Podcast appearances and mentions of jessica steinberg

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Best podcasts about jessica steinberg

Latest podcast episodes about jessica steinberg

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Defense minister Gallant threatens while seeking calm

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 17:26


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military reporter Emanuel Fabian and political correspondent Tal Schneider join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Fabian offers update on aftermath of Friday night terrorist attack that killed seven, following press conference Sunday with Defense Minister Yoav Gallant, who said the police had sealed the terrorist's family home and that Israel would revoke rights of family members and deport them, if needed. Schneider discusses the latest in the government's planned overhaul of the legal system, as attorney Gur Bligh, legal advisor of the Constitution, Law and Justice Committee, pushes back at Knesset law panel chair MK Simcha Rothman, suggesting holding off on the judicial reform package until the next election cycle. Fabian speaks about the Saturday night drone attack that struck a defense facility in the Iranian city of Isfahan, and was carried out by Israel, according to reports from The New York Times. Fabian discusses the purpose behind the reported attack, ostensibly to protect Israel's own security interests. Discussed articles include: Defense minister: Every terrorist will either go to court or the cemetery Knesset law panel chair seeks to expedite judicial upheaval, with some changes Knesset legal adviser: Judicial overhaul should take effect only after next election Report: Israel carried out drone attack on Iranian defense facility Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Defense Minister Yoav Gallant speaks to reporters after an assessment at the IDF's West Bank headquarters, January 29, 2023. (Emanuel Fabian/Times of Israel)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Friday night terror attack tests public security minister

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 21:53


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and political analyst Haviv Rettig Gur join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Steinberg reviews the Friday night terror attack outside a synagogue in Jerusalem's Neve Yaakov neighborhood that killed seven, as well as a spate of shootings and attempted attacks over the course of Saturday. Rettig Gur discusses the reactions of Public Security Minister Itamar Ben Gvir to the terror attacks and how his responses are worrying for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the government moves forward with its response to the situation. Rettig Gur also examines the Palestinian discourse with regard to the terror attacks, and Palestinian reactions to the changes in Israel's government. Berman talks about the official diplomatic condemnations of the Friday night attack, including from the Gulf and UAE, and with many diplomats highlighting that it took place on International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Berman discusses Netanyahu's meeting last week with Jordanian King Abdullah II, their first in four years and the issue of maintaining the status quo on the Temple Mount, which is under the administration of the Jordanians, and has been a source of tension between the two governments, given the increase in visits from Jewish religious nationalists, including Public Security Minister Itamar Ben Gvir. He also speaks about President Isaac Herzog's trip last week to Brussels, which included an address to the European Parliament to mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day and time spent with the local Jewish community. Discussed articles include: ‘His soul is eternal': Funerals held for 3 victims of Jerusalem terror attack Washington, UN, UAE, many others condemn ‘heinous, tragic' Jerusalem terror shooting Netanyahu and Abdullah meet in Jordan, signaling they want to move past tensions Netanyahu vows to maintain Temple Mount status quo in meeting with Jordanian king Herzog welcomed by Belgian king ahead of meetings with EU, NATO chiefs Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: National Security Minister Itamar Ben Gvir speaks to the press at Jerusalem's Shaare Tzedek hospital on January 28, 2023 (Courtesy Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Intense month for Israel; robot helps ibex cross the road

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 16:29


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Zman Yisrael editor Biranit Goren and military correspondent Emmanuel Fabian join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Goren discusses the last 30 days of what she's been calling 'Black January,' for the endless news cycle and changing headlines of the new government, creating a sense of pressure more intense than periods of war or conflict. Fabian reviews overnight clashes in Jenin that killed nine Palestinians in clashes with the IDF and a teen shot dead in East Jerusalem while wielding what turned out to be a fake gun. He also talks about a Shin Bet report regarding the arrest of dozens of West Bank Palestinians with ties to Hamas operatives in Gaza, although many of the young suspects didn't realize that Hamas was using them, often to smuggle guns into the West Bank. Goren describes a new AI-powered new robot helping wildlife cross the roads in Israel by learning their reactions and how to startle them into stopping them from risking their lives. Discussed articles include: 9 Palestinians killed as gunmen clash with IDF soldiers in Jenin Masked Palestinian shot dead after aiming fake gun at police in East Jerusalem Shin Bet reveals Hamas attempts to recruit West Bank Palestinians for terror Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Nubian ibex on a mountain above the Dead Sea, 2009 (Courtesy Matanya Tausig/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
He said, she said situation in Shas leader legal brouhaha

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 21:45


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Legal affairs correspondent Jeremy Sharon and diaspora and religion writer Judah Ari Gross join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Sharon explains the complex legal situation unfolding with the barring of Shas leader Aryeh Deri from the government as a cabinet minister and what he would need to be reinstated. Gross looks at a conference of left-wing religious Jews gathering together for the first time, as this grassroots movement bands together from across the religious spectrum. Sharon discusses the evacuation of an illegal West Bank outpost of religious settlers, and how far-right politicians, Finance Minister Bezalel Smotrich and Public Security minister Itamar Ben-Gvir, equated the situation with the ongoing debate over illegal Bedouin village Khan al-Ahmar in the West Bank. Gross talks about the shortage of ulpan teachers, instructors who teach Hebrew to new immigrants, caused by a lack of wage negotiations and complications with finding alternatives. Discussed articles include: Deri v. High Court: What did he actually pledge in his 2022 plea bargain? Eyeing their community's rightward shift, left-wing religious Jews form new movement Illegal West Bank outpost evacuated for second time as coalition tensions persist Likud MKs call on government to evacuate Bedouin village Khan al-Ahmar immediately After clash over West Bank outpost, Gallant and Smotrich meet with Netanyahu MKs demand solutions to Hebrew teacher shortage that is vexing new immigrants Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Shas leader Aryeh Deri during a Shas party meeting at the Knesset on January 23, 2023 (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Netanyahu's beef with the attorney general; Shabbat culture

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 15:18


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Tal Schneider and real estate writer Danielle Nagler join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider talks about the building quarrel between Attorney General Gali Baharav-Miara and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu regarding her supposed plans to order him to take a leave of absence because of  conflict of interest. Schneider offers some background information about Baharav-Miara as the first female attorney general, her role and why the prime minister sees her as a threat. She also discusses Culture Minister Miki Zohar and the brouhaha over his statement Saturday, saying he intends to shut down cultural activities funded by the government taking place in the upper Galilee on Shabbat, and the prime minister's comments pedaling back Zohar's statements. Nagler takes a look at housing prices across Israel that haven't fallen yet as expected and are up some 19% compared to previous years. Meanwhile, rental prices are also up, compounding the issue for those finding it hard to buy. Nagler also discusses a survey looking at the best places to live in Israel, placing Rishon Lezion at the top of the list with the best quality of life followed by other central locations, including Ramat Gan and Kfar Saba with Jerusalem scoring low on the list. Discussed articles include: Coalition warns AG any move to suspend Netanyahu akin to coup; she denies weighing it New Culture Minister Zohar vows to withdraw funding for art that ‘defames Israel' Rise in housing prices slows but still up almost 19% from 2021 First of Zion: Rishon is Israel's best city to live in, statistics bureau finds Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Newly appointed Attorney General Gali Baharav Miara seen during a welcome ceremony for her in Jerusalem on February 8, 2022. (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Some diplomacy with Kyiv and fusing insects with robots

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 15:56


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and health and science writer Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Berman discusses plan for Foreign Minister Eli Cohen to visit Kyiv, 11 months after the Russian invasion of Ukraine, possibly signaling new direction for Israel-Ukraine relations. Jeffay explains the components of a new robot, made with the antenna of a locust and intended to replace sniffer dogs and high resolution cameras in the future. Berman talks about the visit of US envoy Jake Sullivan last week, the first opportunity of the Biden administration to discuss aspects of the new Netanyahu government as well as Abraham Accords, Saudi Arabia and Iran. Jeffay looks at new research on medical clowning, a well-known aspect of hospital life in Israel, but looking at better collaboration between doctors and clowns. Discussed articles include: FM Cohen to visit Ukraine, most senior Israeli official to do so since war began Israeli robot fitted with locust antenna gains scent superpowers Meeting US national security adviser, Netanyahu stresses bid to build Saudi ties Science of silliness: Israeli study deconstructs medical clowning so MDs use it more Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Foreign Affairs minister Eli Cohen at the Foreign Affairs ministry in Jerusalem, January 2, 2023 (Courtesy Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Does Shas MK Deri ruling create a constitutional crisis?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 20:48


