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Organization independent of any government, usually created to aid those in need or similar

  • 2,862PODCASTS
  • 5,638EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 17, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about ngo

Art of Procurement
440: Leading the Purpose-driven Procurement Movement w/ Peter Smith and Mark Perera

Art of Procurement

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:11


Climate change, habitat loss, and plastic waste threaten our environment. Social issues such as modern slavery, inequality, and discrimination blight the lives of millions of people. As procurement professionals, we have the ability to use our buying power to help address these issues and drive change around the world. But how?  In this episode, Host Philip Ideson welcomes back two repeat guests, Mark Perera, CEO at Vizibl, and Peter Smith, Managing Director at Procurement Excellence, to discuss their new book: Procurement with Purpose. And yet, this is more than a book - this is an opportunity to have conversations with purpose-led procurement organizations and leaders all over the world. They use this conversation to share their perspective on: How purpose-driven procurement is spreading around the world and leading to scope and focus changes for many Chief Procurement Officers The differences between corporate approaches to sustainability and government or NGO approaches to the same initiatives What procurement can do to help our stakeholders make decisions that are not only good for business, but for the environment and social causes as well

Pre-Loved Podcast
S6 Ep1 VENETIA LA MANNA: podcaster and fair fashion campaigner - on solidarity in the fashion industry, Remember Who Made Them, overconsumption, greenwashing, and more.

Pre-Loved Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 59:11


S6 Ep1 VENETIA LA MANNA: podcaster and fair fashion campaigner  - on solidarity in the fashion industry, Remember Who Made Them, overconsumption, greenwashing, and more. JOIN OUR PATREON COMMUNITY: https://www.patreon.com/prelovedpod  Listen and subscribe on: iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play | or wherever you get your podcasts! Please rate & review the show so more vintage lovers find this community. Pre-Loved Podcast is a weekly interview show about rad vintage style with guests you'll want to go thrifting with. Find the show at @emilymstochl on Instagram and @PreLovedPod on Twitter. Pre-Loved Podcast: Venetia La Manna Today's show is with Venetia La Manna, a podcaster and fair fashion campaigner. Across her social platforms Venetia challenges fashion brands who are costing the earth and calls out retailers on their unethical practices in the fashion supply chain. In 2020, she co-founded Remember Who Made Them to help re-energise a new solidarity economy in fashion.  She now hosts a podcast called All The Small Things, an interview series that has amassed well over 2M downloads, and has spoken about the fashion industry and the climate crisis on the likes of BBC World News, Buzzfeed and NowThis. On this episode we chat about Venetia's journey to slow fashion, what she's learned campaigning for fair fashion, her push for greater solidarity in the industry, stories beyond her cherished pre-loved pieces, and more! I'm so excited for you to hear his stories, so let's  dive right into the show!  All the Episode Links: @venetialamanna  Venetia's website Venetia's YouTube All the Small Things - podcast Remember Who Made Them - podcast Outraged by Dotty Charles  The OR Foundation Pre-Loved Podcast with Liz Ricketts of The OR Foundation Pre-Loved Podcast with David, Sammy, Yayra and Kwamena, who are all engaged in secondhand fashion in Accra, Ghana     @ajabarber Aja Barber on Pre-Loved Podcast 90 Days of #NoNewClothes with Remake Vestiaire Collective 282 Portobello @282portobello Jane Bourvis Vintage Beyond Retro Mary's Living and Giving charity shops Anannya Bhattacharjee from Asia Floor Wage Alliance and Garment and Allied Workers Union in North India Nazma Akter - Founder and Executive Director of Awaj Foundation, a grassroots labour rights NGO with over 600,000 worker members across Bangladesh. Monika Hartsel from Solidarity Centre based in the United States  Chamila Thushari from Dabindu Collective in Sri Lanka Livia Firth, Orsola De Castro, Ayesha Barenblat and Elizabeth Cline Orsola de Castro on Pre-Loved Podcast Ayesha Barenblat on Pre-Loved Podcast Elizabeth Cline on Pre-Loved Podcast Heidi of Rogue Essentials on Pre- Loved Podcast Clean Clothes Campaign, Fashion Revolution, Remake, Labour Behind Label Aja Barber, Heidi Kaluza, and Chloe Helen Miles Swatee Deepak, Devi Leiper O'Malley and Ruby Johnson. * JOIN THE PATREON COMMUNITY and get the Pre-Loved Podcast News Flash: https://www.patreon.com/prelovedpod  A special thanks goes out to my Patron Insiders: Patty Weber Beverley Docherty of Wolfe Pack Vintage Danny of Galaxy Live Kayla of Pins Thrift & Vintage Kathy Brand Lucero Buendia Steven Vogel **For more good stuff every week be sure you subscribe to Emily's newsletter! It's called The French Press and you can sign up here.  *** Pre-Loved Podcast stickers are on sale now! PayPal me $4.00 USD at this link, or to @Emily-Stochl on Venmo and provide your address, and I will ship you a sticker anywhere in the world! Or, if you want, you can also use the link paypal.me/prelovedpod or Venmo @Emily-Stochl to send a donation in support of the show. ****Our Depop shop is @prelovedpod if you want to find some vintage gems and support the show.  Pre-Loved Podcast is created by Emily Stochl. Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, and my blog.   

André talkt Anderswo | ... zwischen Mut & Wahnsinn
Horst von einfachmalkaffee | Kaffeereise um Gutes zu tun

André talkt Anderswo | ... zwischen Mut & Wahnsinn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 36:27


Heute gibt es endlich wieder eine Interviewfolge bei André talkt Anderswo. Ich habe den lieben Horst von einfachmalkaffee bei mir zu Gast. Er startet gerade mit einem besonderen Projekt bzw. wird Teil dessen sein. Dazu führt ihn sein Weg nach Guatemala. Er möchte dort die Nichtregierungsorganisation "White Flag Coffee" unterstützen. Warum er das macht, und wie die ehrenamtliche Unterstützung aussehen wird, das erzählt uns Horst in dieser Episode. Zudem wird es während seines Aufenthalts in Guatemala eine weitere Folge geben, zu der wir auch eine Vertreterin von White Flag Coffee einladen werden. Zum Abschluss wird Horst dann nochmals nach seiner Reise bei mir zu Gast sein, um über seine Erfahrungen im Projekt zu berichten. Ich freue mich sehr, dass Horst uns einen Einblick in diese tolle Arbeit gewährt und wir somit in Guatemala dabei sein können. Gerne kannst du das Projekt und Horst schon jetzt unterstüzten; die Links findest du hier unten.   Infos zu Horst und White Flag Coffee findest du hier: https://einfachmalkaffee.com/ https://einfachmalkaffee.com/white-flag-coffee-folge-66/ https://whiteflagcoffee.spiceandlemon.com/ https://www.instagram.com/einfachmalkaffee/ https://www.facebook.com/einfach-mal-Kaffee-113750590527254   Hier findest du meinen Podcast und alle weiteren Infos zu mir: website: https://andre-anderswo.de instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andreanderswo/ facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andreanderswo/ mail: podcast@andre-anderswo.de Hier kannst du meinen Podcast abonnieren: apple podcasts: http://bit.ly/apple-andretalktanderswo spotify: http://bit.ly/spotify-andretalktanderswo google: http://bit.ly/google_andretalktanderswo android: http://bit.ly/android-andretalktanderswo impressum | datenschutz

Eine Stunde Talk - Deutschlandfunk Nova
Chris Klein, warum bringst du Surfbretter nach Westafrika?

Eine Stunde Talk - Deutschlandfunk Nova

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 34:18


2019 reist Chris Klein mit einem Kumpel zum Surfen nach Liberia. Was sie dort erwartet: erstklassige Wellen und wenig Menschen im Wasser – ein Traum für Surfer*innen. Allerdings: Vor Ort gibt es kaum Surfbretter für die Einheimischen. Deshalb gründen Chris und sein Kumpel eine NGO, um alte Surfbretter aus Europa nach Westafrika zu bringen und Perspektiven zu schaffen.***************Mehr zum Thema hier.***************Mehr Ausgaben Deep Talk: - Pia Wieland und Tobias Ertel: "Reisen ohne Flieger ist spannender"- Polizistin Lana Atakisieva: "Ich habe geglaubt, dass mein Berufswunsch ein Traum bleibt"- Wopana Mudimu: "Rassismus ist Teil meiner Lebensrealität" Noch mehr Ausgaben Deep Talk findet ihr hier.*************** Folgt uns auf Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dlfnova/

Boiler Room
Hesher on Stop The Presses (10-JAN-22)

Boiler Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 42:05


RBN and ACR Present: STOP THE PRESSES! With Host, Mark Anderson, and Hesher of the Boiler Room podcast. On this episode Hesher and Mark are discussing the "Global Trends" documents produced by the National Intelligence Council and comparing it to actual media and policy trends we face currently.

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Explores New Guinea: Protecting unparalleled biodiversity

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 75:07


Mongabay Explores is an episodic podcast series that highlights unique places and species from around the globe. Subscribe to the show wherever you get podcasts and stay tuned for subsequent episodes in this season. New Guinea is one of the most most biodiverse regions on the planet and also the world's largest tropical island. It makes up less than 0.5% of the world's landmass, but is estimated to contain as much as 10% of global biodiversity. To unpack the vast biodiversity of New Guinea, conservation policy, and NGO efforts to protect land, culture and Indigenous rights, we spoke with Rodrigo Cámara-Leret, of the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies at the University of Zurich, Charlie Danny Heatubun, head of the research and development agency of the provincial government of West Papua, and Miriam Supuma of Synchronicity Earth. In this third season of the podcast, we take a look at what makes New Guinea unlike any other place in this world, the contributing environmental impacts that threaten its culture and biodiversity, and what is being done to protect it. Listen to the previous 2 seasons of Mongabay Explores via the podcast provider of your choice or find them at our podcast homepage here.  Episode artwork: (Casuarius unappendiculatus) is one of the majestic birds that New Guinea is famous for. Image by Rhett Butler for Mongabay. Please invite your friends to subscribe to Mongabay Explores wherever they get podcasts. If you enjoy our podcast content, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!  See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok by searching for @mongabay. Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.

The Charity Charge Show
EP 81 Brad Voss | Executive Director, Made in the Streets

The Charity Charge Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:59


In Episode 81 of the Charity Charge Show, Stephen talks to Brad Voss, Executive Director of Made in the Streets, whose mission is to love and serve children from the streets of Nairobi, Kenya - meeting their physical, emotional & spiritual needs; loving them fully; equipping them to earn a living & sending them out to a new life. Brad and Stephen talk about fundraising, seeing donors as a customer, and the benefits and drawbacks of running an NGO in Kenya from an office in Texas. Brad comes to MITS with twenty years of valuable experience as a youth minister, preacher, consultant, and leader. Brad is passionate about developing the natural skills and talents of his team, so that together they can achieve their mission to love and serve street kids, in Kenya, across Africa, and around the world. Brad lives in North Richland Hills, TX, with his wife, Shannon, and their two children, Phoebe and Judson, where they all play an active role in their local church, schools, and community. Brad is a graduate of Abilene Christian University, where he earned two degrees: a BS in Communications and a MA in Religion.

OldGuyTalksToMe
Sex Trafficking Grows Lena Walther Awareness Is Prevention

OldGuyTalksToMe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:12


Lena Walther is the Honorary Consul of Sweden to Nevada. As a Consul, Lena also promotes the Swedish Model for Combatting Trafficking and primarily reaches out to legislators that can make a difference. Lena opened the Consulate in 2006 and has been very active ever since. She began her career with the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and has had assignments and lived in 10 countries throughout her and her husband's Diplomatic careers. She moved to Las Vegas in 1997 and has been an entrepreneur since then. Most of her time today is dedicated to Awareness Is Prevention (AIPNV.ORG). In 2014, she co-founded a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Awareness Is Prevention (AIP), which brings awareness of sex trafficking of minors. Through targeted training programs for school-age children and their parents, and an “Awareness through the Arts” program for vulnerable youth, AIP focuses on the training and education aspect in fighting child sex trafficking. The organization also arranges training of Law Enforcement agencies as well as Schools and NGO's. AIP works closely with other non-profit organizations around the US. During the Pandemic in 2020, AIP was approached by a UK organization, “Internet Protection of Children” (IPOC) who needed a partner in the US. The main focus is to force certain online platforms to adhere to age verification in order to prevent minors from accessing the sites. Currently, the focus is on “OnlyFans.com”. Globally, the average cost of a slave is $90. Trafficking primarily involves exploitation which comes in many forms, including; forcing victims into prostitution, subjecting victims to slavery or involuntary servitude, and compelling victims to commit sex acts for the purpose of creating pornography. According to some estimates, approximately 80% of trafficking involves sexual exploitation, and 19% involves labor exploitation. There are approximately 20 to 30 million slaves in the world today. According to the U.S. State Department, 600,000 to 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders every year. More than 70% are female and half are children Episode Highlights: What impact does not have a father in the house have on sex trafficking and sexual abuse? Children, young girls—some as young as 9 years old—are being bought and sold for sex in America. The average age for a young woman being sold for sex is now 13 years old. What is the average age of a boy and girl involved in the sex trade? What is the average time a person spends as a sex slave? What happens to them? What percentage get out? How many children in the US are sold into sex trafficking annually? A young girl can be sold 10 to 15 times a day—and a ‘righteous' pimp confiscates 100 percent of her earnings. Adults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year What is a sex slave worth today? How much money do they produce for the trafficker? How do sex traffickers keep control of their victims? Where do they hide? What are the warning signs that you might have a sex trafficker next door in your neighborhood? Let's talk about the pornification of a generation. How much does a pimp earn per prostitute? What are the risks of being online? How has Covid affected sex trafficking? Is there an increase in sex trafficking due to our open border on the south? What is only fans and why is it dangerous? It seems that sex trafficking has gotten more violent? What are some of the horror stories? What is law enforcement doing about this?

VietnamPlus's Podcast
Hỏi đáp COVID-19: Tiêm vaccine mũi 3 có gây tác dụng phụ hay không?

VietnamPlus's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:14


Hỏi: Hiện nay, Việt Nam cũng như một số quốc gia khác trên thế giới đã triển khai tiêm vaccine ngừa Covid-19 mũi thứ ba hay còn gọi là mũi tăng cường để tăng khả năng bảo vệ con người trước biến thể mới của virus SARS-CoV-2. Vậy tác dụng phụ này có đáng lo ngại hay không?Trả lời: Qua nghiên cứu, mũi tăng cường của vắc-xin mRNA gồm Pfizer và Moderna gây phản ứng ở nhóm người trẻ tuổi nhiều hơn người già do phản ứng miễn dịch ở người già đã suy giảm. Các tác dụng phụ xuất hiện phổ biến như: sốt, nhức đầu, mệt mỏi, đau tại chỗ tiêm,…Một số người sau khi tiêm mũi 3 cũng gặp phải các triệu chứng khác như: tiêu chảy, nôn mửa, đau cơ, đau khớp. Tuy nhiên, hầu hết các biểu hiện này đều ở mức nhẹ hoặc trung bình. Các tác dụng phụ thường sẽ xảy ra sau vài tiếng tiêm ngừa, chúng không kéo dài và thông thường hết trong khoảng từ 3 đến 5 ngày.Ngoài ra, một số người tiêm vaccine mũi 3 cũng cho biết rằng họ có triệu chứng nổi hạch ở vùng nách, dưới cánh tay. Mặc dù phản ứng này xuất hiện rõ rệt hơn mũi 1 và 2 song nó không quá nghiêm trọng. Theo Trung tâm Phòng ngừa và kiểm soát dịch bệnh Hoa Kỳ, phản ứng nổi hạch sau tiêm là dấu hiệu bình thường cho thấy cơ thể mỗi người đang xây dựng lớp bảo vệ chống lại COVID-19.

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM
Việt Nam xây lò phản ứng mới để đáp ứng nhu cầu về chất phóng xạ

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 9:23


Sau cuộc hội đàm ngày 30/11/2021 tại Matxcơva giữa chủ tịch Việt Nam Nguyễn Xuân Phúc và tổng thống Nga Vladimir Putin, hai bên đã ra “Tuyên bố chung về Tầm nhìn quan hệ đối tác chiến lược toàn diện" giữa Việt Nam và Nga.Trong tuyên bố này, Hà Nội và Matxcơva cho biết sẽ tăng cường hợp tác sử dụng năng lượng hạt nhân “vào mục đích hòa bình”, trước hết trong khuôn khổ dự án xây dựng Trung tâm Nghiên cứu khoa học và Công nghệ hạt nhân tại Việt Nam, với sự trợ giúp của Nga. Theo lời Viện trưởng Viện Năng lượng Nguyên tử Việt Nam Trần Chí Thành tại hội nghị Khoa học và Công nghệ hạt nhân toàn quốc lần thứ 14 khai mạc ngày 9/12 tại Đà Lạt, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu khoa học và Công nghệ hạt nhân này sẽ có một lò phản ứng mới với công suất 10MWt, thay thế lò phản ứng hạt nhân Đà Lạt, vừa quá cũ vừa có công suất quá thấp.  Dự án được thực hiện trên cơ sở hiệp định giữa hai chính phủ Việt Nam và Nga về xây dựng Trung tâm Khoa học và Công nghệ hạt nhân trên lãnh thổ Việt Nam, ký ngày 21/11/2011. Tờ Vietnam Investment Review vào tháng 10 cho biết dự án này sẽ tiêu tốn 350 triệu đôla. Ngoài các lò phản ứng do Nga thiết kế, trung tâm còn có một cyclotron và các phòng thí nghiệm. Công ty Nhà nước của Nga Rosatom sẽ tham gia vào dự án, với mục tiêu hoàn tất việc xây dựng trung tâm vào cuối năm 2024.  Ông Trần Chí Thành cho biết, kể từ sau hội nghị lần thứ 13 tổ chức năm 2019, Viện Năng lượng Nguyên tử Việt Nam đã thực hiện các bước để triển khai Dự án Trung tâm Nghiên cứu khoa học công nghệ hạt nhân này. Hiện chưa biết là trung tâm sẽ được đặt ở đâu.  Lò phản ứng hạt nhân mới này trước hết là nhằm đáp ứng nhu cầu ngày càng tăng về chất phóng xạ ở Việt Nam, nhất là trong việc chẩn đoán và điều trị bệnh, theo lời giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển, nguyên Viện trưởng Viện Nguyên tử Đà Lạt, trả lời RFI Việt ngữ ngày 28/12/2021:  " Việt Nam lâu nay vẫn có lò phản ứng hạt nhân ở Đà Lạt, cũng là lò nghiên cứu, nhưng lò này tuổi thọ cũng đã trên 60 năm kể từ ngày được Mỹ xây dựng. Công suất của nó thì rất thấp, thuộc loại lò phản ứng nhỏ trên thế giới, chỉ có 500 Kw, tức là 0,5 Mw. Nhu cầu về chất phóng xạ của Việt Nam thì ngày càng cao. Từ ngày có lò Đà Lạt, chỉ có hai nơi sử dụng chất phóng xạ trong bệnh viện để chẩn đoán và điều trị, đó là bệnh viện Chợ Rẫy ở Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh và bệnh viện Bạch Mai ở Hà Nội. Cả hai bệnh viện này chỉ sử dụng lượng phóng xạ là 2 Curie. Nhưng cho đến gần đây, cả nước có đến 39 trung tâm y học hạt nhân ở hầu hết các tỉnh thành sử dụng chất phóng xạ để chẩn đoán và điều trị bệnh. Lượng chất phóng xạ được sử dụng hiện nay lên đến gần 1.500 Curie. Nhu cầu sử dụng chất phóng xạ rất là cao và lượng chất phóng xạ sử dụng sẽ tăng hàng năm mười mấy phần trăm, trong khi đó mức tăng GDP của Việt Nam là trung bình là khoảng 5 hay 6 %. Do đó, hiện nay lò cũ ở Đà Lạt trước hết là không còn đáp ứng được nhu cầu về chất phóng xạ cho các bệnh viện. Đó là chưa kể còn nhiều ứng dụng khác của lò nghiên cứu mà lò ở Đà Lạt không làm được, cho nên cần phải có một lò có công suất mạnh hơn gấp 20 lần thì mới có thể bảo đảm được hoạt động của các trung tâm y học hạt nhân trên cả nước. Lý do thứ hai là chúng ta cũng cần rất nhiều nguồn phóng xạ dùng cho nhiều mục đích khác nhau. Việc chữa bệnh, hoạt động công nghiệp, các công trình công cộng đều cần những nguồn phóng xạ có hoạt độ cao mà lò phản ứng Đà Lạt không làm được. Lâu nay, chúng ta phải nhập các nguồn đó từ nước ngoài. Do những nhu cầu đó mà từ gần 10 năm nay, Việt Nam vẫn muốn có một lò phản ứng có công suất cao hơn. Trong khu vực châu Á, Nhật và Hàn Quốc đã có những lò phản ứng 10 Mw như thế, thậm chí cao hơn. Trung Quốc thì khỏi nói. Đó là những nước có thể tự làm ra các lò phản ứng. Ấn Độ từ lâu cũng đã có những lò phản ứng hàng chục Mw. Gần đây, khoảng mười năm, Úc có mua một lò mới 20Mw. Indonesia từ lâu cũng đã có lò 30 Mw. Với vị trí của Việt Nam và với dân số như thế, với nhu cầu tăng về chất phóng xạ, dĩ nhiên Việt Nam cần phải có một lò phản ứng mới" Cũng theo lời giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển, ngoài y học hạt nhân, lò phản ứng nguyên tử mới còn có thể phục cho ngành sản xuất chất bán dẫn: " Lò mới còn làm nhiều việc khác nữa mà lò cũ không làm được, ví dụ hiện nay có nhu cầu rất lớn về chất bán dẫn công suất lớn để sử dụng trong xe điện, trong các nguồn năng lượng tái tạo và nhiều thứ khác. Cái đó cần phải có chất silicon công suất lớn, mà silicon công suất lớn đó phải pha tạp với chất phosphore. Người ta đưa các gương tinh thể silicon vào lò phản ứng. Neutron sẽ chiếu vào các tinh thể silicon, biến silic thành phosphore, gọi là quá trình pha tạp bằng neutron trên lò phản ứng. Chỉ có những lò phản ứng từ 10 Mw trở lên mới có thể làm được việc này. Nếu có lò này, Việt Nam sẽ có thể tham gia vào thị trường thế giới về việc tạo ra các chất silicon bán dẫn pha tạp trên lò phản ứng. Chúng ta không sản xuất các thỏi silicon đó. Có những nước chuyên môn sản xuất các linh kiện bán dẫn công suất lớn, như Nhật hay Hàn Quốc, nhưng ta có thể tham gia thị trường chiếu xạ cho họ." Mặc dù trung tâm nghiên cứu hạt nhân mới chủ yếu là nhằm để phát triển các phương pháp điều trị bằng phóng xạ, các chuyên gia cho rằng việc xây dựng một lò phản ứng như vậy có thể là một bước quan trọng tiến đến việc khởi động lại các dự án điện hạt nhân mà Việt Nam đã từ bỏ cách đây hơn 10 năm. Theo chiều hướng đó, trung tâm nghiên cứu hạt nhân mới sẽ là nơi lý tưởng đào tạo đội ngũ hạt nhân tương lai, như ghi nhận của giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển: "Chúng tôi tính một trong những hướng sử dụng có thể mang lại hiệu quả kinh tế khá lớn cho Việt Nam và cũng đáp ứng những nhu cầu của thế giới. Nhưng điều quan trọng hơn hết là một nước như Việt Nam phải có một lò với công suất như thế để đào tạo một đội ngũ, nhằm bảo đảm lâu dài chiến lược sử dụng năng lượng hạt nhân, nếu không thì Việt Nam sẽ cực kỳ lạc hậu, sau này nếu như có những biến chuyển nào đó trên thế giới, mình sẽ không có những lực lượng để thích ứng những biến chuyển đó." Nhưng cho dù có đào tạo được một đội ngũ hạt nhân thì Việt Nam sẽ không thể tự mình xây dựng các nhà máy điện nguyên tử, mà phải cần đến sự trợ giúp của nước ngoài, mà nước đó hầu như chắc chắc sẽ là Nga, bởi vì “Tuyên bố chung về Tầm nhìn quan hệ đối tác chiến lược toàn diện" giữa Việt Nam và Nga, được công bố sau chuyến thăm Matxcơva của ông Nguyên Xuân Phúc có ghi rõ: " Trong trường hợp Việt Nam khôi phục kế hoạch phát triển năng lượng điện hạt nhân, Liên bang Nga sẽ được xem là đối tác ưu tiên trong lĩnh vực này."

