Podcasts about Nordic

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  • 2,125PODCASTS
  • 4,127EPISODES
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  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 25, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Nordic

Show all podcasts related to nordic

Latest podcast episodes about Nordic

The Lawfare Podcast
Finnish and Swedish Perspectives on NATO Membership

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 52:51


Finland and Sweden have made the historic choice to apply to NATO, but there's a lot of misunderstanding out there about the context for these decisions. To talk through it all, David Priess sat down with Emanuel Örtengren, the acting director of the Stockholm Free World Forum, a Swedish foreign and security policy think tank; Minna Ålander from the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, where she focuses on northern Europe and Nordic security; and Henri Vanhanen a foreign policy advisor to Finland's center-right National Coalition Party. They discussed the history of Finnish and Swedish nonalignment, the shift in public and government opinion toward NATO in recent months, and both countries' processes for applying to the alliance.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in East Asian Studies
The “Post-Abe” era, Japan under Fumio Kishida with Paul Midford

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 27:51


Does Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida´s new administration represent the true beginning of the “Post-Abe” era for Japan? After the one-year transitional administration of Yoshihide Suga, Kishida was able to win a three-year term as head of the LDP, the premiership, and lower house election in fall 2021. Since then Kishida has proven to be reasonably popular, and is leaving his stamp on Japanese foreign policy, abandoning Abe´s close ties with Russian President Putin with a hardline toward Russia. Domestically Kishida promotes a “New Capitalism” that promises a reduction in income inequality compared to Abenomics. In this episode Kenneth Bo Nielsen is joined by Paul Midford to look at the new Kishida administration and discuss whether it will set Japan on a new course. Paul Midford is professor of political science at Meiji Gakuin University and the author of a recent book on Japan, “Overcoming Isolationism - Japan's Leadership in East Asian Security Multilateralism”. Kenneth Bo Nielsen is an Associate Professor at the dept. of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo and one of the leaders of the Norwegian Network for Asian Studies. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Political Science
The “Post-Abe” era, Japan under Fumio Kishida with Paul Midford

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 27:51


Does Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida´s new administration represent the true beginning of the “Post-Abe” era for Japan? After the one-year transitional administration of Yoshihide Suga, Kishida was able to win a three-year term as head of the LDP, the premiership, and lower house election in fall 2021. Since then Kishida has proven to be reasonably popular, and is leaving his stamp on Japanese foreign policy, abandoning Abe´s close ties with Russian President Putin with a hardline toward Russia. Domestically Kishida promotes a “New Capitalism” that promises a reduction in income inequality compared to Abenomics. In this episode Kenneth Bo Nielsen is joined by Paul Midford to look at the new Kishida administration and discuss whether it will set Japan on a new course. Paul Midford is professor of political science at Meiji Gakuin University and the author of a recent book on Japan, “Overcoming Isolationism - Japan's Leadership in East Asian Security Multilateralism”. Kenneth Bo Nielsen is an Associate Professor at the dept. of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo and one of the leaders of the Norwegian Network for Asian Studies. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
The “Post-Abe” era, Japan under Fumio Kishida with Paul Midford

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 27:51


Does Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida´s new administration represent the true beginning of the “Post-Abe” era for Japan? After the one-year transitional administration of Yoshihide Suga, Kishida was able to win a three-year term as head of the LDP, the premiership, and lower house election in fall 2021. Since then Kishida has proven to be reasonably popular, and is leaving his stamp on Japanese foreign policy, abandoning Abe´s close ties with Russian President Putin with a hardline toward Russia. Domestically Kishida promotes a “New Capitalism” that promises a reduction in income inequality compared to Abenomics. In this episode Kenneth Bo Nielsen is joined by Paul Midford to look at the new Kishida administration and discuss whether it will set Japan on a new course. Paul Midford is professor of political science at Meiji Gakuin University and the author of a recent book on Japan, “Overcoming Isolationism - Japan's Leadership in East Asian Security Multilateralism”. Kenneth Bo Nielsen is an Associate Professor at the dept. of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo and one of the leaders of the Norwegian Network for Asian Studies. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Wake Up to Money
The CEO pay gap

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 51:43


Sean Farrington speaks to the High Pay Centre think-tank about their latest research, which finds that there is a growing pay gap between FTSE 350 workers and CEOs, plus we speak to a charity in Glasgow about the issues people in the city are facing as the cost of living goes up. Plus, after Russian halts gas supply to Finland, what will it mean for the Nordic nation and the west?

Nordic FoodTech
Nordic Wasabi grows in the greenhouses of Iceland

Nordic FoodTech

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 52:41


Real wasabi is rare and expensive. It requires a specific temperature and a constant stream of fresh water to grow, which has isolated it to the mountains of Japan. That was until Nordic Wasabi came along. They're growing wasabi in Iceland using the country's natural geothermal energy and freshwater. In today's episode, we tell Nordic Wasabi's startup story. We cover everything you could want to know about real wasabi, the amazing possibilities that come with greenhouses, and the challenges of being the first company in Iceland to try and export vegetables. Episode Transcript Related Links Get 15% off Nordic Wasabi with the code NORDICFOODTECH Why food matters to tourism Exploring different kinds of agriculture More episodes on Iceland Subscribe to the podcast

Scandinavian MIND
Einride's new autonomous trailer and fashion education's digital makeover (with Saina Koohnavard)

Scandinavian MIND

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 41:05


In this episode we discuss:Einride's Mesh event and the newly launched autonomous trailer.Inside fashion education's digital makeoverWith: Konrad Olsson, Editor-in-Chief & Founder, Erik Sedin, Junior Editor, Oliver Dahle, Fashion contributor, and Saina Koohnavard, fashion lecturer. Scandinavian MIND Weekly is our show about current trends and events within business, tech, fashion, design, culture, and more. From the Nordic perspective of our team of editors and contributors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Startup Insider
Münchner IoT-Startup Proglove wird von Nordic Capital übernommen (Wearables • Logistik • Exit)