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Legal affairs reporter Jeremy Sharon and US correspondent Jacob Magid join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Sharon discusses the bombshell High Court ruling that bans Shas leader Aryeh Deri from serving as a minister, reviewing what brought Deri back to court after his criminal conviction last year. He also looks at how this latest event with Deri could play out in prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new government, given the sweeping changes the coalition aims to make with its reform package and whether the government's effort to severely restrict judicial review over Knesset legislation could lead to a constitutional crisis. Magid then talks about a delegation of US senators who arrived in Israel on Tuesday and asked not to meet with far-right ministers Bezalel Smotrich and Itamar Ben Gvir or any members of their hardline factions, and what that means, if anything, for US president Joe Biden's current attitude toward Israel. He also discusses US envoy Jake Sullivan's short trip to the region this week, including the envoy's meetings with President Isaac Herzog and prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu as well as with Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas. Discussed articles include: In bombshell ruling, High Court nixes Shas head Deri from serving as minister As coalition looks to radically rebalance power, a messy constitutional crisis looms Delegation of visiting US senators asks not to meet with Smotrich and Ben Gvir Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Health and interior minister Aryeh Deri outside his home in Jerusalem on January 18, 2023 (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Umbrellas up at massive TLV protest; West Bank warnings

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 13:27


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Emmanuel Fabian and reporter Michael Horovitz join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Horovitz describes scene of massive Tel Aviv protest Saturday night demonstrating against prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new government and the coalition's planned judicial overhaul. Fabian discusses recent spate of West Bank clashes amidst plans by finance minister Bezalel Smotrich and public security minister Itamar Ben Gvir to change defense and policing systems in the region. Fabian also dissects some of the comments made by outgoing IDF chief of staff Aviv Kohavi regarding Smotrich's West Bank powers and why the IDF should only report to the defense minister. Steinberg comments on a new documentary, "The Narrow Bridge," making rounds of film festivals, created by Australian trauma psychologist Esther Takac about healing process of four people grieving from tragic losses due to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Discussed articles include: ‘A plan to change Israel's DNA': 80,000 rally in Tel Aviv against judicial overhaul Palestinian shot dead by IDF troops in West Bank amid apparent scuffle Army chief spurns Smotrich's W. Bank powers: IDF reports only to defense minister Documentary places lens on transformation from grief to reconciliation Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: More than 80,000 protest against the current Israeli government at Tel Aviv's Habima Square on January 14, 2023 (Courtesy Avshalom Sassoni/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Will Netanyahu need to brush up on his foreign diplomacy skills?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 16:58


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and health and science writer Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Berman speaks about the diplomatic experience of prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu will need to bring to his government, specifically because of actions from his coalition partners, particularly public security minister Itamar Ben Gvir. Jeffay discusses the findings of Israel's largest health care fund, showing that the new Covid boosters cut hospitalization rates significantly for the 65-plus group, although booster rates have slowed overall in Israel. Berman talks about foreign minister Eli Cohen who will be speaking soon to the Ukrainian foreign minister, and how the new government's attitudes toward Russia may shift Israel's ability to act as a mediator between Russia and Ukraine. Jeffay looks at an open letter signed by obesity experts to Israel, expressing outrage at the scrapping of a year-old tax meant to slow sales of sugary soft drinks. He also explains the US licensing of an Israeli immunotherapy that demonstrated a 56% remission rate in cancer. Discussed articles include: A week in, Netanyahu government already at odds with Biden administration Israel, most Arab partners meet in UAE to prepare for Negev Forum summit in Morocco Israeli study: Omicron-fighting boosters cut hospitalization in over-65s by 81% Backlash from top international obesity experts after Israel scraps soft drink tax After demonstrating 57% remission rate, Israeli immunotherapy licensed by US firm Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE:  Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and health and science writer Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Berman speaks about the diplomatic experience of prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu who has had some bumpy first weeks in his government, specifically because of actions from his coalition partners, including public security minister Itamar Ben Gvir. Jeffay discusses the findings of Israel's largest health care fund, showing that Covid boosters cut hospitalization significantly for the 65-plus group, although booster rates have slowed overall in Israel. Berman also talks about foreign minister Eli Cohen who will be speaking to the Ukrainian foreign minister, and how the new government's attitudes toward Russia may shift Israel's ability to act as a mediator between Russia and Ukraine. Jeffay looks at an open letter signed by obesity experts to Israel, expressing outrage at the scrapping of a year-old tax meant to slow sales of sugary soft drinks.  He also explains the US licensing of an Israeli immunotherapy that demonstrated a 56% remission rate in cancer. Discussed articles include: A week in, Netanyahu government already at odds with Biden administration Israel, most Arab partners meet in UAE to prepare for Negev Forum summit in Morocco Israeli study: Omicron-fighting boosters cut hospitalization in over-65s by 81% Backlash from top international obesity experts after Israel scraps soft drink tax After demonstrating 57% remission rate, Israeli immunotherapy licensed by US firm Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leads a government conference at the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem on January 3, 2023 (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Ministers rethink public broadcaster; new Jewish Agency boss

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 16:25


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Tal Schneider and religions and diaspora reporter Judah Ari Gross join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider discusses comments made by new communications minister Shlomo Karhi regarding the possible dismantling of the public Kan broadcaster, as well as the smaller, popular IDF radio station. She also talks about national security minister Itamar Ben Gvir's plans to break up protests at roadblocks, despite his own long history as a demonstrator and his remarks regarding the use of water cannons as a method of dispersing crowds. Gross speaks about his interview with new Jewish Agency director Doron Almog, with a long professional history in the IDF and unexpectedly finding himself in the midst of what could be a battle over the Law of Return and who is eligible for Israeli citizenship in his new role. He also discusses the most recent immigration numbers in 2022, affected greatly by the influx of immigrants from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, and a downturn from western countries. Discussed articles include: New communications minister says ‘no place' for public broadcasting in Israel Ben Gvir tells police to start arresting anti-government protesters who block roads Jewish Agency chief preaches unity, but readies for battle over Law of Return Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Israelis protest against the current Israeli government, at Habima Square in Tel Aviv, on January 7, 2023 (Courtesy Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
The UN and its anti-Israel bias; NY's Hasidim vs the NYT

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 17:46


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Jacob Magid and US reporter Luke Tress join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Magid discusses the UN security council emergency meeting regarding National Security Minister Itamar Ben Gvir's visit this week to the Temple Mount. Tress looks at another recent UN resolution against Israel and the many condemnations of the United Nations regarding Israel over the last year. Magid talks about the upcoming trip being planned for US national security advisor Jake Sullivan and what the Biden administration is thinking about with regard to Israel and its new government. He also briefly discusses US senator Lindsey Graham, usually a friend to Israel, and his warning about the new government's plan to remain quiet about Russia's war in Ukraine. Tress discusses ultra Orthodox group Agudath Israel and its protest against The New York Times' coverage of yeshiva education that is sharply critical about the lack of secular studies. Discussed articles include: UN Security Council slated to meet on widely decried Temple Mount visit by Ben Gvir UN asks world court to weigh in on Israeli ‘occupation' and ‘annexation' Top Biden aide set to visit Israel amid fears over Netanyahu's plans for West Bank GOP senator pans new government's plan to ‘stay quiet' on Russia's war in Ukraine US Orthodox group launches campaign against New York Times yeshiva coverage Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Tourists visit at the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in the Old City of Jerusalem, on January 3, 2023 (Courtesy Jamal Awad/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Tensions on the rise at handover ceremonies for new ministers

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 16:52


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Tal Schneider and military reporter Mannie Fabian join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider sets the scene for the ministerial handovers at the finance, public security and education ministries, where the new government's ministers began setting the tone for the government's new, right-wing direction. Fabian discusses the ceremony at the Defense Ministry and what former defense minister Benny Gantz told the new defense minister Yoav Gallant with regard to political interference in the army. Schneider also speaks about the upcoming minor fast day on Tuesday and new public security minister Itamar Ben Gvir's plans to visit the Temple Mount, his intentions and the tensions that could arise as a result of his actions. Fabian talks about the Israeli airforce strike early Monday morning on Damascus International Airport, putting it briefly out of service. Discussed articles include: In 1st move as minister, Smotrich orders taxes on plasticware, sugary drinks nixed At defense handover, Gantz warns Gallant not to allow political interference in IDF New police minister Ben Gvir gears up for Temple Mount visit, possibly this week Syria says IAF strikes briefly put Damascus airport out of service, kill 2 soldiers Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
What looms for Law of Return and final coalition details