Jay's Analysis
THE RAND CORPORATION & SHADOW GOVERNMENT – JASON BERMAS / JAY DYER

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 61:24


Jason Bermas invited me back on to discuss the history, origins and plans of the Rand Corp. to enact a technocracy based on the ‘third way' geopolitical philosophy. Commandeered by Neo-cons, the Rand Corp;. was both the mastermind of the Cold War and the “red threat” terr0r campaign, we dive into how Rand and DARPA were actually involved in much, much more!

Erde 5.0 - Perspektivwechsel
069 - Jahresrückblick Perspektivwechsel - Tops und Flops 2021

Erde 5.0 - Perspektivwechsel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 84:00


Und wieder geht ein Jahr vorüber. 2021 war für viele Menschen ein anstrengendes Jahr. Viele Dinge haben sich geändert. Distanz, Demonstrationen, Desinformationen, Verschwörungstheorien, Impfgegner, Boostern, Videokonferenzen statt Meetings, eine neue Bundes-Regierung, Lockdown – „Stillstand als Beschleuniger“ – und das unselige Corona Virus hatte uns erneut Alle fest im Griff. In dieser Folge lassen wir von Januar bis Dezember nochmals die wichtigsten Ereignisse vorüberziehen und erinnern uns gerne an unsere Gesprächspartner: Ihr habt unsere Zuhörer mit Euren Themen und Gedanken - inspiriert und motiviert - manchmal sogar verzaubert. Mit Euren Gedanken, Thesen und Ideen macht Ihr Alle wirklich Lust auf Zukunft – und davon brauchen wir in Deutschland und Europa, soviel mehr! Das Feedback unseres Publikums ist echt Klasse. Viele Zuhörer haben sich dafür bedankt, dass Sie manche Position heute wirklich anders betrachten und der Podcast spannende Neue Perspektiven aufzeigt. Lasst uns die Zukunft auch weiter provozieren. Lasst uns positive Gedanken auch weiter verbreiten. Lasst uns weiter Lust auf Neues anstoßen. Denn der Glaube versetzt ja bekanntlich Berge! Vielleicht ist Covid-19 ja auch tatsächlich die „Schöpferische Zerstörung“, die wir brauchten, um Dinge zu ändern - um uns Alle aus unserer „vertrauten Ecke und Denke“ zu bekommen. Um mit Hermann Hesse zu verbleiben der sagte: „Jedem Anfang wohnt ein Zauber inne, der uns beschützt und der uns hilft, zu leben.“ Danke für Eure Zeit, Eure Unterstützung und Euer Vertrauen. Wir wünschen Euch allen, einen guten Rutsch, ein erfolgreiches und glückliches, aber vor allem auch ein gesundes Jahr 2022.

Bít Tất
Bít Tất Ngành #101: Học làm sếp

Bít Tất

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:57


Sau khi đã tìm được một mentor như ý ở tập trước, chúng ta sẽ bàn luận tiếp về một kỹ năng chưa bao giờ hết “nóng” dù ở bất kỳ cấp bậc, giai đoạn nào trong sự nghiệp: kỹ năng lãnh đạo. Thuyết về người lãnh đạo vĩ đại (The Great Man Theory) tin rằng khả năng lãnh đạo là bẩm sinh.  Thế nhưng kinh nghiệm và sự trau dồi cũng là nhân tố không thể thiếu để tạo nên một nhà lãnh đạo giỏi.Ngoài học hỏi bằng việc quan sát người sếp của mình mỗi ngày, còn cách nào khác để trau dồi khả năng lãnh đạo nữa? Mời các bạn theo dõi tập Bít Tất Ngành lần này cùng 2 khách mời là Linh Phượng (Po), Podcaster tại The Blue Expat founder và Thắng Nguyễn, Managing Director tại Nutifood Sweden nhé. Cảm ơn Đại học RMIT Vietnam đã đồng hành cùng Vietcetera trong tập Bít Tất này.#RMITPostgrad #RMITAlumni

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
138: Global Expansion for Nonprofit Leaders (George Smith)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 44:24


138: Global Expansion for Nonprofit Leaders (George Smith)SUMMARYRegardless of where you are on Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership, insight gained from today's episode with George Smith will no doubt up your game.  Within the first few minutes, George will inspire you as he and Patton reminisce on shared experiences with Eunice Kennedy Shriver and the single most important leadership skill the entire Kennedy clan learned early on.  George expands on his early leadership experiences as he transitioned to the global sector. He shares how not relying on assumptions of standard practices but adapting and capitalizing on the different norms and values of other cultures will develop a higher quality and better performing team.  George also lays out specific examples of leading through varying cultural norms in a collaborative way will build strong leaders throughout an organization who are confident and articulate in communicating with their superiors and peers. By implementing some of the adaptations discussed to your own leadership style, you're sure to enjoy an environment of collaborative learning and development that will elevate your own skills as a nonprofit leader.ABOUT GEORGEGeorge has worked for over 30 years in senior management for International Non-Government Organizations and is recognized as a leader in NGO management and international development. From 1985 until 2002, George worked for Special Olympics International (SOI).  During his tenure he opened the first SOI office in China and served as the Managing Director, East Asia, based in Beijing, China.  He led the development and global roll-out of Unified Sports, an inclusive program bringing together people with and without intellectual disabilities.  Finally, he is recognized for his pioneering work developing SOI programs in other regions including Eastern Europe/Russia and the Middle East. Since 2010 he serves as the Managing Director, North Asia with Orbis. He has helped position Orbis North Asia as a leading International NGO in China and has strengthened relationships with the government and corporate communities.  During his long NGO career, George has been responsible for high level strategic planning, staff management, project development and evaluation, fund raising, donor stewardship, government relations and advocacy. He has received several awards including the R. Tait McKenzie award for his contributions in Health and Physical Education around the world.  He has been awarded the Presidential Citation by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance for outstanding contribution to international development projects.  EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCES Lee Iacocca's Where have All the Leaders Gone?Find out more about Special Olympics International and Orbis 

3 Things
Two new Covid vaccines, Mother Teresa's charity, and AAP's win in Chandigarh

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 30:04


First, Indian Express' Kaunain Sheriff talks about the two Covid-19 vaccines – Corbevax and Covovax – that were granted emergency use authorization earlier this week, along with an oral pill for treating Covid-19.Next, Indian Express' Deeptiman Tiwary talks about the decision the central government has taken against Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, and the controversy around it (11:10).And in the end, Indian Express' Hina Rohtaki talks about how the Aam Aadmi Party managed to score a big win in the Chandigarh Municipal Corporation polls (17:56).

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Solidariti Wira Banjir

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 26:21


NGO dan sukarelawan muncul jadi hero ketika mangsa banjir memerlukan bantuan. Selepas seminggu bencana banjir melanda, apa iktibar yang terlepas pandang, dan strategi pengurusan perlu ditambah baik melibatkan koordinasi dan penyelarasan bantuan khususnya pasca banjir? Diskusi 9 malam.

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM
Tổng kết tình hình Việt Nam năm 2021

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 9:38


Sau khi được quốc tế ca ngợi về thành công trong việc kiềm chế đại dịch Covid-19, trong năm 2021, Việt Nam rốt cuộc cũng phải đối đầu với một đợt dịch bùng phát rất mạnh do tác động của biến thể Delta, vốn lây lan rất nhanh.  Tính đến ngày 22/12, số ca nhiễm Covid ở Việt Nam đã lên tới gần 1 triệu 600 ngàn ca và tổng số ca tử vong đã vượt qua ngưỡng 30.000. Hiện giờ trung bình mỗi ngày có khoảng 200 người chết vì Covid ở Việt Nam và số ca nhiễm mỗi ngày vẫn hơn 10.000. Covid-19: Lao đao vì biến thể Delta Tình hình dịch nghiêm trọng nhất là tại các tỉnh thành miền Nam, đặc biệt là tại Sài Gòn, nơi mà chính quyền địa phương thậm chí đã phải ban hành lệnh giới nghiêm, một biện pháp chưa từng có ở Việt Nam kể từ sau chiến tranh. Đã có nhiều tranh cãi về cách phòng chống dịch ở Việt Nam, nhất là về việc cách ly những người bị nhiễm, mà Việt Nam gọi là F0 và người tiếp xúc gần với F0 gọi là F1. Do số ca nhiễm tăng quá nhiều, nhà chức trách Việt Nam cuối cùng đã buộc phải để cho các ca F0 tự cách ly tại nhà chứ không thể tiếp tục cách ly tập trung như trước đây. Trả lời RFI Việt ngữ ngày 21/12, bác sĩ Trương Hữu Khanh, chuyên gia dịch tễ học, nguyên trưởng khoa Nhiễm-Thần kinh, Bệnh viện Nhi đồng 1, Sài Gòn: “ Khi cách ly một số lượng lớn như vậy thì chắc chắn sẽ làm quá tải cho khối điều trị, bởi vì đưa người ta vào trong đó không chỉ có chuyện chữa bệnh, mà còn các vấn đề hậu cần: ăn uống, ngủ nghỉ. Việc này còn quan trọng hơn chữa bệnh. Cách ly như vậy người ta sẽ khó vượt qua được về mặt tinh thần. Khu cách ly không thể nào hoàn hảo bằng ở nhà. Với lực lượng nhân viên y tế như vậy thì không thể nào chu toàn được chất lượng. Nếu mục tiêu của việc cách ly là để ngăn chận việc lây lan trong cộng đồng, thì có lẽ phải thay đổi, phải rút kinh nghiệm về việc này. Nhất là sau khi đã có vac-xin rồi thì phải bỏ chuyện đó đi. Nếu cách ly tại nhà và tuân thủ tốt thì đã bảo vệ được cộng đồng rồi.” Những biện pháp giãn cách xã hội kéo dài nhằm chặn đứng đại dịch đã khiến đời sống người dân thêm khốn đốn, nhất là những người lao động nhập cư tại Sài Gòn. Theo lời bác sĩ Trương Hữu Khanh, vấn đề là các biện pháp giãn cách xã hội đó đã không thật sự hiệu quả: “ Khi giãn cách như vậy thì hiệu quả không phải là tốt nhất như mình mong muốn. Thật ra lúc đó Sài Gòn giãn cách là giãn cách ở mặt đường, nhưng bệnh đâu có lây ở mặt đường đâu, mà nó lây trong các xóm, trong các khu nhà trọ. Nếu mình giãn cách bên ngoài mà mình không giãn cách bên trong thì không có hiệu quả. Giãn cách đúng thì mới có hiệu quả. Do đó, thất bại của giãn cách, không ngăn được dịch bệnh nhiều, đó là do mình không quyết liệt, để cho người dân đứng yên tại chỗ. Cho nên lúc đó virus vẫn còn lây lan trong các khu phố chật hẹp, số ca bệnh vẫn tăng”. Việc đóng cửa các nhà máy để ngăn chận sự lây lan của virus corona đã ảnh hưởng luôn cả chuỗi cung ứng toàn cầu, do Việt Nam là nơi gia công cho nhiều thương hiệu lớn của quốc tế như Nike. Kể từ tháng 10, chính quyền Việt Nam đã dỡ bỏ hoặc nới lỏng các biện pháp đó, dần dần mở cửa lại nền kinh tế, cho phép các nhà máy hoạt động lại. Covid-19: Nguy cơ Omicron  Hiện giờ, tuy số ca nhiễm hàng ngày vẫn tăng, nhưng nhờ có tỷ lệ tiêm chủng cao, Việt Nam dự trù mở cửa biên giới trở lại để cứu ngành du lịch đã gần như kiệt quệ sau nhiều tháng đóng cửa. Cụ thể, kể từ ngày 01/01/2022, Việt Nam sẽ đón khách ngoại quốc và công dân Việt Nam từ nước ngoài, với điều kiện những người này phải có kết quả xét nghiệm PCR âm tính trong vòng 72 tiếng trước khi nhập cảnh. Thời gian tự cách ly và được xét nghiệm lại là tùy theo người nhập cảnh vào Việt Nam đã được tiêm chủng đầy đủ hay chưa. Để chuẩn bị cho việc mở cửa biên giới, Việt Nam sẽ mở lại các đường bay quốc tế thường lệ theo hai giai đoạn. Trong giai đoạn một sẽ mở lại 9 đường bay giữa Việt Nam với Bắc Kinh/Quảng Châu, Tokyo, Seoul, Đài Bắc, Bangkok, Singapore, Vientiane, Phnom Penh, San Francisco/Los Angeles. Cho giai đoạn hai, sẽ được thực hiện sau khi kết thúc giai đoạn một, ngành giao thông đề xuất mở thêm các đường bay đi/đến Kuala Lumpur, Hồng Kông, Paris, Frankfurt, Sydney và Matxcơva. Nhưng những kế hoạch nói trên rất có thể sẽ lại bị xáo trộn, do hiện nay biến thể Omicron, được biết là lây lan nhanh hơn cả Delta, đã xuất hiện ở nhiều nước, kể cả ở những nước mà Việt Nam dự trù mở lại các chuyến bay. Trong những ngày qua, chính quyền Việt Nam đã tăng cường các biện pháp kiểm soát để cố ngăn chận biến thể Omicron du nhập vào Việt Nam. Tuy vậy, theo bác sĩ Trương Hữu Khanh, rất khó mà ngăn chận được sự lây lan của biến thể Omicron ở Việt Nam. Chính trị: Nguyễn Phú Trọng bất ngờ tái đắc cử Về mặt chính trị, năm 2021 đã được đánh dấu bằng việc ông Nguyễn Phú Trọng, sinh năm 1944, bất ngờ tái đắc cử tổng bí thư Đảng Cộng sản Việt Nam thêm nhiệm kỳ thứ ba, trong khi theo điều lệ đảng, lãnh đạo đảng không được nắm quyền quá hai nhiệm kỳ và những lãnh đạo trên 65 tuổi phải nghỉ hưu. Sỡ dĩ ông Trọng phải tiếp tục giữ chức tổng bí thư vì Đại hội Đảng vào đầu năm 2021 đã không thể tìm ra một nhân vật nào có đủ khả năng và tầm cỡ để thay thế ông. Như vậy là “ trường hợp đặc biệt” Nguyễn Phú Trọng đã trở thành lãnh đạo Việt Nam có thế lực nhất kể từ thời Lê Duẩn, tuy rằng sau đó ông đã phải chuyển giao chức chủ tịch nước cho ông Nguyễn Xuân Phúc, được Quốc Hội chính thức bầu vào tháng 04/2021. Với thế lực như vậy, ông Nguyễn Phú Trọng đã tiếp tục đẩy mạnh chiến dịch chống tham nhũng trong đảng, qua đó loại trừ các đối thủ của ông. Một trong những “nạn nhân” của chiến dịch “đốt lò” do Nguyễn Phú Trọng phát động là cựu chủ tịch Ủy ban Nhân dân Hà Nội Nguyễn Đức Chung, giữa tháng 12 vừa qua đã bị tuyên án thêm 8 năm tù về tội “ Lợi dụng chức vụ quyền hạn trong khi thi hành công vụ”, trong khi đang thi hành án tù 5 năm sau phiên xử tháng 12 năm ngoái về tội “Chiếm đoạt tài liệu bí mật nhà nước”. Một nhân vật đáng chú ý khác bị đưa vào “lò” chính là cựu bộ trưởng Công Thương Việt Nam Vũ Huy Hoàng vào tháng 4 đã bị kết án 11 năm tù về tội "Vi phạm quy định về quản lý, sử dụng tài sản nhà nước gây thất thoát, lãng phí". Tiếp tục bị quốc tế lên án về nhân quyền Nhưng năm 2021 cũng là năm mà trang mạng The Diplomat gọi là “Annus Horribilis” về nhân quyền, tức là một năm vô cùng tồi tệ về nhân quyền, nhất là với việc một loạt nhà hoạt động dân chủ và nhân quyền lãnh án tù nặng nề. Tiêu biểu là nhà báo nổi tiếng Phạm Đoan Trang bị kết án 9 năm tù tại Hà Nội hôm 14/12 về tội « Làm, tàng trữ, phát tán hoặc tuyên truyền thông tin, tài liệu, vật phẩm nhằm chống Nhà nước », theo điều 117 bộ Luật Hình sự Việt Nam. Trong hai ngày sau đó, đến lượt ba nhà hoạt động khác ra tòa cũng với tội danh này: Trịnh Bá Phương bị tuyên phạt 10 năm tù và  5 năm quản chế, Nguyễn Thị Tâm 6 năm tù và 3 năm quản chế, Đỗ Nam Trung 10 năm tù và 4 năm quản chế. Các tổ chức nhân quyền quốc tế như Human Rights Watch, Phóng viên không biên giới, Ủy ban Bảo vệ Nhà báo … cũng như một số nước phương Tây đều đã mạnh mẽ lên án các vụ xử này. Hôm 17/12, Phủ Cao ủy Nhân quyền Liên Hiệp Quốc cũng đã ra thông cáo bày tỏ quan ngại về vụ kết án tù các nhà hoạt động đất đai và nhân quyền ở Việt Nam, kêu gọi chính phủ Hà Nội trả tự do ngay lập tức cho họ. Nhưng chưa hết, trên nguyên tắc vào ngày 31/12, sẽ đến lượt nhà báo Lê Trọng Hùng, người từng ý định ra ứng cử đại biểu Quốc Hội, bị bắt hồi tháng 3/2021, bị xét xử với tội danh tương tự. Như tổ chức Human Rights Watch có nhắc lại, chính quyền Hà Nội thường xuyên sử dụng điều luật hình sự 117 để dập tắt các tiếng nói phê phán chính phủ và Đảng Cộng sản Việt Nam. Chỉ riêng trong năm 2021, các tòa án đã kết tội ít nhất 18 người khác theo điều luật nói trên và xử họ mức án từ 4 đến 15 năm tù. Như nhận định của Stewart Rees, cộng tác viên của Dự án 88, một tổ chức hoạt động nhằm thúc đẩy quyền tự do ngôn luận ở Việt Nam, trên trang The Diplomat ngày 15/12, các án tù cuối năm " như một lời nhắc nhở rằng chính phủ Việt Nam cảm thấy mình có quyền tự do hành động mà không sợ bị quốc tế trừng phạt." Ông viết: " Việc Việt Nam có khả năng được bầu làm thành viên Hội đồng Nhân quyền Liên Hiệp Quốc vào năm tới càng làm tăng thêm sự xúc phạm sau những gì đã xảy suốt một năm qua ở quốc gia này. Đôi khi có vẻ như hành vi của Việt Nam cố tình nhằm chế nhạo nhân quyền." Ngoại giao: Vẫn “đi dây” giữa hai cường quốc Mỹ-Trung Về quan hệ Mỹ-Việt, tổng thống Joe Biden, lên cầm quyền vào tháng 1/2021, vẫn giữ nguyên chính sách của người tiền nhiệm Donald Trump đối với Việt Nam, vốn xem Hà Nội là một đối tác chiến lược quan trọng của Hoa Kỳ ở châu Á. Chính quyền Biden đã tăng cường các quan hệ chiến lược với Việt Nam, thậm chí để làm hài lòng Hà Nội, Washington đã không còn xem Việt Nam là một quốc gia thao túng tiền tệ.  Nhưng theo nhận định của học giả Richard Heydarian tại Manila, Philippines, viết trên trang web của South China Morning Post ngày 18/102, thay vì thiết lập liên minh với Mỹ, Việt Nam vẫn theo đuổi chiến lược cân bằng quan hệ với Hoa Kỳ và Trung Quốc. Hà Nội vẫn thi hành chính sách "ba không": không tham gia liên minh quân sự; không liên kết với nước này để chống nước kia; không cho nước ngoài đặt căn cứ quân sự hoặc sử dụng lãnh thổ Việt Nam để chống lại nước khác ( thật ra thì nay chính sách này đã trở thành “bốn không”, với điểm thứ tư là “không sử dụng vũ lực hoặc đe dọa sử dụng vũ lực trong quan hệ quốc tế”).  Chính là theo chiều hướng đó mà trong năm qua, Việt Nam đã tăng cường quan hệ với các đối tác quan trọng khác như Nhật Bản, qua chuyến viếng thăm Tokyo của thủ tướng Phạm Minh Chính vào cuối tháng 11. Trong cuộc họp thượng đỉnh tại thủ đô Nhật Bản ngày 24/11/2021, thủ tướng Phạm Minh Chính và thủ tướng Fumio Kishida đã thông báo hai nước sẽ gia tăng hợp tác an ninh, đồng thời cùng bày tỏ quan ngại về những hành động của Trung Quốc tại các vùng biển khu vực, trong đó có Biển Đông.  Trước đó, sau khi dự hội nghị thượng đỉnh khí hậu COP26 ở Glasgow, Scotland tháng 11, ông Phạm Minh Chính cũng đã ghé thăm Pháp, một đối tác quan trọng và nhân dịp này hai nước đã ký kết nhiều hợp đồng quan trọng.  Cam kết mạnh mẽ về biến đổi khí hậu Về mặt khí hậu, sự kiện đáng chú ý trong năm 2021 đó là tại hội nghị thượng đỉnh khí hậu COP26 thủ tướng Phạm Minh Chính đã thông báo cam kết của Việt Nam sẽ đạt đến trung hòa carbon ( net - zero emissions ) vào năm 2050. Đây được coi là một cam kết rất mạnh mẽ; bởi vì như vậy Việt Nam phải từ bỏ dần dần các nhà máy điện than vốn thải ra nhiều khí gây hiệu ứng nhà kính khiến Trái đất nóng lên, và sẽ phải đẩy mạnh phát triển các nguồn năng lượng thay thế, trong đó có các năng lượng tái tạo như điện Mặt trời, điện gió… Nhưng để có thể thực hiện được cam kết đó mà vẫn đáp ứng được nhu cầu ngày càng tăng về điện năng của một quốc gia đang tăng trưởng nhanh, ngoài năng lượng tái tạo, Việt Nam sẽ buộc phải tính đến chuyện khởi động lại các dự án nhà máy điện hạt nhân mà Việt Nam đã từ bỏ trước đây. Vấn đề này đã là một trong những chủ đề thảo luận giữa Việt Nam và Nga nhân chuyến viếng thăm Matxcơva của chủ tịch nước Nguyễn Xuân Phúc vào cuối tháng 11. Trước mắt, theo lời Viện trưởng Viện Năng lượng nguyên tử Việt Nam Trần Chí Thành tại hội nghị Khoa học và công nghệ hạt nhân toàn quốc khai mạc ngày 9/12 tại Đà Lạt, một Trung tâm nghiên cứu khoa học công nghệ hạt nhân, với lò phản ứng mới có công suất 10 MWt, sẽ được xây dựng với sự trợ giúp của Nga để phát triển ngành năng lượng nguyên tử Việt Nam.  Việt Nam và Nga đã từng ký một biên bản ghi nhớ vào năm 2011 về dự án nhà máy điện hạt nhân, nhưng dự án này đã bị đình chỉ do những lo ngại về an toàn hạt nhân sau thảm họa Fukushima xảy ra tháng 3 năm đó. Nếu các lãnh đạo Việt Nam quyết định trở lại với chương trình phát triển điện nguyên tử, lò phản ứng nói trên có thể sẽ là khởi đầu cho chương trình đó và dĩ nhiên đối tác hàng đầu gần như chắc chắn sẽ là Nga.