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 24:15


In der Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir Thomas Kirchner, Co-Founder von ProGlove und sprechen mit ihm über den Exit des Startups. Das Geschäftsmodell besteht aus integrierten Hardware- und Softwarelösungen, die auf Handschuhen mit Barcode-Scannern basieren und eine freihändige Datenerfassung ermöglichen. Damit fördert das Startup die Digitalisierung in Fertigungsbereichen sowie Produktionsstätten und erhöht mitarbeiterfreundlich die Effizienz. Kunden aus über 30 Ländern vertrauen auf die Produkte von ProGlove, darunter u.a. Mercedes-Benz, VW, BMW, DHL, Lufthansa, Mediamarkt, XPO Logistics, GAP und Staples. An seinen Standorten in München, Chicago und Belgrad beschäftigt der Branchenpionier über 250 Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter. ProGlove wurde 2014 von Thomas und Paul Günther in München gegründet. Der europäische Private-Equity-Investor Nordic Capital verkündete nun eine Investition in Proglove und wird somit Mehrheitseigentümer. Nordic Capital hat seit 1989 mehr als 19 Milliarden Euro in rund 120 Unternehmen investiert. Das Portfolio umfasst Unternehmen wie Sortera, iLOQ, die Consilium Safety Group und die Cary Group. Die Transaktion steht unter dem Vorbehalt der behördlichen Genehmigungen. Die Gründer und das Management von ProGlove bleiben Minderheitseigentümer. Die bisherigen Investoren von ProGlove waren Summit Partners, DI Technology und Bayern Kapital. Die Summe des Exits ist unbekannt, allerdings liegt die Bewertung von ProGlove laut Medienberichtet bei ca. 500 Millionen Euro.

UF Health Podcasts
To lower cholesterol and blood sugar, try the Nordic diet

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


For a long time, a Nordic diet has been known to help with weight…

New Books Network
Ethnographic Perspectives on Change and Continuity in China

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 36:10


The People's Republic of China has undergone tumultuous and varied sociocultural developments over the course of its history. In this episode, Dr. Suvi Rautio talks about some of the ways in which people and communities have dealt with the resulting change (or lack of it) based on her ethnographic research. Dr. Rautio is currently working on a research project dealing with Maoist China, drawing from her own family history in Beijing to explore how intellectuals navigated life in China's capital during social upheaval. By contrast, Dr. Rautio's previous research has focused on rural village life in Southwest China – she has conducted fieldwork in a traditional Dong ethnic minority village where villagers and authorities try to combine heritage preservation and socioeconomic modernisation. We also discuss how similar struggles between preserving the old and making way for the new have unfolded in modern-day Beijing. Suvi Rautio is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki. Her current project focuses on the transmission of memory and loss among Beijing's intellectual class during the Maoist era. She has also hosted podcasts on Chinese studies and anthropology in the New Books Network. Ari-Joonas Pitkänen is a doctoral candidate at the Centre for East Asian Studies, University of Turku. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Ethnographic Perspectives on Change and Continuity in China

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 36:10


The People's Republic of China has undergone tumultuous and varied sociocultural developments over the course of its history. In this episode, Dr. Suvi Rautio talks about some of the ways in which people and communities have dealt with the resulting change (or lack of it) based on her ethnographic research. Dr. Rautio is currently working on a research project dealing with Maoist China, drawing from her own family history in Beijing to explore how intellectuals navigated life in China's capital during social upheaval. By contrast, Dr. Rautio's previous research has focused on rural village life in Southwest China – she has conducted fieldwork in a traditional Dong ethnic minority village where villagers and authorities try to combine heritage preservation and socioeconomic modernisation. We also discuss how similar struggles between preserving the old and making way for the new have unfolded in modern-day Beijing. Suvi Rautio is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki. Her current project focuses on the transmission of memory and loss among Beijing's intellectual class during the Maoist era. She has also hosted podcasts on Chinese studies and anthropology in the New Books Network. Ari-Joonas Pitkänen is a doctoral candidate at the Centre for East Asian Studies, University of Turku. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

The Nordic Asia Podcast
Ethnographic Perspectives on Change and Continuity in China

The Nordic Asia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 36:10


The People's Republic of China has undergone tumultuous and varied sociocultural developments over the course of its history. In this episode, Dr. Suvi Rautio talks about some of the ways in which people and communities have dealt with the resulting change (or lack of it) based on her ethnographic research. Dr. Rautio is currently working on a research project dealing with Maoist China, drawing from her own family history in Beijing to explore how intellectuals navigated life in China's capital during social upheaval. By contrast, Dr. Rautio's previous research has focused on rural village life in Southwest China – she has conducted fieldwork in a traditional Dong ethnic minority village where villagers and authorities try to combine heritage preservation and socioeconomic modernisation. We also discuss how similar struggles between preserving the old and making way for the new have unfolded in modern-day Beijing. Suvi Rautio is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki. Her current project focuses on the transmission of memory and loss among Beijing's intellectual class during the Maoist era. She has also hosted podcasts on Chinese studies and anthropology in the New Books Network. Ari-Joonas Pitkänen is a doctoral candidate at the Centre for East Asian Studies, University of Turku. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast

New Books in Chinese Studies
Ethnographic Perspectives on Change and Continuity in China

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 36:10


The People's Republic of China has undergone tumultuous and varied sociocultural developments over the course of its history. In this episode, Dr. Suvi Rautio talks about some of the ways in which people and communities have dealt with the resulting change (or lack of it) based on her ethnographic research. Dr. Rautio is currently working on a research project dealing with Maoist China, drawing from her own family history in Beijing to explore how intellectuals navigated life in China's capital during social upheaval. By contrast, Dr. Rautio's previous research has focused on rural village life in Southwest China – she has conducted fieldwork in a traditional Dong ethnic minority village where villagers and authorities try to combine heritage preservation and socioeconomic modernisation. We also discuss how similar struggles between preserving the old and making way for the new have unfolded in modern-day Beijing. Suvi Rautio is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki. Her current project focuses on the transmission of memory and loss among Beijing's intellectual class during the Maoist era. She has also hosted podcasts on Chinese studies and anthropology in the New Books Network. Ari-Joonas Pitkänen is a doctoral candidate at the Centre for East Asian Studies, University of Turku. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

