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Israeli politician

  • 82PODCASTS
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  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Dec 30, 2021LATEST
yair lapid

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Best podcasts about yair lapid

Latest podcast episodes about yair lapid

Mom Is In Control Podcast
912: [BUSINESS] Win/Win Partnerships

Mom Is In Control Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 14:31


"The win-win situation is the basis for America's entire business world. Instead of wasting our time attempting to defeat each other, let's find a way that will make both of us gain and go home satisfied." -Yair Lapid   In this episode, I talk about: How to create win/win partnerships The importance of these partnerships How to make the most of them   Continue the conversation on Instagram @heatherchauvin_ Apply for Mastery: www.heatherchauvin.com/mastery  Apply for Mastery Business: www.heatherchauvin.com/business

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Tikvah Podcast: Judah Ari Gross on Why Israel and Morocco Came to a New Defense Agreement

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021


Last week, the Israeli defense minister Benny Gantz visited Morocco, where for the first time he was accompanied by uniformed Israeli military personnel. Gantz's visit comes on the heels of visits in the last year by Israeli national-security advisor Meir Ben-Shabbat and Israeli foreign minister Yair Lapid, both of whom prepared the way for full […]

The Tikvah Podcast
Judah Ari Gross on Why Israel and Morocco Came to a New Defense Agreement

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 28:35


Last week, the Israeli defense minister Benny Gantz visited Morocco, where for the first time he was accompanied by uniformed Israeli military personnel. Gantz's visit comes on the heels of visits in the last year by Israeli national-security advisor Meir Ben-Shabbat and Israeli foreign minister Yair Lapid, both of whom prepared the way for full diplomatic relations between the two countries. Building on Israel and Morocco's burgeoning diplomatic relations, the purpose of Gantz's recent visit was to negotiate a memorandum of understanding focused on their security cooperation. Judah Ari Gross, the military correspondent for the Times of Israel and this week's podcast guest, accompanied Gantz on his trip. In conversation with Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver, he explains here how this historic agreement happened, what it means, and how it serves each nation's interests. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Lapid visits UK, French leaders during Iran talks

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 15:41


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political reporter Tal Schneider and diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman appear on today's podcast with host Jessica Steinberg. Berman discusses the progress in nuclear talks with Iran that began in Vienna on Monday and will finish up today. He says expectations are low and things remain tense, but Lazar and Schneider agree that the participating countries are paying attention to Israel and its arguments. Berman then looks at foreign minister Yair Lapid's three-day trip to the UK and Paris, where he met with UK prime minister Boris Johnson and French President Emmanuel Macron. While it's somewhat unusual for a foreign minister to meet with heads of state, both Berman and Schneider point out that Lapid is slated to be Israel's next prime minister, should his and Bennett's coalition hold. Finally, Schneider offers a sneak peak to her analysis piece about president Isaac Herzog and his recent diplomatic stunts. Discussed articles include: Lapid tells Macron that only a credible military threat can stop Iran nuclear drive As Iran talks begin, Bennett urges world powers: Resist regime's ‘nuclear blackmail' Lapid tells Macron that only a credible military threat can stop Iran nuclear drive Lapid in the UK: Our fight against Iran and Hezbollah is good against evil In seventh round of nuclear talks, Iran's intentions will finally become clear Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Foreign Minister Yair Lapid (right) meets with French President Emanuel Macron in Paris, on November 30, 2021. (MFA / Quentin Crestinu) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radiokorrespondenterna
Om Sverige-Israel och vad är antisemitism?

Radiokorrespondenterna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 29:46


För en knapp månad sedan var Ann Linde på officiellt besök i Israel, det första svenska utrikesministerbesöket på över 10 år. Ann Lindes företrädare, Margot Wallström, var inte välkommen efter Sveriges erkännande av Palestina. Wallström beskylldes till och med för antisemitism efter uttalanden hon gjort. Men nu har relationen Sverige-Israel reparerats.  Israels utrikesminister Yair Lapid rördes till tårar under Ann Lindes besök. Den förbättrade relationen handlar dels om att Israel har en ny regering där Benjamin Netanyahu inte ingår. Men också om Sveriges arbete för att bekämpa antisemitism.I Radiokorrespondenterna möter vi Ann Linde, de israeliska akademikerna Amos Goldberg och Eva Illouz,  som är kritiska till hur man definierar antisemtism, och den palestinske arbetaren Ayman Mosleh från Gaza, som är en av de ca 10 000 arbetare som för första gången på två decennier släpps in i Israel för att jobba.