Tám Sài Gòn
Review phim rạp: MA TRẬN: HỒI SINH, CÂU CHUYỆN PHÍA TÂY, HỐ SỤT TỬ THẦN, BLACKPINK THE MOVIE...

Tám Sài Gòn

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 14:01


Cùng review các bộ phim ra rạp từ ngày 24/12/2021 MA TRẬN: HỒI SINH C18 Đạo diễn: Lana Wachowski Diễn viên: Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Jessica Henwick, Jonathan Groff, Neil Patrick Harris, Priyanka Chopra Jonas và Christina Ricci Thể loại: Hành Động, Khoa Học Viễn Tưởng Ma Trận: Hồi Sinh là phần phim tiếp theo rất được trông đợi của loạt phim “Ma Trận” đình đám, đã góp phần tái định nghĩa thể loại phim khoa học viễn tưởng. Phần phim mới nhất này đón chào sự trở lại của cặp đôi Keanu Reeves và Carrie-Anne Moss với vai diễn biểu tượng đã làm nên tên tuổi của họ, Neo và Trinity. Ngoài ra, phim còn có sự góp mặt của dàn diễn viên đầy tài năng gồm Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Jessica Henwick, Jonathan Groff, Neil Patrick Harris, Priyanka Chopra Jonas và Christina Ricci. CÂU CHUYỆN PHÍA TÂY C16 Đạo diễn: Steven Spielberg Diễn viên: Ansel Elgort, Rachel Zegler, Ariana DeBose, David Alvarez, Mike Faist, Josh Andrés Rivera, Ana Isabelle, Corey Stoll, Brian d'Arcy James, Rita Moreno Thể loại: Nhạc kịch, Tình cảm Được đạo diễn bởi đạo diễn gạo cội từng giành giải Oscar Steven Spielberg, cùng kịch bản bởi biên kịch từng giành giải Pulitzer Prize và giải Tony Award, Tony Kushner, “Câu chuyện phía Tây” kể lại câu chuyện tình yêu kinh điển của Tony và Maria, giữa sự giằng xé của tình yêu trẻ tuổi và sự ngăn cấm, thù hằn ở thành phố NewYork những năm 1950. HỐ SỤT TỬ THẦN C13 Đạo diễn: Kim Ji Hoon Diễn viên: Cha Seung Won, Kim Sung Kyun, Lee Kwang Soo, Kim Hye Jun… Thể loại: Hài, Hồi hộp Trong lúc Park Dong Won tổ chức tiệc tân gia, một chiếc hố sụt khổng lồ đã bất ngờ nuốt chửng anh cùng căn hộ mới mua xuống độ sâu 500 mét. Tuy may mắn sống sót, nhưng Park Dong Won cần phải nhanh chóng hợp lực với các vị khách và những cư dân khác để thoát khỏi tòa chung cư đổ nát, trước khi chiếc hố bị nước mưa nhấn chìm. BLACKPINK THE MOVIE Đạo diễn: Su Yee Jung, Oh Yoon-Dong Diễn viên: JISOO, JENNIE, ROSÉ, LISA Thể loại: Phim tài liệu Nhóm nhạc nữ được yêu thích toàn cầu, BLACKPINK sẽ kỷ niệm năm thứ 5 hoạt động của nhóm với việc phát hành BLACKPINK THE MOVIE, đây cũng như là món quà đặc biệt dành tặng cho các BLINK— fandom của BLACKPINK — bộ phim sẽ tái hiện một cách sống động những kỷ niệm không thể quên cùng những màn trinh diễn đầy cuồng nhiệt đúng tinh thần lễ hội. NHÓC TRÙM: NỐI NGHIỆP GIA ĐÌNH Đạo diễn: Tom McGrath Diễn viên: Amy Sedaris, Jeff Goldblum, James Marsden Thể loại: Hoạt Hình Nhóc trùm Ted giờ đây đã trở thành một triệu phú nổi tiếng trong khi Tim lại có một cuộc sống đơn giản bên vợ anh Carol và hai cô con gái nhỏ yêu dấu. Mỗi mùa Giáng sinh tới, cả Tina và Tabitha đều mong được gặp chú Ted nhưng dường như hai anh em nhà Templeton nay đã không còn gần gũi như xưa. Nhưng bất ngờ thay khi Ted lại có màn tái xuất không thể hoành tráng hơn khi đáp thẳng máy bay trực thăng tới nhà Tim trước sự ngỡ ngàng của cả gia đình. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kim-thanh-duong/support

VietnamPlus's Podcast
#43 Hỏi đáp COVID-19: Sử dụng thuốc cho F0 tại nhà như thế nào?

VietnamPlus's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 3:02


Hỏi: Sở Y tế Hà Nội vừa ban hành tài liệu hướng dẫn quản lý, điều trị và chăm sóc người bệnh COVID-19 không triệu chứng và triệu chứng nhẹ tại nhà, kèm hướng dẫn sử dụng thuốc điều trị COVID-19 tại nhà cho người trên 18 tuổi bao gồm 3 nhóm: A, B và C. Vậy những gói này gồm những loại thuốc gì?Trả lời: Theo đó, những đối tượng quản lý tại nhà (F0) là người có kết quả xét nghiệm RT-PCR hoặc test nhanh kháng nguyên SARS-CoV-2 dương tính có mức độ lâm sàng gồm: Không triệu chứng hoặc có triệu chứng nhẹ như sốt, ho khan, đau họng, nghẹt mũi, mệt mỏi, đau mỏi cơ khớp, giảm vị giác, khứu giác; chưa phát hiện ra bệnh lý nền, đã tiêm đủ liều vaccine; không mang thai đồng thời có khả năng tự chăm sóc bản thân: Tự ăn uống, giặt quần áo, vệ sinh cá nhân…; biết cách đo thân nhiệt; có khả năng liên lạc với nhân viên y tế; tự dùng thuốc theo đơn  của bác sĩ.Cùng với đó, Sở Y tế Hà Nội cũng đưa hướng dẫn sử dụng thuốc điều trị COVID-19 tại nhà cho người trên 18 tuổi bao gồm 3 nhóm: A, B và C.Nhóm A là những thuốc thông dụng, bao gồm: Thuốc hạ sốt và thuốc nâng cao thể trạng. Tiếp theo là nhóm B gồm thuốc kháng viêm và thuốc chống đông chỉ sử dụng trong tình huống đặc biệt. Nhóm này được dùng khi người bệnh cảm thấy khó thở (thở hụt hơi, khó thở tăng lên khi vận động). Ngoài ra, Sở Y tế Hà Nội lưu ý, với các thuốc dùng cho nhóm B không sử dụng cho phụ nữ có thai và phụ nữ đang cho con bú hoặc mắc một trong những bệnh như: viêm loét dạ dày tá tràng, suy gan, suy thận,...Cuối cùng là nhóm C, nhóm thuốc kháng virus . Đây cũng là nhóm thuốc  không sử dụng trong trường hợp phụ nữ đang mang thai hoặc có kế hoạch có thai, đang cho con bú./.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Empowering People to Live Healthier Lives, a special podcast with Dr. Richard Ashworth | The Public Health Pharmacist

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:10


Empowering People to Live Healthier Lives, a special podcast with Dr. Richard Ashworth Pharmacists, Physcians, and people commited to better health for our nation are working closer than ever before. Dr. Richard Ashworth believes we can do more. Interesting insights on how the healthy aging sector will evolve post-pandemic – including concerns on reported increased levels of stress in seniors and the need to more actively address social determinants of health. Dr. Ashworth and Dr. Madison also talk about navigating the shift to virtual engagement and the opportunities and challenges healthcare organizations will face once the nation fully reopens from COVID-19.  Our guest: Dr. Richard Ashworth, PharmD joined Tivity Health as President and CEO, and as a member of the Board of Directors, in June 2020. Previously, Ashworth facilitated the growth of Walgreens for nearly 30 years, transforming the company into a global leader in pharmacy and health and wellness. He started at Walgreens as a store clerk in 1992, and most recently led as President, responsible for developing the strategies and plans for all Walgreens operations including leadership, development and management of the business. Ashworth has spent his career focused on improving the health and well-being of others, with a passion for making a difference in the lives of customers and members. His experience includes navigating a rapidly changing healthcare landscape while serving a portfolio of large customers and individual consumers in the intensely competitive retail realm. Ashworth is an influential voice in public health policy and the future of healthcare and has shared his views at the White House and on Capitol Hill. He also served on the NACDS board for the last four years, formerly as Chairman. Ashworth earned a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD) and a master's degree in business administration. Our host: Dr. Christina Madison, PharmD is the Founder and CEO of The Public Health Pharmacist™, PLLC a public health consulting firm. She is a clinical pharmacist specializing in public health with a focus on infectious communicable diseases. As a past President of the Nevada Public Health Association, she has been asked to share her clinical public health and infectious disease expertise with Local, State, and International Media outlets and NGO's. Dr. Madison has been featured in over 200+ on-air TV appearances since January 2020 related to the pandemic and public health. She has an intimate knowledge of the impact public health messaging, policy, and legislation can have on communities. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Finding Founders
Foraging for Fungi in Firepower Filled Forests: Founder Wisdom #064 - Giuliana Furci

Finding Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 25:58


Giuliana Furci was born in London but her family returned to Chile when she was 15 years old. At 19, she stumbled across a bright orange mushroom which caught her eye while doing field work in the forest. This moment inspired Giuliana to devote her life to addressing the lack of information on fungi. Starting her career as a self-taught amateur, she became the first female field mycologist in Chile and started the Fungi Foundation, the first NGO dedicated to fungi in the world. Under her leadership, Chile became the first country in the world to include the Fungi kingdom in its environmental legislation. https://ffungi.org/eng/ Subscribe to our Newsletter! https://findingfounders.co/subscribe Website: findingfounders.co Follow Sam: https://www.instagram.com/samueldonner/ Follow Finding Founders IG: https://www.instagram.com/findingfounderspodcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/finding-founders/support

MoneyBall Medicine
How To Track The Pandemic Using Mobile Data, With Nuria Oliver