Adafruit Industries
EYE on NPI - nRF5340 Audio Development Kit

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 16:05


This week's EYE ON NPI is chillin' and listening to some vibin' beats - we're featuring Nordic's jam-packed nRF5340 Audio Development Kit (https://www.digikey.com/en/product-highlight/n/nordic-semi/nrf5340-audio-development-kit) that will get you going fast with Bluetooth Low Energy audio development with a lovely kit that has everything you need to build both basic and advanced BTLE audio demos that exercise all the new capabilities of BT 4.x and 5.x's native audio streaming technology Audio was one of the first killer app's for Bluetooth adoption. Who doesn't remember when ubiquitous 'hands-free' headsets (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headset_(audio)#Bluetooth_wireless_headsets) started popping up in every business guy's ear. For mobile devices, these headsets turned out be quick to pair, and allowed people to talk, or listen to music, while driving or working without wires. Bluetooth classic audio is still incredibly popular today: not just used in headsets but also in Bluetooth speakers (https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/klein-tools-inc/AEPJS2/11570486), hearing aids, wireless mics, home voice agents, and more! When the audio profile was first invented, there were a few, totally reasonable restrictions placed on how it was used. First, it's a point-to-point connection - also called source-sink connection. There's a supplier source of audio - say the MP3 player - and a destination sink like a speaker. Second, the compression codec had to match the processor and battery capabilities of late 90's technology. The first classic codec was called SBC, although recently there are newer codecs that can do a better job with reducing lossyness and, of course, can take advantage of the Moore's-law improvements in memory and processor capabilities. Unfortunately, as one can expect in such a technology space, many of the codecs are patented, licensed, and require per-device fees. Also, unless you know what to look for, it's harder to compare two headsets with different codecs, as another variable that affects audio quality and delay. While many non-audio/non-keyboard devices have thankfully moved from BT classic to BTLE, mostly in order to avoid Apple's MFI program, there's been a bit of a lag in getting audio devices to switch over from classic to LE due to the high inertia of technological laziness. However, in the last few years, a Really Good Reason to move over has been invented: AirPods! (https://www.apple.com/shop/product/MME73AM/A/airpods-3rd-generation) Yep, when Apple came out with their new wireless Bluetooth earbuds, they had to come up with a custom BTLE protocol - because there's two sinks and one source, and even if you created two connections (one for left and one for right) the source would have to work hard to synchronize audio. Sure Apple can put the time and money into that kind of development, but what about everyone else who wanted to make similar products? That's why when BTLE audio came 'free' with multi-point transmission and synchronization and an improved free codec, folks' ears started perking up. With Nordic's new nRF5340 ADK (https://www.digikey.com/short/vm7q7fwz), creating advanced BTLE Audio applications is super fast. The nRF5340 is a dual core ARM processor, which means it's easy to have one core dedicated to codec management and DMA audio streaming, and the other core for interfacing and control. The free software examples (https://developer.nordicsemi.com/nRF_Connect_SDK/doc/latest/nrf/applications/nrf5340_audio/README.html) come with two main demos right now: a synchronous example for making wireless earbuds, and a broadcast example for sending audio to multiple sinks. Note that for these examples you'll often want two ADKs so you can stream audio to both ADKs as a way to mimic earbuds, for example. And, have you heard the good news? Digi-key has a TON of the nRF5340 Audio Development Kit (https://www.digikey.com/short/vm7q7fwz) in stock right now for immediate shipment. Each ADK has all the accessory hardware needed to immediately bootstrap your BTLE example project. (Hint, it's also a great dev board for general nRF5340 development, with SD card, built in debugger, power management, Arduino-esque headers, RGB LEDs, and user interface buttons. Pick up two of these dev kits today and you can be jammin' and boppin' by tomorrow afternoon!

Newshour
Finland and Sweden to join NATO: Turkey objects

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 49:27


All thirty current NATO members have to approve membership for Sweden and Finland but one country - Turkey - is threatening to exercise its veto, accusing the two Nordic neighbours of harbouring Kurdish militants. Also on the programme: the UN security council meets to discuss the global food shortage caused by the war in Ukraine; we hear from a Ukrainian farmer desperate to get his grain to market; and why the Dutch prime minister is in trouble for using an old Nokia phone. (Photo: A member of the Norwegian army participates in a military exercise called "Cold Response 2022", gathering around 30,000 troops from NATO member countries as well as Finland and Sweden Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman)

Matt & Aunie
Dixon & Vining Hour 3 (05/19/22)

Matt & Aunie

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:24


Woman jumps into Spider monkeys enclosure to feed them Cheetos/ Nestle comes to the rescue, flying in baby formula from Nordic countries and interview with Senate candidate Mo Brooks. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nordic Mythology Podcast
116 - Oh My Nordic Goddesses!

Nordic Mythology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 93:21


This week Mathias and Daniel are throwing it back to the old days, which if you're new around here means no guest. The topic this week is everything you ever wanted to know about the Nordic Pantheon Goddesses. We did our best with the subject but as you can imagine when you're covering everything from the original, "send feet pics" story, to why Thor is best girl, it's going to get very complicated very quickly!check us out on Instagram at: www.instagram.com/nordicmythologypodcastAnd if you like what we do, and would like to be in the audience for live streams of new episodes to ask questions please consider supporting us on Patreon:www.patreon.com/NordicMythologyPodcastTo check out Dan's company, Horns of Odin, and their wide range of handmade items inspired by Nordic Mythology and the Viking Age. Visit: www.hornsofodin.comSupport the show

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - SCOTUS Makes Bribing a Member of Congress Easier and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 28:43


Bill Handel talks about how the Supreme Court has made it easier to bribe a member of Congress. Also, how Putin's war in Ukraine backfired and fueled NATO's Nordic expansion. Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee join Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News. The trio discusses news topics that include: Former Minneapolis officer Thomas Lane has plead guilty to manslaughter in George Floyd's death, the Russian soldier being tried for war crimes in Ukraine has plead guilty to killing an unarmed civilian, and a mother is facing charges after her 2nd grade son brought a gun to a Disney magnet school and it having discharged while in his backpack.

