Podcasts about Tel Aviv

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  • 2,395PODCASTS
  • 4,279EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Tel Aviv

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Latest podcast episodes about Tel Aviv

Le Scan - Le podcast marocain de l'actualité
Maroc-Israël : une coopération sécuritaire historique

Le Scan - Le podcast marocain de l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:04


C'est le premier accord sécuritaire d'un Etat arabe avec Israel. Rabat et Tel-Aviv ont conclu  le 24 novembre 2021 une avancée historique en matière coopération militaire. Une avancée conclue lors du premier déplacement officiel d'un ministre de la Défense israélien au Maroc, celui de Benny Grantz. Que s'est-il conclu ? A quelle coopération sécuritaire s'attendre entre le Maroc et Israel ? Quels enjeux et impacts pour le Maroc ? Dans Le Scan, le podcast d'actualité de TelQuel, Landry Benoit reçoit Matthias Inabr, journaliste à i24 news spécialiste en question sécuritaire et militaire et Nizar Derdabi, signé analyste en défense et sécurité.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #192: American Backed Apartheid

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 88:04


On COI #192, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman discuss how Washington is provoking war on multiple fronts. Kyle reports that the NDAA is being held up in the Senate pending votes on myriad proposed amendments. Connor then covers NDAA amendments which seek to end U.S. involvement in the Yemen war as well as Congressional efforts to block another arms sale to the genocidal Saudi regime. Connor also details findings in a new investigative report that exposed which American military industrial complex firms have profited most from sales to Riyadh during the war on Yemen. Kyle updates tensions between NATO and Russia. While the situation on the border between Poland and Belarus is calming down, Washington and its allies continue supplying arms to Kiev, including drones. Goading Moscow, the U.S. is considering sending military advisors to Ukraine as well. Kyle then breaks down the Palestinians' suffering under Israeli apartheid. Kyle talks about how settlers continue to attack Palestinians and steal their property often with the Israeli occupation forces' consent or assistance. Kyle also talks about the Palestinians' brutal treatment inside Israeli prisons where people are often held without charges. Connor lays out escalatory actions taken by Washington and Tel Aviv in advance of the JCPOA talks' resumption. These hostile moves include more sanctions and even threats of war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
American Backed Apartheid

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 88:04


On COI #192, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman discuss how Washington is provoking war on multiple fronts. Kyle reports that the NDAA is being held up in the Senate pending votes on myriad proposed amendments. Connor then covers NDAA amendments which seek to end U.S. involvement in the Yemen war as well as Congressional efforts to block another arms sale to the genocidal Saudi regime. Connor also details findings in a new investigative report that exposed which American military industrial complex firms have profited most from sales to Riyadh during the war on Yemen. Kyle updates tensions between NATO and Russia. While the situation on the border between Poland and Belarus is calming down, Washington and its allies continue supplying arms to Kiev, including drones. Goading Moscow, the U.S. is considering sending military advisors to Ukraine as well. Kyle then breaks down the Palestinians' suffering under Israeli apartheid. Kyle talks about how settlers continue to attack Palestinians and steal their property often with the Israeli occupation forces' consent or assistance. Kyle also talks about the Palestinians' brutal treatment inside Israeli prisons where people are often held without charges. Connor lays out escalatory actions taken by Washington and Tel Aviv in advance of the JCPOA talks' resumption. These hostile moves include more sanctions and even threats of war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

The Fact Hunter
Episode 84: The JFK Assassination & Israel

The Fact Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 68:46


58 years ago President John F. Kennedy was brutally murdered on the world stage. To this day, the federal government continues to hide the truth about the conspirators. Today, we look at another angle: the Israeli connection. JFK did not want Israel to have nukes, and we wanted to limit the power pf the federal reserve. All roads lead to Tel Aviv. thefacthunter.comfacthunterradio.com

Vaybertaytsh
Episode 60: Etl Niborski | עטל ניבאָרסקי

Vaybertaytsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


I'm so pumped about this conversation with Etl Niborski, recorded in Tel Aviv this past summer. Etl is a 19-year-old left-wing activist and a native Yiddish speaker who recently completed her national service working in a school in Jaffa for at-risk youth. We talked all about what it's like to be an Israeli at the end of high school — all of the complicated decisions one has to make about joining the military or finding a way not to — how her Yiddishist background impacts her political thinking, what it was like to be a Yiddish-speaking, non-Hasidic kid on the streets of Jerusalem, and about her current Yiddish activities and projects.For more from The White Screen's album Sex, Drugs, and Palestine, click here.To see our most recent merch, click here.

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast
Israeli environment minister: Country at high risk over climate change

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:08


Ben Caspit speaks this week with Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg. The minister explains that while Israel is a small country in terms of population and its contribution to global pollution, it is also very fragile in terms of the effects of climate change such as bush fires and floods. The latter are expected to increase heavily in the upcoming years, which is why Israel must react rapidly. Zandberg says that Israel must now invest most of its resources not in looking for more natural gas marine fields, but in developing renewable energy resources, with emphasis on solar energy. "We have to do this very quickly, because we are way, way behind," she notes. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Power of X-Men: The Greatest Comic Book Podcast in All of the Multiverse!
Age of Apocalypse Chapter 2: X-Factor #108, Mystique Will Have Vengeance!

Power of X-Men: The Greatest Comic Book Podcast in All of the Multiverse!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 72:04


X-Factor tracks down Mystique at a hospital in Tel Aviv where she is seeking vengeance against Legion for killing Destiny! Will she avenge the woman she loves or has Legion been waiting for her this entire time? This is the second chapter in our Age of Apocalypse read and X-Factor #108 is full of non-stop action!

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Israel and its latest BFF, the United Kingdom

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 17:50


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Founding editor David Horovitz and diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman join host Jessica Steinberg on today's podcast. Horovitz and Berman discuss the UK decision to designate the entirety of Hamas as a terror organization and outlaw support for the group, speaking about the UK as Israel's staunch ally. They also look at President Isaac Herzog's current visit in London for an official three-day visit that is ceremonial and political, reflecting on his role in the government. Berman speaks about his run along the Tel Aviv beach with the UAE ambassador who was engaging in some sports diplomacy. He also talks about a scoop regarding US State Department employees who are protesting President Biden's vaccine mandate. Discussed articles include: Israel cheers as UK says it will designate Hamas as terror group Herzog heads to UK for meetings with Prince Charles, Boris Johnson Shin Bet intel instrumental in UK's terror designation of Hamas – report US diplomats blast Biden vaccine mandate in internal cable ‘Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Britain's Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, arrive in Amman, Jordan, on a four-day tour to Jordan and Egypt, November 16, 2021. (Raad Adayleh/AP) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The CyberWire
Software supply chain threats. Recent Iranian cyber operations. Banking disclosure rules. ICS updates. UK, US announce closer cooperation in cyberops. A real, literal, evil maid?

