with Southwestern, cowgirl, cowboy, denim, hats and whatnot to love and embrace this art form. It's just a beautiful, wearable art form irrespective. That's always been my belief. This is not a gallery where I come to work every day in jeans and boots and a hat. It's just my thing. It is if you're from the country or you've bought a cattle property, but we're city people and city folk.    We have paintings and kachina carvings and some pottery. These are beautiful pieces, quite classic in somebody's home. It's white walls and timber floors. It's plain and very modern how people decorate today, but with this beautiful piece of artwork. They might have one or two great pots as feature pieces, but they don't become pottery collectors per se, as I see people in the Southwest do, where there are ledges and ledges built to house dozens and dozens of pots by a particular tribe because they're a collector. People don't do that here because our architecture and our lifestyle are very different. They have polished floorboards. They'll have a lovely, seasoned marble kitchen bench top, and everything's kind of washed and gray and black and modern and minimal, all of that. Then they'll have the odd piece as a beautiful art piece in their home, but they'll also have something from Japan, and they might have an early Australian aboriginal piece, rather than having the whole placed decked down in Southwestern artifacts or paintings.   With jewelry, you find that people can be general jewelry enthusiasts who collect great jewelry from all over the world, but you tend to find that people like the turquoise, the blues and the greys and the strong, big, sculptural silver. You think it's a really big piece of jewelry, but try and recreate that same belt, for instance, in 18-karat gold set with huge diamonds. It would be millions. It would be unapproachable for a lot of people. So, it's also the materials that are special. They're collectable. It's one-off. It's unique, but at this point, it's still not treated the same. For instance, this is a huge piece of turquoise in a ring by McKee Platero. That's large. If you try to replicate that size stone in a ruby or an emerald or a diamond, one, it would be very hard to find. Two, it would be extortionate because it's so big. But I can secure a natural piece of high-grade turquoise that's large and beautiful. It's not artificial and it's not a copy or a reproduction. It's the real deal, and that gives me a lot of joy, wearing a unique piece of sculpture.

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto
Ep 43 - It's never too late! How Grant Swinbourne continue to pursue his love and passion for photography full time even after his retirement