Scandinavian MIND
Values in the metaverse: Laura Olin (ZOAN)

Scandinavian MIND

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 49:57


This is the second part of our new podcast series Values in the Metaverse. In this series, we will interview designers, experts, and entrepreneurs working with digital fashion, metaverse, and NFTs. When we're creating a new digital universe, what kind of values do we want in it? This is the Nordic perspective.This time we're guested by Laura Olin, the COO and partner of the Finnish virtual reality studio ZOAN. As digital worlds takes hold, Laura Olin underscores the importance of Nordic values. The Scandinavian Mind podcast is a bi-weekly show, about the intersection of lifestyle and technology. Every Wednesday, we publish an in-depth interview with an innovator from the worlds of design, fashion, beauty, mobility or tech. And every Friday, we publish a panel talk or other behind the scenes content from the world of Scandinavian MIND. Sign up to our newsletter for instant access to all our content. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Fourcast
Nato goes Nordic: why Finland and Sweden want to join

The Fourcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 26:55


Finland's Parliament has overwhelmingly endorsed joining Nato, while Sweden's ruling party has broken with 200 years of neutrality to follow their Nordic neighbours in jumping on the alliance bandwagon. The Ukraine War has forced this profound geopolitical moment - but why are the Finns more keen on the move than the Swedes? In today's podcast, we travel to Helsinki.

AP Audio Stories
Nordic NATO bids move forward but Turkey could derail deal

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 0:46


Finland Sweden NATO Intro and Voicer

The Greek Current
Why is Erdogan standing in the way of Sweden and Finland's NATO bid?

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 14:57


Turkey surprised its NATO allies last week by saying it would not view the applications of Sweden and Finland positively, and on Monday Turkish President Erdogan doubled down on comments last week indicating that the two Nordic countries´ path to NATO would be anything but smooth. Erdogan also cited Greece to express his disagreement over Finland and Sweden joining the transatlantic alliance. Expert Alan Makovsky joins Thanos Davelis today to break down what the key issues are, look at what Erdogan hopes to gain with this policy, and break down what this means for US-Turkish relations. Alan Makovsky is a senior fellow for national security and international policy at the Center for American Progress, and has worked on Turkey and the region in several capacities, including as a senior staff member on the Committee on Foreign Affairs in the House of Representatives and at the State Department.You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Erdogan says Swedish, Finnish delegations should not bother coming to TurkeyTurkey objects as Sweden, Finland seek NATO membershipBiden praises Greece for ‘moral leadership' after Russia invasionNATO does not need more tension between Greece and Turkey, Mitsotakis tells university audienceEU growth forecast cut as war in Ukraine fuels inflationCommission delivers gloomy numbers but tries to bat away stagflation fears

This Week in Geopolitics
A precarious moment in history

This Week in Geopolitics

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 68:47


In today's episode we talk about, the riots in Sri Lanka and go over the prospect of the country teetering on the edge of a revolution. After that we'll discuss Turkey's opposition to Finland and Sweden joining NATO and the potentially dangerous situation that may create if NATO prioritizes the 2 Nordic countries over Turkey. Lastly we're gonna talk about the ASEAN meeting in DC, it's true purpose and some of the Statements that were made there. All that and more! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/haisean/support

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
War On Ukraine: Finland And Sweden To Join NATO

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:23


Both Finland and Sweden have announced that they are seeking membership into NATO and the treaty organization could fast track their formal applications. Russian President Vladimir Putin says he is not threatened by this expansion of NATO but warned against any sort of military build up in either of the countries. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Hugh Dugan, former US Delegate to the United Nations and served on the Trump administration's National Security Council, about the decision of the two Nordic countries to end decades of neutrality. Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
War On Ukraine: Finland And Sweden To Join NATO

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:23


Both Finland and Sweden have announced that they are seeking membership into NATO and the treaty organization could fast track their formal applications. Russian President Vladimir Putin says he is not threatened by this expansion of NATO but warned against any sort of military build up in either of the countries. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Hugh Dugan, former US Delegate to the United Nations and served on the Trump administration's National Security Council, about the decision of the two Nordic countries to end decades of neutrality. Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
War On Ukraine: Finland And Sweden To Join NATO

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:23


Both Finland and Sweden have announced that they are seeking membership into NATO and the treaty organization could fast track their formal applications. Russian President Vladimir Putin says he is not threatened by this expansion of NATO but warned against any sort of military build up in either of the countries. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Hugh Dugan, former US Delegate to the United Nations and served on the Trump administration's National Security Council, about the decision of the two Nordic countries to end decades of neutrality. Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ray Appleton
Hour 1 - Law Requiring Women On Corporate Boards Unconstitutional. Putin May Have Cancer. McDonald's Russia Leaving Country. Finland To Join NATO

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:26


A Los Angeles judge has ruled that California's landmark law requiring women on corporate boards is unconstitutional. Commentators on social media have speculated about Russian President Vladimir Putin's health in recent weeks, suggesting that the notorious leader seems to be showing signs of fatigue and possible illness amid the ongoing military invasion of Ukraine launched on February 24. McDonald's became the symbol of glasnost in action 30 years ago when it opened its first restaurant in Moscow. But after temporarily shutting down more than 800 restaurants following the invasion of Ukraine, McDonald's has decided to leave Russia altogether. Finland will apply to join the NATO military alliance, the country's president said Sunday. It will be a historic move for the Nordic country, which has had a decades-long policy of military neutrality until now. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Soundcheck
Wardruna: Nordic Folk Music of the Ancients, Rooted in Nature (Archives)

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 34:50


Norwegian band Wardruna creates music born of Nordic history, Norse runes and nature - and is led by multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Einar Selvik, who composed music for the TV series Vikings. (He was formerly the drummer in the black metal band Gorgoroth under stage name Kvitrafn, for those keeping track.)  Hear a captivating combination of old and recreated Norse historical instruments: Tagelharpa (bowed harp-lyre), birchbark lure (a trumpet), goat horns, Kraviklyra, instruments from nature: stones, bones, trees, fire and ice, along with sounds captured in nature, vocal techniques of many kinds, and ancient poetry. The 2018 record, Runaljod – Ragnarok, is the third of a trilogy of musical interpretations of each of the twenty-four old Nordic runes (the word rune can also mean magical song). Wardruna performs some of their unusual, spiritual, ancient sounding-modern ritual music in-studio. (From the Archives, 2018.)  -Caryn Havlik Set list: "Wunjo," "Isa," "Helvegen" Watch "Helvegen":