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 58:49


When the coronavirus pandemic swept across the world in early 2020, Spain was one of the countries hardest hit. At the time, Nuria Oliver was a telecommunications engineer working and living in Valencia, one of Spain's 17 autonomous regions. She'd spent years working for companies like Microsoft, Telefonica, and Vodafone, using AI to analyze data from mobile networks to explore big questions about healthcare, economics, crime, and other issues—so she realized right away that mobile data could be an important tool for government leaders and public health officials trying to get a handle on the spread of COVID-19.With the backing of Valencia's president, Oliver put together a team of scientists to analyze network data to understand among other things, how much people in Spain were moving around. That helped them predict infection rates, and to see whether lockdowns were really helping to contain the virus's spread. The team's predictions were so accurate, in fact, that when they entered an X Prize Foundation contest seeking the best AI-based pandemic response systems, they won first place. Nuria Oliver joins Harry to explain how they did it—and why mobile data makes a difference in the fight against the pandemic and other health threats.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.When the pandemic swept across the world in early 2020, Spain was one of the countries hardest hit. At the time, Nuria Oliver was a telecommunications engineer working and living in Valencia, which is one of 17 autonomous regions in Spain, the equivalent of U.S. states.  She'd spent years working for companies like Microsoft, Telefonica, and Vodafone, using AI to analyze data from mobile networks to explore big questions about healthcare, economics, crime, and other issues.  And Oliver realized right away that mobile data could be a very important tool for government leaders and public health officials trying to get a handle on the spread of COVID-19.She went to the president of Valencia and proposed putting together a team of scientists who could support government decision makers by analyze mobile network data. She thought the data could reveal, among other things, how much people were moving around. That, in turn, could help predict infection rates, and it would show whether lockdowns and other restrictions on people's movement were really helping to contain the spread of the virus.The president immediately accepted her proposal and appointed her to the honorary position of “commissioner to the president on AI and data science against COVID-19.” And as it turned out, the predictions from Oliver's group were startlingly accurate. In December 2020, when the group entered a contest sponsored by the X Prize Foundation for an AI-based pandemic response systems, they won first place and wound up splitting the $500,00 prize with a second-place team from Slovenia.And for today's show, Nuria Oliver joined me to explain how they did it. We also talked about the difference data is making in the fight against the pandemic, and how our phones are helping to keep us healthy. We recorded this a couple of months ago, in mid-October. But obviously the pandemic hasn't receded at all since then, so everything you'll here is still relevant.Harry Glorikian: Nuria, welcome to the show. It's so great to have you on. I know there's a little bit of a time difference because you're over in Europe right now. But Nuria, I was looking at your background and I was like, Oh my God, I'm like, if I try to go through her entire CV like we're going to, it's the hour of the show is going to like completely go just for the CV. But I wonder if you can sort of give the listeners a quick version of of how your interest in the connection between technology and human behavior has developed over the years. What big themes did you focus on in your various academic and industry posts at MIT Media Lab, Microsoft Research, Telefonica, Vodafone? I mean, those are just a few of the things that you've done. You know, when I when I was think I've done something with my life, I look at people like you and I'm like, I've got so much more to do. But if you could sort of give us that a short version, that would be awesome.Nuria Oliver: All right. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Let's see. So I'm originally from Spain. I studied electrical engineering and computer science in grad school, telecommunications engineering, and since I was very small, I was always fascinated by the idea of being a scientist or being an inventor or being a researcher and discovering something or inventing something new or for answering questions that hadn't been answered before. So I love mysteries and logic problems, and these are difficult things to solve. I wasn't sure how to kind of channel that. And when I studied telecommunications engineering, which was six years at the time, it was like together with a master's or equivalent degree. In my fourth year, I did a project on the parallelism between neural networks and human brain and the human brain and the human sort of like neurons. And it was the discovery of artificial intelligence to me, and it was pretty much love at first sight. I realized that it was fascinating to build technology that could do something intelligent. It sounded like science fiction to me. And I always have had this vision that technology is a great tool that we can use to have positive social impact and to improve the quality of life of people. So this has been my vision since I was also very small. So with artificial intelligence, I thought, Well, if I could build computers that could understand people, that would be the first step to build computers that can help people.Nuria Oliver: So I started focusing on modelling human behavior, and then I went to MIT to do a Ph.D., and that was the main focus of my work. So I built one of the first facial expression recognition systems in the world that was working in real time, or I made an intelligent car that could predict the next maneuver that the driver would do. I participated also in the first smart clothes fashion show in the world in 1997. So it was really an exciting time to be at the Media Lab, and I had a chance to develop new models of different aspects of human behavior. Then I went to Microsoft Research and I continued my work on that topic. I built an intelligent office. I did with a colleague, a system similar to the Minority Report, where you could control the computer. You see your hands in the air. And in 2005, I realized that I had spent a decade building, you know, smart computers, smart cars, smart rooms, but even at the time, the most personal computer was the mobile phone, and it probably was going to be the mobile phone. And I felt that, you know, we weren't really leveraging the opportunities that the phone was bringing to us in terms of helping us.Nuria Oliver: So I decided to explore that topic, and I started working on projects related to the intersection between mobile phones, health and wellness. So I did a project to detect sleep apnea on the phone. I did another one to help people achieve their exercise goals using what is called persuasive computing, which are sort of like theories of human motivation and psychology, but implemented like on the phone to encourage people and motivate people to change behaviors. I got the offer to move back to Spain at the end of 2007 and never thought I was ever going to go back to Spain, but it seemed like an interesting opportunity to create and lead a research area within a very large telco, Telefonica, the largest telco in Spain. And with my family, we decided, okay, let's try. So we move to Barcelona, and the challenge was to create a top research team from scratch in a topics that were not the traditional telco topics at the time. At the time telcos were sort of like networking companies, right? And I was doing, you know, big data, you know, data science, artificial intelligence topics that today are at the core of what a telco company is. But in 2007, it wasn't really the case yet. So so we continued working on on on two streams on the one hand, making phones the serve their name or of a smartphone, basically.Nuria Oliver: So we did a project to help people take their medication correctly, for example, and support medication adherence, particularly in the elderly. But the other strain was a new stream for me, which was because of working in a telco, we could have access to large scale, anonymized mobile network data. So data about an entire city or an entire country, fully anonymized, you know, fully non-personal data and that data transfer that is very valuable for social good. For example, when there is a natural disaster or when or to infer the socioeconomic status of a region or to understand crime and predict hotspots of crime in cities, or to help when there are pandemics. So those are all areas that I started developing and exploring while at Telefonica, and I created the area of data science for social good. I was in Telefonica for eight years and then they offer. I left Telefonica and I joined Vodafone as director of research in data science globally. And again, the challenge was similar to create from scratch research activities across, I don't know, 20 different countries in Vodafone. I also created the area of data science for social good. And then I left Vodafone. But I continue with a connection with Vodafone because I'm still chief scientific adviser to a think tank that Vodafone has in Berlin.Nuria Oliver: Since 2015, I had, while I was at Telefonica, I had also gotten involved with an NGO, which is based in the US, which is called Data-Pop Alliance, and it has been created by the MIT Media Lab, the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, the Overseas Development Institute and Flowminder. And the goal is how to leverage data and AI for social good. So it was very aligned with what I had been doing, so I've been collaborating with them in parallel, developing a lot of projects in developing countries in showing the value that data analyzed with AI methods can have to actually accelerate development of a lot of regions. Then in 2018, I became very involved with a very exciting European initiative called ELLIS, which means the European Laboratory for Learning and Intelligent Systems, and it is the result of a grassroots movement of the European scientists. And our goal is to contribute to Europe's technological sovereignty in AI by attracting and retaining the best scientists in AI to Europe. And to do that, we need to, you know, change a little bit how things are done in Europe, and we've launched a number of actions and activities that we can possibly talk about later. And then finally, in March of 2020, given that I had been working for over a decade on how to use data and AI for social good, including how to use it in the context of infectious diseases and pandemics, I felt that for the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, for the coronavirus pandemic, the governments weren't going to use all these advances that we had made in science, in actually analyzing data, using AI methods to support decision making.Nuria Oliver: So I felt that maybe it was a missed opportunity once again to actually have this disconnection between where science is and where sort of like the real world are and the decision makers are. So, I had an idea in March of 2020, which was proposed, my idea was to propose to the central government and also to the state, the state government, Spain is divided into 17 autonomous regions, which are the equivalent to a state in the US, and they have presidents which is equivalent to governors in the US. So I proposed to the president of the region the idea of having a team of scientists working really closely with the decision makers in sort of like performing relevant models and data analysis that would support their decisions. And they said yes immediately and the president of the Valencian government, and they appointed me commissioner to the president on AI and data science against COVID 19, which is an honorary position. And basically I have been leading a team of 20+ scientists in there since then, working on on four big areas and the intersection between data AI and the pandemic.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I was, you know, it's interesting that you say they don't always take advantage of things. I remember. I have to go back in my memory 20 years ago, actually, because it was right about the time my son was born, I pitched to Telefonica about location-based services. And at the time, it was almost impossible for people to wrap their head around this idea, that location intertwined with data, and giving somebody the information they were looking for to help them make a decision was going to be a, now what is it? You know, it's a billions and billions of dollars of an industry, but at that time it was people couldn't wrap their head around it. So I think if you're ahead of your time, it's always it's always difficult for the average person to sort of understand where things are going.Nuria Oliver: Certainly. Certainly this is certainly the case. And I think the case of our experience in Valencia, we were lucky that there was sort of like a confluence of factors that really enabled this initiative to not only to happen, but to actually be sustained over time for almost two years now, or a year over a year and a half. And to have a certain level of impact and success. And I think one of the elements was the government had already been working for a couple of years prior on the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the profound transformation of our society because of disciplines like biotechnology, nanotechnology or artificial intelligence. They had published their study on artificial intelligence. They had realized that the public administrations haven't undergone the digital transformation that most companies, particularly large companies, have already undergone, and they recognize that there was this opportunity to transform the public administration and become more data driven would become more digital. So I think when I made this proposal, they were in the right mindset and they were already thinking about this. And there was also a relationship of trust with me because I had collaborated with them in drafting the AI strategy.Nuria Oliver: And they they knew that it was a serious effort. They knew that we were going to try to do our best. So I think there are all these different elements that that really helped. And then there was one director general, well there is still there, working for the president who actually comes from the U.S. She's Spanish, but she spent a lot of time working in the for the mayor of New York City. So she had a lot of the same mentality that I had as he was a little bit of an agent of change within the government. She's been a member of our team since the beginning, coming to every single meeting, and that is absolutely necessary because they are the ones that are going to benefit from whatever we do, and they're the ones that need to use it. So they need to see the value and they need to understand it. So I think it's very important to have this sort of like mixed, multidisciplinary, multi-institutional teams.Harry Glorikian: So I mean, I applaud them for seeing that because if you have ever watched our Congress or Senate interview technology people,Nuria Oliver: Yeah, I've seen it, it's famous.Harry Glorikian: It's quite fascinating. Some of the questions where you know, you realize they know so little about. These technologies or their impact and don't understand like. All of these things are like you should be looking at them as nuclear weapons, how do you use them, how do you manage them, how do you use them for good? How do you put things in place to protect people, right?Nuria Oliver: Yes. And the other important message is, I don't think it is acceptable for any policy maker or any representative of citizens to publicly acknowledge, "Oh, I don't know anything about technology." I don't think that is acceptable because technology permeates everything, every single aspect of our lives. So it's it's such a fundamental element of our society that you need to know a lot about technology if you really want to make the right decisions about any topic, absolutely any topic, right? So I think that's definitely something that at least in some governments, they recognize that there is a need for identifying new profiles to work in the public administration, creating new positions, more tech savvy positions, data scientists, but also educating the policymakers and doing courses on on relevant topics related to technology. I think this is very, very, very important.Nuria Oliver: So let's pivot now because I think all of this technology came really in to a lot of good or use when COVID 19 came along. All right. So you know, you one of the data I think you collect in Valencia is mobile data, right? Exactly. Understanding how this data helped you understand and manage the course of the pandemic, can you talk about that a little bit because I think that that's important for people to understand.Nuria Oliver: Yes, so we had four large work streams in this data science for COVID-19 initiative, and the first one was modeling large scale human mobility. Why? Because an infectious disease like COVID-19 that is transmitted from human to human, it doesn't become a pandemic if people don't move. And that's why we have been confined, right? Because it's our movements, the ones that are propagating the disease. So understanding how people move, determining if the confinement measures are working or not, is very important to make the right decisions and the right policies.Nuria Oliver: So there was another lucky factor that I didn't mention, but that has really been very helpful in Spain and is the following factor. For two years prior to the pandemic, the Spanish National Office of Statistics had been drafting a collaboration agreement with the three largest telcos in Spain, which are Telefonica, Vodafone and Orange.Harry Glorikian: Mm hmm.Nuria Oliver: So. So let me rewind a little bit. So part of this transformation that we mentioned of society because you know of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, you know, an artificial intelligence part of this transformation is actually impacting the National Office of Statistics of everyone in the world where the traditional methods to build official statistics, which are via surveys, are susceptible to being improved, leveraging pervasive technology and sort of like big data. So there is a global movement in every National Office of Statistics, in pretty much of every country to explore how they could build official statistics through the analysis of data automatically without having to do surveys, because it's very expensive and it doesn't really scale. And that is why there is only one census every 10 years or 15 years, or in some countries, 40 years, because it's just very expensive to do the census. So the Spanish National Office of Statistics, one of the statistics that they compute is commuting patterns, and they do it by doing surveys. And they thought, OK, maybe we can collaborate with the telcos and analyze aggregated data from the antennas, from the cell phone antennas to infer these mobility patterns automatically without having to do surveys. So that was a very long process of negotiations and getting all the approvals under the data protection agencies and from the legal departments of all these telcos, blah blah blah. So that took them a huge amount of time. So in November of 2019, right before the pandemic, they got all the okays necessary, and they launched the pilot to see how well they could create commuting matrices from this data that was actually a relatively controversial project.Nuria Oliver: It appeared in the media. It wasn't communicated very well because they were saying the National Office of Statistics is tracking you, which is completely wrong. They weren't tracking anyone. But anyhow, when the pandemic happened, they already had all the infrastructure in place and all the legal agreements in place to actually get access to the mobile network data from the operators and combine the data and compute mobility matrices out of the data so that that mobility piece that we did was relatively easy in the sense that the data access was already available. So the vice minister, the vice president of Spain, Calvino, she appointed us the pilot region to be able to use that data during the first wave of the pandemic, at a time when there were really, there was almost no data and it was very hard. We were making a lot of decisions kind of blindly. So through the National Office of Statistics, we were able to access that data and then identify and measure to which degree the confinement measures had impacted the mobility of the population. How successful the stay at home campaign was, how much labor mobility was impactd, h ow was the radius of movement reduced because of the measures? But also what was the impact of those measures on the spread of the virus? Because at the end, you also want to know, OK, is this really slowing down the spread of the virus or not? Right. So we were also able to do that. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: So but now you carried out a large scale survey of the people in Valencia. And so when you look at survey data compared to mobility data, how do you think about that?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, so so the first line of work was the mobility analysis. Then we have two more lines, one which might we might talk about later. One is the computational epidemiological models, the other one was predictive models. And then the fourth line was a citizen survey. And why did we launch this citizen survey? So we launched the survey because in March of 2020 and even today, there were a lot of questions that we couldn't answer. We didn't have any data sources. For example, what is the social behavior that people have? What is the emotional impact of the pandemic. What's the resilience of the population toward all these measures. Are there tests, are people being tested. What is the prevalence of symptoms? Was the labor impact, the economic impact? What kind of protection measures are people taking? How are people moving? Are they leaving their homes, or are they taking public transportation? I mean, there were so many interesting questions that we couldn't really answer, so we decided to ask the people to say, Well, let's just draft, let's design the shortest possible survey that would give us the most information about people's behaviors and perception and situation during the pandemic. So we came out with 26 questions, which we translated to many different languages and the surveys deployed in different countries in the world.Nuria Oliver: It has almost 700,000 answers right now. And one of them is in Spain, evidently. But we also have a very representative sample of in the, I think, in the almost 100,000 from Germany, Italy, Brazil, and the survey has been regularly used by the media, by the policymakers, but also by people to have a sense of how we are doing. So I think the survey has different angles to it. One element is giving a voice to people. You know, I think we have been subject to a lot of measures that have happened to us, but we as citizens haven't had a lot of opportunities to really tell how we were doing and how the pandemic was impacting us and on our fears or what we were thinking. So the survey is a way to listen to to the people and to give them a chance to tell us every week how things are going. It's also an incredible tool to really connect the citizens to the policymakers so they understand, for example, what's the intention to get vaccinated. You know, we know since April of 2020, for example, that the most impacted group emotionally, psychologically is the youth.Nuria Oliver: So the government can think, OK, we need to invest in programs for the youth. But we know that since April of 2020, it's not that we know it now. We know it for over a year and a half from now. So there's a lot of things that we know, you know, for many, many, many months. So that has been incredibly helpful. So the survey is completely complementary to the large scale mobility data. We do have a little bit of mobility information because we ask people their transportation means because we wanted to see people were walking or they were driving individually or they were taking public transport. And we did observe where public transport was kind of shut down for a few weeks or months, there was a huge increase in walking. During the first lockdown, especially. And then there was there wasn't really a big use of public transportation until probably the fall of 2020 or even like the spring of 2021. So, yeah, we did have a little bit of mobility information, but very complementary to the large scale mobility that we could analyze with their mobile data.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think this this sort of way that the government or your group is interacting with the people to sort of get this information. I mean, I think that's a more organized and statistically significant way than Facebook or Twitter or any of these other big rooms that you can yell in, right? So, you know, it adds to the discussion.Nuria Oliver: Yeah. I mean, we invested a lot of thought and a fair amount of time. We think the fact that we had no time because we had to react really quickly. But I think if we if we started this effort in mid-March, right, right at the very, very, very beginning of the pandemic. And I think we launched the survey March 28th. So we had about 10 days. Yeah, we're very fast, but we really thought a lot about it. We spent I mean, we worked all day, all night, all the time. I mean, there was nothing else to do anyway. So I mean, we were just sort of like working, working for...I mean, I have three children, too. But we were really working. And my husband also got very involved in this. So it was kind of like a family effort and we invested a lot of time in designing the survey so the questions were really, would be the most helpful possible and sort of like complimentary to the other data sources that we had. And I think that was relatively successful. I mean, it's definitely been very helpful to many different people. We built very quickly visualization tools of all the answers to the survey so anyone can access them, anyone can look at them. And that was very important so everyone can benefit from the answers.Harry Glorikian: So in a pandemic, what can you--if you said, "Oh my God, this these were the, you know, two or three things that we were able to influence," based on this technology integration or information that we were able to provide policymakers that made the biggest difference.Nuria Oliver: Well, I think there are different levels. I think we had the impact at different levels, so the mobility analysis was extremely helpful for the government to really understand to which degree the lockdown and the measures had worked. And They really appreciated that piece of work a lot. The computational epidemiological models, which we haven't talked about yet, but is basically we've been building models to predict the number of cases and the number of hospitalizations and the number of intensive care units and the number of deaths throughout the entire pandemic. And we've built different types of models because one of the take-home messages here is, of course, the underlying reality is extremely complex and it's not a purely deterministic system. Evidently, the world is really, really hard to model. So if we build models that are completely different in their approach and they give us similar predictions, we can be more certain about those predictions than if the models each of them says something different. So we have three different models running all the time with completely different methods like to really see to which degree, you know, they are aligned. So our predictions have been used. I mean, I've been I've been writing reports for many, many months every day with the predictions of the day. So, so they could have a sense of how things were going, how fast the cases were going to be growing and things like that.Nuria Oliver: So that was particularly helpful. I would say in the third wave, which took place after Christmas, and it was the worst wave here in the Valencia region. And it was very helpful because at the time we had just finished our third model, which was using deep neural networks and is a model that we use in the X Competition. And that model predicted extremely accurately the day of the peak of the number of cases and the number of cases at the peak. And it was very helpful because it was a very stressful moment where the cases were growing exponentially. There was a huge amount of tension as to whether to implement more measures or persist with these measures or change the measures or what to do. Because the number of cases were growing, the deaths were growing and they placed a fair amount of faith in our model, maybe more than I would have placed because I was just like, Oh my God, I hope this model works really, really well. But you know, there's this moment where you are thinking, Oh, I don't know. Maybe I mean, this is just a model, you know, the world is more complicated.Harry Glorikian: Exactly.Nuria Oliver: So that was that was very helpful. At the same time, we also build machine learning based, deep neural, network based prediction models of hospital occupancy and intensive care occupancy that was extremely helpful to allocate resources and to figure out which hospitals were going to be saturated and to to anticipate that and to determine whether they needed to mobilize more intensive care units and things like that.Nuria Oliver: And then, as I mentioned, the survey has been helpful, I would say, all throughout the pandemic to really understand the needs of the people, to understand the sort of like the impact of the pandemic on people's lives and and to determine what would be the areas of priority for new policies. So I think the different work streams have had different impacts, but I think that is a broader impact, which is probably the most important, maybe, which is the impact of showing a different way of working, a way of working that is a lot more data driven. That is more technological, that is very, very different to the traditional approach. And seeing that with with a clear example for a very long time and seeing the value that this way of working has brought, I think has been the best way for them to realize what they might be missing if they don't undergo, you know, the necessary digital transformation.Harry Glorikian: Can you have them come over here and talk to our guys? I think you need to have to come here and talk to our guys.Nuria Oliver: I think you would need also internal advocates.Harry Glorikian: I think that I think there's a lot of those. I think there are there are a number of people internally right that that want to you just need to. I think people who sit in powerful positions need to understand the implications and the impact of this,Nuria Oliver: And they have to accept they have to accept that the data might not tell something that they want to hear. I mean, there is also the risk of of losing control in a sense, right? Because the data could say that the policy didn't work, you know, something that maybe you really believed in and you really push for it and then it's like, OK, sorry, but this is not working right and you have to be.Harry Glorikian: But that's, you know, that's part of the that's part of the whole, you know, scientific method. You have a hypothesis, you go test it. And if it didn't work to come up with a new hypothesis, right? I mean, that's that's the way it should be. And you know, in reality, I have this debate with people. Nuria Oliver: The political world is not exactly like that.Harry Glorikian: But I think this sort of decision making is not just from a policy perspective, but it permeates, all the way through. I mean, I have this debate with a lot of people in the medical world of, it doesn't work. It's making the wrong mistake. It's biased. I'm like, it's always evolving. This is software. It's like every day it's getting better. It doesn't sleep, it can get better the next day. So a year from now, it can be an order of magnitude different than it was, you know, when it started. So. But [musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: You mentioned the X Prize and you guys won the X Prize. And you split that prize with, you know, people in Slovenia. So did you have some programmers there or did you…Nuria Oliver: No, no, no. There was a first prize and a second prize, and we won the first prize and they won the second prize.Harry Glorikian: Oh okay, okay.Nuria Oliver: So there were first, first, I guess first winner and then second the people there stayed second. Yeah, so.Harry Glorikian: So how did that impact? How did that impact, you winning that, did that impact the way that people thought about the model?Nuria Oliver: I think I think it gave us a lot of legitimacy and, you know, a huge external validation because we had been I felt we had been doing very, you know, rigorous solid work for many, many months. But of course, it was constrained to the Valencia region, maximum to Spain and then the X Prize Challenge asked us to build predictive models of the pandemic in 236 countries and regions in the world. So it was a step up, you know, from what we had to do. So I think I think it definitely gave a lot of like external validation to the work. I think I find it a very inspirational story. I never thought we were going to win. I was a little bit the devil's advocate in the team. When I share with the team this idea, this opportunity of the of participating in the X Prize competition, but it was more like a teaser. I didn't think that they were going to actually decide to go for it. And I and I told them many times, Look, guys, guys and girls. I mean, this is, you know, this is a different level. I mean, this is a global competition. You know, if we go for it, we are going to have to work even harder than we have been working all over Christmas and New Year's and everything because the competition started at the end of November. I think it was a very beginning of December. And, you know, and I think we should try our best. I mean, if we go for it, we go 100 percent you. We just don't sort of go, Yes, this is, let's do it. Let's do it.Nuria Oliver: So we kind of jumped into the pool like the X Prize and. Uh, and it was incredible when we won, I couldn't believe it. It was to me, it really shows that there is talent anywhere and everywhere. And many times what fails is not even the talent, it's actually the environment where this talent is.Harry Glorikian: Correct.Nuria Oliver: If it is not an environment that supports the talent and that encourages the talent and that empowers the talent, that talent is like a little seed, right? And we don't have an environment that enables this seed to grow, it just stays on the ground there, you know, not growing. And I think the entire initiative and particularly the X Prize competition, was this sort of environment where, you know, anyone could win. Everyone was in equal conditions and in our team, our team is extremely sort of like a very flat structure. There are students and there are full professors and everyone contributes equally and anyone can do anything you know is very sort of a hands on, you know, very sort of like a start up. And I think that was a big change from the traditional, well-established, somewhat bureaucratic research processes that prevailed in many institutions, right? Where there is a hierarchy from the full professor to the student. And, you know, many times the students feel that they cannot even do some idea that they might have because they have to be asking for permission, you know. So I think for me, it was also this inspirational story on saying, Well, you know, anyone could win any of these competitions, you know, if the environment,Harry Glorikian: Environment and you know, geography, I always joke. I always say, like, if you're in the West Coast or you can fail multiple times, you come to the East Coast, you've got to fail a lot less and it depends on which college or university you graduated from. You go to Europe, you fail a lot less because your family and everybody around you will not be happy, right? It's depending on where you are, right? You're willing to take more or less risk. And then, of course, that can be superimposed on the organization that's also creating that environment. But let me jump now and say, you know and ask. You guys in Valencia have like a 90 percent vaccination rate, which I think is one of the highest in the world, much higher than the U.S. by far. I'm comparing a region to a country, but. What what do you think accounts for this? The differing levels of a compliance. Do you think the people in Spain are just more trusting of the medical establishment? I mean, you guys have Facebook too, so the same misinformation is getting to you. That's getting to us. Are they more trusting of technology?Nuria Oliver: I think there are multiple factors. I think one very important factor is that fortunately, the pandemic wasn't really overly politicized and anyone from any political inclination or party or view, you know, was adopting measures, was wearing masks, you know, was willing to get vaccinated. So there was there hasn't been this coupling that has happened in many countries between the pandemic and your political views. I think this has been completely orthogonal issues in Spain. You know, the pandemic impacts everyone. The pandemic doesn't care if you are right wing, left wing or center. Yes, the virus is going to infect you the same. It doesn't matter what you believe, you're going to get it. Maybe you don't believe in me but I'm going to infect you. So I that has that has definitely helped a lot. The other issue is Spain didn't have a strong anti-vax movement to start from. There is definitely a lot of trust in the medical system. Spain has universal healthcare for free, so you get the best medical care in the world, pretty much for free, you know, cancer treatment, the best cancer treatment. Everything is for free in Spain, and there is a big trust in the system that is a big trust in the doctors and and and people really love the Spanish medical system because they see that it saves a lot of lives, you know? They see that it helps them and is free.Nuria Oliver: So there isn't really clear economic incentives associated to health care because it's a right that people have. So I think that was another element the element of trust, the element of really trusting the system of the system being free and people realizing that, you know, health care is fundamental for a healthy society and everyone sort of like compliant. So we have the lack of politicization, the fact that we didn't have a strong, anti-vax movement initially, the fact that the health care system, you know, is very trust is trusted a lot and it's for free and people really appreciate it. And then we also have the fact that Spain is a very has a very strong group, whole sort of like group culture where conformism to the group is very important in Spain, as opposed to other cultures where they might emphasize more the individual and individualism. Spain is more of a kind of collective culture in that sense. So as soon as there was a minimum critical mass of people vaccinated, it just became an act of pride to be vaccinated and belonging to the group, you know, and sort of like complying with the group and. And I think that was also a factor.Nuria Oliver: So combining all of this, yeah, we are one of the countries with the highest vaccination rates in the world and we don't really have anti-vax movements like other countries have had or have still. And I think people, you know, you have to also remember that Spain was one of the worst impacted countries in the first wave. So the virus is very real to everyone. I would say everyone knows someone that has had COVID or has died from COVID. So I think as opposed to in other countries or regions in the world where the virus may seen something almost like theoretical because it hasn't been next to you, you don't know people infected. You might think, Oh, I don't know, I don't know anyone. So maybe this could not be real, right? Spain has been very, very real because the first wave was horrible here. And, you know, Spain and Italy were like the most impacted country for a long time. So I think that also has made the pandemic extremely real in Spain since the very, very beginning. And seeing the suffering, seeing people dying, seeing your relatives being in intensive care, you know, has really made people think, Oh, it's not, it's a no-brainer for me to get vaccinated. I don't want to go through this.Nuria Oliver: I don't want anyone from my family to go through this, don't want to infect other people. So I think there is also this element of of having really endured a very, very hard first wave of of of really, really shocked the society and people collectively feeling, OK, we need to defeat this virus together. We need to do anything we can to minimize the impact that is having in our society. So I think there are different reasons, you know, like anything. It isn't a simple answer, right, but there is a confluence of factors...Harry Glorikian: I wish.Nuria Oliver: ...that I think have played in our favor in terms of of the pandemic. I mean, the levels of vaccination are extremely high, but also the life is going back to pretty much normal now. I mean, we there is a lot of activity. I mean traveling, a lot of traveling. We had a lot of tourists this year this summer. Spain kept the schools open the entire school year last year. I think that was extremely smart to do. So that was also very positive in terms of not disrupting the lives of the children and the teenagers, which are some of the most affected demographic groups. So, so yeah, so I'm proud that that actually the response has been like this in Spain.Harry Glorikian: So going back to the technological part, do you do you think that phones will be more useful tools for epidemiology or personal health in the next pandemic? And what have we learned that will help us be smarter about how we use [technology]?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, so I think. So I think so there's a difference between phones and the mobile network. Ok, so what we analyzed was data from the mobile network, not from the phones themselves. This is important to clarify because the mobile network is the data captured at the antennas. Correct. That that are all over the geographic space that are the ones providing the cellular connection. So I think that that has proven in many, many cases for many, many years, very valuable, both in developing economies and in developed economies. Then the phone itself, I think the impact this pandemic has been. I would say varied. So the detailed contact tracing, I don't think it has been successful, at least the data that we have from the survey is that in Spain, it didn't really work at all. We didn't advocate for it because based on our research and we didn't think that that was the most important thing to do at the time. We knew since the beginning of the pandemic that roughly 50 percent of the people 59 years old or younger could not self-isolate if they had to. So in what is called TTI Control Strategy, which is trace to know whom to test, to know whom to isolate, if people cannot isolate, there is no point in tracing them and testing them because they're going to be infecting everyone else if they can't isolate? So I think, you know, investing in infrastructure to help people self-isolate and providing support to people so they can self isolate.Nuria Oliver: And it's not a huge burden to them was also very important to enable, you know, everyone to do a proper quarantine. I think there has been quite it's been quite successful actually the part of using the phones for entering symptoms. Many, many people answered our survey on their phones. I would say everyone, pretty much everyone answered a survey on the phones having some sort of like some digital, you know, certificates for vaccinations and things like that. I think that's probably more helpful. They have projects and using the sensors on the phone to diagnose COVID 19 from the... patterns or the coughing patterns. So I think the phone can also be used as a tool for sort of like a screening tool, maybe more than a diagnostic tool. And of course, it can be used for telemedicine as well, particularly in situations where you are. You can leave your house, you know, or you can't really go so. So for quite a few months, actually, the provision of care for non emergencies, non serious issues has been over the phone actually, and in many cases, is the mobile phone. So I think…Harry Glorikian: Which brings me, I have another question for you, though, because based on that is. Separate from the pandemic, because hopefully it's waning and we can get on with our lives. Do you have any ideas you want to pursue in the area of personal health and health care delivery?Nuria Oliver: Yeah, well, there's one idea that I've been trying to do for seven years, but I haven't been able to get around to it yet, which is a project that I call Mobi-well and it's a project that is really the hope is to really shed quantitative light on the interplay between the dependency that we developed towards our phones and our well-being. So I'm very interested in really understanding what are the implications of the fact that we can't live without our phones and our own well-being. I think the phone is an incredibly powerful tool to support our well-being and to help us in many ways, you know, for chronic disease management, for, you know, as I mentioned, the pressures that I mentioned in terms of helping us change behaviors that we want to change, you know, to exercise more or to sleep more or to drink more water or whatever we want to do. The phone is a great ally. It can be a great ally for as a screening tool for different diseases, as an early detection tool. Also for certain diseases. But we cannot obviate that we are addicted to our phones and that we have a dependency towards our phones. So I am also interested in understanding what are the health implications on the wellness implications of such an addiction and such a dependency, particularly in the younger demographic groups. So that's one project that I'm very interested in. I'm also. We are also working a lot in and the ELLIS Alicante Foundation that I just created on the ethical implications of AI.Harry Glorikian: Yes.Nuria Oliver: Implications such as the computational violation of privacy or the lack of veracity or the opacity or the manipulated subliminal manipulation or behavior discrimination, algorithmic discrimination. So a lot of these challenges, you know, we can test them on the phone and we can also explore and develop innovative algorithms that would have guarantees for non-discrimination. Or, you know, that would be privacy preserving. And we can do studies on the phone to see if that is the case. So I think it's also a great tool for human behavioral studies and for what it's called computational social sciences.Harry Glorikian: I mean, if we could just get Facebook to open its data to you?Nuria Oliver: Oh, yeah, I would love that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I'm sure that we could see a lot.Nuria Oliver: Yes, definitely. Absolutely. I mean, you see what's happened with the latest, you know, revelations about some of the Facebook research. So so yeah. But I do think more research is needed to really understand this very complex interplay between ourselves, our wellbeing, both mental wellbeing and physical wellbeing and on the technology that we use. And it's an area that I'm very interested in.Harry Glorikian: My new book is all about that direction, which is how can you utilize technology to live a healthier life. Or is one of the gentleman that I interviewed once said a better health span, not just a life span.Nuria Oliver: Yeah, yeah, exactly. Yeah. So I mean, I've devoted my life to inventing and exploring and developing technology to somehow improve the quality of life of people in some way. But I think it's also time to really understand in a rigorous way, you know, what is the impact that that technology is having on our lives, not technology that is explicitly designed to support our well-being, but the the technology that we use on a daily, you know, on a daily basis, you know, the the services and the applications that we use every day for any purpose, you know, not specifically for health care purposes.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think you were chosen, you were on the TR100 list, if I remember correctly.Nuria Oliver: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And so you always wonder, like how well did the TR100 ed predict correctly? And it seems that they at least in your case, they got it. They got it right on the impact that you would have on the world.Nuria Oliver: Oh, thank you. Yeah, that was really. I have a very nice memory. You know, I got my PhD from M.I.T. So getting this recognition for the MIT Technology Review was really, really nice. And I think it was I was the first Spanish person to get it. So that was also really nice in terms of Spain, because I think, you know, it might have helped other scientists from Spain to, I don't know, be considered or for this award. So, yeah, so I have very nice memories, very fond memories of the event. They areHarry Glorikian: So well. I can't thank you enough for staying up later, or, you know, it's actually late afternoon your time and participating today and sort of giving people who are listening an insight of how technology can make such a profound impact on managing pandemic and keeping people safe and communicating the right information to them. It's huge. And so I hope that people hearing this can take the lessons from our discussion, and you never know people may end up reaching out to you because of it. So I hope that all this, you know, moves in a positive direction. So thank you so much for being on the show today.Nuria Oliver: It was my pleasure. Thank you so much for the interest. And yeah, it's been a really lovely conversation, so I thank you also. Also Linkedin for establishing the connection between us. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: Excellent.Nuria Oliver: Thank you. Ciao. Harry Glorikian: Ciao.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The REAL David Knight Show
Mon 20Dec21 Gates' “Charities” Halt Vaccination for Immigrants w/o Liability Protection for BigPharma