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 50:17


Hey Wicked Hunters,   I am excited to have Grant Swinbourne be part of The Wicked Hunt - The Art of Photography Podcast.   Grant Swinbourne is a photographer from Sydney, Australia.  He produces fine art images from his travels around the world, including seascapes, landscapes and travel images.   Grant had a camera in his hands early, starting with 110mm film Instamatic cameras migrating to an SLR in 1984.  Whilst his photography remained an interest, it was one that took a back seat to his career in IT,  until he switched to digital photography in 2004.  It's now gradually overtaken his time and is now his full-time career.   Known mostly for his beautiful seascapes & cityscapes from along the East coast of Australia, he's also amassed a large portfolio of travel photography from many countries.  Grant has had images published in several magazines, including Viajes National Geographic, the Spanish language travel magazine for National Geographic.   In 2021 he was the driving force behind the establishment of the Aussie Artists Collective (https://twitter.com/AussieArtistCol) a collaborative team bringing together over 70 Australian artists displaying their work in two virtual galleries. Grant now runs educational workshops around the Sydney area to help beginners and intermediate photographers to improve their skills and learn new techniques for creating artistic landscapes and seascapes. If you want to learn more about Grant's work, you can find it here: https://linktr.ee/grantswinbourne    Other ways to listen and subscribe to the podcast: • Spotify - http://bit.ly/twhspotify   • Apple Podcast - https://bit.ly/Theartofphotography   • Google Podcast: https://bit.ly/TheArtOfPhotographyWithStanleyAr   • Website: https://podcast.thewickedhunt.com      • Tune In (Alexa) - https://bit.ly/TuneInTheArtOfPhotographyPodcastWithStanleyAr     For those of you who want to learn more about The Wicked Hunt Photography by Stanley Aryanto: • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thewickedhunt/    • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewickedhunt/  • Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/thewickedhunt/  • Photo prints: https://www.TheWickedHunt.com/   Don't forget to leave a review on the podcast if you enjoy this conversation. It would help us to get found and help to inspire other photographers.  ---------------- Transcription: Grant Swinbourne  0:00   It's never too late, you know, unless you're dead. Once once you're dead, it's too late. But you know, so from my perspective, where you got to do is make sure that before you get there, get out there and do what it is that you're passionate about. Because if you're not actually doing what you're passionate about, then why you're doing it Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  0:18   Hey Wicked Hunters, Welcome back to The Art of Photography podcast with Stanley oriental, where we talk about artists journey and how photography have given them hope, purpose and happiness. And today we have someone from downunder grant Swinburne is that did I pronounce your last name? Correct there, Grant Swinbourne  0:47   Grant. Oh, nice. Swinburne. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  0:48   Yeah, Glyndebourne? There you are? How are you? Man? It's good to have you here. I'm so glad. You know, I know. We connected through Twitter, Twitter space, and, you know, eventually to the NFT world. But it's good to be to have you here and to be able to talk about your artist journey and, you know, being able to share that with the rest of the world. Yeah, thanks Grant Swinbourne  1:09   for having me, Sam. It's great to sort of connected if not in person, virtually. But it's, it's really good and really excited to share a bit more about me. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  1:21   Yeah, it's always good, isn't it to be able to see that person. I think that's why that's why we like Twitter. And a lot of us gonna move from Instagram to Twitter, because we have that ability to start listening to people voice and have a deeper connection. But you know, being is no substitute to being able to see them in person or, you know, even through zoom, it's already helps a lot. So really is one of the things that I love about this podcast. Absolutely. All right. So you know that you are living in Sydney, Australia, and, you know, I've seen a lot of your work and a lot of your work are really have a really, what do you cater to a lot of the seascape and you know, all all the things around the Australian coats. So tell me, is that one of your biggest passion in photography, or you like to take a lot of other genres as well as just, you know, the fact that you're living on the coast in Australia? Grant Swinbourne  2:16   Yeah, I guess, you know, Australia, I mean, it's got a massive coastline. And, you know, to be honest, I mean, I've been to I've been to a few places around the world, luckily enough, but in my opinion, you know, in certain places around Australia, yeah, we're very lucky to have the kind of coastline that we do. There's a lot of beaches that, you know, you can go to some beaches along the coast and not seeing another person. That's not the case in Sydney echo. It's, it's, it's pretty crowded, particularly in summer. But for me, I guess I've always, you know, I've been I was born a couple of streets away from a beach on Botany Bay in Sydney. And so the birch and being around the sea, and around the, the estuaries around Sydney has been part of my life ever since I was born. And I guess I'm always drawn to it, I've always loved swimming, I've always loved that sort of feeling of relaxation that you get, you know, when you've gone to the beach, and whether you've sat there and what's the sunrise or whether you've, you know, gone for a swim or you've gone fishing, or you've gone diving or whatever, you know, it's a good feeling, you know, and I guess for me, that's one of the things that I tried to portray in some of my photography is that feeling of what it's like to have that relaxation even though you might be in a, in quite a crowded cities, and very busy lifestyle, and whatever, there's always these places that you can go to seek a bit of refuge and seek some relaxation. And so for me, that's, that's, I guess, one of the things that I'm trying to communicate with quite a lot of my photography that said, you know, on just as at home, you know, chasing waterfalls, or you know, out in out in a bush scene looking for, you know, mountains and whatever, recently did a trip to the UK and did quite a lot of photography around the Lake District and north Wales, you know, nowhere near the coast and very much about the mountains and so forth. So for me, they're, they're landscapes that I'm equally comfortable in and really, really happy about learning in those places. And, you know, again, it's about the conveying the feeling of being there. That's really what I'm trying to portray. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  4:39   Yeah, that's, that's the cool thing about you know, photography. I think that's one of why the reason why I love photography, the moment is that you could be in a crowded place, but like when you really do need your photography, it's like, you're in the bubble and everything, and we've done it right. That's such a cool feeling. And when you say that I just like yeah, I know exactly like, even if you're like in Bondi Beach like you could just like Sit there have your camera and and like, everything else doesn't just like nothing else matters. So that's really Yeah. So like, what what's your, you know? I love hearing that, you know, like, how can your connection with photography right and your full time live and you know how to be gender coastline really affected you a lot? How did you first fall in love with photography? Like, you know, were you always like holding a camera? Or was there a point in your life where you you just fell in love with them? Grant Swinbourne  5:34   Yeah, I guess it's always been a part of life for me my father, we he was quite a keen photographer. Never, you know, he never really did anything that you know, anyone I guess would call particularly artistic in terms of you know, he never tried to make photography a career or anything like that, you know, the, the art of photography that said, you know, he was always, you know, taking photos on family holidays, or whatever, you know, this is before I was even born. And I remember, he did a lot of stuff that he did from his time in the Navy, in the 1950s and 60s. And I used a lot of sitting there with him on slide nights, you know, so they, obviously they taking photos that ended up being transparencies of slides and loading them into a feeder and then sitting there slotting them through the the slide projector, just up on the on the wall in the lounge room. And, you know, sitting there watching, you know, some of his life portrayed, I guess, in that and you know, as a very young child, I guess that sort of struck me as something that was really cool and interesting to do. I got my sorry about that. I got my first camera when I was probably about 10. And that was a little 110 millimetre you know, happy snapper. film camera was an egg for instamatic. I think it was. And so from there, you know, obviously, growing up in the film days, there was nothing else there was no such thing as digital photography in those days. It was really a matter of, you know, just taking photos of things that I thought were interesting at the time. You know, whether that was down at the beach, or you know, just the back stairs in my grandmother's house, for example. Or the other family cat, it really didn't really didn't really matter to me much at that time. What I took photos of it was just like, Oh, that looks interesting. I'll take a photo of it, you know, and some of them were abysmally awful. Technically, because the camera itself wasn't meant to chop, the subject matter, I had no idea about composition and all those sorts of things. Anyway, fast forward, I guess, until I'd grown up a little bit. And, you know, somewhere, when was it about the mid 80s, mid 1980s, I bought my first SLR, which was a Minolta SG one. And I started to get a little bit more serious about it. And, you know, started to look at, you know, how to how to create a composition and how to how to, you know, develop my own film and that sort of thing. You know, going to high school, and, you know, there was, you know, in art, we'd be messing around mostly with black and white, because colour was expensive, you know, colour enlargers I don't think we had one at the school. You know, they weren't, they were few and far between and very expensive pieces of kit back in the back in the 70s and 80s When I went to school, and so that sort of just drove a little bit more of their creative juices for photography. Funnily enough, though, when I left school and had sort of started to go out to work and whatever work in careers started to take over, then, you know, getting married, having kids, that took even more time, you know, and I sort of started to give up some of those passions a little bit, to concentrate on those things more, you know, more fully. And again, I guess later in in life, once the kids started to get to an age where they were a little bit more self sufficient. I went out and got a digital photography and started to get to a point where I had a few point and shoots, which I did okay with that still wasn't satisfying me. So I ended up buying a Canon DSLR I think it was the 500 D originally. And so yeah, it just started to get a little bit more serious and you know, one of the things that is always fascinated me from some of my father's photography, but also, you know, some of the stuff that I've done at school was long exposure and how that gives you a different look and feel to the image rather than something that you know, it's Just to point out and shoot and get that instant moment, it was about, okay taking the time. And so I really started to develop that. And you know, see scaping really lends itself to that sort of, genre of photography, it's, it's really nice to see that flow, or that totally smooth water, as opposed to not saying that there's anything wrong with the frozen moment as the of the water, but from a aesthetically, I just, I just find it really pleasing to see that smoothing out of the movement of the water, etc. And, you know, that's, I guess what drew me back into that. And so I, I do a lot of it, because I enjoy it. I also enjoy getting up early in the morning now, not very early in the morning, but I don't mind it and enjoy seeing and being somewhere that not many people ask me, you know, I mean, even though Sydney's got, you know, five or 6 million people often go to the beach and see something that only a few 100 People might say, you know if that? Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  11:03   Yeah, that's fantastic. Yeah, I think that's the thing, isn't it? Like, just because people gone there, they don't necessarily see everything. And as a photographer, we tend to observe more, because we want to look for something deeper, something that has connection with us. So you're absolutely right. I mean, here's the funny thing, I went down to my hometown, and I lived there for probably like, 12 years in my life, right? And I'm driving, we're driving in this road that I always drive, like, every single day, like you cannot not drive to that, you know. And just last month, when I was back, I was like driving like, wow, I didn't know there was a mountain, you know, like, right. And so you know, those kind of things you don't notice, until I started to do photography, and start to observe the landscape and everything around a little bit more and deeper. So it's crazy how much you take for granted. Yeah, I love hearing your story. You know, like, just how you got into photography. And it's something like it's been a long journey. How long have you been taking photography in general? Like, do you? Do you have a number? Grant Swinbourne  12:09   Yeah, not not really, I don't really count the, you know, the 10 year old photos in that though, you know, I guess some some people might, you know, and not because I'm ashamed of them or anything, because they were so bad. But I mean, they were, they were truly awful. I look at him now. And I go, you know, what was I think Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  12:31   we all have that kind of photos. Grant Swinbourne  12:32   Yeah, I guess I guess probably since 1984, taking a little bit more seriously. But that said, you know, having that hiatus with the, you know, the, the career and whatever that I had, you know, I got very absorbed in that, and I'd love doing it wouldn't wouldn't have swapped it, it's enabled me to, you know, financially secure my family and all that sort of thing. So, you know, there's, there's, there's a lot of good came out of concentrating on that not on photography now, could I've kept, you know, focusing on that a little bit more on maybe, but, you know, other things got in the way. And it just, it just got left behind. And it was an interest that it was not something that I felt passionate enough about at the time to really get into it. And so, I guess, in all seriousness, probably about 2004, was where I started to get a little bit more, you know, with digital, get get more, I guess, passionate about bringing it to the fore. And now, you know, the end of my career in terms of working I've basically finished work. Or working sorry, I finished working for somebody else in November last year. And so I decided, at that point, you know, financially we were fairly secure with, we're comfortable, we can survive without needing necessarily to make a lot of money. And so I thought, Okay, well, I'm going to make photography, the forefront and work for myself. And so I started doing workshops and started selling prints as you as you do, probably over the last couple of years have started to you know, try to build that brand a little bit. And part of that also, you know, last year with the lock downs that we had here, I couldn't travel more than five kilometres outside my local area for a period of about 165 days, I think, which basically was driving me nuts because there's no beaches within five kilometres of where I live. And so and, you know, I live in suburban Sydney, there's lots of houses, telegraph poles, and I know people take photos of that, but it doesn't drive my passion it does doesn't make me really want to get out there and take those sorts of shots. You know, there's no real parks. There's one with a little brown creek that doesn't look very attractive, you know, there's usually shopping trolleys, and those sorts of things lying around the banks of the hair. You know, so there wasn't a lot to photograph, or I didn't feel it was you know, and so what I did was I decided to start a podcast, you know, similar similar to yours, you know, talking to photographers about, you know, what drives them, and what makes them passionate. So, you know, landscape photography world was born almost exactly a year ago, I think it was the 21st of July, so, only a few weeks away from where we're recording this to, you know, to start building that as, as a means of starting to build the rest of the photography brand as well. So that people, you know, know who you are you, you start to get your name associated with other photographers, etc. And you get known in the photographic industry as well, I think so, part of that, it's really just about trying to try to help build that brand and get, get my name out there and also help promote others, because to me, you know, that act of helping others helps me, you know, aside from making, you know, my name, get out there more, you know, helping others get their name out there and get their photography seen. As we were talking, before we started, you know, one of the, one of the biggest issues for any photographer is their ability to get seen, and if you're not being seen them, you know, sales are going to be much harder, you know, whether they're NF T's or prints or workshops, you know, and so it is really about that hassle of getting your brand out there and people knowing about you, and knowing about what you what you're doing. So helping others do that. Yes, it helps me but it also helps them so familiar, it's a really important thing to do. And that's why I've got involved in in a number of other projects that I've done as well. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  16:51   Yep, fantastic, made, you know, I was going to bring out the podcast, because I know you're doing a podcast as well. And I'd like to know a little bit more about it. So I'm glad that you mentioned that. And I think what you mentioned there is really powerful, you know, like, you always when you give something out to other people, it will come back and, you know, one of the biggest thing that I'm the reason why I started this podcast was just like, I have a burnout, you know, back in 2020, I think so I just want to hear people's journey and understand, like, do they go through this thing? You know, what, what do they do to get out of it and all this stuff, right? So apart from you know, like what you say, of course, you get the benefit of getting associated with the photographer's you know, getting the exposure, but the cool thing about this is like, you get to listen about other people journey and what people struggle with. And, you know, it really helps you that you realise that you're not alone. So for listeners who feel like, you know, they haven't got to where they are, you know, they want it to be that, you know, everyone have their own journey that you got to trust your own journey and follow through with your own journey. Because if we all have the same journey, then we're no different than the computer or underworld being manufactured, we are not manufacture we're human, we're unique. So I think that's, that is so powerful that you share that, thanks for sharing that. Now, I know that you, I think that's really cool that you put, you know, looking at your journey, it's been a really, really long journey to fall into, you know, finally, more into full time based on photography and trying to get that brand up there. And I'm interested to hear this, right, because I know there's gonna be a lot of people out there who say, You know what, I'm getting too old. And, you know, and at the end of my, my, my life, and I'm retired, I don't think I can restart, you know, this passion of mine and stuff like that. But you decided to let you know, the photography kind of just brewing its own and you know, create its own momentum. And I think that's really cool. But you never, ever give up on it and just keep going, keep going. Exactly. Finally, you get to like, Do it, do what you love the most. wants everything secure. So what would you what would you say to those people who feel like it's, it's too late or, you know, I'm not good enough. I'm not good with technology and all these things that come to their head that I know it's not true. Because I know a lot of people, you know, pick it up very quickly. And I teach workshops and courses as well. It's not that hard to learn, right, if they wanted to. Yeah, but what would you say to people who have that kind of mentality so that they can, you know, if they love photography, they can pursue that themselves without having that doubts? Grant Swinbourne  19:29   Yeah, I think, you know, making it a career is not necessarily for everyone, and not everyone should do it. And I'm not trying to put people off doing it because it's a tough business to get into. It's very crowded. There's a hell of a lot of people out there. And some will be better than us. Some will be worse than us photographically. And I think the key is to look at what it means to you as a photographer, if it means that you're able to, you know, create art And that's your primary driver, then pursue that and push that as hard as you can. If it's more about making money, then you know, you need to do different things necessarily, then just focus, you got to do the artistic piece as well. But then there's other things that you need to, you know, sit down and think hard about, you know, how do I, how do I sustain? And how do I diversify my income streams so that when people aren't buying prints, or, you know, attending workshops, or whatever, that you know, you've got other passive income streams coming in. So it's really, then you've got to actually have a bit of a business head on your shoulders to actually say, Okay, well, these are the things that that I need to do to actually make money out of them, probably one of the one of the hardest bits, I guess, in doing that is that need to be all things in that business, you know, you need to be not only the artist, but you know, first and foremost, you've got to be the marketer. So that you've basically got to be able to write some copy, and you've got to put together some kind of advertising, whatever that whatever that looks like, you know, these days, if you want to be on Instagram, you better be good at video editing. IT and technology is there to help you. And there are things that do make things like video editing, and so forth a lot easier. And even putting together together your marketing pieces. Yeah, there are things that can actually help you. So getting into that mindset of researching the tools that you need, building the skill sets that you need, so that you've actually got a set of skills that works in terms of being too late, it's never too late. Unless you there, once munchie dead, it's too late. But you know, so from my perspective, what you got to do is make sure that before you get there, get out there and do what it is that you're passionate about. Because if you're if you're not, if you're not actually, you know, doing what you're passionate about, then why are you doing it? And I guess, you know, for me, could I have done it earlier? Yes, probably would I've had the, the brain space and the skill set that I needed? Well, no, because I've built that up over time, you know, and it's really about getting to the right time, when you can actually do it now Should I've, you know, held onto some of that photographic passion during my other career, while there may be for me, that would have been at the detriment to other elements in the career. And so therefore, you know, I'm not sure that it would have worked for me to do it much earlier than I have. You know, it's I mean, it's really hard to say, and it's going to be an individual choice and an individual thing for everyone. And it's something that you've got to be really comfortable with, and something that you've got to make sure that you're passionate enough about to be able to see it through and have the energy that it takes to actually drive, you know, those marketing elements, and, you know, the, the business elements on top of the actual, you know, passionate pursuit of creating nice art, you know, that that in itself can be all consuming for some people, and they don't have any space for anything else. And, you know, for some people, you know, offloading some of those other things, like the marketing and so forth to other other people can help. But then that cost you money. So, unless you've got a family member that's willing to do it for you. So it's really, it's really hard to sort of give anyone advice without knowing their individual circumstance. But you know, from my perspective, it's really about making sure that you're, you've got the passion, you've got the desire to do it, and you feel that you've got the skill set. If you don't feel that way, then you're probably not ready. You know, it's, that's, that's the, the key thing, but the sooner you drive, to get those skills and get the elements lined up, that you need to line up, you just need to think about it from a planning perspective and say, okay, if I'm going to do this, these are the things that I need, you know, I need to know how to do marketing, I need to know how to do my own accounts. I need to I don't know how to do the administrative side of things, you know, if you if you're gonna make it a business, if you're not gonna make it a business, then it's, it's, they're more about, okay, well, how am I going to create good art? And that's really, okay. Well, once you've got the technical aspects of photography down, Pat, that's where the learning really starts. Because the technical aspects, you know, to me probably about, you know, 10 to 15% of learning photography, the real skill comes when you start to look at composition, quality of life and how that reacts to the landscape, you know, in talking about landscape photography, which is probably my main passion, but also, you know, equally that can work in, you know, portraits or you know, street photography. You know, portrait, at least I guess if you're in a studio situation, you can control the light. So very, very different. But if you're in the street, you know, that play of light and shadow is a key part of making your art look good, but also a key part of giving a feeling and telling a story. I think a lot, a lot of art really needs to tell that story to become to transcend from just being a nice picture to being something that you know, people feel and get a reaction from. Because if it's, if it's a nice picture, that's great, yes, you can hang that on the wall. But, you know, most people are only going to do that if they're feeling a connection with that image. And they're only going to do that if that image has some kind of, you know, I guess powerful elements in it that make you go Yeah, I feel something out of this, you know, whether it's happiness, sadness, or anger, you know? Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  25:54   Fantastic, wow, that's a whole lot of advice there. So, you know, even though you said that, it's hard to give advice, I think that's a really good advice to give is to start with a passion. I remember when I had that, that burnout, that was the biggest thing was that I forgot why I started to begin, why I started in the first place, right? So man, like, I truly agree with that. And, you know, like, you, I think you're right, you know, a lot of people think, you know, I started when I was 30. And nowadays, there's a lot of photographers who's like, 14, and you know, 13, and 19, and it's gonna be a different story, it's gonna be a different passion, it's gonna be a different thing. So, you know, don't try to love what you say, you know, like, everyone's different, everyone have their own story have their own journey, I think that's absolutely, absolutely true. And being able to understand, like, you know, the lights and composition, I think that is the two biggest thing that you can learn from photography, because, like you say, even in a studio, where you can control the light, you can't control anything that you don't understand. First. Grant Swinbourne  27:03   And to me, you know, whether you whether you look at that is another technical aspect in a studio situation, or whether you're, you know, whether you see that as something creative. Doesn't matter to me, but you're quite right, if you don't understand it, you can't control it, and you can't then, you know, work it so that you're actually getting the result that you're looking for. And some of my work is, you know, potluck, you know, because you happen to be in the right place at the right time. You know, there's many times I go out for sunrise, at a beach, for example. And, you know, it's just cloud on the horizon. You know, and or, you know, just the solid, overcast, despite the fact that I've looked at a forecast that says, yes, the, you know, there could be 80%, high cloud and no low cloud, you know, you get there and that's just low cloud, and it's just, you know, what am I doing here, but then sometimes that's where you go out and you find something different to shoot you. And you don't, the key is that by the time that you've taken, if you've taken the time to go out with your camera, and then, you know, the, for me, that's one of the key things is that you can then learn, okay? Like, let's say you're at a beach and you know, it's, it's a really crappy looking sunrise, that you're not going to get that bang, and that you were hoping for, well, don't get discouraged, because you can then take shots or the way flow maybe and get something out of that. You could look at details in the rocks and do more intimate abstracts, you know, there's a whole raft of different things that you can do with that time. And it's a really around that thought process of saying, Okay, well, okay, I'm going to cut off the the disappointment that I feel from, you know, the fact that the sunrise didn't happen the way I hoped it would, and focus on you know, other things that you can do creatively and, you know, it's taking that creative mindset out into the field with you. And then bringing that home into the post production side of things as well that really, I think transcends it from just being a photographer to being a really good photographer to potentially a great photographer, and you see the great photographers, they're taking every opportunity that they've got, you know, if if the conditions are particularly in landscape, if the conditions don't work for you do something different and change, change your focus from our bed like the sunrise didn't work for me, you know, I'm now going to try something a little bit you know, alternative to that sunrise and it's really about keeping that open mind and I guess learning to live with the disappointments that are gonna come because I've had some title failures of shoots where I go out and nothing you know, I've forgotten that I you know, the last shoot that I've done, you know, might have been an astro shoots and we're in right and I've left the the lens on manual focus, and I've got it set up in bold mode. And so I get there set up and I haven't changed it from bold mode and I haven't changed the order. And the first couple of shots is like that's a mess. So, what am I doing? You know, and it's about, you know, clicking, you know, curricula. So that might that might have been a week or so ago, you know, and you've just forgotten that. That's, that's how you left your camera, you know. And so you know, it's about clicking into gear and getting your head around that and getting focused again, on what it is that you're shooting and changing your, your mindset from, you know, whatever, whatever you were planning to shoot to what it is, you're going to do now. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  30:25   Yeah, no, that's, that's, I think, that happens to the best of us. I know, it's still happened with me all the time. But I think it's just, you know, if you understand it, then you know, how to how to fix it. Right. So that's such a good advice there grant. And, you know, I want to talk about a community, you know, we we've been seeing that, in this industry, in photography, actually, in any industry, you know, especially nowadays, it's no longer about, you know, branding, and you know, having people just worship the brand, but now, it's about what you can give out to the community. And when you know, what I want to hear and learn from you. And, you know, like, you already mentioned, how you build the community, one of the things that you do to build a community is through podcasts. But there's a lot of, I know that you're doing a lot of different projects to build that community. So what I want to learn, what I want you to share with the audience so that they can learn from you is that what are the different ways for you to build a community and how important it is to build the community? Grant Swinbourne  31:28   Yeah, sure. I think in terms of community, there's, there's a number of different things that you've got to look at, you know, there's this the community, I guess, that you get, with social media and the following, and so forth, and interacting with your followers, whether they're fellow photographers, or whether they're, you know, just people that like your photography, or whatever, you know, interacting. So when somebody makes a comment, I make a point, you know, whether it's on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or whatever, I thank them on thanking them for the comment, you know, even if even if it's on, you probably should have composed that differently. You know, I accept that criticism, because, you know, in some people's eyes, what I've done isn't perfect, and that's okay. You know, and it's learning to be open to listening to to other opinions and people, that's really important. You know, particularly when, you know, they're part of your audience, and, you know, fellow photographers are part of your audience as well, because that's how people learn, you know, certainly, it's how I've learned is looking at what other people are doing. And, you know, in some cases, copying, you know, and or trying to replicate it, you know, to me, there's absolutely nothing wrong in that, yes, okay, everyone wants to create something unique, or we'd like to create something unique. But you know, if you're going to shoot the Sydney Opera House, how many unique angles are there for not many, you know, there's probably a few 100 that you could, places that you could stand to get a different angle of it. And, you know, the different lighting that you're going to get is going to depend on the time of day. So the point is, is that copying is a way of learning. And so, you