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:43


Software supply chain incidents: FatPipe, PyPi, and IT services generally. A look at recent Iranian operations. The US Federal Reserve publishes its disclosure rules for banks sustaining cyber incidents. CISA issues a set of ICS advisories. Two of the Five Eyes announce plans for continued, even closer cooperation in cyberspace. Johannes Ullrich on attackers abusing "PAM" (Plug Authentication Modules). Our guest is Hatem Naguib, CEO at Barracuda Networks. And a real evil maid seems to have been out and about in Tel Aviv. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/223

D&D Fitness Radio Podcast
Episode 114 - Daniel Tal Mor: Monitoring Metabolism with Lumen

D&D Fitness Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 53:27


In Episode 114, we speak with Daniel Tal Mor direct from Tel Aviv to talk about his most recent start-up project that revolves around health and nutrition. Daniel provides us with the background on this project which is a collaboration with his wife and sister in-law – both of whom are scientists – and how they came up with the technology to allow consumers to track their metabolism and make good choices around nutrition and exercise. While it may seem it is too good to be true, their affordable Lumen device and associated app uses proven science and technology to monitor carbon dioxide levels in your breath to determine how your body is using fats and carbohydrates throughout the day. Daniel tells us about the journey involved in not only developing the technology, but also working with consumers and communities to optimize the benefits of monitoring your nutrition and metabolic status from day to day.Lumen is a device and app that measures your metabolism in a simple breath and provides daily personalized nutrition based on your metabolic data. Through the device and app, you can achieve your fitness goals whether they be weight loss, performance optimization, or simply improving your metabolic health.You can find out more information on Daniel and Lumen via the following links:Website: https://lumen.meInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lumen.me/Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/lumenmetabolism/The D&D Fitness Radio podcast is available at the following locations for downloadable audio, including: iTunes – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/d-d-fitness-radio-podcast/id1331724217iHeart Radio – https://www.iheart.com/podcast/dd-fitness-radio-28797988/Spreaker.com – https://www.spreaker.com/show/d-and-d-fitness-radios-showSpotify – https://open.spotify.com/show/5Py2SSPA4mntNwYRm0OpriYou can reach both Don and Derek at the following locations: Don Saladino: http://www.DonSaladino.com Twitter and Instagram - @DonSaladino YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/donsaladino Derek M. Hansen: http://www.SprintCoach.comTwitter and Instagram - @DerekMHansen YouTube - http://youtube.com/derekmhansen

La Corneta
Top10: #Soy De Ese 1% Que

La Corneta

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:06


Quiero meter Tel Aviv a toda hora

The Freedive Cafe Podcast
#120 | Tom Peled | The Power of the Breath

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 78:14


Tom Peled is a breath coach and freediving coach from Tel Aviv, Israel. Join us for this fascinating conversation on the power of the breath, working with trauma, helping athletes to their peak performance and much more.In this episode we discuss:Shout out to Madison and Alice ModoloTom is from Tel Aviv, IsraelHe joined the Navy when he was 18 and eventually became a scuba instructor.Discussing the diving conditions off the coast of Israel.Did Tom get involved in the competitive scene?Meeting up with Aharon Solomons!The research phase begins...How Tom's teaching methodology developed.How does Tom define breathwork and how is it applied?Helping victims of trauma with breathwork.Inspiration from the oxygen advantage method.How breathwork is integrated into the athlete's training strategy.Hypoventilation and reduced breathwork.When complementary training is and isn't useful.Tom's thoughts on the benefits of running.What a year of training would look like?Respiratory health, treating asthma, COPD with breath work.Tom's take on respiratory training devices.Tom's thoughts on supplementation, what is garbage and what is worth taking? Creatine, beta alanine, citrulline, NAC, ashwagandha.Mental work, long distance athlete's mentality.Talking about the 2 minutes before the dive, the "breathe-up".Hyperventilation - is it always bad?How to get in touch with Tom and get some coaching.DESERT ISLAND QUESTIONS - Patreon ExclusiveTom's plans for the future.Why does he freedive?

The Secret Room | True Stories
154. The Collegiate

The Secret Room | True Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:16


Nicky comes clean about the world of lies she spun so that her family would think she was attending graduate school, and not moving across the country for an online relationship.  Hear how she got in so deep, and if she could dig herself out.  ACORN TV Get your first 30 days free by going to acorn.tv with promo code secret in all lowercase letters only.  Get hooked. Watch the trailer for Ben's recommended show: "Dalgleish." BETTER HELP Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/secret. Click here for testimonials. BROOKLINEN Get $20 off a $100 purchase at brooklinen.com, promo code SECRET.  PROSE Thanks Prose! Take your free hair quiz and get 15% off your first order prose.com/SECRET.. PICTURES See Nicky's going away party; posing with Josh; and working at the department store in West Virginia where she almost got busted! They're all waiting for you on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Handle: @secretroompod. THE SECRET ROOM | UNLOCKED Hear behind the scenes intrigue where the post office was up to some shenanigans with Nicky's mic kit for the show.  Seriously can't believe they did what they did. And Marie from "It Happened in Tel Aviv" tells us what it was like after she got home, and her brother's reaction when he learned her secret from the podcast. The Secret Room | Unlocked is yours when you support your favorite indie podcast that could with a membership at patreon.com/secretroom. ALL OUR SPONSORS See all our sponsors past and present, and their offers, many of which are still valid: secretroompodcast.com/codes FACEBOOK DISCUSSION GROUPThere's even more fun at The Secret Room Podcast Facebook Discussion Page!  Just ask to join, all are welcome. :) YOUR SECRET Do you have a Gordian secret to share?  We'll help sort it out!  Click "Share a secret" at secretroompod.com when you're ready! PODCAST TEAM Producer: Susie Lark.  Shadow producers: Jessie Rose and Oval. Story Development: Luna Patel. Hashtag Flipper: Alessandro Nigro.  Sound Engineer: Marco.  Music and Theme: Breakmaster Cylinder. LISTENER SURVEY Take our Listener Survey at SecretRoomPod.com!

Oui Are New York
Christian Vernet (La Compagnie): Piloter une compagnie aérienne en temps de Covid

Oui Are New York

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:20


Christian nous raconte tout, de l'intérieur! S'il y a bien un secteur qui a pris le COVID de plein fouet, c'est bien le tourisme. Passer à un chiffre d'affaires de Zero du jour au lendemain, demande une sacrée dose de resilience

Stories from Palestine
Spouses of Palestinians and visa precarity

Stories from Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 66:14


Five foreign women from Europe and the United States got together on a Tuesday morning in October for a traditional Palestinian breakfast and to share their experiences as spouses of Palestinian husbands. They talk about how do they experience life in Palestine and what are the difficulties they face in order to stay with their husband and children in Palestine. Each of them has their personal stories that reflect the difficulties to live in a place that is military occupied. The Palestinian Authority has no say in who gets a visa and for how long. It is the Israeli occupation authorities that decide about the fate of the women. Most women have been getting visas that do not allow them to travel to Israel (including Jerusalem and the airport in Tel Aviv), they are not allowed to work, they need to renew their visa every three months and pay full visa fees. Some of the women have the experience of being stuck outside of the country without permission to come back. Others have been without visa and were not even able to leave the town they live in, because of the many Israeli checkpoints where they may find out that you are without visa and you can be deported and separated from your family. This causes a lot of anxiety among the families. Despite the difficulties, the women feel home in Palestine and among Palestinians. They know that the policies were created to make them want to leave. But they are convinced that this is where to want to be and they are not planning to move.This podcast episode was recorded in cooperation with the British Academy project on visa precarity lead by Dr Mark Griffiths. Music in the end of the episode is called Mawtini, which means 'my homeland' (the previous unofficial Palestinian national anthem) It was performed by the Cello Orchestra in 2021 in an online concert that you can find on the YouTube channel of Al KamandjatiIf you want to support Stories from Palestine podcast, please share the podcast with others. You can also financially support the podcast on the Ko-fi platform. Sign up for the mailinglist and follow the YouTube channel.All the links can be found here: https://podspout.app/storiesfrompalestineJoin us on Saturday 27 or Sunday 28 November 2021 for the Christmas Bazar in Singer Cafe in Beit Sahour. The Bazar is from 11.00 until 17.00 and there will be about eight artisans each day promoting their products. Find all the details on the facebook page of Handmade PalestineA route description to Singer Cafe can be found here : http://www.singercafe.com/contact/