Conexão Israel
Do Lado Esquerdo do Muro #111 - Vacina Infantil, Cartel Setor Alimentício, Mansour Abbas e Abdullah

Conexão Israel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 59:43


Semana fria mas com notícias interessantes: - Yair Lapid é ameaçado de morte, - Vai à votação lei que limita cadência de primeiro ministro em 8 anos. - Ministério da Saúde aprova a vacianção de crianças entre 5 e 11 anos. - Agência reguladora investiga possível cartelização entre redes de supermercados. - Israel pede que governo americano tire a empresa NSO de sua lista de exclusão. - Mansour Abbas se encontra com o Rei Abdullah em Aman. - Operação para trazer judeus de origem etíope causa muita polêmica. Tudo isso no episódio #111 do podcast Do Lado Esquerdo do Muro, com Marcos Gorinstein e João Miragaya.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

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SBS Serbian - СБС на српском
Преглед вести за 14. октобар 2021. године

SBS Serbian - СБС на српском

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 14:01


Israel News Talk Radio
Bennett Lies, and his partner Yair Lapid Is The Left's Trojan Horse - The Walter Bingham File

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:11


Bennett's: Emphatic statement that to be Prime Minister with just 10 Knesset seats is undemocratic. But he has only six! Also: There will be no government with the left or with Arabs, said Bennett. Today they are his coalition partners, and he does their bidding! Lapid: Lives in Cloud-Cuckoo-Land; He is prepared to offer Israel's silver for phoney Arab promises, because he does not understand the Palestinian Arab mentality and intentions. Hear: How our Foreign Minister intends to lay the Corner-stone for a Palestinian State within Israel, when he God forbid succeeds as Prime Minister. The: Tactical errors of sixteen years ago still impact on our daily life today. How: Our new, otherwise great State President slipped-up badly. Also: Examples of US President Biden's inability to be the leader of the free world. And: More The Walter Bingham File 05OCT2021 - PODCAST

Jerusalem Studio
Iran's nuclear aspirations –– Jerusalem Studio 636

Jerusalem Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 27:33


With speeches by the Presidents of both the U.S. and Iran at the UN General Assembly behind them, Washington and Tehran are deploying their diplomats to prepare for the next and perhaps most fruitful round of their indirect talks in Vienna. Rousing rhetoric aside, Ebrahim Raisi and his Foreign Minister sounded as if their Supreme Leader directed them to resume the negotiations, though not necessarily to make meaningful concessions in them. For his part, Joe Biden kept a conciliatory tone, while insisting on Iran's full compliance with commitments undertaken six years ago. In Israel, two distinct views are heard - the more militant by Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, and a moderate one by the Defense and Foreign Ministers, Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid. Panel: - Jonathan Hessen, Host. - Amir Oren, TV7 Analyst and Host of Watchmen Talk. - Brig. Gen. Yossi Kuperwasser – Project Director on Middle East Developments, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. - Col. (Res.) Reuven Ben-Shalom, Cross-Cultural Strategist and Associate at the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Herzliya. Articles on the topic: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/bennett-iran-crossed-all-nuclear-red-lines/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/window-for-iran-nuclear-talks-may-close-warns-us/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/israeli-fm-butcher-of-tehran-lied-to-world/ You are welcome to join our audience and watch all of our programs - free of charge! TV7 Israel News: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/563/ Jerusalem Studio: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/18738/ TV7 Israel News Editor's Note: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76269/ TV7 Israel: Watchmen Talk: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76256/ Jerusalem Prays: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/135790/ TV7's Times Observer: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/97531/ TV7's Middle East Review: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/997755/ My Brother's Keeper: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/53719/ This week in 60 seconds: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/123456/ Those who wish can send prayer requests to TV7 Israel News in the following ways: Facebook Messenger: https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Email: israelnews@tv7.fi Please be sure to mention your first name and country of residence. Any attached videos should not exceed 20 seconds in duration. #IsraelNews #tv7israelnews #newsupdates Rally behind our vision - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/donate/ To purchase TV7 Israel News merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/tv7-israel-news-store Live view of Jerusalem - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/jerusalem-live-feed/ Visit our website - http://www.tv7israelnews.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/tv7israelnews Like TV7 Israel News on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Follow TV7 Israel News on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tv7israelnews/ Follow TV7 Israel News on Twitter - https://twitter.com/tv7israelnews