know, looking at what other people are doing, helps you, and you have to recognise that other people are going to copy you. If you get any kind of notoriety out in the in the industry, you know, people are going to look at your work and go, I'd like to replicate that. How did you do that? You know, and that's, that's how you how you learn it. It's also one of the reasons why when I post a lot of the time, I will include my camera settings. So I'll put the EXIF up there, I'll tell you what camera and lens I'm using. I'll tell you, whether it's an exposure blend, or whether it's a single image, I'll tell you, you know, pretty much anything you want. And if anybody asks, and some people do, not many people do, but you know, some people ask, you know, how did you do that? And they'll tell you, if it's a composite, you know, there's no hiding, as far as I'm concerned and trying to say, Oh, this amazing image of a lighthouse on a point at night with the Milky Way behind it, you know, there's absolutely no way that you if you've got the lighthouse in front of you and the light shining, right that you can actually see the Milky Way a little and take a photo of it. Yeah, you might see a few stars, but you're not gonna get that Milky Way, you know, milk that you're going to see, you're going to have to make a composite of it to to actually make that work unless you got some amazing gear. That does something that I don't know that. So, you know, it's really about, you know, that that learning side of things is is a big part of community. Beyond that, I guess, in terms of building communities, I see that is really important and helping people promote their own work, you know, certainly has helped me both promote my work, but also it's helped me understand other people and get to know other people that I wouldn't have ordinarily come into contact with, you know, yes, you can sit there passively on social media, for example, and just look at like and whatever. And never, never engage with people to me. The word social in social media is Really the main point of it. So if you're not interacting with it in that way, you're not talking to people. You're not asking people questions, you're not commenting and saying, Yeah, well, I like this, but or I don't like that, you know? What's the point of being on social media, you know, if you're not engaging in that way, so, to me, building that community in that way, is important. And I guess this really came to the fore, probably about August, July, August, last year, I started to get into NF T's in a little way, you know, mental review items and so forth. And was trying to work out how that traction, I guess that, you know, needed to happen could happen for, you know, for me, personally, because, yes, I'd like to sell some NF T's and make some money out of it, because that was one of the things that a lot of people got into, but then recognise that, you know, to do that, you got to have actually have to communicate and the, you see comments from collectors of NF T's, you know, saying that one of the key things for them, aside from the feeling they get from the art itself, is the conversations that I have with the artists. And so getting that conversation going and getting people involved in that conversation is really, really important. And so I guess one of the things that I did a little bit of thinking, I saw some of the traction that some of the New Zealand photographers were getting in that NFT space, because they kind of the thing is they already had a community where a lot of them knew one another, a lot of them had shot together and so forth, because there are a smaller community than some other countries in the world. And I'm not saying I'm not saying that disparagingly, I'm saying that, because it's just the fact that we're smaller, they're a smaller country, smaller community, it's easier for them to get together physically, in a lot of ways, you know, than it is might be, it's really difficult for me to go and shoot with a guy in Perth, because it's a six hour flight away, you know, whereas someone in Sydney, I can ring up and we can connect and go and shoot, you know, which is great. But, you know, if you want that whole Australian experience, then you know, it's not all about Sydney, or Brisbane or Melbourne. It's, it's about the entire country. And so some of these guys getting some traction, because they were sort of supporting one another mainly in Twitter, retweeting, and so forth. And I had a bit of a think about it and thought, Okay, well, one of the ways that we could do this is we could actually create a collective of Australian artists and get them together to start promoting each other's work. Beyond that, we also saw the rise of things like on cyber, where you have these virtual galleries, you know, 3d galleries where, you know, either in VR or on just on a on a 2d screen, you can actually move around a virtual gallery space, looking at the art. And so I reached out to a number of people that I knew, but also some people that I didn't know, and asked if they'd be interested in submitting their work through a gallery. And so we did the first gallery, which was, I think, 44 pieces with 22. Artists, we then grew that to being 110 pieces in a much larger gallery, with 68 artists. And so from that developed, through the chats, a bit of discord, you know, conversation spaces and so forth, we started to build a, I guess, a photographic community within Australia, that was that self supporting and now we have, you know, a number of people joining, you know, group chats, and so forth, so that they can come into that fold and, you know, help promote one another's work, you know, so we, we talk to one another, you know, I guess it's offline a little bit, you know, it's still online, but it's, it's out of the public view, about what we're going to do, and then we go and do it. And in the public vein, it looks like there's, there's a bunch of guys or by guys and girls that, you know, sort of work together to try and promote one another's work. And so for me, a, it's really helped in not just providing work, but it's, it's helped in developing that community in that relationship with people, there's a connection there, and you know, that you can go to that person, you know, I know that there's been some, you know, technical issues that have come up with, you know, people's wallets, or on open sea or on foundation and whatever. And people have been able to help within that community to actually resolve some of those issues or give advice about how to resolve them. But there's also been some collaborations that have come out of it. And there's also been some work opportunities for one another where people who've gone out and helped on shoots or have helped with web design or help with, you know, building other projects. And so you know, that community building I think is is something that It's really important to be part of the community because we're, we're not individuals that are islands that are able to do everything ourselves. You know, some people are lucky and gifted that way, but not many of us. Certainly not. Yeah. And so by being able to lean on other people's skills and their knowledge and their backgrounds, you can actually, you know, bring your knowledge forward and bring your skill set forward. And you can learn a lot. And to me, you know, it's one of the things that I think, should be probably, you know, a mantra for everybody is never stop learning, you know, because if you stop learning, then, you know, you're not going to progress. You know, progress only comes through learning. And so it's really about educating yourself and educating other people with things that you may know, or they may know that you don't know. And it's that sharing of information that really, I find the most valuable part out of it, let alone any sales or whatever, which might come out of it. From a financial perspective. To me, the most enriching part is not the financial part, it's actually the learning. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  41:05   Wow, that is one whole lot of advice and wisdom there. Thanks a lot for sharing that grant. I think, you know, like, when I first started, especially like this, there was a time where I wanted to do like fashion photography and stuff. And there was a lot of this notion where, you know, like, we are competing against each other, and I think I'm really happy that especially in this NFT world, you know, even though I know that there are a lot of jealousy, a lot of, you know, a lot of competition and all that stuff, which, you know, I don't think we can ever get away from it, right? We're only human, but we're, we're seeing a lot more community based, where we help each other support each other. And what's really cool is that I feel like I'm, you know, that community translate translate back to, like, you know, the whole bigger community as well, you know, that's not only in the NFT. And I think it's really cool to be able to see people coming together, you know, without being scared or worried that you know, their their work, we're going to be competing against each other, but instead, just have that peace of mind and have that supportive nature to help each other. So, I always, you know, I'm very honoured to be part of the community, the Australian collective community. And, you know, it's awesome that you put everyone together to be part of that. And, like you say, it's not only, you know, we're able to help each other with the exposure, but we create, we're making friends, we genuinely creating connection with other people. I mean, that's why I have you here and get you share your wisdom. So yeah, this is I think this the really coolest thing about about photography, it's not only the photography itself, but we are, you know, the connection that you make out of that. So thanks a lot for sharing that grant. We're coming to the hour mark now. And one of the things that I always ask my, you know, my podcast guests is that if you have one advice that you can give to, to the audience, whether it's a life advice, photography, advice, or whatever it may be, what would that advice be, Grant Swinbourne  43:10   I guess, get started on what makes you, you know, happy, as quick as you can do it as early as you can. So, if you want to make a career out of photography, you know, make the decision, the key thing is making the decision. And once you've made the decision, that that's what you're going to do, then build a plan for how you're going to do it. Because very rarely do people go out and just do things, you know, building a plan, I think is absolutely vital. If you're going to try and make a living out of something, if you don't have a plan for it. And what you're going to do, if something fails, or something doesn't work the way that you'd like, you know, having that plan and having the backup plan or plan B plan C, having that plan is absolutely vital. So for me, you know, just get started, make the decision to you know, get into it, or, you know, make the decision that it's just gonna be a hobby, you know, and if it's just gonna be a hobby, and you're happy with that, stick with that, you know, but you know, make, make a decision about what it means to you as early as you can. And then don't forget that you can change your mind. And, you know, if decision AI is the wrong one, this is where Plan B and Plan C come in, you know, you can always go with decision B, you know, and say okay, well, it's not working as a business. So I'll keep it as a hobby, and I'll get on work and drive Ubers or whatever it is that you need to do to make the money to survive and keep shelter over your head and feed your family or whatever, you know that that's fine. Whatever it takes to do that. Then, you know, it's really up to you to make your path and decide how you want to how you want to fit this into your life. And if you want to make it all consuming and you want to make it your business and you want to make money out of it, then you know, warning is you might not but you know you You won't if you don't try, and if you don't start, so make that decision as early as you possibly can. And then, you know, go and do everything you possibly can to make it happen. Because if you're not doing everything you possibly can to make it happen, it'll never happen. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  45:13   Wow, that is a great advice. I wish you'd come to my life a little bit earlier in, in my life, Grant Swinbourne  45:20   I wish I'd made that decision. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  45:24   I think that it's really important to to be able to make that decision, you know, like, I know that I started this journey, because you exactly what you say I would rather you know, fail and go back to, you know, try something else rather than not knowing right? The what if, what if it does? Well, you know, what, if I, I, what if it worked out what if you know, all these things finally actually make, I can make things happen and actually do something that I really happy about? So, I think it's really powerful that you you mentioned that. And one of the things that's really cool is, you know, it's never too late. Right? Like, absolutely not. I love how you say, you can always change your mind, because that is absolutely true. You know, I take this seminar with Tony Robbins, and he's like one of the, you know, the best in mindset in life and all this stuff. And one of the things that he says, like, make decision quick and change slowly. Right. So what do you say that really hits that home? And I think in many cases, we're just too scared of you know, what could have gone wrong, but a lot of that is just in our head. So that is great advice. Great advice. Grant Swinbourne  46:31   Yeah. I remember, probably one of the one of my favourite sayings is that if you think you can, or you think you can't, you're right. Yeah, Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  46:44   that's, that's very true. You know, it's all about how you believe in yourself. And your, your, your belief, I'm going to drive everything. While the grant, it's been a really nice conversation. I love getting to know you, I love getting to know your story. And I love hearing all of your wisdom. It's been amazing, you know, just hearing all of this things that, that you draw back from your experience, and hopefully, you know, we can hunters who are listening to this podcast, can draw that inspiration when they're not sure of which way to go. Because I think you're absolutely right. You don't have to do this full time. I think, you know, it takes a lot of a certain personality for people to enjoy full time. But yeah, it's like, I've never met anyone who doesn't enjoy photography, if they can do it, right. I think because Grant Swinbourne  47:32   it's not like golf, golf can frustrate the hell out of you. Yeah. To a certain degree, if you know, but I think I've applied golf, and I get a lot more satisfaction out of photography than I do at a golf. A lot more frustration out of golf than I do out of photography. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  47:52   Awesome. Yeah. So for the audience who want to learn more about you connect with you and you know, want to see more of your work, what is the best way for them to, to connect with you and, guys, I will, you know, like always, always, I will always have that link in the description. So if you need to, you know, click on it or want to go to it, it's right there. But what is the best way to connect with you? Grant Swinbourne  48:16   You can find me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube. Brands, if you're looking for grand Swinburne photography, you should be able to find me. Also, you can you can find my podcast, landscape photography world, anywhere where you get podcasts. There's also a YouTube channel where that it's the grand Swinburne photography channel on YouTube, where you can listen to episode see the teasers and so forth. So, you know, pretty much any, any social media I don't do Tik Tok though, so, because video really isn't my thing. But, you know, that's, that's, that's me. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  48:53   Fantastic. Well, thanks a lot, Grant. You know, it's been a great conversation. And thank you for being here. Grant Swinbourne  49:00   Thank you very much for having me sale. It's been an absolute pleasure. And I look forward to talking to you from the other side of the microphone on landscape photography world at some point. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  49:10   That will be interesting. I'd love I'd love to have that. But yeah, it's been a really great conversation. I really enjoyed this podcast. So thank you for it for the time that you've spirit. To Stanley. Thanks very much, Matt. All right weekend as well. Thanks a lot for listening. And I'm glad that you tuned in today. You know, Grant has been grant stories has been inspiring from when he started his photography to like taking it seriously to where he is right now. pursuing it full time. I think it's one of the coolest journey that I've heard and he said it himself you know, all you have, all you need is that to believe in yourself whether you can or no, it's really up to you. So I think that's such a really cool thing that he brought up at the end of this to wrap everything up. But if you haven't hit the subscribe button and do so so that you can hear next people and the next thing points story as well as their journey. on how to you know pursue not only photography full time but if you only want to do it as a hobby you know there's a lot of guests in my podcast that doesn't really do it full time so hit that subscribe button and I'll see you guys next week all right well until next time weekenders  