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 181:39


* Biden's Build Back Better — BUSTED! Manchin puts a lump of coal in Biden's Christmas stocking, putting his state ahead of the Progressive Globalist agenda* Gates “charitable” NGO's halt vaccination for stateless immigrants who don't have a govt liability protection for BigPharma. They know it's dangerous* Sony's Spiderman shows people aren't afraid to go to theaters — they just don't want to pay for LGBT/“woke” Hollywood propaganda. Sony has a different model than the rest — entertainment, NOT political reeducation* “Santa, all I want is a vaccine”. Ruthless govt propaganda targets young children and teens as Democrat Pritzker removes Parental Rights, notification for teen abortions* NYC declares war on natural gas for home heating and cooking. It's all about CENTRALIZED control of energy use, using the power grid as a control tool* As govt admits heart damage and heart attacks from vaccine - they push to children* Pfizer begins using infants and children under 5 as lab rats for profit* More baseless Omicron panic and projection, but people aren't buying it. Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Mon 20Dec21 Gates' “Charities” Halt Vaccination for Immigrants w/o Liability Protection for BigPharma

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 181:39


* Biden's Build Back Better — BUSTED! Manchin puts a lump of coal in Biden's Christmas stocking, putting his state ahead of the Progressive Globalist agenda* Gates “charitable” NGO's halt vaccination for stateless immigrants who don't have a govt liability protection for BigPharma. They know it's dangerous* Sony's Spiderman shows people aren't afraid to go to theaters — they just don't want to pay for LGBT/“woke” Hollywood propaganda. Sony has a different model than the rest — entertainment, NOT political reeducation* “Santa, all I want is a vaccine”. Ruthless govt propaganda targets young children and teens as Democrat Pritzker removes Parental Rights, notification for teen abortions* NYC declares war on natural gas for home heating and cooking. It's all about CENTRALIZED control of energy use, using the power grid as a control tool* As govt admits heart damage and heart attacks from vaccine - they push to children* Pfizer begins using infants and children under 5 as lab rats for profit* More baseless Omicron panic and projection, but people aren't buying it. Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM
RSF : Người dân Việt Nam cần thêm thông tin ngoài những kênh chính thức của Nhà nước

TẠP CHÍ VIỆT NAM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 10:08


Chỉ trong tháng 12/2021, năm nhà hoạt động nhân quyền bị đưa ra xét xử ở Việt Nam, trong đó có nhà báo Phạm Đoan Trang. Còn tính đến ngày 01/12, Việt Nam đã kết án 43 nhà báo và blogger, trở thành nước thứ ba trên thế giới bỏ tù nhiều nhà báo nhất trong năm 2021 (chỉ sau Trung Quốc và Miến Điện), theo báo cáo hàng năm của tổ chức Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF, Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới) tại Paris. Sau khi các tổ chức bảo vệ nhân quyền quốc tế lên tiếng, Pháp, Liên Hiệp Châu Âu và Phủ Cao Ủy Nhân Quyền Liên Hiệp Quốc cũng lần lượt kêu gọi Việt Nam trả tự do cho những người vừa bị kết án. Theo Phủ Cao Ủy Nhân Quyền Liên Hiệp Quốc ngày 17/12, những bản án nặng nề “góp phần tạo ra bầu không khí tự kiểm duyệt trong nước, khiến người dân lạnh nhạt với tự do truyền thông”, “ngăn cản mọi người thực hiện các quyền cơ bản và tham gia vào các cuộc tranh luận công khai về những vấn đề quan trọng” của Việt Nam. Ông Daniel Bastard, giám đốc khu vực châu Á-Thái Bình Dương của Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF, Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới), cũng có những nhận định tương tự khi trả lời phỏng vấn RFI Tiếng Việt ngày 17/12 nhân dịp RSF công bố báo cáo hàng năm về các hành vi ngược đãi đối với các nhà báo trên khắp thế giới. ***** RFI : Ngày 16/12/2021, Tổ chức Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới (Reporters Sans Frontières, RSF) công bố báo cáo hàng năm về các hành vi ngược đãi các nhà báo trên khắp thế giới. RSF dựa trên những thông số nào để xếp Việt Nam trong nhóm 5 nước bỏ tù nhiều nhà báo nhất ? Daniel Bastard : Năm nay (2021), tổ chức chúng tôi ghi nhận không dưới 43 nhà báo và bloggeur đang bị cầm tù ở Việt Nam, gồm những người đang bị tạm giam hay đã bị kết án. Trong số 43 nhà báo, chúng tôi chia thành hai nhóm, rất đặc trưng cho một quốc gia như Việt Nam. Một nửa trong số họ không phải là nhà báo chuyên nghiệp, không làm việc cho các cơ quan truyền thông chính thức nên họ được gọi là “blogger”. Thực ra, đó là những công dân, khi thấy báo chí chính thức không cho phép họ nhận được những thông tin đáng tin cậy và độc lập, nên tự đi điều tra và làm công việc của một nhà báo và công bố nội dung công việc của họ dưới dạng video hay bài viết. Và vì công việc này, họ phải trả giá là bị bắt giữ hay bị cầm tù vì những động cơ khác nhau, trong đó lý do thường xuyên nhất là “tuyên truyền chống phá Nhà nước” hay “lợi dụng các quyền tự do dân chủ”. Những cụm từ này có vẻ hoàn toàn không phù hợp với một nhà nước pháp quyền dân chủ nhưng lại diễn ra ở Việt Nam theo bộ luật hình sự. Đây là điểm rất quan trọng và rất đặc thù ở Việt Nam, nơi có tỉ lệ nhà báo công dân cao. Họ là những người quyết định gánh trọng trách thông tin cho người dân về những gì đang xảy ra ở trong nước.   RFI : Ở đây có sự khác nhau về khái niệm “nhà báo” từ quan điểm của Việt Nam và nhìn từ các nước phương Tây ? Daniel Bastard : Cần lưu ý rằng tổ chức Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới chúng tôi có nhiệm vụ bảo vệ quyền tự do báo chí, quyền tự do thông tin và quyền được làm báo nói chung. Khi nói về nghề làm báo, không nhất thiết phải có thẻ nhà báo, không hẳn phải làm việc cho một cơ quan truyền thông cố định, mà là phục vụ cho một khái niệm rộng hơn một chút, vẫn được gọi là “lợi ích công cộng”, có nghĩa là lợi ích cho toàn thể công dân của một cộng đồng, một quốc gia như Việt Nam. Có thể dễ nhận thấy rằng Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới có hai danh mục nhà báo : nhà báo “công dân” và nhà báo chuyên nghiệp. Trong trường hợp thứ nhất, chúng ta có những công dân hoạt động vì lợi ích chung. Họ không tìm được khái niệm “lợi ích công” này ở các phương tiện truyền thông chính thống nên nhận thấy phải thông tin cho đồng hương, ví dụ như về cuộc biểu tình phản đối một dự án gây ô nhiễm môi trường, hay một vụ tham nhũng ở địa phương. Vì những thông tin như vậy không được truyền tải trên truyền thông chính thức nên phải đăng lên blog, một trang mạng hoặc một kênh video. Liên quan đến những người mà chúng tôi coi là nhà báo chuyên nghiệp, chúng tôi nhận thấy rằng thường đó là những nhà báo dày dặn kinh nghiệm vì họ bắt đầu sự nghiệp trong cơ quan truyền thông chính thức, các hãng thông tấn hay trong nhiều tờ báo lớn thuộc báo chí chính thức của Việt Nam. Phải nhắc lại là Việt Nam có rất nhiều đầu báo và kênh truyền hình nhưng tất cả đều theo một đường lối biên tập duy nhất theo sự chỉ đạo của ban Tuyên giáo Trung ương. Chúng tôi nhận thấy rằng nhiều nhà báo nghĩ là sẽ mang thiên chức nhà báo phục vụ đất nước hoặc người dân Việt Nam, nhưng lại nhận ra thực tế “không phải vậy. Bên trong các phương tiện truyền thông chính thức này, người ta không thể làm việc như một nhà báo thực thụ vì không có tự do biên tập”. Trưởng ban biên tập lại luôn nói : “Không, chúng ta không thể đưa tin về vấn đề này vì quá nhạy cảm. Ban Tuyên giáo Trung ương sẽ khiển trách”. Chính từ thực tế này đã nảy sinh một trong những đặc trưng của Việt Nam. Đó là ngày càng có nhiều nhà báo thất vọng vì những gì diễn ra trong các cơ quan truyền thông chính thức, nên họ lập kênh truyền thông riêng hoặc hợp tác với các kênh truyền thông, phần lớn đặt ở nước người hoặc những kênh không được chính thức theo dõi ở Việt Nam. RFI : Theo ông, liệu sẽ có một số thay đổi về tự do báo chỉ ở Việt Nam trong tương lai ? Daniel Bastard : Tôi lại bắt đầu với con số 43 nhà báo đang bị giam giữ ở Việt Nam. Tôi nghĩ đây là một kỷ lục. Chưa bao giờ lại có nhiều nhà báo bị cầm tù ở Việt Nam đến như vậy kể từ khi tổ chức Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới thống kê số nhà báo bị bắt giam. Con số này mang ý nghĩa lịch sử và cho thấy hai khả năng, hoặc là cuộc trấn áp quá mạnh hoặc có quá nhiều nhà báo ở Việt Nam tìm cách thông tin cho đồng bào. Bất chấp đường lối biên tập được chỉ đạo từ trung ương, chúng tôi vẫn thấy loại hình báo chí “blogosphere” (thế giới blog) rất năng động, tích cực trong việc tìm kiếm và trao đổi thông tin. Đây giống như trò chơi mèo vờn chuột giữa bộ Công An muốn ngăn cản các nhà báo lên tiếng và những công dân ngày càng muốn đảm nhiệm chức năng nhà báo và tìm kiếm thông tin. RFI : Facebook, mạng xã hội lớn ở Việt Nam, giống như ở nhiều nước khác, bị cáo buộc vi phạm quyền tự do ngôn luận của người sử dụng. Việc vi phạm này ở Việt Nam khác với ở các nước phương Tây như nào ? Daniel Bastard : Trường hợp của Việt Nam cũng rất thú vị vì trái với Trung Quốc, mạng xã hội Facebook không bị chặn mà được phép hoạt động ở Việt Nam. Tại Trung Quốc, nếu gõ Facebook.com, thì một dòng tin nhắn lỗi sẽ hiện lên và phải sử dụng mạng ảo để truy cập Facebook. Nói tóm lại, rất ít người Trung Quốc sử dụng Facebook. Ở Việt Nam thì hoàn toàn ngược lại. Phần lớn người sử dụng internet đều dùng Facebook. Mạng xã hội này trở thành nền tảng trao đổi rất nhiều thông tin, như tôi nói ở trên, là “thông tin vì lợi ích công cộng”. Tuy nhiên, vấn đề ở chỗ Facebook lại dựa trên thuật toán, hoàn toàn thiếu minh bạch. Một thông tin, một bài đăng có thể được gửi đến người sử dụng này mà lại không chuyển đến một người khác. Thực ra, Facebook có trách nhiệm là nhà cung cấp thông tin lớn và có vai trò thực sự trong việc nêu bật những thông tin được coi là đáng tin cậy, tức là thông tin của báo chí thực thụ. Tuy nhiên, tổ chức Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới cho rằng Facebook đã không đáp ứng được những kỳ vọng theo trách nhiệm của họ, có nghĩa là Facebook phải ý thức được rằng họ là nguồn thông tin tiềm năng dựa trên báo chí đáng tin cậy nhưng cũng là nguồn thông tin tuyên truyền, thậm chí dẫn đến thù hận. Lấy ví dụ Miến Điện vào lúc diễn ra các vụ thảm sát người thiểu số Rohingya, Facebook đã trở thành công cụ cho những phát biểu, kêu gọi thù hận và giết người. Facebook đã không làm gì để điều chỉnh vì họ hoàn toàn không có nhận sự để xử lý các thông điệp viết bằng tiếng Miến Điện. Do đó, có thể thấy là sự thiếu điều chỉnh từ phía Facebook có thể gây ra tác động và hệ quả rất lớn và kinh hoàng. Chính vì vậy, chúng tôi kêu gọi Facebook phải chứng minh được trách nhiệm của họ bằng cách điều chỉnh tốt hơn các mạng xã hội, trước tiên là bằng tiếng Việt, tiếp theo là bên trong nước Việt Nam và nhất là kháng lại được những yêu cầu của bộ Công An Việt Nam. Chúng ta biết là bộ Công An Việt Nam có cả một đội quân “dư luận viên” (troll) chuyên lợi dụng các thuật toán và truy đuổi những công dân tìm cách phổ biến thông tin đáng tin cậy. RFI : Có thể thấy là Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới, cũng như nhiều tổ chức phi chính phủ khác, rất nhanh chóng và kịch liệt lên án các bản án nhắm vào các nhà báo hoạt động. Ngoài ra, RSF còn có phương tiện hành động nào khác, chẳng hạn đối với trường hợp Việt Nam ? Daniel Bastard : Tổ chức Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới có hai phương tiện hành động lớn. Dĩ nhiên ngoài việc lên án các vụ kết án, hỗ trợ các nhà báo bị tù và gia đình họ, những gia đình nhà báo gặp khó khăn về tài chính, thì chúng tôi “vận động hành lang”. Với tư cách là một tổ chức phi chính phủ, chúng tôi sẽ đi gặp các chính phủ châu Âu hoặc Bắc Mỹ để yêu cầu họ, trong các cuộc trao đổi song phương với đồng nhiệm Việt Nam, đề nghị trả tự do cho một nhà báo nào đó. Thông thường, cách hiệu quả là đưa tên một hoặc hai mục tiêu để các nhà ngoại giao châu Âu hoặc Bắc Mỹ có thể nêu lên và yêu cầu phía đồng nhiệm Việt Nam, kiểu như “Đây, chúng tôi biết là việc nhà báo này bị bắt giam là hoàn toàn trái luật pháp và quá đáng. Trong khuôn khổ trao đổi song phương, chúng tôi yêu cầu các ngài trả tự do cho nhà báo đó”. Đó là cách mà chúng tôi đã làm thành công để blogger Mẹ Nấm sang Mỹ và blogger Nguyễn Văn Đài sang Đức. Vấn đề lớn đặt ra là để được tự do, họ phải chấp nhận tị nạn. Trong trường hợp Phạm Đoan Trang, nhà báo này nói rõ cô không muốn rời Việt Nam, cô muốn ở lại dù bị kết án 9 năm tù. Một khả năng khác để có thể giúp cải thiện tự do báo chí ở Việt Nam, đó là yêu cầu ban hành các lệnh trừng phạt nhắm trực tiếp đến một số lãnh đạo Việt Nam mà chúng tôi cho là phải chịu trách nhiệm về những vụ vi phạm các quyền cơ bản trong Công ước Quốc tế về Quyền dân sự và chính trị mà Việt Nam là nước tham gia ký kết. Chúng tôi đề nghị một số nước như Hoa Kỳ, Canada, Liên Hiệp Châu Âu áp dụng Luật Magnitsky cho phép phong tỏa tài sản của một cá nhân có thể có ở nước ngoài (tài khoản ngân hàng ở Mỹ, Thụy Sĩ…) và cấm người đó, cũng như gia đình họ, nhập cảnh vào nước ban hành các lệnh trừng phạt trên. Biện pháp này cho phép xác định rõ những người phải chịu trách nhiệm về các vụ vi phạm nhân quyền mà không cáo buộc toàn bộ chính phủ Việt Nam vì có thể trong chính phủ Việt Nam có những người muốn hành động vì tự do báo chí. Và nhất là không trừng phạt người dân Việt Nam vì họ chỉ yêu cầu có được thêm chút thông tin và được tự do báo chí. RFI Tiếng Việt xin chân thành cảm ơn ông Daniel Bastard, giám đốc khu vực châu Á-Thái Bình Dương của Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF, Phóng Viên Không Biên Giới) tại Paris.