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 16:24


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Settlements reporter Jeremy Sharon and religion and diaspora affairs correspondent Judah Ari Gross join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Sharon talks about the final details of the coalition deal, including Border Police control for Otzma Yehudit's Itamar Ben Gvir and settlement expansion powers for Religious Zionism's Bezalel Smotrich, creating unprecedented, dramatic changes in Israel's incoming government. Gross discusses the background of Likud MK Amichai Chikli, being appointed Diaspora Affairs minister and what that could mean for future debates of the Law of Return and the grandchild clause, under attack from the Religious Zionism party, and their belief that it alters the Jewish identity of the state. Gross also talks about the legacy of Rabbi Chaim Druckman, considered a founder of the settler movement, and who was buried earlier this week. Discussed articles include: Otzma Yehudit deal includes control over Border Police, major boost to police funds Religious Zionism coalition deal: Settlement growth, changes to discrimination laws Political deals over Law of Return set stage for fight over future of immigration Rabbi Chaim Druckman, spiritual leader of political religious Zionism, dies at 90 Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Likud leader MK Benjamin Netanyahu with Otzma Yehudit party head Itamar Ben Gvir at a vote in the assembly hall of the Knesset on December 28, 2022 (Courtesy Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Why Bibi's Likud partners are silent on proposed racist laws

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 19:36


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Times of Israel founding editor David Horovitz and political correspondent Tal Schneider join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Horovitz speaks about the various pieces of legislation being proposed and discussed by the incoming government, including one that could allow places of business to bar certain customers, depending on owners' religious beliefs. He and Schneider discuss the potential racist legislation, President Isaac Herzog's response and the possible reasons for the continued silence of Netanyahu's Likud partners. Schneider also talks about her recent interview with Zohar Palti, the former intelligence director in the Mossad, and his remarks about Iran's nuclear program, as well as the need to keep the peace with Jordan and how the incoming, right-wing government could handle these potentially delicate political situations. Discussed articles include: Hanukkah 2022, when Netanyahu began turning out the lights on Israeli democracy No ban on racist MKs, a curbed judiciary, more yeshiva funds: 12 key coalition plans Former Mossad intel chief says Israel must prepare for an imminent attack on Iran Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Ministers and MKs seen during a plenum session at the assembly hall of the Knesset, on December 20, 2022 (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Podcasts
Award-winning Israeli film 'Cinema Sabaya' tells story of Jewish and Arab women

The Times of Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 29:50


This week's Times Will Tell is a recording of a recent sold-out Times of Israel live event in Jerusalem, featuring an English language screening of the award-winning "Cinema Sabaya" film followed by a conversation with filmmaker Orit Fouks Rotem. "Cinema Sabaya," starring Dana Ivgy, tells the story of Arab and Jewish female municipal workers who take part in a video workshop, documenting their own lives and viewing each others' — challenging their beliefs in order to get to know one another. Fouks Rotem spoke with Times of Israel arts and culture editor Jessica Steinberg about the making of the film, her casting of mostly unknown actors who had a lot of freedom with the script and her goals in making this movie about women of different stripes. As the Best Picture winner in the Ophir Awards, Israel's version of the Oscars, "Cinema Sabaya" automatically became Israel's selection for consideration as a foreign film nominee at the 2023 Academy Awards in the United States, a voting race that Fouks Rotem describes as well. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. Times of Israel: This week's Times Will Tell is a recording of a recently sold-out Times@10 event, a screening in English of “Cinema Sabaya,” the award-winning Israeli film that is Israel's choice for an Oscar foreign film nomination, followed by a conversation with director Orit Fouks Rotem, at Jerusalem's Yes Planet. Have a listen and enjoy. I'm very pleased to introduce Orit Fouks Rotem, the director of Cinema Sabaya, which won the Ophir Award, Israel's Oscar for Best Film, Best Director, Best Supporting Actress for Joanna Said, Best Costumes and Best Casting. Cinema Sabaya is the underdog film that unexpectedly swept the awards, automatically making it Israel's selection for consideration as foreign film nominee at the 2023 Academy Awards in the US. It's also Orit's first full feature film, one that she worked on for eight years. She's a graduate of Jerusalem's Sam Spiegel Film School. And we considered showing this screening there in the new arts campus where they have a screening room that fits 120. That's the largest one, but it wouldn't have fit all of you. So it's a good thing that we did it here at Yes Planet. It's very good to have you here and we're going to have a little conversation that we'll also open to some questions from the audience.  I know your mother was involved in the initial idea. So if you could tell us a little bit of the story of how it came about and how your mother was involved in it from the very start. Orit Fouks Rotem: So thank you for coming and taking the time to watch the film. Yeah, so my mother is the advisor for women's issues to the mayor of Hadera and she was a participant in a group like this, like you just saw, she studied stills photography with Arab women in the area of Hadera. And I just finished film school and looked for an idea for a film and she told me about the course and I thought it's very interesting platform to discuss a lot of subjects through women and through women's eyes. And then I started making those kind of groups as research for a few years. Tell us how you found your first group. That's a great story. So I wanted to make this kind of group and I didn't really know what I'm going to do, so I just went to Acre because someone told me, you should go to Acre. There are a lot of Jewish and a lot of Arab women. I just walked in the street and asked women if they want to study how to use the video cameras. And they looked at me like I'm crazy. And then I went to this small shop and this woman there told me, go to this place. There are women meeting there once a week. It was like a shelter and I offered them to teach them a course of video filmmaking and they said yes. And then I just went there once a week for a while and actually made up this course that you saw in the film. And on the way I thought, maybe it can be also a documentary. But then I understood that many of the things that came up there, I wouldn't be able to use them in a documentary. So I decided to go with my first plan and make a fiction film. But take this conflict for this character that I wrote based on me, of course. And that's it. That's my mother's. So your mother helped get you started. Art imitates life. Life imitates art. You wrote the film, you were thinking about it as a documentary, but ended up making it into a feature film. Tell us a little bit about why you wanted those elements of truth and reality as opposed to full-on fiction. For me, as a viewer, when I believe what I see, it touches me. And if I don't believe it, I can understand it intellectually, but I don't feel it. So for me, it's the most important thing to do is to make this believable. And that was the way I think, to make it believable. Because a lot of people ask me after the film if it's a documentary or if it's a fiction film, mostly outside of Israel, where they don't know that I've been any of the actresses. And for me it's the best compliment because it means that they weren't sure if what they see is real life. Talk about the actors a little bit. Dana Ivgy, the main character, plays Rona, the filmmaking teacher, is a very well known actress who actually was up for two of the awards in September. Both this for this film and for another film. But she is the most well known actor in the film. The rest were some of them had never acted before. Correct. And some of them just hadn't really acted a lot. Can you tell us a little bit about the casting process, how you found these women, who they are in real life? So all of them are actresses except for Liora Levi who really lives on a boat and I found her through my script advisor, who told me I just have to meet this woman to take her to my film. And then I met her and wrote her in after that. So she is the only one who's not really an actor. Did you have to convince her? It was her dream for a long time to be in the film. In the beginning, I wasn't sure if she can act and I also made auditions for her character. It's really funny to think that someone else could be her. So yeah, she's one of a kind and all the others have something to do with acting. Some of them did, like, commercials and Joanna Said, this is her first film and she studied it for a semester in the Hazuti, and she did some theater, but not in a professional way. All the rest are actresses, not so known, but Amal Murkus, who's the singer, is really known. You and I spoke about what you call the trick of the story, which is that most of the film takes place in this one room and the other scenes that we see are brought from the videos that the characters that the women made from their own homes. So tell us a little bit about that, how you came to decide that that was going to be the setting and also how did you make those films? So the film they're bringing into class is of mostly the women themselves shot the videos. I went with them to locations that we found and we brought actors like the one who cuts his fingernail is my landlord because in the same day there was an extra that was supposed to come and he didn't show up. They thought, who can be her husband? They needed to have the location. We're paying those people. So I just called him and luckily he didn't cut his nails before and showed up. He's Jewish. My landlord got money for this. He didn't take it from the rent. And Yulia Tagil, the actor who plays Yelena, she really lived with her mother at that time and she's divorced and it's really her daughters in the film. So we used reality sometimes, but she's different. We did a mix of the real life and their true emotions. Were they okay with that? Was that something you had to discuss? As far as I discussed with each one of them, some of them didn't want to bring, so it was their choice. Some of them don't share. Some of them don't share at all.  Yeah, like Nahed. I found that in every group I made, always there was one that didn't share. And she also suspects Rona's intentions so that also gives her a reason not to share. Right. She's suspicious the whole time about what's really happening there. Yes. You told me that Dana Ivgy sometimes filmed. She filmed all the way. She held the camera, right. And she kept it going. And in the end we decided to use her footage only in three parts of the film. But at the beginning I didn't know. I thought maybe a lot of the film would be from her perspective. What about the women as a group? The cast as a group, obviously the experience changed them in terms of making a film. For some of them, it was their first time. But did it affect them as a group? As a community of people together? So yes, of course. It was really interesting to see they didn't know each other before. We didn't rehearse. We met twice in order to read the script together, so they will understand everything. But we didn't do the scenes, we didn't rehearse because I wanted to keep everything to the shooting days. We had twelve shooting days only. Tell everyone where the room was, where you filmed it. We filmed in Ben Shemen. It's a boarding school. And we filmed in a place where Shimon Peres got married. It was just an empty hall. When we came down and we fixed everything, the curtains, the color of the walls, which was, like, abandoned. In the weeks since the elections, we're feeling the effects of what's happening around us. When did you actually film this? In what year? 2019? Right before COVID closed everything. Three months before COVID and what were you looking to bring to the table in terms of your Arab Jewish subject matter? How deeply did you want to get into it? Did you get into subjects that you didn't anticipate beforehand? My main motivation was to bring deep and full feminine characters to the screen. It was more important for me than the conflict, in a way, because I saw many films about the conflict that tells you what to think. And I didn't want it to be this kind of film. I wanted it to be more open. So the main thing will be the women themselves. And of course, when I go to Arab and Jewish women together, I have to put the concept on the table because it's very not to do that. It's there. So I did it, like in the beginning of the film, just to get rid of it and not to get rid of it, but to finish with it and to make room for these women. Because I think it's even more political when you identify with the character that you will never be identified, maybe before and when you see the film and not to have an agenda that tells you what to think about it. Did you have any reactions as you went through the editing process from your cast or from your editing team of putting more in, putting less in? How did you react to that? I didn't really open it to the cast, but, yeah, it was a dilemma how much to put it, because what you see in the film, the political part, was in the shooting much longer. We decided to put it there, but don't let it take over everything. And Amal Murkius is a really political figure and it was important for me to be loyal to what she wanted and to give her a place to say what she thinks and also to the actor that plays Esti. They felt like they represent all the Jewish and all the Arabs in Israel. So I tried to tell them it's not true, but in a way it's a bit true because I see when people see it outside of Israel, mostly they look at this like, as a representation of what is happening. So you just came back from a road show in the States showing the film, working on exposing it in terms of the Oscar nomination. What was it like to show it to audiences out there? What were their reactions to this film that is presenting what is happening here, but not intending to necessarily. A lot of questions were about the election and what's going to be in Israel now. They reacted like in Israel, everyone has a character that he likes the most. And the questions were a lot about the work in progress and how we got this authenticity that there is in the film. So it wasn't really different in that part. Okay, so you are in this race to try and win the Oscar nomination. Yes, we are at the voting starts in the 12th.  Next week. Next week. No pressure. No pressure. If you know any Academy members, please tell them to see the film. It's amazing how many people know Academy members. It's a really small world. Tell us a little bit about the process. Now, there is 93 films from all over the world. And in the 12th until the 15th, they're voting for the 15, the short list, and after and who goes to the shortlist, competes to be in the five, and then you're a nominee. Each Academy member gets, like, I think, eight films. And you can vote for 15 films to rate 15 films. And, yeah, it's supposed to be equal, but I don't know how it really works. It's a lot about money. I see. And big companies like Netflix that run the film can have more impact. And the Jordanian film now gets a lot of attention to our government, thanks to them. Right. So, of course, you want this nomination, but at the same time, how does it actually feel to be in this place? In other words, it is your first feature film. It did do incredibly well. It's a film that really catches people emotionally and through the vibrancy of what we see on the screen. Where are you right now in terms of the Cinema aabaya effect on yourself? Where do you want to go with all of this besides obviously wanting a nomination? That would be pretty nice. Yes. In a way, all the time you want more and more. In a way, I want it to end and to have a good memory and keep going to the next film. Okay. Well, we want to see what your next film is. Thank you very much, Orit Fouks Rotem. Thank you. IMAGE: The cast of 'Cinema Sabaya' (Courtesy PR)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Bias in UN investigator social media; lessons from World Cup