The West Live Podcast
News update: Petrol prices set to SPIKE this week

The West Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 1:13


Petrol in Perth remains on track to break the $2 per litre barrier for the second time in the space of two months when the fortnightly cycle hits a new high on Wednesday. But Motor Trade Association chief executive Stephen Moir tipped unleaded was likely to soar even further beyond that amid fresh uncertainty in global energy markets sparked by fears Russia is on the cusp of cutting off its supply of natural gas to Finland in retaliation to the Nordic nation's plans to join NATO. On Friday, wholesale petrol was selling for 178.9c per litre, the most expensive level it has reached since the end of March. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Finland declares its intention to join the NATO alliance

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 2:55


In our news wrap: Finland made official its declaration to join the western NATO alliance as the fellow Nordic nation of Sweden has also moved a step closer to applying for membership. Also, Turkey remains the greatest obstacle to Finland and Sweden's admission to NATO, and the sprawling city of Shanghai will begin gradually reopening some businesses under a COVID lockdown. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Finland declares its intention to join the NATO alliance

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 2:55


In our news wrap: Finland made official its declaration to join the western NATO alliance as the fellow Nordic nation of Sweden has also moved a step closer to applying for membership. Also, Turkey remains the greatest obstacle to Finland and Sweden's admission to NATO, and the sprawling city of Shanghai will begin gradually reopening some businesses under a COVID lockdown. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Gamereactor TV - English
Assetto Corsa - Acer Predator Race Cup Nordic Finals 2022

Gamereactor TV - English

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 68:57


Coronavirus Daily
Ukraine's military continues to chip away at Russia's positions in the East and South, but still this war has decidedly entered a stalemate

Coronavirus Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:23


Ukraine's military says it recently did major damage to Russian units looking to cross a key river in the northeastern part of the country, inflicting what it says were hundreds of casualties among Russian soldiers ... and a significant loss of armor and equipment. And yet the situation on the ground in both Eastern and Southern Ukraine hasn't changed much in recent days. The war has ground into a stalemate that neither side seems totally capable of winning ... and yet neither side is ready to make concessions. Meanwhile there's a possible fly in the ointment in what looked to be a sure-thing expansion of NATO, by welcoming Finland and Sweden into the alliance. Today Turkey's president raised concerns about allowing the two Nordic countries to join NATO under rushed timetables. It could all be a negotiating ploy to make sure Turkey, which maintains one of NATO's most powerful militaries, gets something out of the deal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #85: Indy Pass President and Founder Doug Fish