Digital Planet
Distress of TikTok fake school accounts

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:25


TikTok School challenge It's November so school children in the US are being encouraged to “Kiss your friend's girlfriend at school”. In September the TikTok school challenge suggested they “Vandalize the restroom”. These are just two of the examples that schools in the US have been dealing with following a call on TikTok to pupils. Now in the UK teachers are facing an onslaught of online abuse via TikTok too. Headteacher Sarah Raffray, who is also the Chair of the Society of Heads in the UK, is live on the show. The fake account created at her school has been removed by TikTok as have hundreds of others, but is the social media platform doing enough to control this libellous behaviour? Disinformation campaign in Kenya The Pandora papers revealed that Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta and his family have offshore accounts containing $30m. Following the release of this information a collaborative disinformation campaign manipulating Twitter's algorithms was launched attempting to exonerate the President. Odanga Madung is a Mozilla fellow and is on the programme to discuss a report he's co-authored “How to Manipulate Twitter and Influence People: Propaganda and the Pandora Papers in Kenya”. So far 400 accounts have been deleted, but with elections next year this campaign could already be influencing the outcome. AI (lack of) diversity in the workforce Research from the Digital Planet team at Tuft's University has examined the world's top AI hubs and ranked them in terms of diversity. Bhaskar Chakravorti, who led the team behind the work, tells us that San Francisco has the lowest proportion of black AI talent in the US. When it comes to the proportion of women in the field, AI is much less diverse than the industry overall. 17 percent of the AI talent pool in the 50 hotspots in the world is female as compared to 27 percent in STEM overall. Tel Aviv comes out on top globally for employing women in AI. We discuss how this imbalance is impacting AI development. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington. Studio Manager: John Boland Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: TikTok logo displayed on a smart phone. Credit: Illustration by Nikolas Joao Kokovlis/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Israel Policy Pod
Israel's Security Policy: Change or Continuity Post-Bibi?

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 60:35


With the Bennett-Lapid government nearly half a year old, it is time to assess how, if at all, Israel's security policies have changed since the departure of Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister. In this episode, Tel Aviv-based journalist and Israel Policy Forum Policy Advisor Neri Zilber hosts Haaretz Military Correspondent and Defense Analyst Amos Harel for a wide-ranging conversation on how Israeli decision-makers view the Iranian threat, U.S. efforts to restore the nuclear agreement, advanced weapons entering Lebanon, and the state of affairs in both Gaza and the West Bank.Support the show (https://ipf.li/3jzyDg5)

Tel Aviv Review
The Tel Aviv Review LIVE in New York: Timothy Snyder on Tyranny (Rerun)

Tel Aviv Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 79:08


Tel Aviv Review host Gilad Halpern interviews Yale University's Professor Timothy Snyder about his New York Times number one bestselling book, “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.” History doesn't repeat itself, but what can contemporary Americans learn from 20th-century Europe?

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast
International media expert Peter Lerner: Ignoring BDS is an ineffective strategy for Israel

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:32


Ben Caspit speaks this week with Lt. Col. (res.) Peter Lerner, the former director of international media at the IDF's spokesperson's office. Commenting on Israel's repeated failures in the field of public diplomacy, Lerner says that “In Israel, we are very good at improvising, we are fantastic with innovation, but public accountability, responsibility and transparency are limited. We do have a hard case to make, but we can also do better on public diplomacy.” Lerner cites as a negative example the case of Israel's ambassador to the UK Tzipi Hotovely, recently attacked by BDS activists when coming out of a university lecture. For Lerner, immediately after the incident, Hotovely failed to enter into a “media-crisis-mode,” and she also focused her reactions on Israeli media, instead of addressing primarily the British press.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Kan English
News Flash November 15, 2021

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 6:07


Police begin evicting residents of Tel Aviv's Givat Amal Bet neighborhood. Mass brawl outside hospital emergency room ramps up calls to crack down on violence, illegal weapons in Arab sector. Report: Hezbollah plotted to assassinate ex-Israeli intelligence official.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Geomob
Ed/Steven: Ed is back

Geomob

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 28:28


Ed is recovering from breaking his jaw, Steven is literally zipping around the Tel Aviv tech scene, and IN-PERSON!!!! Geomob events are coming up soon. This is one of our update episodes in which we discuss our projects and general geo news. Some of the highlights: Geovation is starting a mentorship program, and our friends at Esri Startup program has renewed their sponsorship of Geomob. Thank you! Show notes on the Geomob website, where you can also learn more about Geomob events and sign up for our monthly newsletter.

Power of X-Men: The Greatest Comic Book Podcast in All of the Multiverse!
Age of Apocalypse Chapter 1: X-Men #38 -IT BEGINS HERE!

Power of X-Men: The Greatest Comic Book Podcast in All of the Multiverse!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 92:23


ENTER NOW THE AGE OF APOCALYPSE! Welcome to a brand-new season of Power of X-Men: Apocalypse! We'll be reading every issue of the classic X-event, Age of Apocalypse! And this is where the first seed is planted for the Age of Apocalypse! While in Tel Aviv, Legion has a vision of Destiny from beyond the grave, telling him that in order to seek redemption he has to help his father aka Xavier achieve his dream of peaceful co-existence between humans and mutants! Meanwhile, at the X-Mansion the X-Men are up to a whole lot of 90s shenanigans: Jean and Psylocke are psychically training and talking about Scott, Rogue and Iceman are by the pool throwing shade at each other, and Gambit is going toe to toe with Sabertooth! THE DRAMA! THE FASHION! THE FIGHTS! Buckle in, our AoA read BEGINS NOW!   

Israel Policy Pod
Israel Policy Pod (trailer)

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 0:44


Shalom, I'm Neri Zilber, a Tel-Aviv-based journalist and the host of Israel Policy Pod, Israel Policy Forum's ongoing podcast that goes beyond the headlines to bring you analysis from our experts and distinguished guests, including policymakers, journalists, activists, and academics.Israel Policy Forum is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the goal of a two-state solution in order to preserve Israel's future as Jewish, democratic, and secure. Find Israel Policy Pod wherever you get your podcasts and support our work at israelpolicyforum.org/support Support the show (https://ipf.li/3jzyDg5)

Israel Daily News Podcast
Israel Daily News Podcast; Wed. Nov. 10, 2021

Israel Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:24


Israel's Ambassador to the UK gets harassed before a college debate; Mansour Abbas turns down a talk with Mahmoud Abbas & Morocco launches direct flights to Tel Aviv. Social Media links, Newsletter sign-up &, Support the show $ here: https://linktr.ee/israeldailynews Music: Flying High; Erika Krall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE0fnZ9Ktuk --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/israeldailynews/support

The Cannabis Investing Podcast
IM Cannabis CEO Oren Shuster - Multi-Country Operator

The Cannabis Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:27


I talked to Oren Shuster, CEO of IM Cannabis, this week in Tel Aviv at its CannaBIZ conference. We discuss the significant share price decline in the industry across the board; the significance of the Republican announcement in the US. Israel's unique market, comparisons to Michigan; Germany and Europe and the growth still to come. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Israel Policy Pod
After the Budget: What's Next in Israeli Politics?