VOV - Chương trình thời sự
VOV - Thời sự 6h (19/12/2021)

VOV - Chương trình thời sự

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 27:54


- Tổng Bí thư Nguyễn Phú Trọng dự lễ kỷ niệm 190 năm thành lập tỉnh, 80 năm thành lập Đảng bộ tỉnh và 25 năm tái lập tỉnh Hưng Yên. - Chủ tịch Quốc hội Vương Đình Huệ thăm bang Karnataka – nơi được coi là thung lũng Silicon của Ấn Độ. - Nga chính thức rút khỏi Hiệp ước Bầu trời Mở; đồng thời lên án Mỹ phải chịu mọi trách nhiệm về sự đổ vỡ thương lượng. - Bình luận: Ngoại trưởng Mỹ thăm Đông Nam Á: Vội nhưng chắc. Chủ đề : Thung lũng Silicon, Karnataka, Bão rai, Bão số 9 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vov1thoisu/support

Machong Chismisan
Machong Chismisan S12E12: Poet, Payo at comment section ni Ann Mateo with guest co-host Head Writer Pat

Machong Chismisan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 79:08


Nag launch kami ng mga bagong segment sa show, nagbalik ng lumang segment, nagbigay kami ng mga walang kabuluhang payo at napunta kami sa usapang Ngo-ngo. Abangan nyo rin nga pala ang bagong palabas ni Head Writer Pat na lalabas sa Net 25 at ito ang Quizon CT. Ito ang bagong gag show ng NET25 ang "QUIZON CT" O Quizon Comedy Theater, kasama sina Eric, Epy at Vandolph Quizon, ang wife ni Vandolph na si Jenny. Kung nagustuhan nyo ang aming podcast, pwede nyo kami i-follow sa Spotify at mga social media namin. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/showbizbro/ Twitter: @machongchismisn Instagram: @machongchismisn Pag marami kayong pera at gusto nyo kaming suportahan para makagawa pa ng maraming content, pwede kayong mag subscribe sa aming Patreon. www.Patreon.com/MachongChismisan Kami rin ay tumatanggap pa rin ng online limos gamit ang mga Paypal, Paymaya at GCash accounts below: Paypal: Paypal.Me/MachongChismisan Paymaya/Gcash: 09178274673 Want to start your own podcast? Use Podmetrics and sign up for free using the link below and use our referral code. link: https://podmetrics.co/ referral code: MachongChismisan

Fringe Radio Network
The Oddcast - Robber Barons and Secret Societies

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 72:40


A detailed history on the most well connected network to ever walk the face of the planet. You know who i'm talking about. It's Charles Savoie, and he dishes the suppressed dirt once again on The Pilgrims Society who were spawned out of Cecil Rhodes Wills, and his secretive Society of The Elect. This group went on to inspire The Association of Helpers, Roundtable Groups, The Inquiry, The Royal Institiute of International Affair (RIIA)/Chatham House, The Council On Foreign Relations (CFR), Trilateral Commission, The World Affairs Council, and the many other interlocked NGO's, and think tanks. Savoie has been collecting this hard to find history for several decades, and has put the names, and connected organizations in both public, and private together. Join us once again as we go down that rabbit hole Texas style!

A Sustainable Mind - environment & sustainability podcast
Sustainable Healthcare with Dr. Rosie Spooner

A Sustainable Mind - environment & sustainability podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:04


Dr. Rosie Spooner is a British Pediatrician who is currently an Education Fellow at the Centre for Sustainable Healthcare, an NGO working on mainstreaming sustainability practices into planning and delivery of health services. Rosie is a practicing clinician who works alongside medical schools and postgraduate education programs to support the integration of sustainable healthcare into mainstream healthcare teaching. She became more concerned about the connection between the climate emergency and health after a year sailing with her husband on a 12-meter boat for 12,000 miles, crossing the Atlantic twice. On this journey she saw how climate change is already destabilizing the world's natural systems and witnessed the catastrophic effects this can have on human health. She is a member of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and has campaigned for them to divest from fossil fuel investments and declare a climate emergency. Today's Sponsors:  Brightmark is on a mission to reimagine waste, transforming organic waste into renewable natural gas and creating innovative approaches to plastics renewal. Learn more at Brightmark.com. Tentree is an earth-first sustainable clothing company. Check out their selection of eco-friendly clothing and accessories at Tentree.com and use promo code ‘ASM' for 15% off your first purchase. In this episode Marjorie and Dr. Rosie discuss: How delivering healthcare impacts the environment and what some health professionals are doing to reduce the impacts What role patients and clients play in the sustainability of the healthcare How hygiene and infection control practices impact both sustainability and patient comfortability The complexities of transitioning to more earth-conscious healthcare strategies when product availability and contracts dictate much of the reusable and disposable supplies Resources mentioned in today's episode: SustainableHealthcare.org (https://sustainablehealthcare.org.uk/) Health Care Without Harm ChoosingWisely.org The Planetary Health Report Card Outrage + Optimism with Christiana Figueres   Connect with Dr. Rosie Spooner and the Centre for Sustainable Healthcare: Website: http://sustainablehealthcare.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CentreforSustainableHealthcare/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SusHealthcare Twitter: https://twitter.com/spooner_rosie LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosie-spooner-37581218a/    Connect with Marjorie Alexander: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/asustainablemind/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SustainableMind Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/asustainablemind/ Website: http://www.asustainablemind.com   Interested in sponsoring or supporting A Sustainable Mind? Visit our sponsorship page at ASustainableMind.com/sponsor!

New Books in Political Science
John Lapidus, "The Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:25


Generous welfare states are losing their key characteristics, not least in Sweden, where privatisation of funding has proceeded privatisation of provision, beginning in the 1990s. Supplementary exclusionary sources of welfare in healthcare, education, and social care, have proliferated throughout European welfare states under the neoliberal agenda that has dominated debate across the developed world. Rather than full privatisation, we see semi-private solutions, in which the citizen becomes the consumer, but remains subsidised by the state in their pursuit of private welfare, via tax breaks that benefit the richest in society most, rather than those with the greatest need. At the same time, private providers have been able to free-ride on the state, for example by hiring like doctors and teachers trained on state-funded courses, whilst the divided welfare state erodes the more generous, universal system by undermining the trust in it and the willingness of people to contribute to it. Ultimately, it replaces one view of social policy as an investment, something that generates wealth and contributes to the future, with another, of social policy as a cost, that takes up resources rather than generates them. John Lapidus' The Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) charts the development of this process in Sweden, beginning with the privatisation of provision, such as private hospitals and tutoring, and how it lays the groundwork for private funding, which puts pressure on existing generous and universal welfare systems sustained by the public sector. In our discussion, we identify the methods through which neoliberal advocates promote privatisation, and how ongoing privatisation becomes self-reinforcing to nullify opponents, win over ambivalent actors, and dominate the debate in the political sphere. We end on an optimistic note, looking at the education sector and discussing what we can learn from debates in this area to promote and restore equality throughout the welfare state. John is currently a Research Fellow at the School of Business, Economics and Law within the University of Gothenberg in Sweden, where he earnt his PhD in 2015. Prior to John's academic career, he spent several years as a journalist, and also spent time working in Nicaragua for the Swedish-Nicaragua Friendship Association, an international NGO that helps communities build self-help organisations and tackle poverty. Leo Nasskau is an expert on the future of work and interviews authors writing about public policy and political economy — particularly how capitalism can be reformed to deliver sustainable prosperity for all. To join the discussion about this book, visit leonasskau.co.uk, and to give Leo anonymous feedback, go to bit.ly/Feedback-Leo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
John Lapidus, "The Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:25


Generous welfare states are losing their key characteristics, not least in Sweden, where privatisation of funding has proceeded privatisation of provision, beginning in the 1990s. Supplementary exclusionary sources of welfare in healthcare, education, and social care, have proliferated throughout European welfare states under the neoliberal agenda that has dominated debate across the developed world. Rather than full privatisation, we see semi-private solutions, in which the citizen becomes the consumer, but remains subsidised by the state in their pursuit of private welfare, via tax breaks that benefit the richest in society most, rather than those with the greatest need. At the same time, private providers have been able to free-ride on the state, for example by hiring like doctors and teachers trained on state-funded courses, whilst the divided welfare state erodes the more generous, universal system by undermining the trust in it and the willingness of people to contribute to it. Ultimately, it replaces one view of social policy as an investment, something that generates wealth and contributes to the future, with another, of social policy as a cost, that takes up resources rather than generates them. John Lapidus' The Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) charts the development of this process in Sweden, beginning with the privatisation of provision, such as private hospitals and tutoring, and how it lays the groundwork for private funding, which puts pressure on existing generous and universal welfare systems sustained by the public sector. In our discussion, we identify the methods through which neoliberal advocates promote privatisation, and how ongoing privatisation becomes self-reinforcing to nullify opponents, win over ambivalent actors, and dominate the debate in the political sphere. We end on an optimistic note, looking at the education sector and discussing what we can learn from debates in this area to promote and restore equality throughout the welfare state. John is currently a Research Fellow at the School of Business, Economics and Law within the University of Gothenberg in Sweden, where he earnt his PhD in 2015. Prior to John's academic career, he spent several years as a journalist, and also spent time working in Nicaragua for the Swedish-Nicaragua Friendship Association, an international NGO that helps communities build self-help organisations and tackle poverty. Leo Nasskau is an expert on the future of work and interviews authors writing about public policy and political economy — particularly how capitalism can be reformed to deliver sustainable prosperity for all. To join the discussion about this book, visit leonasskau.co.uk, and to give Leo anonymous feedback, go to bit.ly/Feedback-Leo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Podcast Lepiej Teraz
PLT #210 Jak dzięki podcastom zebrać pieniądze na cele charytatywne?- Radek Budnicki dla Fanimani.pl

Podcast Lepiej Teraz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:57


Marek Zywert z Fanimani.pl zaprosił mnie do przeprowadzenia szkolenia/webinarium dla NGOs pt: "Gwizdek na psy, czyli jak zrobić podcast organizacji społecznej"W domu, na spacerze, w autobusie... 9 milionów Polaków - słucha podcastów. W tym świecie każdy znajdzie coś dla siebie. A czy organizacja społeczna może tam skutecznie zaistnieć?Od ponad roku akademia.fanimani.pl dzieli się wiedzą z organizacjami społecznymi z całej Polski i pomyśleli, że podcasty byłyby dla nich czymś bardzo ciekawym i wartościowym. Okazuje się, że owszem. Podcasty mogą w znaczny sposób wspomóc zbiórkę pieniędzy na cele charytatywne. Nie każdy jednak wie, jak to zrobić.Z tego odcinka dowiesz się m.in:W tym odcinku opowiem, jak wykorzystać fenomen podcastów dla dobrej sprawy oraz czym jest Gwizdek na psy czyli jak zrobić podcast organizacji społecznej.Dowiesz się też dlaczego każdy może być gwizdkiem na psy, a wspólnie zastanowimy się nad różnymi formami zaistnienia organizacji w podcastowym świecie.Skąd ta popularność podcastów?Czy one nie były tylko dla tych co dużo czasu spędzają w trasie?Jak obecnie wygląda świat podcastów?Co było najtrudniejsze żeby zacząć?Ile czasu zajmuje przygotowanie 1h podcastu?Czy to jest technicznie skomplikowane czy mogę chwycić telefon i nagrać?Podcast dla NGO? (dyskusja, aby zainspirować organizacje o czym/ jak mogą robić podcast)Wiem, że słuchasz podcastów po angielsku. Czy trafiłeś na podcasty organizacji społecznych?Czy to ma Twoim zdaniem sens?Podcast prezesa, podcast organizacji, aktualności?Jak jeszcze ngo może podejść do podcastu?Współpraca z jakimś podcasterem? (opowieść o początkach organizacji? czy może o pasji wolontariusza/prezesa?)Jak często (co tydzień, dwa miesiąc?) i jak długo (5 min, 15 a może 3h)?JAK ZOSTAĆ ZAWODOWYM PODCASTEREM?DLA WSZYSTKICH, KTÓRZY PRAGNĄ DOKŁADNIEJ ZGŁĘBIĆ TAJNIKI TWORZENIA PODCASTU, Z KTÓREGO MOŻNA SIĘ UTRZYMYWAĆ, STWORZYŁEM SPECJALNY AUDIOBOOK  WRAZ Z FILMAMI VIDEO, GDZIE ODPOWIADAM NA WSZYSTKIE PYTANIA SŁUCHACZY W FORMIE Q&A, KTÓRE WIĄŻĄ SIĘ Z TWORZENIEM DOCHODOWEGO PODCASTU.JEŚLI PRAGNIESZ ZOSTAĆ ZAWODOWYM PODCASTEREM,KLIKNIJ ZDJECIE PONIŻEJ:

Empathy Media Lab
Radio Labour Covers Tola Moeun‘s Labor Link Interview

Empathy Media Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:00


We are excited to share Radio Labour's December 15, 2021 excerpt, “Cambodia's garment workers need help,” that covered The Labor Link's podcast interview with Tola Moeun.  Summary: Tola Moeun is a human rights defender and the Executive Director of the Center for Alliance of Labor and Human Rights (CENTRAL), an NGO which supports Cambodian labourers by providing them with legal aid, and other appropriate means, to demand transparent and accountable governance on labour and human rights issues.. The Radio Labour team consists of labour educators, negotiators, research representatives, union members and others connected to the labour movement. Most of us work, or have worked, for a union, a labour studies centre, or a global union. The team is led by Marc Bélanger, an international labour educator, based in Canada. To learn more about Radio Labour, visit: https://www.radiolabour.net/. 

The Big Story
846: Why the SC Judgement on Char Dham Highway Project is Problematic

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 17:18


How does a tourism infrastructure project suddenly become a concern of the Ministry of Defence in India? This is the question which every environment activist in the country is asking about the controversial Char Dham Highway Development Project, which has been riddled with ecological violations ever since its construction began in 2016. The Rs 12,000 crore highway expansion project aims to widen nearly 900 kms of hills in Uttarakhand to provide all weather connectivity to the state's four major shrines—Badrinath, Kedarnath, Gangotri and Yamunotri—all in the upper Himalayas and all in very ecological sensitive zones. Now, the project from its start had a clear motive to provide easier access to the shrines. But over the years, with each ecological concern raised by activist in the Supremo Court, specifically targeting the petition to widen the roads beyond the Ministry of Roads and Transport 2018 mandate of 5.5 meters, the project has also moved into the ambit of national security. The Ministry of Defense in an affidavit in 2020 claimed that the roads need to be 7 meter wide to ferry essential arms and ammunition to sensitive border areas, given the rising China threat. And while the Supreme Court noted the environment concerns regarding the project, it agreed to the requirements of “national security,” and essentially, set aside its 2020 judgement where it denied the Ministry of Road and Transport the same thing. And activists and NGO's petitioning the widening of the highway project have been baffled by the Supreme Court judgement given that it does provide any credence to what they have been saying for the past few years or the hundreds of landslides which have occurred in the region due to the project. Guest: Mallika Bhanot, a member of Ganga Ahvaan, a citizen forum working towards conserving the Ganga and the Himalayas Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Editor: Shorbori Purkayastha Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

The Make Meaning Podcast
Episode #118 - Elizabeth Gowing - How to know a place by living its stories

The Make Meaning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 31:29


Elizabeth Gowing's life changed when she moved from London to Kosovo in 2006 for her partner's job on what was supposed to be a six-month contract. Fifteen years later, Elizabeth speaks Albanian, teaches English and leads The Ideas Partnership, an NGO that offers support to people through education, health and social welfare as well as offering literacy classes, and arts and dance sessions. Driven by a background in primary education and education policy, Elizabeth launched the nonprofit organization in 2009 to help children and families in the region. In the latest episode of the Make Meaning Podcast, Elizabeth speaks with host Lynne Golodner about the events that inspired The Ideas Partnership, how she writes about “slices of life around the world,” and the importance of seizing the moment, all the time. Elizabeth offers ideas for listeners about how to use joy to make change in the world. In this episode, Lynne and Elizabeth discuss:  How learning a language deepens connections The importance of education for all children How to tackle systemic problems by thinking big & staying small Being authentic in your writing The value of spontaneity Storytelling as a way to better understanding   Links and Resources; Kosovo The Ideas Partnership Kosovo Ministry of Education UNICEF EU Award for Roma Integration Mother Teresa Medal for Humanitarian Work Tara Mohr: Hooked vs. Unhooked  Maya Angelou Quote Travels in Blood and Honey: Becoming a Beekeeper in Kosovo BBC Radio 4 Writing Finding Your Voice at Midlife Writers Course with Lynne Golodner Mary Edith Durham and the Royal Anthropological Society Frederick Buechner Quote Sapune Find Elizabeth Gowing: Website Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn Blog

Thời sự quốc tế - VOA
Bản tin VOA ngày 15/12/2021 - Tháng Mười Hai 15, 2021

Thời sự quốc tế - VOA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 29:59


Ngoại trưởng Blinken nói Mỹ sẽ can dự sâu hơn ở châu Á trước sự ‘hung hăng' của Trung Quốc; Điện Kremlin: Putin và Tập sẽ điện đàm thảo luận về sự ‘gây hấn' của Mỹ và NATO; Việt Nam tuyên án nhà hoạt động Phạm Đoan Trang 9 năm tù

Talking Taiwan
Ep 161 | Lee Ming-che Taiwanese Political Prisoner in China: Yibee Huang Speaks Candidly

Talking Taiwan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 65:29


A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   To mark the year's International Human Rights Day, I reached out to Yibee Huang, the CEO of Covenants Watch to talk about Lee Ming-che a Taiwanese activist who has been imprisoned in China since 2017.   December 10th is International Human Rights Day. It's also an important day in Taiwan's history and a turning point in Taiwan's transition from authoritarianism to democracy. I'm referring to the Kaohsiung incident, also known as the Formosa Incident which began as a celebration of International Human Rights Day in 1979, but ended with a police crackdown and the arrest of prominent opposition leaders (The Kaohsiung Eight) who were tried in military court and sentenced to terms ranging from 12 year to life imprisonment. For more information about the Kaohsiung Incident visit the Related Links section below.   Covenants Watch is an NGO based in Taipei, Taiwan that is committed to promoting human rights and equality for all people. Despite Taiwan not being a member of the United Nations, Covenants Watch ensured that Lee Ming-che's case was the first from Taiwan that was taken up by a UN special mechanism, namely the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (the WGEID).   Yibee talked to me about Lee Ming-che's case and other Taiwanese who have gone missing or been imprisoned in China.   About Covenants Watch:   Covenants Watch (CW) is an NGO based in Taipei, Taiwan. It is committed to promoting human rights and equality for all people. Excluded from international society since the 1970s, the Taiwanese government has not been under the supervision of the United Nations system. Under these circumstances, CW strives to introduce a unique treaty review process that can hold the government accountable and ensures its domestic laws, policies and practices are aligned with international human rights standards. In addition to its domestic activities, CW plays an increasing role on the international level by participating in the Special Procedures and the Universal Periodic Review of the UN Human Rights Council.   Here's a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:   The mission of Covenants Watch and Lee Ming-che's connection to the organization Lee Ming-che's early life and background How Ming-che's political views changed and developed into a sense of Taiwanese identity While in college Ming-che got involved in student-led social movement and pro-democracy activities organized by pro-DPP (Democratic Progressive Party) students, and met his future wife Ching-yu The NGOs and organizations that Ming-che has worked with His involvement with the DPP and Taiwan independence movement What is known about the circumstances of his arrest What Ming-che was doing in China, when he went missing on March 19, 2017 The March 24th press conference that Lee Ching-Yu (Lee Ming-che's wife) and human rights groups organized to call upon the Chinese government to explain what happened to Ming-che The timeline of when Chinese authorities first responded, admitted that Ming-che was under arrest, the date of Ming-che's trial and sentencing How Lee Ching-yu's travel documents (Tai bao zheng/台胞證) were nullified when she tried to make plans to travel to Beijing in April 2017 to confront the Chinese government about what has happened to Ming-che Why Ching-yu tattooed the words “Lee Ming-Che, I am proud of you” on her forearms Ming-che's confession which was revealed at his trial Cases of human rights activists and lawyers who were tortured Swedish NGO worker Peter Dahlin's forced confession How Ching-yu needs apply for special consent from the Chinese authorities each time she would like to travel to China What a Tai bao zheng (台胞證) is How Covenant Watch appealed to the UN's Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID) for help with Lee Ming-che's case What is the UN's Universal Periodic Review Why Ming-che's was transferred from Chishan Prison in Hunan to Yancheng Prison in Hebei in late 2018 and what happened to him as a result How the Chinese government has imposed an additional penalty of two years of deprivation of political rights on Lee Ming-che, which may be imposed at the end of his sentence in April 2022 How Ming-che has been treated in prison Ching-yu last saw Ming-che in January 2020 The Write a Letter or Postcard to Ming-che campaign that was started on Ming-che's first birthday after being imprisoned in China The different campaigns that have been organized for Ming-che The purpose behind letters and postcards written for Ming-che The UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (aka The Nelson Mandela Rules) Public support for Lee Ming-che in Taiwan How Lee Ming-che was not able to attend his father's funeral What support Lee Ming-che has gotten from Taiwan's government or President Tsai Ing-wen The case of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo The national security legislation that was passed by China's National People's Congress in June 2020, criminalizes sedition in Hong Kong The Safeguard Defenders report stating that 600 overseas Taiwanese have been extradited to China   Related Links: To view all related links for this article, click link below: https://talkingtaiwan.com/lee-ming-che-taiwanese-political-prisoner-in-china-yibbie-huang-speaks-candidly-ep-161/

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
256 Mission Driven: Saving Lives in Afghanistan with Valerie Edmondson Bolaños

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 62:55


In this episode of Christopher Lochhead: Follow Your Different, you will hear one of the most inspiring, horrifying, and yet deeply moving conversations from our guest, Valerie Edmondson Bolaños. Valerie Edmondson Bolaños is the founder of an extraordinary NGO called Warrior Angels Rescue. She started her own NGO in the way of Hurricane Maria. It was a Category Five storm that devastated her home island of Puerto Rico back in 2017. What started off as an effort to rescue her own family grew into a much larger scale over time. Since August of 2021, Valerie and the Warrior Angels Rescue has been evacuating girls, women, and their families from the humanitarian crisis that is escalating in Afghanistan after the United States left. What you're about to hear is really one of the most inspiring mission-driven founders you can listen to. We hope that it moves you as well. Valerie Edmondson Bolaños on the Afghanistan Situation The conversation starts as Valerie gives a perspective of what the situation is in Afghanistan at this moment after the United States withdrawal last August of 2021. “It's pretty horrific, which should come as no surprise. We've noticed (that) just in the three months that we've been working there. It just descended from an absolutely apocalyptic situation into the depths of hell. The messages and videos that we're receiving directly from the families that we're helping that are in our evacuation lists are just horrifying. I've had nightmares, and I'm not even living through it firsthand.” – Valerie Edmondson Bolaños These horrors stem from the local terrorist organizations who are trying to root out those who have worked with the US forces when they were still on the ground. They torture and beat them publicly, while abducting and interrogating those who they think had close ties or worked directly with the US forces. This was on top of the different terrorist organizations jockeying for power amongst themselves, which adds another layer of suffering for those on the ground. The Taliban Taking Away the Power Valerie shares that are a lot of shortages on the ground. The economy has all but shut down entirely because people are in hiding. People who had decent homes and careers had to leave almost everything to stay with families that are less conspicuous. “The Taliban is literally trying to take away power from the people who have even the slightest bit of power. And so much power comes from being educated and being having a profession. So they want to quash any potential viable resistance to their takeover by not only literally taking away power and electricity and connectivity from everyone, but they're targeting middle class families and upper class families. So everyone's gone into hiding, which means that most of the mechanisms that keep society going and keep the economy going are completely shut down.” – Valerie Edmondson Bolaños While the medical care is not completely gone, it's can still be hard to get in the current circumstances. There are simply too much people that are now relying on volunteer medical professionals who are scared but also want to save as many lives as they can. How the Pandemic Factors In On the topic of medical care, Valerie was asked about the COVID spread and deaths in Afghanistan. She shares that there isn't really any visible evidence of any data being collected at this point. Not to mention any effort for vaccination programs to speak of. “There's no data being collected. People aren't going to hospitals for the most part, because then they're afraid they'll be killed. So yeah, I don't I don't think any data is really coming out, or being collected. I mean, that would require a functioning government, which is not what the Taliban has created.” – Valerie Edmondson Bolaños The pandemic really added a few levels of complication of how volunteer NGOs like the Warrior Angels Rescue can operate on the ground, as not only are you worried about getting shot,