Daily News Brief by TRT World
Friday, October 1, 2021

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 2:17


*) US Democrats block Republican bid to cut benefits for Afghan refugees The US Senate has narrowly defeated Republican-backed legislation that would have curtailed assistance for thousands of Afghans evacuated last month. The voting underscores the deep divide over how the country should deal with a flood of Afghans desperate for new homes after the US withdrawal from their homeland. President Joe Biden's withdrawal order has ended the longest war in US history which led to Kabul's fall to the Taliban and an outflow of refugees to several countries. *) Israel's foreign minister opens embassy on landmark visit to Bahrain Israel's top diplomat Yair Lapid has begun a landmark visit to Bahrain where he opened the Israeli embassy one year after the US-brokered normalisation of ties. Lapid met with King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, in what Israeli media said was the first public meeting of a Gulf monarch with an Israeli official. The UAE, Bahrain and Morocco became the first Arab states in decades to normalise relations with Israel last year, following negotiations spearheaded by former US president Trump. *) North Korea fires newly developed anti-aircraft missile in latest test North Korea says it has successfully fired a new anti-aircraft missile, the latest in a flurry of weapons tests by the nuclear-armed nation. The new test comes even as Pyongyang pushes to reopen dormant communication channels with South Korea in a small reconciliation step. Pyongyang is under multiple international sanctions over its weapons programmes, which have made rapid progress under Kim Jong-un. *) Ethiopia expels seven senior UN staff for 'meddling' Ethiopia says it would expel seven senior UN officials for what it called "meddling in the internal affairs of the country.” UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has said he was "shocked" by the decision and expressed full confidence in his staff in Ethiopia. Ethiopia's northernmost Tigray region has been mired in conflict since November, when Abiy sent troops to topple the regional ruling party, the Tigray People's Liberation Front. And finally… *) A collection of artwork by Muhammad Ali heads to auction A rare collection of sketches and paintings by American boxer Muhammad Ali is going up for auction in New York next week. The 24-piece collection reflects Ali's interest in religion and social justice, but there are also some that picture him in the ring. The former world heavyweight champion died in 2016 at age 74 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
News Mash-up: Political Leaders

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 1:29


UK PM Johnson marries in low-key ceremony British Prime Minister Boris Johnson married his fiancee Carrie Symonds at Westminster Cathedral on May 29, capping a week of political drama with a wedding kept so under wraps that his office did not confirm it until the following day. Johnson, 56, and Symonds, 33, have been living together in Downing Street since Johnson became prime minister in 2019. They announced their engagement in February of last year and their son was born in April the same year. The last British prime minister to marry in office was Lord Liverpool in 1822.  (Reuters, AP) Netanyahu's rivals try to seal pact to unseat him Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's rivals on May 31 sought to finalize a unity coalition that would unseat the veteran Israeli leader. Centrist opposition chief Yair Lapid secured support May 30 from ultranationalist Naftali Bennett for a “change” government of ideologically disparate rivals. If they hammer out a deal, the pair will split the premiership, with Bennett serving the first two years and Lapid the following two. No political party has ever won an outright majority in Israel's parliament, forcing smaller factions to form a coalition.  (Reuters, AP) These articles were provided by The Japan Times Alpha.

Cinco continentes
Cinco continentes - Los talibanes toman Herat

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 44:47


Este jueves 12 de agosto, Cinco continentes comienza en Afganistán, donde continúa la ofensiva de los talibanes, que ya han tomado el control de la estratégica ciudad de Herat, la segunda más importante del país. Además, nos interesamos por la oficialización de la normalización de relaciones entre Israel y Marruecos que se ha plasmado con la visita a Rabat del ministro de Exteriores israelí, Yair Lapid. También detallamos el informe de Amnistía Internacional que denuncia violaciones y torturas cometidas por las fuerzas afines al gobierno de Etiopía contra las mujeres en la región separatista de Tigray. Escuchar audio

Cinco continentes
Cinco continentes - Israel y Marruecos sellan su relación

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 13:18


Con Bernabé López, arabista y profesor honorífico de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, nos interesamos por la visita de dos días de duración que ha realizado en Marruecos el ministro de Exteriores de Israel, Yair Lapid: la primera de un alto cargo del gobierno israelí desde que ambos países normalizaron sus relaciones el verano pasado.  Escuchar audio

Israel Daily News Podcast
Special Interview: Omar al-Busaidy on the Israel Daily News Podcast

Israel Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 32:21


This podcast is the audio recording of a live interview Shanna Fuld (host of Israel Daily News Podcast) hosted with special guest Omar al-Busaidy. She felt the interview was so unique and refreshing, she had to upload the audio. What we covered: The partnership between the United Arab Emirates & Israel. *What does Sharaka mean? *Yair Lapid's recent trip to UAE *Opening the Israeli Embassy in the UAE *Can the UAE support Israel AND Palestinians? Omar Al-Busaidy is a Fulbright Scholar pursuing his Master's in International Affairs at Florida State University. Al-Busaidy is a best-selling author in the United Arab Emirates, an entrepreneur, member of the US-UAE Public Affairs Committee, Economic Affairs Liaison at the Consulate General of the United Arab Emirates in New York, Co-Founder of Creative Space Events Management based in Saudi Arabia and is now the CEO of the U.S. Sharaka branch. We explain what Sharaka is at the top of the show. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/israeldailynews/support

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
7/2/21 Phil Weiss on Israel's Declining Influence in American Liberal Politics