Breakfast with Gareth Parker
Tradie plans to run from Perth to Sydney to raise $1 million

Breakfast with Gareth Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 3:25


Nedd Brockmann has set himself what some see as an impossible challenge, running 4000km from Cottesloe Beach to Bondi Beach. Determined to achieve the fastest known time in 40 consecutive days, the Sydney tradie also hopes to raise awareness for a good cause along the way, the We Are Mobilise homeless charity which does outreach programs on the street and provide food and hygiene packs to those sleeping rough. Brockmann hopes to reach a goal of $1 million towards the charity and anticipations the more momentum the run attracts the more money they can raise. “All the training has been done – it's time to get running” he told 6PR Breakfast host Gareth Parker.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Panic: Queer True Crime
Bashed: The Gay Bondi Cliff Murders

Panic: Queer True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 15:12


For decades murders of gay men were happening on the cliffs of Bondi Beaches. Between 1970 and 2010 gay men were hunted, brutally attacked, and in some cases thrown to their deaths from the cliffs of cruising spots above the beautiful beaches of Sydney, Australia. Many of these murders remain unsolved.  John Russell was a barmen in Bondi he'd spent the night with his friends then capped the evening off with a visit to the gay cruising spots above the beaches of Bondi, Australia his body was found the next morning. Ross Warren was an up and coming newsreader who never showed up for his on air job. His body has never been found. Scott Johnson was a brilliant mathematician who was approaching the end of Ph.D. studies when his naked body was found on craggy rocks of Manly beach. Decades of terror and violence in Sydney, Australia treated like sport and a right of passage. Thanks for joining me for Bashed.

Drive with Jim Wilson
Waverley Council says there is 'far superior' technology to shark nets

Drive with Jim Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 5:51


Waverley Council, which takes in Bondi Beach, says there is "far superior" technology out there compared to shark nets but stopped short of calling for their removal.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily Telegraph News & Politics
Playground Recruitment Centre For Radicalised Teens 18/08/2022

Daily Telegraph News & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 2:42


THE school playground is becoming the recruitment centre for teenagers looking to radicalise vulnerable and lonely kids, A SYDNEY mayor whose council takes in Bondi Beach wants shark nets removed this summer despite only one fatal attack occurring on a pro­tected beach since nets were introduced in NSW almost 100 years ago.KISS rock gods Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons have landed, vowing to make the iconic band's final shows in Australia an unforgettable celebration – with full makeup, costumes, flames, fake blood and all the hits. AND.. the desperate battle for the NRL grand final remains in the balance after the ARL Commission again delayed a decision on rugby league's showpiece event.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Strong Enough
James Pratt: Malibu Crush

Strong Enough

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 51:46


Episode 65 of Strong Enough Podcast brings James Pratt, an award-winning actor, director, producer, writer, and luxury auctioneer. He is the recipient of various accolades including: (2021) Best actor at American Golden Picture International Film Festival, (2020) Europe Film Festival – Special Jury Award, and Next Rush Magazine's 2019 Top 5 Under 35 in Australia for Entertainment. He is also a Three Time REB Australian Auctioneer of the Year Winner, (2019, 2020, 2021).  During this episode, James shares how spending time in the Australian Outback as a young man led him to appreciate the beauty of the world amidst tragedy and turmoil and inspired him to follow his dreams. He talks about his newest feature film, Malibu Crush, and what it was like working both in front of and behind the camera. James gives great advice on reaching your goals in life and why focusing on the positives will bring more happiness your way. You don't want to miss this intimate look into the life of this Australian and Hollywood star. #actor #film #entrepreneur Strong Enough Podcast:Merch: StrongEnoughPod.comEpisodes: StrongEnoughPodEpisodes.comSocials: @strongenoughpodstrongenoughpod@gmail.com Guest:James PrattSocials: @james_pratt7mogulproductions.com

Women’s Health Australia Uninterrupted Podcast
Luxe Listings D'Leanne Lewis | Pregnant and Fit at 50

Women’s Health Australia Uninterrupted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:39


If you're a fan of Luxe Listings Sydney, you'll know D'Leanne Lewis, the real estate agent boss who has dominated the industry over the past 20 years. In the Amazon Prime Video series we see the single mum of two kill it with the younger agents, while also bringing up two small humans and maintaining a good fitness routine.Well, make that soon-to-be three small humans. At 50, D'Leanne – who is also Principal of Laing + Simmons Double Bay and Bondi Beach – is pregnant.In this episode, she chats about becoming a success in a male dominated industry, falling pregnant at 50 and how she got her strength back after a tough period in her life.SHOW NOTES:If you're looking for a support group, visit https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/servicesandsupport CREDITS:This podcast was hosted and produced by WH editor-in-chief Lizza Gebilagin, with additional sound editing by Abby Williams.For more from Women's Health Australia, find us on Instagram, visit our website or find the print and digital editions of the magazine. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The QuiverCast
Grayson Hinrichs

The QuiverCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:21


Today we sit down with Grayson Hinrichs,  @grayson_hinrichs all the way from Australia.  Grayson grew up surfing Bondi Beach in Sydney and he tells us how he got the idea to surf.  He tells the story about his and his girlfriends short film Borderless , how it came about and some of the adventures they had along the way.  Grayson explains why surfing has changed so much for him recently, and what it was like winning the gold at ISA World Junior Championship in 2018.  He talks about how diving has helped him surf  bigger waves, while teaching him how to be in tune with the ocean.  And did Grayson really have a pet named Squishy?  Find out!! Support the show

Knockin' Doorz Down
Mike Diamond | A Path to Sobriety, Purpose, Secrets on Mental Agility, Purpose & Finding Your Fuel

Knockin' Doorz Down

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 67:39


Listen to and Subscribe to the podcast on all platforms for more amazing interviews at https://www.KDDPodcast.com © 2021 by KDD Media Company. All rights reserved. #MikeDiamond #onedayatatime #wedorecover Listen to and Subscribe to the podcast on all platforms for more amazing interviews at https://www.KDDPodcast.com © 2021 by KDD Media Company. All rights reserved. #MikeDiamond #onedayatatime #wedorecover Why did Knockin' Doorz Down podcast host Jason LaChance want to talk with Mike? Mike Diamond has achieved a great deal externally, but it is the internal battles that he's confronted with the drive for mastery of self. With knowledge, purpose, and a sense of humor. Mike Diamond is an Author, Television Personality, Director, Life Coach, and Interventionist. Known for his work on the hit TV shows NY Ink and Bondi Ink Tattoo Crew, which is currently nominated for a Logie Award for Best Reality Series. Originally from Perth, Western Australia, Mike got off to a bit of a rough start. Battling undiagnosed dyslexia, he started using drugs and alcohol at age 12. At age 16, he was expelled from Aquinas College and finished at Melville H.S. Immediately after graduation, Mike moved to Sydney and enrolled at the Actors Center. He got a job at a local clothing store which, unbeknownst to him at the time, would change his life forever. Lady Luck was on Mike's side when a customer at the store handed him a Green Card Lottery ticket. Mike won a green card in 1997 and made the move to Miami. Shortly after his arrival, Mike landed a role on the CBS sitcom, Grapevine from Director David Frankel. After Grapevine, Mike moved to NYC, where he worked on various projects including as a guest star on Sex and the City. Mike wrote, created, and starred in a VH1 pilot with former STP and Velvet Revolver frontman, Scott Weiland. Splitting his time between NYC, Miami, and Los Angeles, Mike had regular gigs performing stand-up at Caroline's on Broadway and The Comedy Store. Mike was properly introduced into the tattoo world when he appeared on Miami Ink. He later became the store manager for his good friend, Ami James, at Wooster St and starred in Season 3 of NY Ink. Mike then headed back to his hometown where he wrote, directed, produced, and starred in Bondi Ink Tattoo Crew, based on Bondi Beach. Although Mike has had plenty of “highs” in his life, he has also had his “low” moments along the way. Mike has battled cocaine and alcohol addiction for the majority of his life. The defining moment came at the height of his career while shooting a TV show for VH1. To the outside world, Mike looked like he was living the dream but on the inside, Mike was spiritually bankrupt and miserable. He realized that if he didn't turn his life around, he was going to die. April 16, 2006, was the day Mike Diamond got sober. Since then, Mike has literally helped hundreds of people on the road to recovery. He is on beck and call to all his clients and friends, helping them through their life problems and battles with addiction. This is Mike Diamond in his own words, on the Knockin' Doorz Down podcast. For more on Mike Diamond https://themikediamond.com/ For 51FIFTY use the discount code KDD20 for 20% off! https://51fiftyltm.com/ For more information on Carlos Vieira's autobiography Knockin' Doorz Down, the Carlos Vieira Foundation, the Race 2B Drug-Free, Race to End the Stigma, and Race For Autism programs visit: https://www.carlosvieirafoundation.org/ 

New Books in Geography
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/australian-and-new-zealand-studies

New Books in Sports
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books Network
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Ricetta: "Mortadella fritta cacio e pepe" del ristorante Da Orazio di Bondi

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 8:17


Orazio D'Elia, proprietario del ristorante Da Orazio di Bondi Beach, spiega come fare la "Mortadella fritta".  

ComebaCK
ComebaCK INTERVIEW #395 - Nini Fritz - iConnect/Bucket Lister - Enjoy Your Job And Travel The World

ComebaCK

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 64:13


Nini Fritz is a bucketlister, iConnector and pancake enthusiast, adventuring between Bali and Bondi Beach, Australia. In a fascinating discussion, we talk about dreams, travel, lifestyle, creating bucket lists, and more. Topics include ⁃ Moving away from her native Germany and experiencing the world ⁃ Living as an expat in the serenity of Bali and how life is living there ⁃ The importance of travel and exploring different countries ⁃ The ideas behind her professional life - IConnect (creating social interaction) and bucket list, and how to use these to work abroad ⁃ HER OWN bucket list, and how she's ticking off as time passes ⁃ Helping people connect and communicate together and taking action on their own bucket list ⁃ Inspiring this to live life to the FULLEST and how she does too Her work https://instagram.com/nini_quarantini?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= https://iconnect-strongerthanwifi.com/ https://instagram.com/iconnect_strongerthanwifi?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= And more about ComebaCK at @thecomebackwithck on Instagram.

Drinks Adventures
Brewer turned distiller Ben Stevens of Bondi Liquor Co

Drinks Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 23:45


A podcast for lovers of wine, beer, liquor (incl. whisky, whiskey, bourbon, vodka tequila etc) and cocktails, Drinks Adventures hosts wine makers, brewing and distilling experts, sommeliers, bartenders & more.Founded by three friends with background in drinks and hospitality, Bondi Liquor Co is the first operating distillery in Sydney's eastern suburbs.Co-founder and distiller Ben Stevens has experience in both sales and production, having previously worked at Young Henrys, Clare Valley Brewing and Carlton & United Breweries.He joins us this episode for a chat about the challenges of being the first in a new area, where the authorities are unaccustomed to alcohol production.We'll explore the Bondi Liquor gin range, and the pros and cons of tying your brand name to a globally recognised place, like Bondi Beach.First up though, I asked Ben about the Bondi Liquor Co origin story.Tags:gin, distilling, distillery, distiller, liquor, craft spirits, cocktail, cocktails, Sydney, wine, winemaking, winemaker, viticulture, beer, craft beer, brewing,

Christopher & Eric
Ep. 130 – Christopher & Eric’s True Crime TV Club Serves Up “Deep Water – The Real Story”

Christopher & Eric

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 59:03


Christopher and Eric commence their Pride Month observances in an international way with this riveting tale of anti-gay violence, police misconduct and moving family loyalty from Down Under. In "Deep Water – The Real Story", a rash of suspicious deaths and disappearances of gay men at Sydney's famed Bondi Beach reveals a dark legacy of violent hatred and a police force even more complicit than first meets the eye. Where the documentary ends, Christopher and Eric bring you the hopeful and encouraging outcome to one of the victim's stories. #ItsGettingBetter

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
Alex Prichard (Icebergs Dining Room & Bar) - Adapt, evolve, excel

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 33:23


After leaving home at the age of 15 to move to Sydney, Alex Prichard (Icebergs Dining Room & Bar) landed a job under the mentorship of Massimo Mele. The two formed a great friendship, and it helped Alex find his way in the hospitality sector. After dream gigs and some of the cities best venues, he's now leading the team at one of Australia's most important restaurants.https://www.instagram.com/alexsprichard/?hl=enFollow Deep In The Weeds on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/deepintheweedspodcast/?hl=enFollow Huckhttps://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer)https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

The Theatre of Others Podcast
TOO Episode 113- Conversation with Indigenous artist Tiriki Onus

The Theatre of Others Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 81:04


In this episode, Adam and Budi speak with First Nations Indigenous artist Tiriki Onus. Tiriki Onus is the Senior Lecturer and Head of the Wilin Centre for Indigenous Arts and Cultural Development, Associate Dean (Indigenous) and Deputy Dean (Place) for the Faculty of Fine Arts and Music, Melbourne University.Tiriki graduated from the VCA in 2011 with a Bachelor of Music Performance (Voice). He has performed at dozens of venues around Australia, as well as a series of engagements during his participation in Kwaya's cross-cultural connections journey to Uganda in 2012. He spent ten years as a successful visual artist prior to attending the VCA, with work exhibited around Australia in venues such as Cooee Gallery, Bondi Beach, Queensland Performing Arts Centre, Brisbane, and the Royal Exhibition Buildings and Melbourne Museum, Melbourne, and Old Parliament House, Canberra. He has also worked as an art curator, conservator, theatre set producer, university lecturer, spokesman, and panelist.  He was the Australian curator of the >: John Mawurndjul exhibition for Museum Tinguely in Basel, Switzerland; a project which ran from 2003 to 2005. Tiriki received the Harold Blair Opera Scholarship in 2012 and 2013 and became the University's inaugural Hutchinson Indigenous Fellow in 2014. He is currently undertaking his Ph.D., Biganga: Mapping Paths Back to Knowing, focusing on the revival of ancient technologies and cultural safety through the medium of Possum Cloak making.Mentioned in this episode:Yorta Yorta CountryDja Dja WarrungBlakfullaBunurongBill OnusMoomba FestivalAblazeTo submit a question, please visit http://www.speakpipe.com/theatreofothers for voice recording or submit an email to podcast@theatreofothers.com Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwiseIf you enjoyed this week´s podcast, we´d love for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps with our visibility, and the more people listen to the podcast, the more we can invest in it and make it even better Music credit: https://www.purple-planet.comAdditional compositions by @jack_burmeisterSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/theatreofothers)

Balades gourmandes
L'INTÉGRALE - Voyage à Sidney (30/04/22)

Balades gourmandes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 6:59


Sidney est la ville la plus emblématique de cette île-continent qu'est l'Australie. 7 700 000 km2, 25 millions d'habitants (autant de barbecues) et 60 millions de kangourous. Découverte de Bondi Beach, l'Opéra de Sidney et le Harbour Bridge.