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 20:46


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. US correspondent Jacob Magid and US reporter Luke Tress join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Tress offers update on announcement of New York State prevention unit meant to help crack down on antisemitism, which has been on a steady rise in the last few years. Magid discusses his separate interviews with ex-Meretz MK Yair Golan and Hadash-Ta'al's Ayman Odeh at the recent J Street conference, each with their own differing views regarding what's next for resurrecting Israel's left. Tress talks about uncovering anti-Israel comments made on social media by a UN investigator now tasked with reporting on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories. Magid speaks about lessons from the World Cup, where there has been an overall sense of pro-Palestinian sentiments amidst the playing field of the Abraham Accords. Discussed articles include: New York launches bias prevention unit as leaders vow to tackle antisemitism The Israeli left has fallen apart. Will Jewish-Arab partnership save it? UN Palestinian rights official's social media history reveals antisemitic comments Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Morocco's players celebrate with a Palestinian flag at the end of the Qatar 2022 World Cup round of 16 football match between Morocco and Spain at the Education City Stadium in Al-Rayyan, west of Doha on December 6, 2022. (Photo by Glyn KIRK / AFP)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
IDF examines Jenin death; ultra-Orthodox push religion-state

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 17:02


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Emanuel Fabian and religions reporter Judah Ari Gross join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Fabian discusses the death of 16-year-old Jana Majdi Assam Zakarna, found dead on the roof of her Jenin home late Sunday after a gun battle between Palestinians and Israeli border police, and Israel's attempts to figure out what happened. Gross looks at the latest reports of attempts by the ultra-Orthodox United Torah Judaism party to spread Haredi measures across Israel, as well as the results of a poll showing that few Israelis support these kinds of demands. Fabian talks about Gaza operatives' attempts to contact Israelis through social media. Gross looks at a Momentum trip to Israel for Russian and Ukrainian women, which went ahead despite political concerns and emotions, and offered surprising results. Discussed articles include: IDF says sniper likely mistakenly killed Palestinian girl during Jenin raid Few Israelis support religion-and-state blitz mulled by incoming coalition – poll Shin Bet: Gaza operatives try to ‘catfish' Israelis with fake social media accounts Russian and Ukrainian Jewish women bond during first-of-its-kind trip to Israel Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: MK Moshe Gafni speaks during a meeting of the United Torah Judaism party at the Knesset, the Israeli parliament in Jerusalem, on December 5, 2022 (Photo by Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Uptick in TikTok West Bank attacks; Covid vaxx research

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 13:46


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Mannie Fabian and health reporter Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Fabian discusses comments made by top military intelligence official Amit Saar at a recent military think tank conference, positing that Israel needs to better understand the causes of the recent West Bank attacks, often carried out by younger, frustrated Palestinians using firearms and posting their attacks on social media platform TikTok. Jeffay talks about an Israeli study regarding the psychosomatic side effects of Covid vaccines and how that affects those gearing up for their next boosters. Fabian explains the partnership between the US Lockheed Martin and Israel's Rafael weapons manufacturer who are developing a laser interception system, with mutual investment and development teams from both companies. Jeffay talks about an Israeli sociology study finding that gynecological research has overlooked women going through menopause or who are post menopause. Discussed articles include: Top military intel officer: West Bank violence only going to get worse Side effects of COVID vaccines often ‘psychosomatic': Israeli peer-reviewed study Lockheed Martin joins Iron Beam project to build variant of system for US market Gynecology research neglects women after onset of menopause — Israeli study Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Palestinian demonstrators clash with Israeli security forces during a protest in the village of Kfar Qaddum, near the West Bank city of Nablus, December 2, 2022 (Courtesy Nasser Ishtayeh/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
What does Bibi gain from extremist MK Avi Maoz?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 19:08


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Times of Israel founding editor David Horovitz and environmental reporter Sue Surkes join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Horovitz discusses Benjamin Netanyahu's quizzical decision to appoint extremist MK Avi Maoz as a deputy minister at the helm of a new “national Jewish identity” government agency, an appointment that will give him control over external subjects taught at schools.   He also looks at the newly released details of the coalition agreement that will give Bezalel Smotrich's far-right Religious Zionism party extensive influence over the Israeli government's civilian activities in the West Bank. Surkes discusses the most recent findings regarding Israeli pension funds that hold some $17 billion in companies that profit from oil, gas, coal and other polluting energy sources. Horovitz talks about Iran and the increase in press information being disseminated lately regarding the disbanding of its morality police and hijab laws. Surkes looks at the recent sharp increase in bird flu in Europe and whether it's spreading in Israel, given Israel's location as an avian highway and the predominance of cranes and other birds stopping in the country during the winter months. Discussed articles include: Likud on back foot as dozens of towns say won't let anti-LGBT MK dictate education Deal will reportedly give Smotrich say in filling sensitive West Bank defense posts Smotrich primed for authority over key West Bank appointments in deal with Likud At least NIS 57.6 billion of Israelis' pensions invested in fossil fuels — watchdog Bird flu detected in Israel in 2nd case within days Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Noam head Avi Maoz speaks during a function meeting at the Knesset, the Israeli parliament in Jerusalem, on November 28, 2022. Photo by Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Bibi tries to rein in Smotrich; chess channels real life