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jade S. Sasser, "On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change" (NYU Press, 2018)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 54:30


Since the turn of the millennium, American media, scientists, and environmental activists have insisted that the global population crisis is “back”—and that the only way to avoid catastrophic climate change is to ensure women's universal access to contraception. Did the population problem ever disappear? What is bringing it back—and why now? In On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change (New York University Press, 2018), Jade S. Sasser explores how a small network of international development actors, including private donors, NGO program managers, scientists, and youth advocates, is bringing population back to the center of public environmental debate. While these narratives never disappeared, Sasser argues, histories of human rights abuses, racism, and a conservative backlash against abortion in the 1980s drove them underground—until now. Using interviews and case studies from a wide range of sites—from Silicon Valley foundation headquarters to youth advocacy trainings, the halls of Congress and an international climate change conference—Sasser demonstrates how population growth has been reframed as an urgent source of climate crisis and a unique opportunity to support women's sexual and reproductive health and rights. ­Although well-intentioned—promoting positive action, women's empowerment, and moral accountability to a global community—these groups also perpetuate the same myths about the sexuality and lack of virtue and control of women and the people of global south that have been debunked for decades. Unless the development community recognizes the pervasive repackaging of failed narratives, Sasser argues, true change and development progress will not be possible. On Infertile Ground presents a unique critique of international development that blends the study of feminism, environmentalism, and activism in a groundbreaking way. It will make any development professional take a second look at the ideals driving their work. Dr. Nicole Bourbonnais is an Associate Professor of International History and Politics and Co-Director of the Gender Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Her research explores reproductive politics and practice from a transnational historical perspective. More info here. witter: @iheid_history and @GC_IHEID Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Jade S. Sasser, "On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change" (NYU Press, 2018)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 54:30


Since the turn of the millennium, American media, scientists, and environmental activists have insisted that the global population crisis is “back”—and that the only way to avoid catastrophic climate change is to ensure women's universal access to contraception. Did the population problem ever disappear? What is bringing it back—and why now? In On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change (New York University Press, 2018), Jade S. Sasser explores how a small network of international development actors, including private donors, NGO program managers, scientists, and youth advocates, is bringing population back to the center of public environmental debate. While these narratives never disappeared, Sasser argues, histories of human rights abuses, racism, and a conservative backlash against abortion in the 1980s drove them underground—until now. Using interviews and case studies from a wide range of sites—from Silicon Valley foundation headquarters to youth advocacy trainings, the halls of Congress and an international climate change conference—Sasser demonstrates how population growth has been reframed as an urgent source of climate crisis and a unique opportunity to support women's sexual and reproductive health and rights. ­Although well-intentioned—promoting positive action, women's empowerment, and moral accountability to a global community—these groups also perpetuate the same myths about the sexuality and lack of virtue and control of women and the people of global south that have been debunked for decades. Unless the development community recognizes the pervasive repackaging of failed narratives, Sasser argues, true change and development progress will not be possible. On Infertile Ground presents a unique critique of international development that blends the study of feminism, environmentalism, and activism in a groundbreaking way. It will make any development professional take a second look at the ideals driving their work. Dr. Nicole Bourbonnais is an Associate Professor of International History and Politics and Co-Director of the Gender Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Her research explores reproductive politics and practice from a transnational historical perspective. More info here. witter: @iheid_history and @GC_IHEID Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Jade S. Sasser, "On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change" (NYU Press, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 54:30


Since the turn of the millennium, American media, scientists, and environmental activists have insisted that the global population crisis is “back”—and that the only way to avoid catastrophic climate change is to ensure women's universal access to contraception. Did the population problem ever disappear? What is bringing it back—and why now? In On Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women's Rights in the Era of Climate Change (New York University Press, 2018), Jade S. Sasser explores how a small network of international development actors, including private donors, NGO program managers, scientists, and youth advocates, is bringing population back to the center of public environmental debate. While these narratives never disappeared, Sasser argues, histories of human rights abuses, racism, and a conservative backlash against abortion in the 1980s drove them underground—until now. Using interviews and case studies from a wide range of sites—from Silicon Valley foundation headquarters to youth advocacy trainings, the halls of Congress and an international climate change conference—Sasser demonstrates how population growth has been reframed as an urgent source of climate crisis and a unique opportunity to support women's sexual and reproductive health and rights. ­Although well-intentioned—promoting positive action, women's empowerment, and moral accountability to a global community—these groups also perpetuate the same myths about the sexuality and lack of virtue and control of women and the people of global south that have been debunked for decades. Unless the development community recognizes the pervasive repackaging of failed narratives, Sasser argues, true change and development progress will not be possible. On Infertile Ground presents a unique critique of international development that blends the study of feminism, environmentalism, and activism in a groundbreaking way. It will make any development professional take a second look at the ideals driving their work. Dr. Nicole Bourbonnais is an Associate Professor of International History and Politics and Co-Director of the Gender Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Her research explores reproductive politics and practice from a transnational historical perspective. More info here. witter: @iheid_history and @GC_IHEID Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Simblified
Nudge Theory And Social Change

Simblified

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:41


When Social Purpose Organizations get down to do their work, they sometimes find themselves having to beg people to change. Suman Srivastava, author of 'Don't Beg. Inspire.' begs to differ! Join your Simblified hosts in their conversation with Suman about the book, the principles of nudge theory, and lots of fun and wisdom. Links: Dan Pallota's Ted talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pallotta_the_way_we_think_about_charity_is_dead_wrong?language=en "Don't Beg. Inspire." - The book https://linktr.ee/DB.Inspire Follow Suman Srivastava on Twitter & Instagram: https://twitter.com/suman7 https://www.instagram.com/suman_srivastava Add one part news, one part bad jokes, one part Wikipedia research, one part cult references from spending too much time on the internet, one part Wodehouse quotes, and one part quality puns, and you get Simblified. A weekly podcast to help you appear smarter, to an audience that knows no less! Your four hosts - Chuck, Naren, Srikeit and Tony attempt to deconstruct topics with humour (conditions apply). Fans of the show have described it as "fun conversations with relatable folks", "irreverent humour", "the funniest thing to come out of Malad West" and "if I give you a good review will you please let me go". Started in 2016 as a creative outlet, Simblified now has over 200 episodes, including some live ones, and some with guests who are much smarter than the hosts. Welcome to the world of Simblified! You can contact the hosts on: Chuck: twitter.com/chuck_gopal / instagram.com/chuckofalltrades Naren: twitter.com/shenoyn / instagram.com/shenoynv Tony: twitter.com/notytony / instagram.com/notytony Srikeit: twitter.com/srikeit / instagram.com/srikeit

A Fork In Time: The Alternate History Podcast
Episode 0127—Ngo Not Again

A Fork In Time: The Alternate History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 90:32


The last installment of our JFK "Arc" for November 2021.Less than a month before the assassination of President John F.  Kennedy in November 1963, a US-approved coup in South Vietnam removed prime minister Ngo Dinh Diem and his younger brother, Ngo Dihn Nhu, who controlled the secret police and special forces.  The regime change was the first in a series of several more in the immediate months and others that would follow through the remaining years of the conflict--leading to instability and uncertainty for much of the duration of the conflict.How might the conflict in Vietnam have been different if an alternative expectation on cooperation had been reached with the Ngo regime or subsequent leadership?  How might the continuation of a Kennedy presidency have influenced this alternative path?Referenced A Fork In Time episodes:Episode #96, Letter Ho A GoEpisode 124, If Lillian Brown InsistedReferenced The Room Where It Happened  episode:Room #4: A Room with Many ReflectionsChoose which listener's topics to expedite to productionCLICK HEREWebsite: www.aforkintimepodcast.comE-Mail: aforkintimepodcast@gmail.comDirect Link to Listener Survey: https://www.aforkintimepodcast.com/listenersurveyIf you enjoy the podcast, you can help by supporting us via Patreon.https://www.patreon.com/aforkintimeYou can follow A Fork In Time on….Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aforkintimeTwitter: @AFITPodcastPinterest: www.pinterest.com/aforkintimeCheck Out The Room Where It Happened, our other podcast where the focus is on "real" history:https://www.aforkintimepodcast.com/theroomwhereithappenedCredit: Credence Clearwater Revival's Fortunate Son is mentioned in the episode and a brief portion of the song is played for reference.Theme Music: Conquer by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/aforkintime)

The John Batchelor Show
NGO terror deceptions. Matthew Levitt @Levitt_Matt @WashInstitute; @Georgetown; Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 10:47


Photo:  PFLP: In the mountains east of the Jordan River, a patrol from the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine punctuates a battle hymn with Soviet, Czechoslovak (vz. 58), and (top left) Egyptian weapons. Early 1969.  A pet of some European NGO's. .. NGO terror deceptions.  Matthew Levitt @Levitt_Matt  @WashInstitute; @Georgetown;   Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 https://www.jpost.com/opinion/pflp-ngo-ties-are-far-from-hidden-opinion-685616 Matthew Levitt is the Fromer-Wexler Fellow at The Washington Institute and director of its Jeanette and Eli Reinhard Program on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.  https://www.jpost.com/opinion/pflp-ngo-ties-are-far-from-hidden-opinion-685616 https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/blurred-line-between-civil-society-and-terrorism-examining-charges-ngos-funding https://www.timesofisrael.com/spanish-palestinian-woman-pleads-guilty-to-raising-pflp-funds-through-charity/

Mongabay Newscast
What do two giant land deals mean for the future of Southeast Asia's forests?

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 55:36


We discuss two big stories from Southeast Asia that Mongabay's been covering which highlight the importance of land rights and also Free, Prior, and Informed Consent for Indigenous and local communities. Cynthia Ong is our first guest, she's founder of LEAP, an NGO based in the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, who shares the fallout from a story broken by Mongabay about a giant carbon deal signed by government officials in Sabah -- covering more than 2 million hectares of the state's forests for at least the next 100 years -- without consulting local communities. Our second guest is Gerry Flynn, a Mongabay contributor based in Cambodia who has been covering a recent government decree that made 127,000 hectares of protected areas available for sale or rent. Flynn discusses why there are fears that it will amount to a land grab by powerful interests. Further reading about the Sabah deal: Is colonial history repeating itself with Sabah forest carbon deal? (Ong's commentary) Details emerge about Sabah carbon deal Articles about Cambodia by Flynn: The great Koh Kong land rush Carving up the Cardamoms: Conservationists fear massive land grab in Cambodia Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! Episode artwork: Stung Proat, Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Welcome to Strategy Skills episode 196, an episode with an inspiring speaker, author, and coach, Kay Formanek. Get Kay's book here: https://amzn.to/3EgXNYP Kay Formanek is the Founder and CEO of Diversity and Performance, a company committed to creating new insights and more conscious diversity leaders. She is the author of Beyond D&I, a book that equips leaders with strategic models and practical tools for advancing Diversity Performance in their organization. Kay is a leading authority on diversity and inclusion, a global speaker, board member, contributor to leading business schools, and advisor and expert to various top advisory organizations. She brings over 30 years of experience of navigating diversity journeys and cultural transformations in over 50 organizations spread across the world. She was Partner and Managing Director in Accenture, where she played a crucial role in advancing diversity and inclusion for 25 years. She also assumes the role of Inclusive Leadership Coach and Expert in Aberkyn and McKinsey. Within the framework of her own company, Diversity and Performance BV, Kay has spent the last six years undertaking extensive study and research in the areas of diversity, inclusion, equity, leadership, and purpose. She has collaborated with multiple organizations to develop and test her thinking. Her experience and research led to the development of the anchor diversity models: The Virtuous Circle and the Integrated Diversity Model. Kay believes in the importance of knowledge and personal learning to overcome personal and systemic bias and that personal learning is at the heart of becoming a courageous and inclusive leader of diversity. She has developed the global certification program for corporates, government institutions, professional services organizations, and NGO's entitled "Inclusive Leadership and Mitigating Bias" Certification. Diplomats, ambassadors, D&I practitioners, leaders, professors, and many individuals who wish to play a role in advancing inclusive diversity have attended certifications around the world: Dubai, Singapore, South Africa, Boston, London, Brussels, Amsterdam, and more than 30 other locations. In this episode, Kay spoke about the importance of diversity, inclusion, and equity in an organization. We will learn more about the underlying reason behind why people discriminate, stereotype, and why people have unconscious bias.  Beyond D&I: Leading Diversity with Purpose and Inclusiveness. Kay Formanek: https://amzn.to/3EgXNYP Enjoying our podcast? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Congressional Dish
CD243: Target Nicaragua