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 45:00


The new Israeli government passed a state budget last week for the first time in over three years—a crucial milestone for the Bennett-Lapid coalition. In this episode, Tel Aviv-based journalist and Israel Policy Forum Policy Advisor Neri Zilber hosts Israeli political reporter Tal Schneider (Times of Israel) to discuss the significance of the budget approval, the coalition's challenges ahead, post-budget U.S.-Israel relations, and what to expect from Benjamin Netanyahu. Support the show (https://ipf.li/3jzyDg5)

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast
Washington Institute's Makovsky: Biden & Bennett prefer to keep disagreements discrete

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 41:29


Ben Caspit hosts this week on his podcast David Makovsky, the Ziegler distinguished fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Commenting on recent signs of tensions between Washington and Jerusalem on the Palestinian issue and other topics, Makovsky says that “We have a situation where both President Joe Biden and Prime Minister Naftali Bennett have an understanding, to try to maintain a public sense of harmony and avoid airing dirty laundry in public. An understanding on both sides to keep disagreements private.” Makovsky further notes that while rooting for the Bennett-led government and hailing its success in passing Israel's state budget, the US administration is now concerned it could take moves it could not have taken otherwise. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

This Podcast Will Change Your Life.
This Podcast Will Change Your Life, Episode Two Hundred and Seventy - Jews, Newspapers and Frank Thomas.

This Podcast Will Change Your Life.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 75:35


This episode stars Avner Landes (Meiselman: The Lean Years). It was recorded over the Zoom between the This Podcast Will Change Your Life home studio in Chicago, IL (and Landes' former hometown, sort of), and Landes' current home in Tel Aviv (yes, that Tel Aviv) in August 2021. 

Was jetzt?
Warum Deutschland eine neue Erklärung aus Glasgow nicht unterschreibt

Was jetzt?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 10:54


Bei der UN-Klimakonferenz COP26 hat sich Deutschland einem Finanzierungsstopp CO2-lastiger Projekte nicht angeschlossen und auf ein klares Bekenntnis zum Kohleausstieg 2030 verzichtet. Derweil ist der weltweite CO2-Ausstoß nach dem krisenbedingten Rückgang erneut gestiegen. Elena Erdmann aus dem ZEIT-ONLINE-Wissensressort berichtet aus Glasgow. In Israel sind mehr als 40 Prozent der Menschen bereits dreimal geimpft. Auch die Bundesregierung will auf die Boosterimpfung setzen, um vor allem Ältere von der neuen Infektionswelle zu schützen. Was sie von Israel lernen kann und wie sich die Drittimpfung auf die dortige Corona-Lage auswirkt, erklärt Steffi Hentschke, die für ZEIT ONLINE aus Tel Aviv berichtet. Und sonst so? Ein Erfinder, fünf Meereswirbel und sehr viel Müll. Moderation und Produktion: Pia Rauschenberger Mitarbeit/Redaktion: Alexander Eydlin, Mathias Peer Fragen, Kritik, Anregungen? Sie erreichen uns unter wasjetzt@zeit.de. Weitere Links zur Folge: UN-Klimakonferenz COP26: Dieser lebensfreundliche Planet steht auf dem Spiel (https://www.zeit.de/wissen/umwelt/2021-10/un-klimakonferenz-cop26-glasgow-klimaziele-klimapolitik) CO2-Emissionen: Der globale CO2-Ausstoß ist so hoch wie vor Corona (https://www.zeit.de/wissen/umwelt/2021-11/co2-emissionen-anstieg-global-carbon-project-glasgow-china-kohle-gas) Klimagipfel in Glasgow: „Die Natur könnt ihr nicht betrügen“ (https://www.zeit.de/gesellschaft/zeitgeschehen/2021-11/klimagipfel-glasgow-proteste-un-klimakonferenz-cop26-fs) UN-Klimakonferenz: Wachsende Verzweiflung und ein leises Wow (https://www.zeit.de/politik/2021-11/un-klimakonferenz-glasgow-gefuehle-verzweiflung-hoffnung) Corona-Impfung: Kinder? Alte? Wer sich vor Corona schützen muss (https://www.zeit.de/2021/45/corona-impfung-booster-impfung-kleine-kinder-zulassung-wirksamkeit) Boosterimpfungen: Nach der Impfung ist vor der Impfung (https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2021-11/corona-booster-impfungen-auffrischungsimpfung-faq) Jonas Schreyögg: „Man muss die Menschen in so einer Lage schon offensiv angehen“ (https://www.zeit.de/hamburg/2021-11/jonas-schreyoegg-corona-booster-impfung-umfrage-bereitschaft-interview) Corona in Israel: „Mehr Impfungen für etwas Normalität“ (https://www.zeit.de/politik/ausland/2021-08/corona-israel-vierte-welle-delta-variante-impfung-alltag) Boosterimpfungen in Hamburg: Worauf warten wir diesmal? (https://www.zeit.de/hamburg/2021-11/booster-impfungen-corona-impfzentrum-hamburg)

20 Minute Leaders
Ep625: Guy Yamen | Managing Partner, TPY Capital

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 23:10


Guy is co-founder and managing partner of TPY Capital, an early stage Israel based VC which is in its second fund, of +$100m.  Prior to launching TPY, he spent a few years as a consultant with McKinsey & Company, in the New York and Tel Aviv offices. As part of Guy's commitment to societal change, he co-founded Prize4Life, a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating the discovery of treatments and cures for ALS.  Guy received an MBA from Harvard Business School (with distinction) as well as a BA in economics and an LL.B (magna cum laude), both from Tel Aviv University.

The Promised Podcast
The “Earmarks & Skidmarks” Edition

The Promised Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 59:56


Allison Kaplan Sommer and Noah Efron discuss three two topics of incomparable importance and end with an anecdote about something in Israel that made them smile this week. Listen to the Extra-Special, Special Extra Segment on Patreon   —You Say “Corruption” Like It Was a Bad Thing!— Should coalition members get to earmark millions for their favorite causes? —Death, Taxes & Traffic— The Knesset's new “pigovian” congestion tax will make half a million people pay handsomely every time they drive into Tel Aviv. Isn't it time that someone made Allison pay? —A Likud So Powerful That Even It Can't Form a Government?— For our most unreasonably generous Patreon supporters, in our extra-special, special extra discussion, we try to make sense of a new poll finding that if elections were held today, the Likud would grow stronger – to 36 seats – but that neither today's coalition nor today's opposition would be able to form a government. What's it augur? All that and the enchanting sounds of Tandu*! *With eternal gratitude to Reena Berenberg!