The Scorecard with Liam Flanagan
Bondi Beach to host swimming's hottest rivalry

The Scorecard with Liam Flanagan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 8:15


Ponga to stay in Newcastle Ben Simmons bounces back to the NBA Bondi Beach to host swimming's hottest rivalry Wimbledon to ban Russian players See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bec & Cosi Catch Up - hit107 Adelaide
Cosi Tells The Hilarious Story About Embarrassing His Kids At Bondi!

Bec & Cosi Catch Up - hit107 Adelaide

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 3:22


This morning on the show, Cosi told a hilarious story about his family's Easter long weekend in Sydney. They went to Bondi Beach and he did an epic 'embarrassing dad' moment... See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System  

Agrotitanes
115 | Qué es lo que deseas vivir?

Agrotitanes

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 78:32


“Si un huevo se rompe por una fuerza externa, la vida termina. Si se rompe por una fuerza interna, la vida comienza. Las cosas buenas siempre comienzan desde el interior.” Jim Kwik nuestras raíces somos la abundante naturaleza y estilo de vida ecológica de Australia, con un toque de color y vibrante cultura mexicana. Todos los que conocen a Ere están de acuerdo en que hay algo especial en ella - tal vez sea la mística influencia de su herencia latina. Una infancia vivida en México con un abuelo curandero y el talento de una madre para los remedios caseros y recetas de belleza, hizo que Ere sintiera curiosidad por la naturaleza y la salud. Obtuvo una licenciatura en nutrición y una certificación en naturopatía, flores de Bach y acupuntura. Ere emigró a Australia con una rica herencia cultural Mexicana y en 2002 nació Ere Perez Natural Cosmetics en Bondi Beach, Sydney. Para Ere, la belleza natural se trata de cómo vives tu vida, cómo te conectas con el mundo y cómo nutres tu cuerpo - por dentro y por fuera. una marca Australiana con sabor Mexicano Basado en la ciencia y poder de las plantas y productos botánicos. Creamos maquillaje y productos de cuidado de la piel innovadores para el consumidor actual que busca una belleza minimalista, ética y saludable. Fuente: Ere Perez

101 Part Time Jobs
Alex Cameron & Roy Molloy

101 Part Time Jobs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 39:43


From police corruption ombudsman to pharmacy driver, Alex Cameron and his business partner/saxophonist Roy Molloy had their fair share of vocations growing up in Bondi Beach.OXY MUSIC is out 11 March on Secretly Canadian.Thinking of going to 2000 Trees Festival 6-9 July in Cheltenham, headlined by IDLES, Jimmy Eat World, Thrice and Turnstile?Use the voucher code '101POD' to get 10% off your tickets: https://www.twothousandtreesfestival.co.uk/tickets/Music: Alex Cameron 'Best Life' / Cock Sparrer 'Working' See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

STAGES with Peter Eyers
'There is Nothing Like a Dame' - Showgirl & Drag Doyen; Monique Kelly

STAGES with Peter Eyers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 63:02


Monique Kelly is one of Australia's greatest drag artists. Equally adept at glamorous, torch-song and comic turns, she commands the stage with a comprehensive appreciation of stagecraft, savvy and seduction. Monique first stepped on to a stage at Gilligans, Bondi Beach in 1972, and has never stopped her desire to please an audience.In 1973 she took up residence in Kings Cross and was a featured performer at the Carousel Cabaret and an original cast member of the long-running revue Les Girls, touring Australia and New Zealand.It's at this time that Monique Kelly created the Golden Girls and staged crowd pleasing shows at the Unicorn Hotel, The Flinders Hotel and the Taxi Club. Her cheeky pantos at the Taxi Club set new levels of production and fabulously outrageous costuming for a cast of three.Monique Kelly has headlined at almost every gay hotel and club on Sydney's golden mile. Iconic venues from a time passed, all of which offered a joyous celebration of the art of Drag; the Unicorn, Patches, Capriccios, Tropicana, Flo's Place, Paddington Green Hotel, the Albury and Annie's Bar.In the early nineties Monique joined the original cast of the famous ‘Carlotta and her Beautiful Boys' revue as its comedian. This production show travelled for several years to every major town and City across the entire country playing to packed audiences who would never forget the fantastic experience of seeing this artist at her best.In 2002 she made a triumphant return to our spotlights starring in her own show at The Venus Room, bringing the kind of original performance, not seen on other stages.Monique has been involved with, and worked tirelessly fund raising for all of the major charities related to HIV/AIDS for many years, especially the Luncheon Club. She has appeared in and compered the Luncheon Club's World AIDS Day picnic in the park, as well as the Carols in the Park at Christmas time.In 2002 Monique Kelly was inducted into the DIVA Hall of Fame - an acknowledgement of her generosity, skill and fabulousness as a performer, and Sydney icon.The STAGES podcast is available to access and subscribe from Whooshkaa, Spotify and Apple podcasts. Or from wherever you access your favourite podcasts. A conversation with creatives about craft and career. Recipient of Best New Podcast at 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Follow socials on instagram (stagespodcast) and facebook (Stages).www.stagespodcast.com.au

Why It Matters
Jason Graham-Nye on the Circular Economy and Reinventing Diapers

Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 50:17


The Politics of Everything
123: The Politics of Solar - Mathew Collett

The Politics of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 22:02


Most of us know that Vitamin D is important to our health. Many of us stuck inside offices are actually deficient in Vitamin D, which in a nation where skin cancer is still a major issue, seems ironic. Meet Mathew Collett. He is CEO, director, and co-founder of Solar-D, a Sydney-based company reframing how we experience SPF in the form of revolutionary sunscreens. Growing up on Sydney's iconic coastline Mathew enveloped himself in a beachside lifestyle and the Emerald City's outdoor culture from a very early age - starting as a young nipper (junior surf lifesaver) on the famous sands of Bondi Beach and later on taking up an array of sports including cricket, rugby and his passion for surfing. Growing up in Bondi, where Solar D Derma Tech's life began, Mat has instilled his active lifestyle and passion for outdoor activities to his three teenage kids who spend any spare moment following in their father's footsteps by taking on water sports, surfing, team sports and becoming volunteer Surf Life Savers at the Bondi Surf Bathers Life Savers Club. Solar D Derma Tech is hailed as the biggest development in SPF technology in over 50 years, the technology is formulated to allow through more of the UVB light that our bodies use to naturally produce Vitamin D, whilst still offering broad SPF protection. After securing patents in territories all around the world, Mat began to build the Solar D brand, spending the last several years re-educating and shifting the public mindset toward using the new sunscreen which benefits from the Activated Vitamin D SPF Technology, while continuing the overall importance of a ‘slip slop slap' mentality. Mathew has over 30 years of experience across startups, Banking, Corporate Advisory, FMCG, and Business Development. Mathew spent over 20 years in corporate banking and financial markets where he developed a key understanding of financial instruments, business management, and client relationships. Mathew was a former Director at JBWere (now Goldman Sachs Australia) and Managing Director of ICAP Australia where he specialized in fixed income, private equity, venture capital investments, and corporate advisory for early-stage business across multiple sectors. He was also co-founder of Australia's oldest and largest Lime Farm, Lime Grove, which created a large range of Lime-based FMCG products which sold over 75% through Australia's largest grocery chain, Woolworth's. Prior to Solar D, he helped fund, build and commercialize Cocoon Data (now Covata), a data security company now listed on the ASX (CVT). Mathew discusses in the podcast: Why solar in terms of your business focus? What do you like about this business most? How do we safely use sunscreen and still keep producing a natural level of Vitamin D? Explain why this is so important. What is a “vitamin D promoting SPF technology” about and what should we all understand it to mean in terms of products? Why do we need more of the “good Vitamin D” and has your business found differences globally given different climates and environmental conditions for people? Who have been your greatest mentors (1 or 2) and what has made them have such an impact in your life Take away: What is your final takeaway message for us on The Politics of Solar? For more about Mathew: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mathew-collett-728b6012/ W: http://www.solar-d.com/

Ocean Protect Podcast
Volvo Ocean Lovers Festival 2022 with Anita Kolni & Carolyn Grant