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 14:10


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Knesset correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn and investigative and features reporter Inna Lazareva join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Keller-Lynn discusses incoming prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's complex negotiations with Religious Zionism leader and idealogue Bezalel Smotrich, and how their coalition deal is an attempt to rein in Smotrich on certain issues. She also talks about why there could be as many as 32 ministries in Israel's small parliament in order to keep the complicated coalition together. Lazareva looks at recent chess championships in Israel, one with the first Israeli woman to captain a local chess team and another featuring Ukrainians in Israel who most recently were on the battlefield with Russia. Steinberg speaks about the recently opened Jerusalem Arts campus in downtown Jerusalem, with four arts schools, including the Sam Spiegel Film and Television School, and the failed efforts to include student dorms as part of the campus. Discussed articles include: Netanyahu, Smotrich said to inch closer to finalizing deal to form government ‘Are you here by mistake?' Meet the 1st Israeli woman to captain a men's chess team Holding Russia in check, Ukrainians look to capture chess glory at Jerusalem tourney Film school's second act gives starring role to new downtown Jerusalem arts campus IMAGE: Religious Zionist party head MK Bezalel Smotrich seen after coalition talks at a hotel in Jerusalem on November 30, 2022. Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
How Shas' Deri can get top job; why Trump dined with Ye

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 19:42


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political writer Tal Schneider and US correspondent Jacob Magid join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider discusses events in the new Knesset, including efforts to extract Shas party's Aryeh Deri from his legal wrangling in order to make him a minister and more about the extremist one-man political party Avi Maoz of Noam. Magid talks about how the Biden administration will handle the new government, given the president's long-standing ties with incoming prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who will have to carefully navigate his coalition members vis a vis the US. He also comments on former president Donald Trump's dinner with Ye, formerly known as Kanye West and known antisemite Nick Fuentes. Discussed articles include: ‘A crisis of trust': Deri said to rage at Netanyahu over broken coalition promises Trump's own ex-antisemitism envoy is latest to bash him for Kanye, Fuentes meeting Lapid: Netanyahu and allies intend to dismantle the democratic foundations of Israel Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE:  Shas chairman Aryeh Deri seen after coalition talks at a hotel in Jerusalem on November 21, 2022 (Courtesy Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Netanyahu's 'mind-blowing' extremist ministerial appointees

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 17:51


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Editor David Horovitz and health reporter Nathan Jeffay join host Amanda Borschel-Dan in today's episode. Before the serious talk, Borschel-Dan mentions that ahead of the nominations for Best Foreign Film for the Academy Awards, on December 6 at Jerusalem's Yes Planet, The Times of Israel is holding a screening of “Cinema Sabaya,” which swept Israel's Ophir Awards in September, and culture editor Jessica Steinberg is speaking with its creator, Orit Fouks Rotem. Turning to Horovitz, we hear why it is problematic to world Jewry that Avi Maoz, the single lawmaker of the fringe Noam party, will be appointed as a deputy minister and head a to-be-created authority for Jewish identity, which will be housed under the Prime Minister's Office. In another contentious appointment, Otzma Yehudit leader Itamar Ben Gvir is set to be the newly created role of national security minister in the upcoming government. The brand new National Security Ministry's planned portfolio will include overseeing the police and, potentially, Israeli settlers in the West Bank. Jeffay reports on a recent peer-reviewed study that tells us about the currently available COVID booster's safety. We hear about a new company, Wisdome Wearables, that may soon blow the paper mask idea away. What's their great, peer-reviewed idea? Another new Israeli med-tech start up claims it can use voice analysis techniques through a phone app they're calling HearO to sound the alarm before the onset of congestive heart failure. And finally, four South Sudanese children who have waited over two and a half years for heart surgery should be soon going under the knife in Holon. How did they, and their guardians, finally get the green light? Discussed articles include: TICKETS HERE: English screening of Israel's Oscar pick ‘Cinema Sabaya' + director interview Netanyahu puts extremist homophobic politician in charge of Israel's Jewish identity ‘Insanity, unreal': Netanyahu slammed over deal with anti-pluralistic, homophobic MK Ben Gvir: Security forces should be able to shoot anyone holding stones or firebombs Israeli data provides ‘safety assurances' to world on fourth COVID shots — study Israeli scientists invent face mask made of thin air, which blows virus away Israeli app sounds alarm before heart failure — just by analyzing your voice In first, 4 children from South Sudan to get life-saving heart surgery in Israel Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: MK Avi Maoz attends a discussion at Jerusalem's Knesset, the assembly hall of the Israeli parliament, on November 22, 2022. (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Self-driving buses on the road; Chabad emissaries convene

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 16:09


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. US reporter Luke Tress and Tech Israel editor Ricky Ben David join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Ben-David discusses the future of self-driving buses in Israel, meant to help alleviate the traffic situation and being rolled out throughout the country over the next two months. Tress looks at a thwarted antisemitic terror attack in New York City's Penn Station, and the city and state's response to the ongoing uptick in antisemitic incidents. Ben-David talks about two new offices being opened in Abu Dhabi, part of a growing list of Israeli concerns doing business in the United Arab Emirates since the Abraham Accords. Tress speaks about the recent Chabad 'shluchim' convention in New Jersey for thousands of ultra-Orthodox emissaries placed around the world. Discussed articles include: Israel to test self-driving public bus systems in two-year national pilot New York police arrest 2 men, seize weapons over ‘threat to Jewish community' Two Israeli companies join $545m innovation program in Abu Dhabi Thousands of Chabad emissaries gather in New York to reconnect, celebrate growth Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: The Chabad movement's annual convention in Edison, New Jersey, November 20, 2022. (Luke Tress/Times of Israel)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Mixed reactions for 25th Knesset; MDs use new tumor tech

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 14:30


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Knesset correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn and health and science reporter Nathan Jeffay join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Keller-Lynn talks about Tuesday's swearing-in of the 25th Knesset, with newcomers elated by their wins and the opposition heralding the end of democracy, with concerns over a lack of unity in the government. Jeffay speaks about a Hebrew University study that examines plummeting sperm counts worldwide, which could point to a wider decline in aspects of men's health. Keller-Lynn also discusses the lack of outside activists at the ongoing United Nations Climate Conference COP27 in Egypt's Sharm el Sheikh, part of the Egyptian efforts to quash the usual protests. Jeffay looks at a new technology under trial, which offers a fuller report on the DNA of tumors. Discussed articles include: Far-right vows upped security under new gov't; Liberman warns of ‘ayatollah regime' Sperm counts worldwide have plunged 62% in under 50 years, Israeli-led study finds Egyptians keep tight leash on climate confab, muffling traditional din of protests Israeli hospital: New tech gave instant DNA info on tumors, jump-starts treatment Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Likud leader MK Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister Yair Lapid, and Party leaders at a swearing-in ceremony of the 25th Knesset, at the Israeli parliament in Jerusalem, November 15, 2022. (Photo by Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
New Knesset as govt talks stall; diplomatic pinball at UN

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 17:24


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political writer Tal Schneider and diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider discusses prime minister-elect Benjamin Netanyahu's options for his government's top ministers and why those choices are stalling his ongoing coalition talks, even as the 25th Knesset is being sworn in Tuesday. Berman looks at the welcome offered by Russia's Kremlin to Netanyahu, and what that could mean for Israel-Russia-Ukraine relations going forward. Schneider talks about why foreign diplomats are leery of any official meetings with newly elected Itamar Ben-Gvir, and how that could play out in the future. Berman examines whether Israel retaliated against Ukraine at the UN Monday, and what is signified by this diplomatic pinball. Discussed articles include: Knesset swearing in heralds political stability, though discourse unlikely to soften Ben Gvir claims he's met foreign officials to rehabilitate image; evidence is scant Kremlin on Netanyahu win: Good to have Israeli leaders who share a ‘common approach' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Parliament workers seen preparing the Israeli parliament for Tuesday's opening session of the Knesset, the Israeli parliament in Jerusalem on November 14, 2022 (Courtesy Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Ben-Gvir may not be welcome in US; Israel calls out Kyiv