20 Minute Leaders
Ep624: Jonathan Geifman | Co Founder & CEO, Helios

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:47


Jonathan Geifman, born and raised in Tel Aviv, Israel, married to Adi, father to Dean. Spent nearly a decade in the Israeli armed forces. Co-founded a product design studio that operates in the USA, and in the past 5 years been pursuing a childhood dream to enable the expansion of humanity beyond earth with his company Helios.

Unorthodox
Happy Returns: Ep. 293

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 57:05


This week on Unorthodox, our national nightmare is over: Stephanie returns to the show! We talk to comedian Alex Edelman, whose new one-man show, “Just For Us,” is about the time he infiltrated a white supremacist gathering. Edelman, who was raised Orthodox, tells us about starting to wrap tefillin again during the pandemic, his work on Saturday Night Seder, and why some Jewish comedians miss the mark for him. “Just For Us” runs Dec. 1-19 at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York. Then we visit Sherry Herring, New York City's latest culinary import from Tel Aviv and Liel's favorite place on Earth, to sample chipotle tuna and piri piri sardine sandwiches and learn about the Jewish love of smoked fish. Unorthodox is produced by Tablet Studios. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation at bit.ly/givetounorthodox. Send comments and questions to unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Secret Room | True Stories
153. It Happened in Tel Aviv

The Secret Room | True Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 74:40


Marie tells us about her youthful sojourn to Tel Aviv during the Second Intifada and how she almost caused a man to lose his life. BROOKLINEN Get $20 off a $100 purchase at brooklinen.com, promo code SECRET. DIPSEA Get a 30 day free trial when you go to DipseaStories.com/SECRET. FEALS Become a member at Feals.com/SECRET and you'll get 40% off your first three months with free shipping.   TERRITORY FOODS To save $75 across your first three orders, plus free shipping, go to territoryfoods.com and use the promo code SECRET. PICTURES See Marie on the beach where she slept at night; Marie's apartment above the Suq Ha Carmel market; Ari and his bar staff; and Marie today. L They're all waiting for you on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Handle: @secretroompod. THE SECRET ROOM | UNLOCKED First Marie tells us what she's up to today and share's some candid thoughts about the interview.  Also, Rachel's back from our last episode, "Was Any of it Real?"  Years after the interview a real Drew entered her life. With the memory of fake Drew still very present in her head, the prospect of a real-life Drew was too hard to resist.  Also, catfish tales you submitted after hearing the episode.  And Susie even shares one of her own! The Secret Room | Unlocked is yours when you support your favorite indie podcast that could with a membership at patreon.com/secretroom. ALL OUR SPONSORS See all our sponsors past and present, and their offers, many of which are still valid: secretroompodcast.com/codes FACEBOOK DISCUSSION GROUPThere's even more fun at The Secret Room Podcast Facebook Discussion Page!  Just ask to join, all are welcome. :) YOUR SECRET Do you have a pedantic secret to share?  Consider all your options and then submit.  Click "Share a secret" at secretroompod.com when you're ready! PODCAST TEAM Producer: Susie Lark.  Shadow producers: JB. Story Development: Luna Patel. Hashtag Flipper: Alessandro Nigro.  Sound Engineer: Marco.  Music and Theme: Breakmaster Cylinder. LISTENER SURVEY Take our Listener Survey at SecretRoomPod.com!

Der Role Models Podcast
#74 - Haya Molcho über ihr Familienunternehmen, Balagan und Visionen

Der Role Models Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:52


Haya Molcho wurde 1955 in Tel Aviv geboren. Bereits im Alter von neun Jahren zog sie mit ihrer Familie nach Bremen, wo sie nach dem Abitur Psychologie studierte. Bevor sich Haya Molcho als Gastronomin etablierte, erkundete sie ausgiebig für einige Jahre die Welt. In den 1980er Jahren wurde sie mit ihrem Mann, Samy Molcho, in Wien sesshaft - hier vergrößerte sich die Familie, das Paar bekam vier Söhne namens Nuriel (1984), Elior (1986), Ilan (1987) und Nadiv (1990). Aus ihren Anfangsbuchstaben ist der Name "NENI" entstanden. Aus Haya's Hobby wurde ein Nebenjob und mittlerweile ist NENI ein Imperium. 2009 eröffnete sie am Wiener Naschmarkt ihr erstes Lokal NENI, später kamen weitere Lokale in Wien, Berlin und weiteren Städten in Europa dazu. NENI lebt vom gemeinsamen Teilen der Gerichte, von Leidenschaft und Lebensfreude – kurz Balagan, sympathisches Chaos. Das NENI ist also ein Familienunternehmen mit zwei Generationen. Und ihre Familie ist Haya am Wichtigsten, das wird mehr als deutlich in unserem Gespräch. Wie baut man ein Familienunternehmen auf und welche Regeln hat Haya mit ihrer Familie aufgestellt? Was lernt sie von ihren Söhnen und was lernen sie von ihr? Haya teilt, wie sie der Umzug im Kindesalter von Tel Aviv nach Deutschland geprägt hat, welche Visionen sie noch hat und warum sie stets auf Kurskorrektur ist. Mehr Infos zu Haya Molcho: https://neni.at https://www.instagram.com/hayamolcho https://www.instagram.com/nenifood https://neni.at/produkte/kochbucher Diese Episode wird von unseren Partnern She's Mercedes und sygns unterstützt. Vielen Dank! Im She's Mercedes Newsletter werden einmal im Monat eindrucksvolle Porträts, spannende Homestories und inspirierende Interviews präsentiert. Zudem erfahrt ihr von exklusiven Veranstaltungen und Gewinnspielen. Lass Dich inspirieren und werde Teil der She's Mercedes Community. Anmelden könnt ihr euch unter: https://newsletter.shesmercedes.de Auf sygns.de findest du einen intuitiven Konfigurator, mit dem du in wenigen Schritten deine Marke als Leuchtlogo oder Mooswand individuell gestalten kannst. Sygns achtet bei der Produktion auf hochwertige Qualität, um mit deinem neuen Leuchtlogo einen Magic Moment in deiner Location zu erzeugen. Für Hörer*innen des Role Models Podcasts gibt's auf alle Bestellungen 20% Rabatt - und das ohne Mindestbestellwert. Einlösen kannst du den Gutscheincode ROLEMODELS20 auf www.sygns.de Folgt Role Models auf: Instagram: https://instagram.com/_rolemodels LinkedIn: https://de.linkedin.com/company/rolemodels Twitter: https://twitter.com/rolemodels Facebook: https://facebook.com/rolemodels Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dJ3j2Q Website: https://rolemodels.co

Jews You Should Know
Episode 166 - The Intel Tech Guru: A Conversation with Avram Miller