Ocean Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2022 29:37


Anita and Caz join us to talk about the amazing Volvo Ocean Lovers Festival that they founded - which is happening at Bondi Beach 10-13 March 2022. Anita and Caz were last on the podcast two years ago, in the lead up to the 2020 Ocean Lovers Festival - just before a little thing called Covid forced the cancellation of the festival. But it takes more than a pandemic to stop these two. We talk about the ups and downs of the last two years, and what it takes to help protect the ocean with a big dose of love.Useful links:https://www.oceanloversfestival.com/Our previous Ocean Protect Podcast chat "Anita Kolni and Carolyn Grant are ocean love trailblazers" (from March 2020): https://open.spotify.com/episode/72H399cjkHrfb97nKO9gpX?si=b526e075ef6542e1 For further information about Ocean Protect, check us out at www.oceanprotect.com.au See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
#OzWatch: Tsunami on Bondi Beach. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 10:28


Photo:   Family camp/fishing trip in the Australian bush early 1900s @Batchelorshow #OzWatch: Tsunami on Bondi Beach. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jan/16/australia-tsunami-warning-east-coast-beaches-closed-after-undersea-volcano-erupts-near-tonga

Just Hit Play
Episode 33. Iron Butterfly In-a-gadda-da-vidda and Patience by Tame Impala. Independent artist is Selfish Sons

Just Hit Play

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 40:51


Will In a gadda da-vida break Nicks brain?  We also listen to the beautiful Patience by Tame Impala.  Our independent artist is Selfish Sons and the song Hard enough.  Theme song: by Braden Mutch: www.instagram.com/braden_mutch/www.facebook.com/bradenmutchmusicClosing track by Selfish Sons:  Hard EnoughYouTube: www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5fFr5ip__MSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/5Fqu2dYwt7GFleLcxCEYKEInstagram: www.instagram.com/selfishsons/?hl=enSpotify playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4BWn1zZb6nMgWTcDb6oACdInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/justhitplaypodcast/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JusthitplaypodcastEmail: justhitplay7300@gmail.com

Have The Nerve: A Podcast About Disability
Episode 11: Tourism, Access and City Planning with Access Bondi

Have The Nerve: A Podcast About Disability

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 23:09


Now that Summer is upon us in the Southern Hemisphere, Mike Cerrone, Project Officer for Waverley Council's Access Bondi! talks to Susan about why it's important for tourist destinations to be accessible for all people of all abilities. Bondi Beach is a popular tourist destination on the east coast of Australia that brings in millions of visitors every year. We talk about how decent and suitable access can change society's perceptions on inclusion, give people freedom of choice when they go out and how your input can help encourage local councils to make accessibility a priority.Information about what we have discussed in this episode:Access Bondi! - https://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/community/disability_inclusion/access_bondiBondi Beach - https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-east/bondi/beach-lifestyleNRMA x SCIA November 2021 joint report 'Where Do I Park?' - https://www.mynrma.com.au/-/media/nrma-where-do-i-park-report.pdf Waverley Council Access & inclusion planning   https://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/community/disability_inclusion/access_and_inclusion_planningWaverley Council Access Committee  https://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/council/advisory_committees/access_committeeWaverley Council Small Grants - https://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/community/awards_forums_and_grants/small_grants_programCreditsThis episode has been written, produced and edited by Susan Wood with assistance by Michelle Kearney and Nathan Mikhael. Logo art by Cobie Ann Moore.Spinal Cord Injuries Australia is a for-purpose organisation that supports people with a spinal cord injury and other neurological conditions. For more information about our supports and services visit scia.org.au.

All That Glitters
Kerri Pottharst

All That Glitters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 60:40


In life, I’m coming to realise more and more, that mindset is everything. That was certainly the case for Kerri Pottharst and her incredible win on Bondi Beach at the 2000 Olympics with teammate Natalie Cook. Their gold-medal winning mindset took them to the top of their sport at a home Olympics and is something that Kerri continues to utilise to this day. That’s how she was able to push herself on the SAS course at 55 years old and continues to grow and develop to help other women reach their high performance potential. Kerri is a wonderfully inspiring woman, who doesn’t let anything slow her down. I know you’ll love this chat!! Enjoy x Instagram: @kerripottharst Website: https://www.kerripottharst.com Contact hello@strozkiymedia.com for sponsorship opportunities. Host: Libby Trickett Instagram: @allthatglitterspod Produced by: Strozkiy Media (@strozkiymedia) www.strozkiymedia.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Politics of Everything
113: The Politics of Buyer's Agents - Michelle Tucker and Linda Johnson

The Politics of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:16


Buying property is expensive especially in Australia's biggest cities and regional areas now surging too (thanks Covid), with purchasers paying stamp duty, conveyancing, and legal fees, not to mention the huge deposit required. So, would you really want to pay more for something you could do yourself? Well, recently I did. For the first time ever, my husband and I engaged a buyer's agent to find us a Coastal family home that had some non-negotiables, a set time frame, and a strict budget – so the agency we used Spring Buyer's Agency is run by Michelle Tucker and Linda Johnson, and they were worth every cent – having found us the right property in 8 days. As background, Linda brings a diverse and varied skill set to Spring Buyers Agency, having operated in multiple roles in her 23 years' experience within the Real Estate industry.  Beginning in residential sales, she was mentored by an industry leader and spent 10 years as a successful selling agent in one of Australia's most iconic and desirable locations - Bondi Beach. She held senior leadership positions, functioning as Director of Operations with Raine & Horne Bondi Beach, Head of Residential Sales with LJ Hooker Lower North Shore, and was General Manager with the Australian operation of LINK Franchising, the largest business brokerage firm in the world. Linda also achieved her Master of Business Administration (MBA) in 2016. Michelle's 15 years' experience within the property industry is built on an intimate understanding of market conditions and a drive to achieve outstanding results. Beginning her career with LJ Hooker Terrigal, she worked as a specialist property developer on the Central Coast. Most recently, as Head of Projects for McGrath Central Coast, Michelle managed all medium to large scale off-plan development projects. Buyer's agents work for buyers to find a suitable property according to the buyer's brief and often negotiate the purchase on behalf of the buyer. Depending on the service needed, they may charge a set fee, starting from as little as $100 to attend an auction for you. For a full search, inspection, and negotiation service, they may charge a percentage of the property's sale price, which can be up to 3 percent, plus GST. When houses in my home city of Sydney now selling well over $1.5 million, that adds up to a lot of money when you pay another service. So, is it worth it? Like all my guests, I wanted to remind you that they are not being paid nor vice versa. We cover in this podcast: What is a buyer's agent and how did you become one? How did the sector grow and who uses a buyer's agent? Is it just for wealthy people? What has been the hardest thing about being a buyer's agent – are you ever been unsuccessful for a client for whatever reason? How do you ensure they get a great property and not pay too much or feel obligated to say yes faster than normal market conditions? Take away: What is your final takeaway message on The Politics of Buyer's Agents? To connect more with Linda and Michelle: Website: https://www.springbuyersagency.com.au/

Bondi Badlands
Introducing Bondi Badlands

Bondi Badlands

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 11:15


Ahead of the first episode of Bondi Badlands this week, listen to host and Good Weekend deputy editor Greg Callaghan in conversation with Good Weekend editor Katrina Strickland about the series and a special preview of what to expect. For over 15 years, Greg Callaghan has been writing about the murders of gay men at the clifftops on the southern headland of Sydney's Bondi. This was the epicentre of a wave of gay hate killings that spread across Sydney at the time. Now Callaghan hosts a podcast which delves into the factors behind this war on gay men and why these murders continue to reverberate as cold cases. Become a subscriber: our supporters power our newsrooms and are critical for the sustainability of news coverage. Becoming a subscriber also gets you exclusive behind-the-scenes content and invitations to special events. Click on the links to subscribe https://subscribe.theage.com.au/ or https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bondi Badlands
Coming soon - Bondi Badlands

Bondi Badlands

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 1:03


Launching Saturday October 2, Bondi Badlands, a new podcast from The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, investigates a series of murders and mysterious disappearances that happened on the southern headland at Sydney's Bondi Beach in the late 1980s and early 1990s.  When a high profile TV newsreader and weatherman disappeared on the Bondi cliff tops on a frigid winter's night in July 1989, it received nationwide news coverage but such a shoddy police investigation that links would not be drawn to a series of other murders at Bondi and across Sydney at the time. More than a decade later, one police investigator would join the dots, revealing a dark mosaic of murder that would keep unfolding to this day. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off The Podium
Episode 134 - Kerri Pottharst Interview

Off The Podium

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 75:44


A massive interview for you today as we get our first ever taste of Beach Volleyball on the show by speaking with the legendary two-time Olympic medallist Kerri Pottharst about her amazing career and Olympic experiences! We learn from Kerri how a random moment from her brother got her into the sport and how that lead to an amazing indoor career throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. We also learn about the transition into beach volleyball, what lead her to partnering up with Natalie Cook and what her experiences were like throughout her three Olympics. Added to this we find out just what it was like to experience that gold medal win in front of 10,000 screaming fans at Bondi Beach and everything else that followed, as well as just where the sport is at now in Australia and how the recent silver medal win in Tokyo by Taliqua Clancy & Mariafe Artacho del Solar will help spur on a new generation of volleyball players leading into Brisbane 2032. It's an exciting chat with an exciting guest that you won't want to miss!