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 20:25


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. US correspondents Jacob Magid and Luke Tress join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Magid discusses what the final midterm results mean for US-Israel ties and which legislation will likely be handled over the next few years, with Democrats in control of the Senate, but with a slim majority for Republicans in the House. Tress looks at the loss of New York's most likely Haredi champion, Lee Zeldin, and how governor elect Kathy Hochul will likely react to the various issues at play in the ultra-Orthodox community. Magid talks about the US reaction to far-right politician Itamar Ben-Gvir, the presumptive public security minister, who may very well not be welcomed or receive a visa to visit Washington. Tress and Magid break down Friday's tiff at the UN, when Israel called out Ukraine for supporting a resolution by a committee calling on the International Court of Justice to “urgently” weigh in on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Israeli “annexation.” Discussed articles include: US blasts ‘abhorrent' celebration of Kahane after prospective minister attends Hochul triumphs over Jewish challenger Zeldin in close New York governor race Israeli envoy lashes Kyiv for backing UN panel call on ICJ to opine on ‘annexation' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Head of the Otzma Yehudit party MK Itamar Ben Gvir and members of the party speak to the press after a meeting with Israeli president Isaac Herzog at the President's residence in Jerusalem on November 10, 2022, as Herzog began consulting political leaders to decide who to task with trying to form a new government after the results of the country's general election were announced (Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Who's on Bibi's short list? IDF investigates latest theft

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 18:15


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. ToI founding editor David Horovitz and military correspondent Mannie Fabian join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Horovitz discusses the ongoing coalition talks and possible ministerial appointments, as Prime Minister-elect Benjamin Netanyahu figures out what will work best for him and his new government. Horovitz also talks about the so-called override clause that all four parties in Netanyahu's incoming coalition are interested in legislating, which would reduce the power of the Supreme Court. Fabian looks at the latest and largest theft of IDF bullets and grenades, stolen from a Golan Heights army base. He also discusses the ongoing IDF investigation into the death of 78-year-old Omar As'ad and the possibility of charges being pressed against the officer and soldier in the accidental death of As'ad, an American citizen. Discussed articles include: Herzog tasks Netanyahu with forming coalition: ‘Not easy decision as he's on trial' Israel could be en route to a tyranny of the majority 73,000 bullets, 72 grenades stolen from Golan Heights army base in latest theft IDF mulls charges against 2 soldiers over death of elderly Palestinian-American man Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Illustrative: Opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu speaks to US President Joe Biden, from a Likud office in Tel Aviv on November 7, 2022. (Courtesy Likud)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
How Bibi will handle the Democrats; Israel's role at COP27

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 16:20


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Tal Schneider and environmental reporter Sue Surkes join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Schneider discusses how prime minister-elect Benjamin Netanyahu will handle the Democrat-heavy results of this week's US midterm elections, given the far-right emphasis of his new government partners. She also looks at the issues and topics being debated with Netanyahu's coalition partners, including the Law of Return, subsidies to yeshivas, Jewish identity,  Surkes reports from Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt, where she's attending COP27 United Nations Climate Conference and where Israel is hosting a large delegation, promoting its climate technologies. Discussed articles include: Herzog heard on hot mic saying ‘entire world' anxious about Ben Gvir Israel joins Mideast nations, including Iraq, Lebanon, to agree on climate action Israeli startup to supply Moroccan renewable energy developer with hydrogen power Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Likud leader Benjamin Netanyahu arrives coalition talks with his political allies, in Jerusalem, November 6, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
New government's religious tones; will rental prices come down?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 17:53


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diaspora and religions reporter Judah Ari Gross and real estate editor Danielle Nagler join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Gross discusses reaction of US Jewry post election results and what could be the issues that will push the buttons on Jewish community's reactions. Nagler looks at the rental market and what changes need to be made to ease pressure on Israelis seeking suitable housing. Gross also talks about the new government made up of religious parties, and how that will affect issues of religion and state, including LGBTQ rights and the kosher certification process. Nagler speaks about the Israeli hotel industry and its shifts following the pandemic with regard to both local and foreign tourists. Discussed articles include: Herzog to US Jews: Respect Israel's election results even if you don't like them Vowing to lower prices, new government could target Israel's untamed rental market Israel poised to have its most religious government; experts say no theocracy yet Israel to build 8,000 new hotel rooms by 2023 as tourism ramps up Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Religious Zionism leader Bezalel Smotrich arrives for coalition talks with Likud chief Benjamin Netanyahu, in Jerusalem, November 6, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Ben Gvir's newfound fame; IDF soldier's 9 hours in Iran

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 16:48


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Jacob Magid and military reporter Emmanuel Fabian join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Magid discusses his election day coverage with Itamar Ben Gvir, and the differences this time around to the nationalist candidate, as opposed to 19 months ago, when Ben Gvir first ran for the Knesset. Magid also looks at how Israel's left-wing parties ran their campaigns, and what could lay ahead for them over the next four years. Fabian offers an update on the car ramming attack that took place Wednesday, in which an IDF officer was seriously injured by an Arab assailant. He also unpacks the unexpected story of an IDF soldier traveling home to Israel, and landing unexpectedly, undetected, in an Iranian airport. Discussed articles include: It took 4 voting rounds to normalize Ben Gvir. By the end of the 5th, he's a star ‘We'll reassert ownership of this state,' Ben Gvir vows as exit polls show big gains Officer seriously wounded in West Bank car-ramming; attacker shot dead — IDF 9 hours at an Iranian airport: IDF soldier faces unnerving flight diversion Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Head of the Otzma Yehudit party MK Itamar Ben Gvir speaks to supporters as the exit polls of the Israeli elections are announced, at the party's campaign headquarters in Jerusalem, November 1, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Election Day redux; Herzog's White House visit

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 16:29


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Knesset reporter Carrie Keller-Lynn and US correspondent Luke Tress join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Keller-Lynn looks at the various factors that could shift this election, Israel's fifth in four years. Tress talks about President Isaac Herzog's visit to the White House and with President Joe Biden last week, including the varying emphases on the US brokered maritime border agreement between Israel and Lebanon, and nuclear talks with Iran. Tress also discusses the admission of guilt and $5 million penalty being paid by New York's largest Hasidic yeshiva over its misappropriation of government funds. Discussed articles include: As Israel votes for fifth time since 2019, these 5 factors could break the deadlock White House's Lebanon success, Iran failure on display during Herzog visit US despairing over increasingly distant Iran nuke talks, Israeli official says New York's biggest Hasidic yeshiva to pay $8m after admitting to systematic fraud Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Voter casts their ballot at a polling station in Bnei Brak on November 1, 2022 (Menahem KAHANA / AFP)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Diaspora issues, Chabad navigates Russia and COP27 in Sharm

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 19:01


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Religions reporter Judah Ari Gross and environmental correspondent Sue Surkes join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Gross discusses matters of concern to Jewish diaspora and Israeli candidates, including the Western Wall, in a panel ahead of next week's elections. Surkes looks at Israel's plans for COP27, beginning November 6 in Sharm el sheikh in Egypt, including the official delegation and pavilion, hundreds of local NGOs and presentation of climate tech companies. Gross talks about the delicate situation Chabad Lubavitch is finding itself navigating in Russia, including a recent accusation of the Hasidic sect as a "supremicist cult" by a top security official. Surkes explains the concept of green taxonomy, the categorization process of what kinds of business activities can be considered 'green' or climate-friendly investments. Discussed articles include: For a brief moment, frayed Israel-Diaspora ties take center stage in election debate Israel's big delegation to COP27 hoping to make connections, help climate with tech Ministry drafts plans to recruit finance, business sectors to fight climate change Russian chief rabbi protests as top official describes Chabad as a supremacist cult Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Illustrative: Russian Chief Rabbi Berel Lazar, a Chabad emissary, with congregants at an unfinished synagogue in Sevatopol, Crimea, July 14, 2014. (Cnaan Liphshiz/JTA)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Push for Arab vote; archaeology meets science in research

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 14:47


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Knesset correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn and deputy editor Amanda Borschel-Dan join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Keller-Lynn discusses defense minister Benny Gantz looking for possible alliances with Haredi politicians in election campaigning. She also talks about Prime Minister Yair Lapid's push to get Arabs to vote; not necessarily for his party Yesh Atid, but as a method to pull votes away from the rival Likud party. Borschel-Dan explains an Israeli archaeologist's use of groundbreaking archeomagnetic dating to help pinpoint specific dates in biblical history. Discussed articles include: Gantz plugs possible alliance with Haredi politicians, but UTJ says it won't zigzag Israeli researchers say magnetic fields provide way to securely date biblical events Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: The ruins of Beit Shean, ancient Scythopolis (Yossi Zamir/Flash 90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Ben Gvir stuffs peppers and Smotrich proposes legal reforms