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 128:14


In mid-November, following the re-election of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, Congress passed and President Biden signed the RENACER Act, which escalated an ongoing economic war against President Daniel Ortega. In this episode learn about what the RENACER Act does as we examine the situation in Nicaragua and find out and why Daniel Ortega has a target on his back. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes Essential Background Episodes CD102: The World Trade Organization: COOL? CD167: Combating Russia (NDAA 2018) LIVE CD186: National Endowment for Democracy CD187: Combating China Rabbit Hole Episodes CD041: Why Attack Syria? CD067: What Do We Want In Ukraine? CD108: Regime Change (Syria) CD131: Bombing Libya CD156: Sanctions – Russia, North Korea & Iran CD172: The Illegal Bombing of Syria CD176: Target Venezuela: Regime Change in Progress CD190: A Coup for Capitalism CD191: The “Democracies” Of Elliott Abrams CD208: The Brink of the Iran War CD224: Social Media Censorship CD225: Targets of the Free Marketeers CD229: Target Belarus U.S.-Nicaragua Relations Maureen Taft-Morales. November 4, 2021. “Nicaragua in Brief: Political Developments in 2021, U.S. Policy, and Issues for Congress.” Congressional Research Service. U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. September 14, 2021. U.S. Relations With Nicaragua William I. Robinson. August 19, 2021. “Crisis in Nicaragua: Is the Ortega-Murillo Government Leftist? (Part I)” North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) Clare Ribando Seelke. March 17, 2008. “Nicaragua: Political Situation and U.S. Relations” [RS22836]. Congressional Research Service. Maureen Taft-Morales. April 19, 2007. “Nicaragua: The Election of Daniel Ortega and Issues in U.S. Relations [RL33983] Congressional Research Service. IMF Staff. May 16, 2006. “Nicaragua : Staff Report for the 2005 Article IV Consultation, Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Reviews Under the Three Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility, Requests for Rephasing and Waiver of Performance Criteria, Financing Assurances Review, and Request for Extension of the Arrangement.” The International Monetary Fund. Author's Name Redacted. May 16, 1997. “Nicaragua: Changes Under the Chamorro Government and U.S. Concerns” [96-813 F]. Congressional Research Service. Edgar Chamorro. January 9, 1986. “Terror Is the Most Effective Weapon of Nicaragua's 'Contras.'” The New York Times. Fred Hiatt, Joanne Omang, Michael Getler and Don Oberdorfer. April 7, 1984. “CIA Helped To Mine Ports In Nicaragua.” The Washington Post. Nicaragua Relationships to Russia and China 100% Noticias. September 9, 2021. “Nicaraguan Parliament Ratifies Security Agreement with Russia. Havana Times. “Russia, Nicaragua ink information security deal.” July 19, 2021. TASS: Russian News Agency. Frida Ghitis. June 8, 2017. “A Russian Satellite-Tracking Facility in Nicaragua Raises Echoes of the Cold War.” World Politics Review. Cristina Silva. May 22, 2017. “New Cold War: Is Russia Spying on the U.S. From a Nicaragua Military Compound?” Newsweek. Carrie Kahn. November 17, 2016. “U.S. To Monitor Security Agreement Signed Between Russia And Nicaragua.” NPR Morning Edition. John Otis. June 4, 2015. “Nicaraguan Canal Plan Riles Landholders.” The Wall Street Journal. Matthew Miller. May 4, 2014. “China's 'ordinary' billionaire behind grand Nicaragua canal plan.” Reuters. 2021 Sanctions “Nicaragua Leaves the Organization of American States.” November 19, 2021. Telesur. U.S. Department of the Treasury. November 15, 2021. “Treasury Sanctions Public Ministry of Nicaragua and Nine Government Officials Following Sham November Elections.” Antony Blinken. November 15, 2021. “New Sanctions Following Sham Elections in Nicaragua.” U.S. Department of State. Ned Price. August 6, 2021. “The United States Restricts Visas of 50 Additional Nicaraguan Individuals Affiliated With Ortega-Murillo Regime.” U.S. Department of State. Antony Blinken. July 12, 2021. “The United States Restricts Visas of 100 Nicaraguans Affiliated with Ortega-Murillo Regime.” U.S. Department of State. U.S. Department of the Treasury. June 9, 2021. “Treasury Sanctions Nicaraguan Officials for Supporting Ortega's Efforts to Undermine Democracy, Human Rights, and the Economy.” “Nicaragua Minimum Wage.” Minimum-Wage.org 2021 Nicaraguan Elections “North Americans Debunk US & OAS Claims on Nicaragua Election.” November 10, 2021. Kawsachun News. Monique Beals. November 7, 2021. “Biden slams Nicaragua's 'sham elections,' calls Ortegas autocrats.” The Hill. Meta (formerly Facebook). November 1, 2021. “October 2021 Coordinated Inauthentic Behavior Report.” Meta (formerly Facebook). November 1, 2021. “October 2021 Coordinated Inauthentic Behavior Report Summary.” Nahal Toosi. October 26, 2021. “Tiny Nicaragua is becoming a big problem for Joe Biden.” Politico. Antony Blinken. October 22, 2021. “The United States Applauds the OAS Resolution Condemning the Undemocratic Electoral Process and Repression in Nicaragua.” U.S. Embassy in El Salvador. Carlos Dada. October 6, 2021. “La prioridad ahorita es que no nos maten; luego, la justicia y la democracia.” El Faro. Kai M. Thaler and Ryan C. Berg. August 24, 2021. “To replace autocrats of Nicaragua, think beyond this fall's election.” The Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. December 11, 2020. “Nicaragua opposition figure seeks rule changes for 2021 vote.” The Associated Press. Foreign Agent Law Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero. May 2, 2021. “Changes in Nicaragua's Consumer Law.” Marca Sur. “Nicaragua: National Assembly Approves Law To Defend Its People. December 22, 2020. Telesur. LAND Staff. October 29, 2020. “Nicaragua Approves Cybercrime Law.” Latin America News Dispatch (LAND). Associated Press. October 15, 2020. “Nicaragua passes controversial 'foreign agent' law.” ABC News. Oretega's Arrested Opponents Felix Maradiaga Biography. World Economic Forum. Felix Maradiaga Curriculum Vitae. Academia.edu Cristiana Chamorro Biography. The Dialogue: Leadership for the Americas. Cristiana Chamorro LinkedIn Profile. Juan Sebastian Chamorro LinkedIn Profile. Samantha Sultoon Biography. The Atlantic Council. Jared Genser, Brian Tronic, Stephanie Herrmann, and Michael Russ. October 28, 2021. “Petition to United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention.” Perseus Strategies. Tom Phillips. October 22, 2021. “Nicaraguan business leaders arrested in Ortega's pre-election crackdown.” The Guardian. “Nicaragua: Police arrest 2 more opposition contenders.” September 6, 2021. Deutsche Welle (DW). Ismael López Ocampo and Mary Beth Sheridan. June 9, 2021. “As election looms, Nicaraguan government arrests Ortega's challengers.” The Washington Post. “Ortega Holds Arturo Cruz Prisoner at Interrogation Jail.” June 7, 2021. Havana Times. “Nicaraguan police detain another opposition presidential contender. June 5, 2021. Reuters. “Nicaragua: Opposition Leader Linked To Money Laundering Scandal.” June 3, 2021. Telesur. The Guardian Staff and agencies in Managua. June 2, 2021. “Nicaragua police detain opposition leader and expected Ortega challenger.” The Guardian. Trump Era - April 2018 Protests Paz Gómez. August 25, 2021. “The Break-Up: COSEP's Love Affair with Daniel Ortega.” Impunity Observer. Mary Beth Sheridan. August 4, 2019. “Nicaragua's Ortega is strangling La Prensa, one of Latin America's most storied newspapers.” The Washington Post. U.S. Department of the Treasury. April 17, 2019. “Treasury Targets Finances of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega's Regime.” Samantha Sultoon. November 29, 2018. “Trump administration's new Nicaragua sanctions strategically target the top.” New Atlanticist Blog from the Atlantic Council. Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Nicaragua [Executive Order 13851] November 27, 2018. Federal Register Vol. 83 No. 230. Rocio Cara Labrador. November 26, 2018. “Nicaragua in Crisis: What to Know.” Council of Foreign Relations. Rafael Bernal. November 01, 2018. “Bolton dubs Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua the 'Troika of Tyranny'” The Hill. Mabel Calero. July 26, 2018. “Daniel Ortega buries his model of alliance with private companies that lasted 11 years.” La Prensa. Max Blumenthal. June 19, 2018. “US govt meddling machine boasts of ‘laying the groundwork for insurrection' in Nicaragua.” The Grayzone. “Pension reforms in Nicaragua leads to violent protests and opposition from business groups.” The Caribbean Council. Foreign “Assistance” to Nicaragua About ForeignAssistance.gov National Endowment for Democracy Grants Awarded to Fundacion Nicaraguense para el Desarrollo Economico y Social National Endowment for Democracy Grants Awarded to Instituto de Estudios Estrategicos y Politicas Publicas Associated Press. August 26, 2021. “Nicaragua Orders Closure of 15 More NGOs.” U.S. News and World Report. William I. Robinson. August 20, 2021. “Crisis in Nicaragua: Is the US Trying to Overthrow the Ortega-Murillo Government? (Part II)” North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) Elliott Abrams. June 9, 2021. “Biden and Democracy in Nicaragua.” Council on Foreign Relations. Ben Norton. June 1, 2021. “How USAID created Nicaragua's anti-Sandinista media apparatus, now under money laundering investigation.” The Grayzone. John Perry. August 4, 2020. “The US contracts out its regime change operation in Nicaragua.” Council on Hemispheric Affairs. Responsive Assistance in Nicaragua [RFTOP No: 72052420R00004] “Section C - Statement of Work.” March-April 2020. USAID OIG Latin America and Caribbean Regional Office. October 24, 2019. “Financial Audit of the Media Strengthening Program in Nicaragua, Managed by Fundación Violeta Barrios de Chamorro Para la Reconciliación y la Democracia, Cooperative Agreement AID-524-A-14-00001, January 1 to December 31, 2018 (9-524-20-004-R)” USAID. IMF Western Hemisphere Department Staff. June 27, 2017. “Nicaragua : Selected Issues.” The International Monetary Fund. Richard Falk. February 21, 2012. “When an ‘NGO' is not an NGO: Twists and turns under Egyptian skies.” Al Jazeera. Laws S. 1064: RENACER Act Sponsor: Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ) Passed by Voice Vote in the Senate November 3, 2021 House Vote Breakdown Law Outline Sec. 2: Sense of Congress "Congress unequivocally condemns the politically motivated and unlawful detention of presidential candidates Cristiana Chamorro, Arturo Cruz, Felix Maradiaga, and Juan Sebastian Chamorro." "Congress unequivocally condemns the passage of the Foreign Agents Regulation Law, the Special Cybercrimes Law, the Self Determination Law, and the Consumer Protection Law by the National Assembly of Nicaragua..." Sec. 3: Review of Participation of Nicaragua in Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement "The President should review" the continued participation of Nicaragua in the agreement. The authority listed is Article 21.2 of the agreement that says, "Nothing in this agreement shall be construed... to preclude a Party from applying measures that it considers necessary for the fulfillment of its obligations with respect to the maintenance or restoration of international peace or security, or the protection of its own essential security interests." President Trump issued an Executive Order on November 27, 2018 that said that the response to the protests that began on April 18, 2018 "and the Ortega regime's systematic dismantling and undermining of democratic institutions and the rule of law, its use of indiscriminate violence and repressive tactics against civilians, as well as its corruption leading to the destabilization of Nicaragua's economy constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States." Sec. 4: Restrictions on International Financial Institutions Relating to Nicaragua Directs the United States Executive Director at the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, and the International Monetary Fund to "increase scrutiny of any loan or financial or technical assistance provided for a project in Nicaragua" and "to ensure" that the loan or assistance is administered through an entity with full independence from the Government of Nicaragua. Sec. 5: Targeted Sanctions to Advance Democratic Elections The Secretary of State and Secretary of Treasury, "in consultation" with the intelligence community, "shall develop and implement a coordinated strategy" for implementing targeted sanctions in order to "facilitate the necessary conditions for free, fair, and transparent elections in Nicaragua." Targets sanctions specifically at... Officials in the government of President Daniel Ortega Family members of Daniel Ortega High ranking members of the National Nicaraguan Police Members of the Supreme Electoral Council of Nicaragua Officials of the Central Bank of Nicaragua Party members and elected officials from the Sandinista National Liberation Front and their family members Businesses that conduct "corrupt" financial transactions with officials in the government of President Daniel Ortega, his party, or his family. The sanctions are authorized by the 2018 law (outlined below) against "any foreign person" who, on or after April 18, 2018... Used violence "or conduct" that "constitutes a serious abuse" against protestors Taken "actions or policies" that undermine "democratic processes or institutions" Any current or former government official that used "private or public assets for personal gain or political purposes" Any current or former government official involved in corruption related to government contracts Any current or former government official involved in bribery Any current or former government official that transferred the proceeds of corruption Arrested or prosecuted a person disseminating information to the public The sanctions include... Asset blocking of "all property and interests in property" if they are in the United States, come within the United States, or come within the possession or control of a "United States person." Exclusion from the United States and revocation of visas and other documents. Anyone who "violates, attempts to violate, conspires to violate, or causes a violation" of sanctions can be hit with a civil penalty of a $250,000 maximum fine or up to twice the amount of sanctions violating transaction and/or a criminal penalty of up to $1 million or up to 20 years in prison. Sec. 6: Developing and Implementing a Coordinated Sanctions Strategy with Diplomatic Partners Requires the Secretary of State to coordinate with other countries - specifically Canada, members of the European Union, and governments in Latin America and the Caribbean - to impose the sanctions together "in order to advance democratic elections in Nicaragua." Sec. 7: Inclusion of Nicaragua in List of Countries Subject to Certain Sanctions Relating to Corruption Adds Nicaragua to an annual report that gets submitted to Congress. The people identified in the report who are accused of corruption in regards to government contracts, bribery, extortion, money laundering, or "violence, harassment, or intimidation directed at governmental or non governmental corruption investigators" will have their visas revoked and be prohibited from entering the United States. Sec. 9: Classified Report on the Activities of the Russian Federation in Nicaragua The Department of State - working with intelligence officials - will submit a classified report to Congress within 90 days about... Cooperation between the Nicaraguan military and Russian military, intelligence, security forces, law enforcement, and Russian security contractors. Cooperation between Russia and Nicaragua in telecommunications and satellites Economic cooperation, specifically in banking Threats that cooperation between Russia and Nicaragua pose to "United States national interests and national security." Sec. 12: Supporting Independent News Media and Freedom of Information in Nicaragua The Secretary of State, Administrator of USAID and the CEO of the United States Agency for Global Media will submit a report to Congress listing all media "directly or indirectly owned or controlled by President Daniel Ortega, members of the Ortega family, or known allies of the Ortega government" and it will access the extent to which Voice of America is reaching the Nicaraguan people. Sec. 13: Amendment to Short Title of Public Law 115-335 Renames the "Nicaraguan Human Rights and Anticorruption Act of 2018" the "Nicaragua Investment and Conditionality Act of 2018" or "NICA Act" H.R. 1918: Nicaragua Human Rights and Anticorruption Act of 2018 Signed into law on December 20, 2018 Sponsor: Representative Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL) Law Outline Sec. 2: Sense of Congress on Advancing a Negotiated Solution to Nicaragua's Crisis Congress wanted the Catholic Church of Nicaragua to negotiate for early elections on behalf of "civil society", the student movement, private sector, and the "political opposition" Congress did like that the Government of Nicaragua was refusing to negotiate Sec. 4: Restrictions on International Financial Institutions Relating to Nicaragua Forces the Treasury Secretary to instruct our representatives at the World Bank Group and Inter-American Development Bank to oppose "any loan or financial or technical assistance to the Government of Nicaragua for a project in Nicaragua." We can support loans "to address basic human needs" or "promote democracy in Nicaragua" Sec. 5 : Imposition of Targeted Sanctions with Respect to Nicaragua Authorizes sanctions against "any foreign person" who, on or after April 18, 2018... Used violence "or conduct" that "constitutes a serious abuse" against protestors Taken "actions or policies" that undermine "democratic processes or institutions" Any current or former government official that used "private or public assets for personal gain or political purposes" Any current or former government official involved in corruption related to government contracts Any current or former government official involved in bribery Any current or former government official that transferred the proceeds of corruption Arrested or prosecuted a person disseminating information to the public The sanctions include... Asset blocking of "all property and interests in property" if they are in the United States, come within the United States, or come within the possession or control of a "United States person." Exclusion from the United States and revocation of visas and other documents. Punishes anyone who "violates, attempts to violate, conspires to violate, or causes a violation" of sanctions with a civil penalty up to a $250,000 fine or up to twice the amount of sanctions violating transaction and/or a criminal penalty of up to $1 million or up to 20 years in prison. The asset blocking sanctions do not authorize the blocking of goods imports. Sec. 6: Annual Certification and Waiver Allows the President to waive the travel restrictions and sanctions. Sec. 10: Termination The sanctions authorized by this law expire on December 31, 2023. Audio Sources Kawsachun News - Nicaragua 2021 Election Observer Press Conference November 10, 2021 Moderator: I present Paul Pumphrey from Friends of the Congo. Paul Pumphrey: Here in Nicaragua, I saw a free and fair election. I talked to many people who were not a part of the Sandinistas party. And yet they themselves said they were willing to accept whatever result happened in the election. Moderator: Next we have Craig Pasta Jardula who is a journalist based in the United States. Craig Pasta Jardula: Mainly, I want to talk about the process, meaning the chain of custody, because that's something that we really saw that was great here in Nicaragua, it made this election a home run. The chain of custody is very strong here, including the fact that in Nicaragua, we have something that is awesome that a lot of countries need to adopt, which is where the vote is cast, it is counted, that ensures a strong chain of custody. Moderator: Next is Rick Cohn from Friends of Latin America. 13:05 Rick Cohn: I want to speak just a little bit though a group of 11 of us went to Bilwi on the Caribbean coast. And in the United States, one of the things they'll use to say this election is fake, is that a high percentage of people voted, and a high percentage of people voted for the FSLN. And that can't happen, because American politicians that would never happen. Well, so I want to say something about why the voters told us they were voting. They told us that basically, they had two Category Four and Category Five hurricanes last year, and the government came and saved their lives, saved many, many lives. And, you know, people have trust in that government. And then the government came in and made sure the electric was up. In Puerto Rico from a year earlier, electric still isn't isn't working, because they, you know, are making money selling electric, but it still doesn't work. They told us they had new roofs put on almost immediately they were delivered. They told us that the schools were rebuilt. All of the schools were in good condition. Oh, the schools and some of them have new buildings. So we had a situation where they were very happy with the performance of the government. And that is why -- oh, they also told us they had one kilometer of road before the FSLN came into power from the neoliberal period, now they have 500 kilometers. And with 70 more kilometers, they'll be able to drive from all the way to Managua, which they've never been able to do in history. So they told us these things. And the FSLN party received the highest percentage of votes, but that's not strange, because they really support the government. They received 86.7% of the vote. You know, there's no way that's made up - it's not fake. It's where they're at. It is certainly the biggest deficiency in democracy in Nicaragua is the interference that there is so much interference from the US government and the media, and the censorship and the lies that they tell. That's the interference that's occurring in this election. 33:52 Rick Cohn: Corporate media like Facebook, well, all of the corporate media including Facebook and Twitter, but social media, are actually just part of the US system and they're contracted to provide information back and forth, they're actually an aspect of the government and they close 1000s of people's accounts, who are people, and I met some of them, they're actual people, and they close their accounts. And they weren't, you know, anyone who was saying anything other than the fact that they may have been supporting the Nicaraguan people or opposed to the the sanctions on Nicaragua. AN INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE TO ORTEGA'S DESTRUCTION OF DEMOCRACY IN NICARAGUA September 21, 2021 House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, Migration and International Economic Policy *Hearing not on C-SPAN Witnesses: Emily Mendrala Deputy Assistant Secretary of State at the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs Laure Chinchilla Former President of Costa Rica Co-Chair at The Inter-American Dialogue Ryan Berg, PhD Senior Fellow in the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Oct. 2018 - Apr. 2021: Research Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute Apr. 2018 - Oct. 2018: Research Consultant at The World Bank July 2014 - Oct 2014: US State Department negotiator at the Organization of American States (OAS) 2009: Intern for Paul Ryan Berta Valle Wife of Felix Maradiaga Rep. Albio Sires (D-NJ): The regime has rounded up nearly every potential challenger to Ortega and has not even tried to hide these arrests and forced disappearances under the veneer of legality. 05:42 Rep. Albio Sires (D-NJ): Having written the NICA Act with Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), I am frustrated that the International Monetary Fund recently provided $350 million to the regime. The IMF should not take Ortega's us word for it that these funds will be used to address the COVID pandemic. 06:53 Rep. Albio Sires (D-NJ): We should also begin preparing a number of severe diplomatic consequences, assuming Nicaragua's election in November becomes a coronation for Ortega. Nicaragua should be suspended under the International Democratic Charter on November 8, and its participation under the Central America Free Trade Agreement should be reconsidered. 10:39 Rep. Mark Green (R-TN): On November 7 a political farce will be held, claiming to resemble elections. No one should be fooled about the outcome -- any hope of unseating the socialist dictatorship is sitting inside of Ortega's prisons. 13:56 *Emily Mendrala: As you are well aware, the Ortega-Murillo government has carried out a ruthless crackdown over the past several months, canceling the registration of opposition parties, incarcerating journalists, opposition leaders, potential presidential candidates, students, private sector leaders and others who defend free and fair elections, attacking the free press, closing long standing NGOs that provide humanitarian and medical assistance to Nicaraguans in need. 15:06 Emily Mendrala: In the face of sham elections in Nicaragua, we and our international partners must continue to denounce and push back against the Ortega-Murillo government's anti-democratic rule as well as its use of Russian-inspired laws to carry out repression. 17:56 Emily Mendrala: Through USAID we continue to support Nicaraguan civil society, independent media and human rights defenders. Our continued support assures Nicaraguans that the outside world has not forgotten them. 19:06 Rep. Albio Sires (D-NJ): Are we using our voice? Is the administration using its voice and vote with international financial institution to oppose loans and other financial assistance to Ortega? Because I have to tell you, it's very upsetting to me that we do all this work here. We asked the administration to put sanctions on different people. And yet the IMF, which we probably contribute the largest amount of money, or if not, one of the largest amounts of money, they seem to just ignore what's going on in Nicaragua. And it has to -- I intend to write a letter to the IMF. And hopefully we'll have them before this committee, because this is not acceptable. 20:22 Emily Mendrala: We are using our voice and our vote and every opportunity in front of multilateral institutions to oppose lending to the Ortega-Murillo government. We will continue to use our voice, vote and influence to advocate against lending from international financial institutions to the Ortega-Murillo government and we will also continue to collaborate with international partners where appropriate: EU, Canada and others to do the same. 30:43 Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-TX): The upcoming November 7 elections will be neither free nor fair 1:04:30 Berta Valle: Even though Félix [Maradiaga] has dedicated his life to serving our country, the regime has charged him and others with a conspiracy to undermine national integrity. The government is alleging that Félix and others were part of a global conspiracy to use foreign resources, including from the US Agency for International Development, the International Republican Institute and the National Endowment for Democracy to harm the interests of the nation. 1:16:33 Ryan Berg: As well as November 7, I think we need to declare Nicaragua's elections illegitimate under current conditions. 1:27:16 Ryan Berg: Thank you, Congressman Green, for the question. Yes, the two countries that I would point out as extra-hemispheric actors who have have come into the hemisphere to shore up the Ortega regime are Russia and Iran. Russia, we've seen with a significant presence in Nicaragua for a while. Its increased its presence in past years, to an extent that I think should be very alarming for the US government. Not only does it have a number of port agreements with Nicaragua, and access to the Caribbean, where it can engage in anti access and area denial capabilities, potentially. But also in cyberspace. We saw recently the Russians and Nicaraguans sign a major agreement in the cyberspace, particularly to help the regime not only increase its domestic security apparatus, but to spy potentially on the opposition on our own citizens, and indeed, potentially on on other governments in Central America, depending upon the strength of the equipment transfers that we'll see in future. So they have a whole number or whole range of capabilities that they are developing within Nicaragua, that there are signals intelligence stations that are actually quite close to the US Embassy in Managua. And so that's that's Russia, Russia has an interest in shoring up this regime on the cheap. And I think Iran has approached the regime in a number of ways, most specifically, in offering partnerships to circumvent US sanctions architecture, in which it excels, because of the sanctions architecture that it has been under for so long. And we haven't seen as deep I would say, as a presence of the Iranians in Nicaragua, but it's it's there and it's also concerning. I think, in general, Congressman, part of the Ortega regime's plan for survival is to sort of recreate a situation of rivalry and enmity in Central America again, and lend a platform for major geopolitical competitors to the United States to increase their capabilities on the US doorstep and I think that's a significant aspect of this political, economic and social crisis here. 1:35:50 Rep. Albio Sires (D-NJ): If the Ortega regime moves ahead was stealing this November's elections the international community must come together to impose a very steep price. John Bolton: Miami Dade College's National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower November 1, 2018 John Bolton: The "Troika of Tyranny" in this hemisphere -- Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua -- has finally met its match. John Bolton: Today in this hemisphere we are also confronted once again, with the destructive forces of oppression, socialism and totalitarianism. In Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua, we see the perils of poisonous ideologies left unchecked. Nicaraguan President Speech at the United Nations General Assembly September 25, 2007 16:50 President Daniel Ortega: The General Assembly is simply a reflection of this world where a capitalist and imperialist minority is imposing global capitalism to impoverish the world continue to enslave us all and promote apartheid against Latin American immigrants and against African immigrants in Europe. This global capitalism is one beast and it has tentacles everywhere. 25:30 President Daniel Ortega: They have to understand once and for all, that just as they have managed to profit from privatizations that have given rise to these huge multi-nationals that then set up in developing countries, they say that they are helping us. No business person provides assistance, they simply go to earn as much money as they can, they don't go to invest. Developing countries are considered to be insecure countries, and we are simply being ransacked. If we compare the volume of riches that they're extracting from our countries -- the capitalists in developed countries I'm talking about -- through their major companies, the globalized multinationals. If we can compare that wealth with what the Latin American immigrants send back to their families from the U.S. or the Asian and African families in Europe send back to their families, it is a miserable amount compared to the volume of wealth that is extracted on a daily basis by these forms of institutionalized oppression. 28:30 President Daniel Ortega: These companies are simply using cheap labor. They are benefiting from clauses in free trade agreements. I've got us free trade, why not? Free trade for societies and nations. But clearly in that system, it's the law of the jungle the strongest will impose themselves on the rest. What well the world needs is fair trade. What the world demands is really a genuine change in the capitalist, globalized, imperialist economies, that is where we need to have a change. They have to change this concept that they have of a free market. They have to change the slant of these free trade agreements. Nicaraguan Presidential Address to Congress April 16, 1991 20:00 President Violetta Chamorro: My government is committed to radically reducing government intervention in the economy and the enormous bureaucratic apparatus that we have inherited. Our Congress approved a law that authorizes private banks to operate and encourages foreign investments and is studying the privatization law in order to convert government to businesses. We are rapidly advancing towards the establishment of a social market economy. Restrictions on prices and salaries must be lifted. Likewise, we have initiated a serious economic stabilization program accompanied by the corresponding tax reforms in order to discipline and improve and decrease public spending to encourage domestic production and to stimulate private domestic and foreign investment. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

canada news europe russian work china asian ceo american america nicaraguan nicaragua north freedom state friends congress new york times robinson human rights president iran council donald trump cold war crisis situation united states democracy russia caribbean government economy voice african target activities egyptian arrested green developing businesses cooperation secretary policy puerto rico inclusion washington post cuba latin american migration donations sense fundaci americas european union guerrero academia berg bolton abc news venezuela los angeles times ngo international development petition noticias congressman wall street journal central america threats joe biden guardian overthrow respect intern seventh eighth signed bureau us state department latin america economic national endowment effort reuters instituto democracia request catholic church newsweek national assembly world bank foreign affairs ngos research fellow foreign relations world report asset associated press congo amendment sec regime hwy treasury targets minimum wage ortega politico repression concerns implementing embassy love affair extension strategic public law music alley requests participation tyranny officials al jazeera managua pension iranians ocampo subcommittee house committee managed imf el salvador western hemisphere arrangement richard falk usaid maradiaga imposition administrators exclusion category five world economic forum advancing executive orders restrictions global media daniel ortega international monetary fund tom phillips americas program central banks inter american development bank us embassy united states agency world bank group matthew miller waiver poverty reduction thaler congressional research service treasury secretary russian federation congressional dish consumer law american states atlantic council sandinista carlos dada ryan c name redacted el faro sandinistas international republican institute research consultant telesur ned price la prensa fred hiatt rafael bernal john perry reconciliaci renames nahal toosi us agency world politics review american states oas terroris grayzone ben norton cover art design western hemisphere affairs united nations working group kai m max blumenthal david ippolito antony blinken npr morning edition ortega murillo fsln crestview covid-19
Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
Strange News: Crowdsourced Looting, Dumb Passwords, and the US as a 'Backsliding' Democracy

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:08


An NGO called the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance has classified the United States as a backsliding democracy. A list of popular passwords may indicate people are increasingly less cautious than they should be. Multiple cities are falling prey to crowdsourced looting, thought to be coordinated in advance via social media. All this and more in this week's Strange News. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

John Solomon Reports
Congressman says security exemptions for illegal aliens, creating situation ‘worse since 9/11'

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:51


Congressman Lance Gooden (R-TX) discusses his recent unearthing of documents that show that Lutheran, Catholic, and Jewish Charities by way of ‘corporate and Federal sponsors' are trafficking illegal migrants from the Southern border to interior states in the US. The Congressman commented that he is working on legislation now to to outlaw ‘corporate, Federal sponsors' from receiving tax breaks for trafficking of illegals by way of NGO donations. He comments that the border ‘is a disaster', and ‘the fact that someone could actually get a tax break for helping someone who has broken the law by entering our nation' is ‘stunning'. Gooden goes on to say, a message needs to be sent ‘to these charities that if they're going to engage in illegal actions, then they no longer need to be in the business of providing charity.'See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

John Solomon Reports
NGO's trafficking illegal migrants around US, providing documents to bypass TSA, local laws, says Ex Border Patrol Commissioner

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:15


Mark Morgan, Former Customs and Border Patrol Commissioner, gives his reaction to recent documents obtained exclusively by Just the News, showing that NGO's are working with the Biden administration to move illegal aliens from the border into the every state in the US. The documents obtained show that NGO's provide illegal migrants with papers to show TSA at the airports, saying to let them through without proper papers or any form of identification. Morgan reacts saying that it is ‘a joke', to say that ‘illegal aliens are being vetted'. ‘There is no way that that aliens from 150 different countries', totaling ‘1.7 million' people, ‘mostly in 10 months' could have been properly vetted. Stating that this should be ‘alarming to every American citizen'.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.