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 66:51


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Starting in June, paid subscribers will receive podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoDoug Fish, President and Founder of the Indy PassRecorded onMay 9, 2022About the Indy PassHere’s an overview of the 2022-23 Indy Pass suite:And here’s what that gets you access to:Why I interviewed himIt’s unfortunate that Steamboat, a personal favorite and one of Colorado’s most amiable mountains, has become the avatar for sticker-shock skiing, but there it is: $269 peak-day walk-up lift tickets last season. Any collateral pain is self-inflicted, and they seem committed to the process, so I don’t feel too bad hammering on them about it. Still, for readers of this newsletter, most of whom have next year’s Ikon Passes tucked into their jacket pockets by Easter, my ceaseless yammering about walk-up ticket prices can probably seem tedious and abstract, like detailing the logistical challenges of sustainable asteroid mining or the tolerable viral load of a brontosaurus: who cares?Which is a fair question. But as the three dozen or so mega-resorts that have mainlined this triple-digit ticket tactic race toward $300 for a day of skiing, a cartoonishly absurd double universe has materialized. One that makes comparisons like this possible: for $10 more than an Ikon-oblivious skier would pay for one day at Steamboat, they could have skied 162 days at 81 ski areas with a $279 Indy Pass. Which is probably more days than most skiers rack up in a decade, and more ski areas than they visit in a lifetime.It’s a hell of a bargain, is what I’m trying to say here, and an amazing product that the greater skiing public has, so far, failed to appreciate in large numbers. Indy predicted 400,000 redemptions this past season. The number came in at 125,000. That’s a 68.75 percent miss, which Fish attributes, in this interview, to overzealous predictions coming off the bomber Covid-induced boom season of 2020-21. What that means, for us skiers, is that this thing probably has plenty of room left to grow.“Growth” means a couple things here. First, more resorts are incoming. Fish promised as much in this interview, even in already crowded New England. The smaller-than-expected number of redemptions means the 85 percent cut of Indy revenue that goes to the resorts was not as diluted as Fish feared it could have been (he explains how the pass operates in the interview). Plus, the new Allied Resorts discount program is broad enough that this thing could easily reach a total of 200 downhill partners (it’s not unthinkable that the addition of cross-country ski areas could push that number toward 300).Second, more skiers are likely coming too. That’s a good thing. Numbers bring stability. Wouldn’t more skiers mean more redemptions? Yes, but it means more revenue, too, and since it’s likely that the most hardcore skiers – i.e. those most likely to redeem 30 days – are already in. Fish was comfortable enough with the average number of redemptions that he held prices steady for next season – and sales are strong as a result.For all the attention The Storm lavishes on the Indy Pass, the product is an industry minnow, not even three years old. Yet somehow this little pass with as many annual visits as an Eagle County weekend has stapled itself to the marquee alongside the Epic and Ikon passes, a toddler in size 14 boots. It’s been astonishing to watch it grow, but it will be more amazing still to see what happens when it grows into those knee-high kicks. Fish is the first three-time guest on The Storm Skiing Podcast. Yes, because he’s generous with his time and humble in his approach, but also because he keeps coming up with new things to say, keeps making the story more compelling, keeps making us believe that this is something worth talking about.What we talked aboutContinued discussion on whether any of the Mt. Hood ski areas would ever land on Indy; redemption and sales totals versus expectations for this past ski season; how the Indy Pass works from a business point of view; how Indy is able to sign headliners like Powder Mountain and Jay Peak, which could easily align with the Epic or Ikon passes; how Cannon kept visits high even as the mountain added an enormous number of blackout dates; White Pass finds the Epkon refugees; the power of Brundage and Tamarack as a combined destination; other popular Indy combos; the New England state that will definitely get a new full Indy Pass partner before next season; expansion potential in New York; the chances of Jay staying with Indy post-sale (whenever that happens); why Indy Pass prices will stay steady for 2022-23; why the Indy Pass processing fee exists and why it’s here to stay; the Indy Switch Pass; untangling the spaghetti bowl of last year’s blackout dates; fixing the Saturday problem; thoughts on the recent additions of Kelly Canyon, Bluewood, and Ski Sawmill; the surprising appeal of Swain; finally breaking into Colorado, with Sunlight; the number of Indy Pass visits that originate out of state; thoughts on Japan; dispensing with the resort target number; losing Marmot Basin; the genesis and purpose of the Allied Resorts program; begging Doug to shift Burke to full partner status; and why Indy began including cross-country ski areas and how the response has been so far.          Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewSince it debuted in 2008, the Epic Pass has both held steady and constantly evolved. Its premise, from the beginning, was fairly basic: unlimited access to all Vail Resorts, all the time. It launched with six mountains, and now includes access to 9,000. But almost annually, Vail has added some innovation or another: the Epic Local Pass, various versions of the Epic Day Pass, local and midweek passes, a massive lodging and on-mountain discount program, the Epic Mix tracking app, a payment plan, etc. Some of these innovations were more useful than others, but every year, we can expect something new. And that’s in addition to all the extra ski areas.Vail, skiing’s imperial fleet, rippling with aircraft carriers and battleships and submarines, is well equipped to dream up such annual salvos of newness. It’s impressive that Indy, with a staff that would be insufficient to captain a 30-foot fishing boat, has orchestrated a commando version of this evolution. The 2019 Indy Pass cost $199 and delivered two days each at 34 ski areas. There were no blackouts and no product variation (a few partners offered an add-on pass). The next year: 52 ski areas, plus a $99 kids pass and a $129 add-on pass, available uniformly across all partner ski areas. The Indy+ Pass and a payment plan also debuted. 2021 brought a (probably too large, Fish now admits) price increase, but access to 66 ski areas at launch and an additional 17 by December, including four in Japan.  By the time Indy confirmed its 2022-23 lineup last month, the roster stood at 83 downhill partners. An ambitious cross-country initiative seeks to add more than 30 Nordic partners by winter, and the standalone XC pass is just $69 (all Indy Pass holders get the XC days). And the Allied Resorts program, announced earlier this week, ensures that nearly any ski area that’s interested can fold itself into this nationally marketed network. Fish also held prices steady, upped the renewal discount, and introduced the Indy Switch Pass to encourage Epkon snobs to reconsider.There was plenty to talk about, is my point. And Fish, as always, accommodated, on one condition: for the love of God can we keep it to an hour?Questions I wish I’d askedI had meant to ask Doug about the possibility of pre-loading Indy tickets onto resort’s RFID cards, but I didn’t get to it. While he said that such integrations were “not practical,” he did provide the following statement, teasing a pretty cool tech upgrade coming for the season after next:In partnership with our tech partner Entabeni Systems, we will be rolling out an app for the 2023-24 season [I incorrectly indicated on Twitter earlier this week that this feature would be available for next ski season] that will allow our passholders to carry their pass on their phones. Among other features, it will contain a scannable QR code that can be read at the ticket window, eliminating the need for looking them up in our system.This app can be deployed without passing any additional costs on to our customers which we’d have to do if we issued a physical pass.What we got wrongI intimated that Powder Mountain was outside of the Wasatch Mountains, but the ski area in fact lies within this mountain range. I also suggested that Winter Park was a blacked-out mountain on the Ikon Pass, which it is not (on any version of the product other than the Ikon Session Pass). Doug also referred to “Wintergreen,” West Virginia. He meant Winterplace. Wintergreen is in Virginia, and is not an Indy Pass partner. Doug also referred to the marketing director of Sunlight, Colorado as “Tony Hawks” – his name is Troy Hawks, and you can (and should) follow him on Twitter here, since he’s the man who brough Indy Pass to Colorado.Why you should buy the Indy PassIn my head, gas is always a dollar a gallon. Even decades after that fleeting era when I pushed shopping carts for $4.35 an hour and drove a rusty pick-up, any sum over $15 to fill my gas tank baffles me. Candy bars are forever lodged at 35 cents, Hostess cupcakes at 55 cents – such were the prices when I would peddle my Huffy to the neighborhood Total in the 1980s.I’m sure there’s a name for this pricing nostalgia. Whatever it’s called, the first best thing about the Indy Pass has become a liability, as It-Used-to-Cost-$199 Bro forever peppers social media with his waxings of this bygone era. “When the Indy Pass came out, it was under $200 and there were no blackouts,” he will complain. “And it came with a pair of Volkls and a free Subaru. Now it costs $279, there’s all kinds of blackouts, and the courtesy ‘vehicle’ is just a Shetland pony without a saddle. It’s all going to hell!”Bros across America need to let it go. Yes, last year’s price jump was a little extreme. Fish admits as much in the interview. But it is still a very good deal – had it debuted at $279 with its current roster, it would seem like the greatest thing ever. That’s because it is. The glory in the Indy Pass is not in what it was – a coalition of 34 broadly distributed resorts – but in what it has become and is transforming into. We’re closing in on 100 partners, and we’ll likely blow right past that by the Fourth of July. God bless America. This is one damn fine product.There is one more dumbass Bro out there that befuddles Indy’s ascension: It’s-Not-Worth-It Bro. It’s-Not-Worth-It Bro’s narrative goes something like this: yes, it’s cool that Indy put all these mountains on one pass, but they’re not the sort of ski resorts that are “worth” traveling to Montana/Idaho/Utah for or anything.I beg your pardon? Scroll back to the chart at the top of this article. Red Lodge: 2,400 vertical feet, 1,635 acres, 250 inches of annual snowfall. Powder Mountain: 2,205 vert/8,464 acres (3,000 lift-served)/400 inches. Brundage: 1,921/1,920/320. Castle: 2,833/3,592/354. Exactly which district of Narnia do you call home if these numbers leave you yawning?There are a lot of good reasons to buy an Indy Pass: you live within a few hours of a half dozen or more partners and are looking for a reasonably priced family winter. You have an Epkon pass but are leary of voyaging through the gates of Mount Snow/Keystone/Mammoth/Crystal on a midwinter Saturday. You’ve already visited every high-speed demo center on the continent and are looking for something different. You’re Van Life Bro and want to ski an entire winter for less than five dollars. You want to support skiing’s equivalent of craft beer (only, in this case, the indie label is a lot less expensive). Or you just love skiing and everything about it, and you want to understand this dynamic world to the fullest extent possible.There are good reasons not to buy the Indy Pass, too: you don’t travel much, the mountains are too far, you are happy with your local, you dad’s private plane is too big to land at any mountain town airport other than Eagle. But if your goal is lots of skiing, and if you don’t exactly need a home mountain and have a little flexibility to travel, if you value novelty and don’t mind the occasional mile-long Hall double chair ride to the summit, then lock this thing in before prices increase on May 18.More Indy Pass on The Storm Skiing Podcast:Snow Ridge, New York GM Nick MirBeaver Mountain, Utah owner Travis SeeholzerLittle Switzerland, Nordic Mountain, The Rock Co-Owner Rick SchmitzTamarack, Idaho President Scott TurlingtonShawnee Mountain, Pennsylvania CEO Nick FredericksChina Peak, California CEO Tim CoheeLutsen and Granite Peak Owner Charles SkinnerCaberfae Peaks, Michigan Co-Owner and GM Tim MeyerWhaleback Executive Director Jon Hunt (recorded pre-Indy)Titus Mountain Co-Owner Bruce Monette Jr. (recorded pre-Indy)Indy Pass Founder Doug Fish (April 27, 2021 – 2nd appearance)West Mountain, New York owners Sara and Spencer Montgomery (recorded pre-Indy)Montage Mountain Managing Owner Charles Jefferson (recorded pre-Indy)Granite Peak, Wisconsin GM Greg FisherWaterville Valley, New Hampshire GM Tim SmithBolton Valley, Vermont President Lindsay DesLauriersBousquet GM and ownership (recorded pre-Indy)Saddleback, Maine GM Andy Shepard (recorded pre-Indy)Jay Peak, Vermont GM Steve WrightCannon Mountain, New Hampshire GM John DeVivoIndy Pass Founder Doug Fish (May 31, 2020 – 1st appearance)Berkshire East and Catamount, Massachusetts Owner Jon SchaeferBurk Mountain GM Kevin Mack (recorded pre-Indy)Magic Mountain, Vermont President Geoff HathewayThe Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 51/100 in 2022. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Daily News Brief by TRT World