Jews You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 41:07


Avram Miller - The Intel Guru Avram Miller is best recognized for co-founding Intel Capital, the computer industry's most successful corporate investment organization. While at Intel, he was Vice President of Corporate Development. Miller was a major influence behind the creation of residential broadband, which was a crucial component in the development of today's internet. Miller had a good career in medical science before moving into high tech. Miller has served on a variety of company boards in both high tech and health care since leaving Intel in 1999. He has advised and invested in a number of early-stage businesses. He currently resides in Tel Aviv and travels widely across the globe. Avram Miller discusses how intuition, imagination, humor, and risk-taking enabled him to become one of Silicon Valley's pioneers and leading venture investors in his new book, The Flight of a Wild Duck: An Improbable Journey Through Life and Technology. He recounts his journey from childhood illness and an inability to function in the educational system to becoming a top executive at one of the world's leading technological firms.   Timestamps: 00:00 Introduction 2:58 Avram's family migration story and childhood in San Francisco 6:54 Growing up in a Jewish family 8:14 Avram's background and history with science and technology 13:27 How Avram managed to work in two different industries without formal training 16:10 Why Avram switched from the medical field to the computer field 17:43 Avram's time and breakthroughs at Intel 23:41 Importance of engagement with the Jewish community throughout Avram's life 29:54 Talking about The Flight of a Wild Duck 30:34 Bill Gates and Steve Jobs 31:37 Some advice for kids and parents 34:21 Moving to Israel and current experience over there 34:49 Audiogram 2 - Israel 37:24 What's next for Avram   Connect with Avram Miller: Website: http://www.avrammiller.com/bio.html LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/avram/?originalSubdomain=il Twitter: https://twitter.com/avrammiller Blog: https://twothirdsdone.com/   Connect with Ari: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jewsyoushouldknow Twitter: https://twitter.com/JewsUShouldKnow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rabbi.K Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ari-koretzky-18b12217/

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast
Geneva Initiative Director Baltiansky: No real crisis in Biden-Bennett relations

On Israel with Ben Caspit, an Al-Monitor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 35:36


Ben Caspit speaks this week with Geneva Initiative-Israel Director General Gadi Baltiansky. Commenting on the recent decision by Israeli authorities to advance construction of homes in West Bank settlements, Baltiansky says that "the Americans don't want a confrontation with the Israeli government, and vice-versa. The US administration still senses relief over [former Prime Minister Benjamin] Netanyahu being out of the game, and they know that the Bennet-Lapid government is the only alternative." For Baltiansky, as long as there are no dramatic steps on the ground, the Americans won't engage seriously and deeply with this issue. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crimepod Puerto Rico
La Masacre de Lod

Crimepod Puerto Rico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 22:00


En este episodio hablamos de la masacre del aeropuerto de Lod el cual fue un ataque terrorista ocurrido el 30 de mayo de 1972. Ese día tres miembros de un grupo llamado el Ejército Rojo Japonés, que según se alega fueron reclutados y entrenados por un grupo palestino llamado el Frente Popular para la Liberación de Palestina, llevaron a cabo un atentado en el aeropuerto de Lod cerca de Tel-Aviv, en Israel el cual hoy es conocido como el Aeropuerto Internacional Ben-Gurion. Además de las 26 víctimas fatales unas 80 personas resultaron heridas. 16 de las víctimas fatales eran puertorriqueños.Recuerda seguirnos en Facebook, Twitter e Instagram Visita crimepodpr.com para más detalles.Música de fondo: 'Sustain Lights 7'  Daniel Birch,  'Exlibris' de Kosta TFuentes de información y documentos disponibles en Patreon.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/crimepodpr)

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

new york japan europe russian university china chinese american mexico america future oklahoma indian south asian world war ii representation gdp west european france turkey iran council donald trump syria iraq united states vladimir putin russia washington gulf cia africa turkish pakistan african afghanistan needless egyptian indians middle east sudan barack obama struggle bush morocco cook muslims european union palestinians mediterranean tel aviv steven cook ethiopia arab ge trouble security council gold medal outreach assad joe biden nile saudi cabinet arab israeli horn pennsylvania state university jerusalem university college london foreign policy south korea foreign affairs ngos algeria united arab emirates saudi arabia foreign relations cfr ottoman empire turks academic hezbollah libya nato abu dhabi ethiopian syracuse university ambition state of the union southern mississippi fully webinars iraqi ucl oman embassy algerian intervene north africa mena bahrain gaza israelis saudis uae brookings institution sisi yemen east africa west bank iranians geopolitics arrests eastern mediterranean ramadan sudanese ankara george w bush levant benjamin netanyahu yair lapid suez canal riyadh khartoum washington institute near east policy damascus tigray hamas emiratis abdel fattah bashar akp hafez islamists broader mbs nile river eritreans east jerusalem emirates persian gulf recep tayyip erdogan turkish republic maxwell school algerians haftar blue nile false dawn egyptair sharm king abdullah nagorno karabakh gaza strip middle easterners cook it khalifa haftar national program qataris sheikhs sanam wisconsin whitewater kurdistan regional government development party naftali bennett egyptian president abdel fattah ottomanism abraham accords
Israel Policy Pod
From Fauda to Hollywood with Avi Issacharoff

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:44


The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has recently returned to the headlines, but it has been prominently on-screen for several years thanks to the hit Israeli television show, Fauda. In this episode, Tel Aviv-based journalist and Israel Policy Forum Policy Advisor Neri Zilber hosts Israeli journalist and Fauda co-creator Avi Issacharoff for a wide-ranging conversation on the show's origins, his career path, what he thinks about the new Israeli government's strategy of "shrinking the conflict," Palestinian politics after Mahmoud Abbas, and the state of play in Gaza.Support the show (https://ipf.li/3jzyDg5)

The Land of Israel Network
Rejuvenation: Hip Set

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:45


Author and businessman Michael Fertik joins Eve to speak about his book ‘Hip Set'. He categorizes the genre as ‘noir', usually focused on tough characters whose outlook on life is cynical, bleak and pessimistic. The setting of his fast paced crime novel, however, is Tel Aviv, whose beach backdrop and unique meld of people and cultures take it out of any typical style. Fertik's Zionism is a refreshingly realistic take on a very vibrant and flawed country whose depth, chaos and history make it one of a kind. The ‘conflict' prism often prevents people seeing the truth of Israel; his nuanced and well written novel is a great way to begin to feel the excitement and the challenges of this old new country.

Haaretz Weekly
'Kissinger said the Arabs will get tired of fighting Israel. He was right'

Haaretz Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:18


Within the space of a few days, Turkey announced that it had arrested a supposed spy ring operated by Israel's Mossad, and informed the ambassadors of the U.S., France and Germany that they should expect a deportation order from Ankara. What is all the noise about? We discuss the latest developments with Louis Fishman, an expert on Turkish politics who divides his time between Istanbul and Tel Aviv.  Starting at the 11:30 mark, we hear from Martin Indyk, a former U.S. ambassador to Israel and author of the newly released "Master of the Game: Henry Kissinger and the Art of Middle East Diplomacy." How would Kissinger respond to this week's Israeli announcement of new construction in West Bank settlements, and what did the Clinton administration fail to learn from the master? Listen to the full discussion with host Amir Tibon.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Reportage International
Reportage international - De la livraison de sushis au transport de passagers: en Israël, le pari des drones