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 16:03


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Knesset correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn and settlements reporter Jeremy Sharon join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Keller-Lynn discusses the political whitewashing of Otzma Yehudit's Itamar Ben Gvir as the November 1 elections loom closer. Sharon looks at the efforts of Bezalel Smotrich of the Religious Zionism party, as he unveils a program of radical legal reforms, including one that could lead to the end of Benjamin Netanyahu's criminal trial. Steinberg talks about two films detailing ultra-Orthodox life, one a humorous rom-com, the other a complicated family drama. Discussed articles include: From far right to ‘cuddly care bear,' Ben Gvir's political whitewashing is underway Smotrich launches bid to neuter judiciary, potentially halt ally Netanyahu's trial Matchmaking, infertility in focus in 2 new films on Haredi life Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Can Biden fulfill 4G promise? Tech update plus Ted Deutch

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 18:51


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. US correspondent Jacob Magid and Tech Israel editor Ricky Ben-David join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Magid discusses updates regarding assurances made by President Joe Biden during his visit to the region in July, regarding the Allenby crossing, 4G networks in the West Bank and funding for East Jerusalem hospitals. Ben-David looks at the startup put together by the former CEO of cybersecurity firm NSO with former Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz, who quit politics after being implicated in a corruption scandal. She also talks about the drop in investments in Israeli startups  in the third quarter of 2022, and expectations for the end of the year. Magid speaks about his interview with Ted Deutch, former US representative from Florida who is now at the held of the American Jewish Committee. Discussed articles include: Biden-promised plan to operate Allenby crossing 24/7 faces new hurdle Former NSO CEO and ex-chancellor of Austria establish new cybersecurity startup Investments in Israeli startups drop by 36% in third quarter of 2022 — report Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: US President Joe Biden speaks at the White House complex in Washington, October 11, 2022. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Biden's maritime message; should guns be allowed at shul?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 18:28


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. US correspondent Jacob Magid and US reporter Luke Tress join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Magid talks about US politics regarding Israel's maritime deal with Lebanon, and whether Biden pushed to do this prior to Israeli and US mid-term elections. Tress discusses interview with Reform Rabbi Ammiel Hirsch about his new pro-Israel program to bolster support for Israel, amid anti-Zionism in liberal US circles. Magid examines PA President Mahmoud Abbas comments made during closed meeting about Secretary of State Anthony Blinken, lack of US measures pushing for Israel-PA peace and why it's important to speak to AIPAC. Tress looks at recent lawsuit against New York state by two Jewish, Orthodox, gun-owning plaintiffs, seeking to protect their neighborhood synagogue following new law barring firearms in places of worship. Discussed articles include: ‘You're making history': Biden hails border deal in calls with Lapid, Lebanon's Aoun Leading New York Reform rabbi launches push against anti-Zionism in the movement ‘You little boy': Abbas says he scolded Blinken for not pressuring Israel Jewish gun owners sue NY leadership over law barring firearms in places of worship Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Illustrative: In this Nov. 2, 2018 photograph, Beth Israel Congregation members drive past security officer Jim Lowman, who has been providing armed protection over 20 years at the synagogue in Jackson, Miss. Recent events of violence at houses of worship have cause the Congregation to increase security. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Comics fans marvel at choice of Sabra; IDF builds fake Gaza

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 17:57


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Emanuel Fabian and culture editor Jessica Steinberg join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. On Tuesday, 21-year-old Staff Sgt. Ido Baruch was shot and killed near the settlement of Shavei Shomron in the northern West Bank. Fabian fills in the details of this tragic death during the ongoing wave of terror. Fabian describes a recent tour he took of the Southern Command Training Base, known in the army by the Hebrew acronym Baf Darom. Steinberg describes Israel's premiere satirical sketch comedy show, “Eretz Nehederet” (“It's a Wonderful Country”), which is marking 20 years on air. While many Marvel comics fans were pleased to hear about the inclusion of Israeli actress Shira Haas as Sabra in an upcoming movie, not all comic book fans — or creators — are on board. Steinberg brings us up to super speed. Discussed articles include: Soldier killed in checkpoint shooting buried as hunt for suspect enters third day Soldier killed in shooting attack while securing settler march in northern West Bank In the Negev, a fake fence prepares troops for fighting Gaza from the outside Israel's favorite sketch comedy show celebrates 20 years of political satire Sabra may get Marvel role, but she's a superficial character, say comic book artists IMAGE: Comic book artist Uri Fink drew and posted his Sabraman retort on Twitter to Marvel's Sabra character in an upcoming 2024 film. (courtesy, Uri Fink/Twitter)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Podcasts
IPO's Lahav Shani compares orchestra conducting to film direction