*) Russia warns of consequences after Finland announces NATO bid The Kremlin has warned about taking retaliatory “military-technical” steps after Finland's leaders came out in favour of applying to join NATO. Finland has been militarily neutral for decades, but it shares a 1,300 kilometre border with Russia. The Nordic country is expected to approve the plans to join the alliance next week and its neighbour Sweden could do the same within days. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has said the alliance would welcome Finland and Sweden with open arms. *) Kiev in talks to evacuate 38 wounded Azovstal fighters As Ukraine continues to push back against Russia, an explosion hits the besieged Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol. Ukraine general staff said that Russia's military hit the embattled port city and the plant with artillery and air strikes. Kiev earlier said it was holding "difficult" talks with Russia to secure safe passage for dozens of wounded fighters from the plant Azovstal is the last pocket of Ukrainian resistance in the devastated southern port city. *) Slain Al Jazeera journalist to be buried in Jerusalem The UN has said the killing of Palestinian journalist Shireen Abu Akleh may be a war crime. And, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas said he would refer it to the International Criminal Court. The Al Jazeera correspondent has been remembered in a state ceremony in Ramallah in the occupied West Bank. Witnesses say she was shot in the head by Israeli forces while covering an army raid on a refugee camp in Jenin. *) North Korea confirms first Covid-19 death in explosive outbreak North Korea has reported its first Covid deaths and said 350-thousand people are infected with the virus. The country has expanded its lockdown to try to stop the virus spreading. Pyongyang says almost 200-thousand people are in quarantine after six people died in the past few days. North Korea has declared the outbreak an emergency and tighter restrictions are expected to continue to be rolled out And, finally... *) Scientists for first time grow plants in soil from the Moon Scientists for the first time have grown seeds in soil from the moon. The ground-breaking experiment has given researchers hope that it may be possible to one day grow plants directly on the Moon. However, scientists said the plants in the lunar samples grew more slowly and had stunted roots. Still, much remains to be studied on the topic and the researchers intend to leave no stone unturned.

The Nordic Asia Podcast
The New Political Cry in South Korea?: The History of Feminist Activisms and Politics in South Korea

The Nordic Asia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:52


The anti-feminist movement in South Korea is gaining global attention. The story has been covered by many western mainstream news outlets including the New York Times, CNN, and BBC. Is this trend a new trend in South Korea? Where does this anti-feminist idea come from? In this episode, we invite Prof. Ju Hui Judy Han and discuss South Korean feminist history and gender politics. We discuss pre- and post-democratization feminist movements, the new president's worrisome position on gender issues, and predict the future feminist movements in South Korea. We end our conversation with the conclusion that although there have been many obstacles, we cannot overlook the progress at the grassroots level. If you are interested in learning about South Korean feminist history, join Myunghee Lee for this interview with Judy Han. This is the second episode in the series. The first episode can be found here. About the interviewer Myunghee Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIAS. She also is a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on protest, authoritarian politics, and democratization. About the speaker Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and has previously taught at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in journals such as The Scholar & Feminist Online, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, Geoforum, and Journal of Korean Studies as well as in several edited books such as Rights Claiming in South Korea (2021), Digital Lives in the Global City (2020), Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018), and Territories of Poverty (2015). She is currently working on a book on “queer throughlines” and co-writing another book on protest cultures. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast

New Books in East Asian Studies
The New Political Cry in South Korea?: The History of Feminist Activisms and Politics in South Korea

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:52


The anti-feminist movement in South Korea is gaining global attention. The story has been covered by many western mainstream news outlets including the New York Times, CNN, and BBC. Is this trend a new trend in South Korea? Where does this anti-feminist idea come from? In this episode, we invite Prof. Ju Hui Judy Han and discuss South Korean feminist history and gender politics. We discuss pre- and post-democratization feminist movements, the new president's worrisome position on gender issues, and predict the future feminist movements in South Korea. We end our conversation with the conclusion that although there have been many obstacles, we cannot overlook the progress at the grassroots level. If you are interested in learning about South Korean feminist history, join Myunghee Lee for this interview with Judy Han. This is the second episode in the series. The first episode can be found here. About the interviewer Myunghee Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIAS. She also is a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on protest, authoritarian politics, and democratization. About the speaker Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and has previously taught at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in journals such as The Scholar & Feminist Online, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, Geoforum, and Journal of Korean Studies as well as in several edited books such as Rights Claiming in South Korea (2021), Digital Lives in the Global City (2020), Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018), and Territories of Poverty (2015). She is currently working on a book on “queer throughlines” and co-writing another book on protest cultures. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Political Science
The New Political Cry in South Korea?: The History of Feminist Activisms and Politics in South Korea

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:52


The anti-feminist movement in South Korea is gaining global attention. The story has been covered by many western mainstream news outlets including the New York Times, CNN, and BBC. Is this trend a new trend in South Korea? Where does this anti-feminist idea come from? In this episode, we invite Prof. Ju Hui Judy Han and discuss South Korean feminist history and gender politics. We discuss pre- and post-democratization feminist movements, the new president's worrisome position on gender issues, and predict the future feminist movements in South Korea. We end our conversation with the conclusion that although there have been many obstacles, we cannot overlook the progress at the grassroots level. If you are interested in learning about South Korean feminist history, join Myunghee Lee for this interview with Judy Han. This is the second episode in the series. The first episode can be found here. About the interviewer Myunghee Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIAS. She also is a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on protest, authoritarian politics, and democratization. About the speaker Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and has previously taught at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in journals such as The Scholar & Feminist Online, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, Geoforum, and Journal of Korean Studies as well as in several edited books such as Rights Claiming in South Korea (2021), Digital Lives in the Global City (2020), Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018), and Territories of Poverty (2015). She is currently working on a book on “queer throughlines” and co-writing another book on protest cultures. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
The New Political Cry in South Korea?: The History of Feminist Activisms and Politics in South Korea

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:52


The anti-feminist movement in South Korea is gaining global attention. The story has been covered by many western mainstream news outlets including the New York Times, CNN, and BBC. Is this trend a new trend in South Korea? Where does this anti-feminist idea come from? In this episode, we invite Prof. Ju Hui Judy Han and discuss South Korean feminist history and gender politics. We discuss pre- and post-democratization feminist movements, the new president's worrisome position on gender issues, and predict the future feminist movements in South Korea. We end our conversation with the conclusion that although there have been many obstacles, we cannot overlook the progress at the grassroots level. If you are interested in learning about South Korean feminist history, join Myunghee Lee for this interview with Judy Han. This is the second episode in the series. The first episode can be found here. About the interviewer Myunghee Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIAS. She also is a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on protest, authoritarian politics, and democratization. About the speaker Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and has previously taught at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in journals such as The Scholar & Feminist Online, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, Geoforum, and Journal of Korean Studies as well as in several edited books such as Rights Claiming in South Korea (2021), Digital Lives in the Global City (2020), Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018), and Territories of Poverty (2015). She is currently working on a book on “queer throughlines” and co-writing another book on protest cultures. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Gender Studies
The New Political Cry in South Korea?: The History of Feminist Activisms and Politics in South Korea

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:52


The anti-feminist movement in South Korea is gaining global attention. The story has been covered by many western mainstream news outlets including the New York Times, CNN, and BBC. Is this trend a new trend in South Korea? Where does this anti-feminist idea come from? In this episode, we invite Prof. Ju Hui Judy Han and discuss South Korean feminist history and gender politics. We discuss pre- and post-democratization feminist movements, the new president's worrisome position on gender issues, and predict the future feminist movements in South Korea. We end our conversation with the conclusion that although there have been many obstacles, we cannot overlook the progress at the grassroots level. If you are interested in learning about South Korean feminist history, join Myunghee Lee for this interview with Judy Han. This is the second episode in the series. The first episode can be found here. About the interviewer Myunghee Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIAS. She also is a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on protest, authoritarian politics, and democratization. About the speaker Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, and has previously taught at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in journals such as The Scholar & Feminist Online, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, Geoforum, and Journal of Korean Studies as well as in several edited books such as Rights Claiming in South Korea (2021), Digital Lives in the Global City (2020), Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018), and Territories of Poverty (2015). She is currently working on a book on “queer throughlines” and co-writing another book on protest cultures. The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo. We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia. About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Finland will seek NATO membership

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 36:11


Finland must seek immediate membership in NATO, leaders of the Nordic nation said on Thursday, moving to end seven decades outside the Western military bloc in response to Russia's war in Ukraine. Finland's entry would add significant combat power to the alliance while also deepening the East-West divisions that have consumed Europe since Russia's Feb. 24 invasion. Neighboring Sweden is expected to announce its own NATO bid soon. Moscow said that Finnish accession, which would add hundreds of miles to NATO's shared border with Russia, would threaten its security. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Finnish membership could require new measures by Russia to “balance the situation.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  Finland will seek NATO membership

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 36:11


Finland must seek immediate membership in NATO, leaders of the Nordic nation said on Thursday, moving to end seven decades outside the Western military bloc in response to Russia's war in Ukraine. Finland's entry would add significant combat power to the alliance while also deepening the East-West divisions that have consumed Europe since Russia's Feb. 24 invasion. Neighboring Sweden is expected to announce its own NATO bid soon. Moscow said that Finnish accession, which would add hundreds of miles to NATO's shared border with Russia, would threaten its security. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Finnish membership could require new measures by Russia to “balance the situation.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.