Reportage International

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 2:29


Des drones capables de livrer des repas ? C'est une réalité en Israël. Si pour l'instant il ne s'agit que de tests, cette nouvelle technologie pourrait bien révolutionner notamment la livraison de matériels médicaux en zone urbaine. Et pourquoi pas, aussi, le transport de passagers. C'est une plage bien tranquille du nord de Tel Aviv brusquement perturbée par un essaim de drones. Ils atterrissent sur une pelouse. Ils livrent des sushis, des canettes de bière et des crèmes glacées à la grande joie des journalistes venus assister à l'événement. C'est la troisième phase sur huit d'un vaste exercice qui se déroule simultanément dans plusieurs sites de la métropole israélienne. Mais aussi, au même moment à l'autre bout du monde, télécommandé à plus de 10 000 kilomètres au Brésil. « Nous essayons de mettre sur pied un réseau national. Ce n'est pas un drone qui vole d'un point à un autre. Nous voulons créer un système de gestion qui permettra à de nombreux drones appartenant à de nombreuses compagnies de voler ensemble en zone urbaine pour des usages différents », explique Daniella Partem, directrice du centre israélien de la Quatrième révolution industrielle qui dépend de l'Agence pour l'innovation. L'idée est de contribuer à la réduction de la congestion routière et améliorer la qualité de l'air en utilisant des véhicules aériens sans pilote à propulsion électrique. « Nous faisons cela de manière progressive pour vérifier la technologie, montrer que c'est sûr et sous contrôle, insiste Eyal Billia, responsable des systèmes de transport intelligents à Ayal on Highways, la société qui gère le projet. Nous construisons le projet à pas de bébés, pour qu'il n'y ait aucun danger pour le public. » En coordination avec la police et l'armée La protection contre les intrusions d'objets volants non identifiés est également une préoccupation. « Israël a des restrictions très larges en matière de sécurité, remarque Libby Bahat, de la direction générale de l'aviation civile israélienne. Nous avançons à chaque étape avec les diverses forces de sécurité, à commencer par l'armée de l'air, la police et d'autres pour tester cette coordination. » Pour l'instant, les missions sont limitées à cinq kilomètres avec une charge de 2,5 kilos environ. Mais dès l'année prochaine, selon l'agence pour l'innovation, les drones seront capables de voler dans un rayon de 100 kilomètres avec notamment du matériel médical.  « Dans quatre ans, nous voulons déjà, dans le cadre de nos tests, faire voler des passagers, des taxis volants. Des engins autonomes qui peuvent transporter de deux à six personnes. Nous travaillons sur cette option et ce sera la prochaine phase de ce projet », annonce Reut Borochov, la responsable des drones à Ayalon Highway. De la fiction à la réalité, ou comment se frayer un chemin à quelque 100 mètres au-dessus des embouteillages qui paralysent tous les jours le pays qui affirme être la start-up nation.

Life is a Festival Podcast
#112 - Sex and Shamanic Shadow Hunting | Ohad Pele & Jasmeen Hana (ISTA)

Life is a Festival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 84:57


I've been wanting to train in sexual, shamanic healing at the International School of Temple Arts (ISTA) for years. Today on Life is a Festival I discuss the my ISTA Level 1 training with two of my facilitators Ohad Pele & Jasmeen Hana. On the show we talk about temple arts and why a training like ISTA is so valuable. We discuss the practice of bringing life force to interrupt patterns and liberate sexual energy. We review the four stages of Shamanic Shadow Hunting and other techniques to bring consciousness to all areas of the body. We finish with how healing the erotic depolarizes us politically and the benefits and challenges of ISTA in the era of Me Too. The International School of Temple Arts works with spirituality and sexuality as two expressions of the life force. Their vision is a world where humans have a peaceful, delightful, shameless, fearless and loving relationship with their own bodies, sexuality, emotions, hearts, minds and spirit. Ohad Pele, a lead facilitator in ISTA, has been teaching Kabbalah, Sacred Sexuality and Conscious Relating for more than 30 years. A former traditional Kabbalist Rabbi in Jerusalem, he is well known as one of the most influential and radical spiritual teachers in Israel. Before joining ISTA Pele was heading “Neviah – the Hebraic Academy of Universal Spirit” in Tel Aviv. Pele is an artist, photographer and a song writer and author of the historical fiction "Kedesha - A timeless tale of a Love Priestess", Jasmeen Hana has studied Vipassana meditation, Ayurveda, kundalini yoga, plant medicine, and ancient Egyptian embodiment practices. She organizes and co-facilitates Kemetic/ African shamanic yoga teacher trainings in Luxor and offers Egyptian Mystery retreats, blue lotus ceremonies, facilitating with ISTA and holds a point at Highden Mystery School in New Zealand. Timestamps :12 - What are Temple Arts :15 - Jasmeen and Ohad's initiation to magic :22 - Why ISTA? :31 - Bringing life force to interrupt patterns and liberating sexual energy :37 - The four stages of Shamanic Shadow Hunting :50 - Bringing consciousness to all areas of the body :57 - The structure and facilitation of ISTA 1:05 - How healing the erotic depolarizes 1:12 - ISTA in the era of Me Too Links: ISTA Website: https://ista.life/ Pele Ohad: https://ista.life/profile/pele-ohad Ohad's books on Amazon: "Kedesha - A timeless tale of a Love Priestess", Kabbalah Love: https://www.kabalove.org/ Jasmeen Hana: https://www.egyptian-templearts.com/ Caitlyn Cook: https://ista.life/profile/caitlyn-cook Autobiography in Five Short Chapters: https://palousemindfulness.com/docs/autobio_5chapters.pdf Wheel of Consent - Betty Martin: https://bettymartin.org/videos/

Israel Policy Pod
Israel, Iran, China: Plan A or Plan B?

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:18


Negotiations over the Iran nuclear deal are sputtering, and Israel is pushing the Biden administration for a credible plan B. What are the prospects for a diplomatic solution to the Iran nuclear crisis? And can renewed economic pressure bring Iran back to the negotiating table? Finally, what is China's role in all of this? In this episode, Tel Aviv-based journalist and Israel Policy Forum Policy Advisor Neri Zilber hosts Iran and China expert Kevjn Lim to discuss the state of play for these two significant geopolitical challenges.Support the show (https://ipf.li/3jzyDg5)

Israel Daily News Podcast
Israel Daily News Podcast; Thu. Oct. 21, 2021

Israel Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:14


IDF Officer exposed for sexually exploiting women on the job; Tel Aviv light rail makes its first full run & MASA participants join together for first in-person outing since Covid-19 took over. Social Media links, Newsletter sign-up &, Support the show $ here: https://linktr.ee/israeldailynews Music: התקווה 6 - פלונטר (Prod. By Stav Beger); https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4b7WZPZ4mA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/israeldailynews/support

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
COVID studies offer telling results

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 17:00


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Startup Israel editor Ricky Ben-David and science and health correspondent Nathan Jeffay join the podcast today, hosted by Jessica Steinberg. Jeffay discusses results of two new studies, including one which found that almost one in three ultra-Orthodox Israelis has been infected with the coronavirus, showing that the large, tight-knit communities and close family quarters were some of the factors that brought about the high number of cases. Ben-David takes a look at the agreement signed between Israel and the United Arab Emirates to collaborate on a number of space projects, including the Beresheet 2 space mission to the moon. Both countries have significant research and experience to contribute to the projects, said Ben-David. Jeffay speaks about the advanced 3D technology used to successfully reconstruct the jaw of an IDF soldier who was shot in the face, and Ben-David talks about the new, foldable cars created by an Israeli automotive company that will allow for squeezing into tight spots in busy cities like Tel Aviv. Discussed articles include: 1 in 3 Haredim caught coronavirus, double the national average – study Large Israeli study finds Pfizer COVID shot keeps teens safe from Delta strain New Israel-UAE agreement to promote innovation-based business ties Israel, UAE to launch joint space projects, including Beresheet 2 Moon mission After IDF soldier takes bullet to face, doctors rebuild his jaw in high-tech op Israeli ‘foldable' electric cars to make debut as emergency response vehicles Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Ultra Orthodox Jews walk in the Ultra orthodox town of Bnei Brak on October 14, 2020, during a nationwide lockdown to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Photo by Yossi Aloni/Flash90 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Composers Datebook
A quirky piece by Marga Richter