The Times of Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 23:01


Israel Philharmonic conductor Lahav Shani speaks with Jessica Steinberg for this week's Times Will Tell episode, ahead of the orchestra's nine-city tour in the US, beginning in November. The tour is the IPO's first since the start of the pandemic, and Shani's first as its artistic director. Shani, 33, is a world renowned pianist, double bass player and conductor, known for his skills as a musician and conductor as well as for the young age at which he's accomplished so much. The rising star also became the chief conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra in September 2018 and the principal guest conductor of the Vienna Symphony Orchestra. Shani made his first appearance as a soloist with the Israel Philharmonic in 2007. Six years later, he conducted the debut concert of the Philharmonic's 2013 season. (That same year, he won the coveted top prize at Germany's Gustav Mahler International Conducting Competition.) He follows in the giant footsteps of the legendary Zubin Mehta, who led the IPO for nearly 50 years. Shani speaks about the challenges of following Mehta, about conducting his friends and colleagues, and the wonders of seeking new sounds and music. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. The Times of Israel: Tell us a little bit about this nine-city tour in the US, which is your first with the IPO since you just took over as musical director very recently.  Lahav Shani: Well, this is going to be the orchestra's very first tour since the pandemic, and that's a very serious thing for the Israel Philharmonic, because it's an orchestra that used to tour almost all the time relative to other orchestras. I toured with the orchestra before, but not as a conductor, as a pianist, or as a double bass player. On our tour to the Far East in 2010 is when I really got to know the orchestra in Japan, in South Korea, etc. That was also the very first time that I got the opportunity to conduct the orchestra. Wait, how old were you in 2010? I must have been 21. I went there as a double bass player and as a pianist soloist, and Zubin Mehta was still the music director, he just offered me to conduct the orchestra I had never heard. I had just started to study in Berlin the year before, and the musicians really wanted to see if I could really conduct. And so that was really the real beginning of my relationship with the orchestra as a conductor. So now, finally, to go on a real tour and be the music director, and in the US, in fantastic halls, that's a really special moment. You are the official conductor of the Israel Philharmonic. You're also the chief conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic. How does that actually work in real-time?  Well, conductors usually hardly see their own home, unfortunately, that's one of the biggest sacrifices one has to make in this profession. There are 52 weeks in a year, about nine of them I do in Israel, about eight or nine in Rotterdam, and a couple of weeks more with each orchestra on tour. And then the rest of the time, there's a little bit of piano playing. You still have your solo career, you still perform as a pianist, right? I play and conduct. I play chamber music with musicians from my orchestras and with soloists, at festivals, And I also like to enjoy my free time every once in a while. But then I go to Israel, now, for example, to rehearse with the orchestra for concerts in Israel. And then after we've done all the concerts, then we would have a few days to just refresh the repertoire that we're going to take on tour. Because we have played this repertoire before, so it's not like starting from scratch for us. So there's a lot of discussion, of course, about your youth, your age, you're in your early thirties if I'm not mistaken. Yes. You're the first IPO musical director to be born in Israel, and dealing with this challenge of aging audiences. What does it mean in terms of the Philharmonic repertoire? Everything has to be looked at in the right context. First of all, we're just stepping out of these two years of pandemic everywhere in the world, during which classical music suffered. Taking that into account, the Israel Philharmonic is really blessed with one of the best audiences in the world, and we're already selling out concerts again in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and Haifa. This is really a blessing because it's not the same situation everywhere in the world. And our public is really loyal, there are great music lovers in Israel. The orchestra sometimes repeats the same program five, six, even seven times so that our entire Israeli public can hear the concert. So you're repeating it so that everyone can make it to the same repertoire. Exactly. So about three times in Tel Aviv, two times in Haifa, one time in Jerusalem. That's just to play for all of our subscribers. The problem of the age of the audience has been an ongoing thing for decades. Classical music was always something that the younger people didn't find interesting. The important thing for me is that anyone who has any curiosity for music shouldn't be afraid to come and try it out and not to think that if they don't know enough, then they cannot enjoy it. The idea is that you first need the curiosity, and the music will just take you over if you're really interested, if you allow it, and if you become an active listener. You took over for Zubin Mehta, and I can't imagine what that's like, to follow in those footsteps.  First of all, it's a big honor, no question. Zubin Mehta is, I would say, one of my mentors, one of the musicians that really inspired me to become a conductor in the first place. I've played with him many times in the orchestra, as a double bass player. I played with him as a soloist pianist. I went on tours with him, with the orchestra. So there's a real feeling of being almost colleagues, even when I was much younger. My relationship with the orchestra has been shaped for many years. So it's not like I just came out of nowhere. They kept inviting me back every year as a [guest] conductor, and as a pianist. They liked you? Yeah, they liked me. I liked them. Many of the young musicians in the orchestra are people my age, these are people that I know since childhood. When they named me musical director, it was not the beginning of a relationship, but rather a continuation. It actually feels very natural and very much the right thing to do, and very comfortable. We're very direct with each other, as Israelis are in general. I often get the question, how do you deal with people older than you? Or how do you deal with people who are your friends, and you are supposed to lead them and tell them what to do. This relationship is so clear and direct and natural that I feel very comfortable with all of the musicians, and I feel that they're happy to go together with me and explore everything. What about your multifaceted career? You're a conductor, a solo pianist, a double bass player. What is that like to be both a performer, a musician, and the one who is guiding the whole show? Well, at the end, it's the same thing. Making music is making music. However, the big difference between conducting and playing an instrument yourself is that when you conduct, you're always dependent on other people. You have your musical ideas, but you can move your hands as fast as you want or as loud as you can. It doesn't make any sound. It's other people that have to like what you do. They have to agree with you. You have to convince them, and then they might play as you think they should. And when you play the piano, it's just you and the keyboard, and that's it. And if you're in good shape and if you practice, there's a good chance that you might be able to make the sound that you imagine. So also, it's very healthy, in a way, as a conductor, to keep this physical contact with the sound, not to forget what it means for the musicians to make those sounds. It's not just that they do what you want and they do what you tell them. They are the ones who express themselves, and they're the ones who make the sound and try their best. So this is really a collaboration in the end. But if you really play an instrument often, then you don't lose this feeling and you don't lose the feeling of what it means to make sound for other people. I like that explanation. And then, given the fact that you have two different orchestras that you work so closely, what is that like in terms of what you produce? Is there ever any overlap? Well, any piece that I take for any orchestra, not just for my orchestra, but also when I'm a guest conductor, it is going to be different than other orchestras. And the rehearsal process, a lot of it is improvisation. You have an ideal way, let's say, in your mind, and the orchestra does something that may be slightly different than your idea, even though they see your body language and you're clear [about your intent], they have their tendencies or their habits, or they want to do something else. And then as a leader, you need to ask yourself the question often, should I just take what I have right now? Is it good enough? Is it better than what I thought? Or is it very far away? You try to stay as objective as you can, also as a conductor, because if you tell the musician in the orchestra, can you play it like that and not another way, there is a very good chance they will ask, why is your way better than mine? And it's a very fair question. So you must be able to convince the musicians why they should play one way or another. Or if you like what they do, also just say, actually I like that better than my idea. Think about film directors, for example. Most likely, they have a very clear vision, a very clear image of the entire film in their mind. But then they're facing these world-class actors. And the actors, sometimes they have their way to say the lines. So there must be very good communication between the director and the actor so that the actor is able to say things as he understands or as she understands, with their subtext. And if the director feels this could work well, then they should let it happen. And if not, they need to be able to guide them in another way. It's exactly the same kind of communication. I like that metaphor. Okay, last question. You obviously have many new beginnings happening in the next month and year, but what are one or two things that you're looking to bring to your plate this year? Well, repertoire is something that we determine one, two, sometimes three years before we actually play it. Sometimes it's a bit annoying because if there is something you really, really want to perform but maybe in three years, you won't like it anymore. Who knows? I want to continue and deepen the relationship with my orchestras. It's true that this relationship goes years back, but as music director, this is just going to be my second official season because my first season had to be delayed during the pandemic. So it's really about deepening these relationships and keep exploring different territories of the repertoire together and keep discovering our sound. The combination of a conductor and an orchestra needs to bring something unique, something that is different, and this is something that is to be discovered. It's not that I can imagine to the last note in my mind and the orchestra has to do exactly what I imagine. This is a process that we need to really understand each other better so that we're completely free to express the music and focus on the music itself and stay in the flow and in communicating it with the public. Times Will Tell podcasts are available for download on iTunes, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, Stitcher, PlayerFM or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Lahav Shani, artistic director and chief conductor of the Israel Philharmonic, which will head to the US in November 2022 for its first US tour post-pandemic (Courtesy IPO)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Sex abuse stats in religious schools; railroad electioneering

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 19:39


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Religions reporter Judah Ari Gross and Knesset correspondent Carrie Keller-Lynn join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Gross discusses statistics regarding the higher incidence of sexual abuse in Israel's religious school system. Keller-Lynn looks at efforts by Transportation Minister Merav Michaeli to institute Shabbat service on the Israeli railroad system ahead of upcoming elections. Gross talks about the unlikely marriage of a Utah law allowing wedding ceremonies via Zoom that has eased the path toward civil weddings in Israel. Keller-Lynn speaks about Arab nationalist party Balad and its defection from the upcoming elections. Discussed articles include: Religious students report sexual abuse at twice rate of secular school peers – study Michaeli promises to run Tel Aviv light rail on Shabbat starting next year In step toward civil marriage, Jerusalem court accepts ‘Zoom weddings' from Utah Balad to meet to consider boycotting elections after being disqualified Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Illustrative: Israeli students seen on the first day of school at a school in Jerusalem, on September 1, 2022. (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Justice An LSC Podcast
How “Lawyerless” Courts Fail Everyone

Talk Justice An LSC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 36:18


There is a massive disconnect between what courts were designed to do—solve legal disputes through lawyer-driven, adversarial litigation—and what these courts are asked to do today—help people without lawyers navigate complex social, economic and interpersonal challenges, most of which are deeply tied to structural inequality. As a result, the judicial role is in upheaval, according to our guests. In this episode, we discuss how we got here and if we can fix it. Guests: Colleen F. Shanahan, Clinical Professor of Law, Columbia University Law School; Founder of Columbia Law School's Community Advocacy Lab Anna Carpenter, Professor of Law, Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Senior Director, Presidential Initiatives, Office of the President, University of Utah; Founder and Director of the Justice Lab at Utah College of Law Alyx Mark, Assistant Professor of Government, Wesleyan University. Article: “America's Lawyerless Courts,” written by Anna E. Carpenter, Colleen F. Shanahan, Alyx Mark and Jessica Steinberg.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
How “Lawyerless” Courts Fail Everyone

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 36:18


There is a massive disconnect between what courts were designed to do—solve legal disputes through lawyer-driven, adversarial litigation—and what these courts are asked to do today—help people without lawyers navigate complex social, economic and interpersonal challenges, most of which are deeply tied to structural inequality. As a result, the judicial role is in upheaval, according to our guests. In this episode, we discuss how we got here and if we can fix it. Guests: Colleen F. Shanahan, Clinical Professor of Law, Columbia University Law School; Founder of Columbia Law School's Community Advocacy Lab Anna Carpenter, Professor of Law, Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Senior Director, Presidential Initiatives, Office of the President, University of Utah; Founder and Director of the Justice Lab at Utah College of Law Alyx Mark, Assistant Professor of Government, Wesleyan University. Article: “America's Lawyerless Courts,” written by Anna E. Carpenter, Colleen F. Shanahan, Alyx Mark and Jessica Steinberg.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
For Rosh Hashanah, Negev Desert wine and ancient opium

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 14:49


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. For this special Jewish New Year episode, co-hosts Amanda Borschel-Dan and Jessica Steinberg dish while their festive dishes are cooking. We first hear about Steinberg's adventures in the Negev Desert on the trail of innovative wineries way down south. Borschel-Dan talks about a study in which a team of Israeli scientists and archaeologists believe they have identified the earliest physical evidence of opium use. She also discusses the recent discovery of an untouched 3,300-year-old cave at Palmachim beach -- and it's unfortunate aftermath. The next two days are holidays, so the pair picked out two favorite episodes of our weekly Times Will Tell podcast that will be shared instead of the Daily Briefing on Monday and Tuesday. They explain why these episodes are worth another listen. Discussed articles include: In the Negev, a new breed of vintners are making the desert bloom Israeli archaeologists uncover earliest known use of opium in the ancient world Frozen in time: 3,300-year-old burial cave from Ramses II era found at popular beach Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Pouring a Nana Estate Winery rose while looking out toward the unlikely desert terroir of this Negev vineyard. (Courtesy: Nana Winery)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.