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Let's face it. Brevity and wit are not always qualities one associates with new music. But today we offer a sample: this comic overture is less than 5 minutes long, and opens, as you just heard, with a Fellini-esque duet for piccolo and contrabassoon. The overture is entitled “Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark,” and is a rather burlesque celebration of modern theoretical physics. Its alliterative title evokes those subatomic particles known as “quarks” that, we're told, make up our universe. And, since this music changes time signature so often, perhaps Heisenberg's “uncertainty principle” is thrown in for good measure. The music is by Marga Richter, who was born on this date in 1926 in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Richter received her early music training in Minneapolis, and then moved to New York's Juilliard School. By the time of her death in 2020, she had composed over 75 works including an opera and two ballets, as well as two piano concertos and a variety of solo, chamber and symphonic works. "Composing,” said Richter,” is my response to a constant desire to transform my perceptions and emotions into music … Music is the way I speak to the silence of the universe." Music Played in Today's Program Marga Richter (b. 1926) — Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark (Czech Radio Orchestra; Gerard Schwarz) MMC 2006 On This Day Births 1879 - French composer, pianist, and writer Joseph Canteloube, in Annonay (near Tournon); 1885 - Austrian composer and musicologist Egon Wellesz, in Vienna; 1921 - English composer (Sir) Malcolm Arnold, in Northampton; 1926 - American composer Marga Richter, in Reedsburg, Wisconsin; 1949 - Israeli composer Shulamit Ran, in Tel Aviv; Deaths 1662 - English composer Henry Lawes, age 66, in London; Premieres 1784 - Gretry: opera, "Richard Coeur de Lion" (Richard the Lionhearted), in Paris; 1858 - Offenbach: comic opera, "Orphée aux enfers" (Orpheus in the Underworld), in Paris; 1900 - Rimsky-Korsakov: opera "The Tale of Tsar Saltan," at the Solodovnikov Theatre in Moscow, with Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov conducting (Gregorian date: Nov. 3); 1921 - Third (and final) version of Sibelius: Symphony No. 5, in Helsinki under the composer's direction; Sibelius conducted the first performances of two earlier versions of this symphony in Helsinki on Dec. 8, 1915 and Dec. 14, 1916; 1926 - Nielsen: Flute Concerto (first version), in Paris, conducted by Emil Telmányi (the composer's son-in-law), with Holger Gilbert-Jespersen the soloist; Nielsen revised this score and premiered the final version in Oslo on November 9, 1926, again with Gilbert-Jespersen as the soloist; 1933 - Gershwin: musical "Let 'Em Eat Cake," at the Imperial Theater in New York City; 1941 - Copland: Piano Sonata, in Buenos Aires, by the composer; 1956 - Menotti: madrigal-fable "The Unicorn, the Gordon and the Manticore," at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; 1984 - Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Double Quartet for strings, at a concert of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, by the Emerson Quartet and friends. 2004 - Danielpour: "Songs of Solitude" (to texts of W.B. Yeats), at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall in Philadelphia, by baritone Thomas Hampson and the Philadelphia Orchestra, with Daniel Robertson conducting; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in D, Op. 6, no. 5 and possibly his Concerto Grosso in F, Op. 6, no. 9 as well (see Julian date: Oct. 10). Links and Resources On Marga Richter An interview with Richter

ART'S COOL with Ken Goshen
Realism, Trolls, and Enemies of Experience | Ilya Gefter

ART'S COOL with Ken Goshen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 98:52


 Today's topic is "Realism," what it meant for different painters in different times and ways to think about it today. Very importantly, we also discuss why detail is the enemy of experience, and how Courbet was basically a troll.  We are very fortunate to have the great Ilya Gefter back on the podcast. Ilya Gefter is a painter, art educator and the founder and director of the Visual Art Center in Tel-Aviv, Israel. Ilya has shown in 14 solo exhibitions before he was 40, he's won numerous prestigious awards, and his work can be found in notable public collections in the US, Canada, Spain, and Israel. He has written for Ha'artez newspaper, and has done curatorial work for Rothschild Gallery in Tel Aviv. Ilya is an exceptional artist and thinker and a tremendous inspiration to me, so I'm very excited to bring his voice and his ideas to all of you. Ilya's website: https://www.ilyagefter.com/Ilya's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ2DRWhnRa4r0NOB7XZ6gUAIlya's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ilyagefter.art/To support the ART'S COOL podcast please visit: https://www.patreon.com/kengoshenFor more from Ken Goshen please visit: https://www.kengoshen.comMusic by Adaam James

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation
400: Leading the Social Impact Revolution with Sir Ronald Cohen

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:18


From refugee to venture capitalist to social impact pioneer, Sir Ronald Cohen has dedicated his life to reshaping capitalism to drive real change. Listen as he shares how capitalism is being reshaped and the 3 major forces driving real change. Sir Ronald Cohen is Chairman of the Global Steering Group for Impact Investment and The Portland Trust. He is a co-founder director of Social Finance UK, USA, and Israel, and co-founder Chair of Bridges Fund Management and Big Society Capital.  For nearly two decades, Sir Ronald's pioneering initiatives in driving impact investment have catalyzed a number of global efforts, each focused on driving private capital to serve social and environmental good. He chaired the Social Impact Investment Taskforce established under the UK's presidency of the G8 (2013-2015), the Social Investment Task Force (2000-2010) and the Commission on Unclaimed Assets (2005-2007). In 2012 he received the Rockefeller Foundation's Innovation Award for innovation in social finance. He co-founded and was Executive Chairman of Apax Partners Worldwide LLP (1972-2005). He was a founder director and Chairman of the British Venture Capital Association and a founder director of the European Venture Capital Association. He is the author of Impact: Reshaping Capitalism To Drive Real Change published in 2020, which became a Wall Street Journal Bestseller. His previous book 'The Second Bounce of the Ball,' published in 2007, was described by the Financial Times as “one of the best books written on entrepreneurship in recent years.״ Sir Ronald lives in Tel Aviv, London, and New York with his wife of more than thirty years. Full Bio What We Discuss With Sir Ronald Cohen in This Episode Reshaping capitalism to drive social change The unintended consequences of capitalism How to measure the true social impact of business The scales are tilting in favor of businesses who do good 3 major forces helping us improve the world How capital is being directed to social impact initiatives through bonds Moving beyond doing no harm to doing good and doing well Tips for attracting impact investors to your startup idea Examples of specialist impact fund companies Why you don't need to sacrifice market returns for impact How soon we're going to look at the impact of a company the same way we do profit Which countries are leading the way Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/mm2rc6xu