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 33:16


Phil Weiss comes back on the show to talk about Israel-Palestine. Now that Netanyahu has been ousted, Weiss is hopeful about the Biden administration's ability to work with Israel's new coalition government on issues like settlements and the Iran nuclear deal. Although Israel's new prime minister, Naftali Bennett, is possibly even further to the right than Netanyahu, he is working closely with centrist Yair Lapid and, for the first time ever, with an Arab party in the Knesset. Weiss is also optimistic about the international community: the Israelis have gone too far, he thinks, in "establishing facts on the ground"—in other words, everyone can see that the two-state solution is dead, and the Israeli government is nakedly presiding over an apartheid regime. Discussed on the show: "Israel is ‘considerably weakened' — as BDS finds a home in the Democratic Party" (Mondoweiss) "Biden won't make Obama's mistake — so there will be ‘no daylight' between U.S. and Israel" (Mondoweiss) "Israeli Authorities and the Crimes of Apartheid and Persecution" (Human Rights Watch) Philip Weiss is the long-time editor of Mondoweiss.net. Follow him on Twitter @PhilWeiss. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
7/2/21 Phil Weiss on Israel’s Declining Influence in American Liberal Politics

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 33:16


Phil Weiss comes back on the show to talk about Israel-Palestine. Now that Netanyahu has been ousted, Weiss is hopeful about the Biden administration's ability to work with Israel's new coalition government on issues like settlements and the Iran nuclear deal. Although Israel's new prime minister, Naftali Bennett, is possibly even further to the right than Netanyahu, he is working closely with centrist Yair Lapid and, for the first time ever, with an Arab party in the Knesset. Weiss is also optimistic about the international community: the Israelis have gone too far, he thinks, in "establishing facts on the ground"—in other words, everyone can see that the two-state solution is dead, and the Israeli government is nakedly presiding over an apartheid regime. Discussed on the show: "Israel is ‘considerably weakened' — as BDS finds a home in the Democratic Party" (Mondoweiss) "Biden won't make Obama's mistake — so there will be ‘no daylight' between U.S. and Israel" (Mondoweiss) "Israeli Authorities and the Crimes of Apartheid and Persecution" (Human Rights Watch) Philip Weiss is the long-time editor of Mondoweiss.net. Follow him on Twitter @PhilWeiss. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://youtu.be/jzDoUSF6wk8

Daily News Brief by TRT World
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 2:12


Scores dead as record-smashing heatwave engulfs parts of Canada and US, and an injured Serena Williams ends her bid for Wimbledon glory in tears *) Scores dead as record-breaking heat wave grips Canada, US Scores of deaths have been reported in North America, as Canada recorded its highest ever temperature amid scorching conditions that extended to the US Pacific Northwest. At least 134 people have died suddenly since Friday in Canada's Vancouver area, with authorities linking the vast majority to the heat. The deaths came as Canada set a new all-time high temperature record for a third day in a row Tuesday, reaching 121 degrees Fahrenheit (49.5 degrees Celsius) in Lytton, British Columbia. *) Tigray rebels gain more ground despite the ceasefire Rebel fighters in Ethiopia's war-hit Tigray seized control of more territory. The move comes one day after retaking the local capital Mekele and vowing to drive all "enemies" out of the region. The rebels' gains and militant rhetoric cast doubt on whether a unilateral ceasefire declared by the federal government would actually lead to a pause in the nearly eight-month-old conflict. *) Israel opens first embassy in Gulf as Lapid visits UAE Israel's top diplomat Yair Lapid has opened the Jewish state's first embassy in the Gulf during his trip to the UAE after ties were normalised last year. He met with his Emirati counterpart, Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, in the UAE capital Abu Dhabi. Since their US-brokered normalisation agreement was signed last September, the two countries have signed a raft of deals ranging from tourism to aviation and financial services. *) South Africa's Zuma gets 15 months' jail for evading corruption inquiry Former South African President Jacob Zuma has been sentenced to 15 months in jail for contempt of court over refusal to cooperate with a corruption inquiry. Zuma was not in court for the ruling on Tuesday and has been ordered to hand himself over within five days to a police station. This is the first time in South Africa's history that a former president has been sentenced to prison. And finally ... *) Wimbledon ends in tears for injured Serena Tennis great Serena Williams limped out of Wimbledon in tears after her latest bid for a record-equalling 24th Grand Slam singles crown ended in injury. She was leading 3-1 in the first set of her first-round match against Aliaksandra Sasnovich of Belarus when she slipped and had to have her left ankle examined. Williams returned from receiving medical attention but called it a day at 3-3 and walked off Centre Court in tears.

Israel Policy Pod
A Bennett-Lapid Foreign Policy

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 59:17


Jerusalem Post Diplomatic Correspondent Lahav Harkov joins Israel Policy Forum's latest briefing from the UAE to provide a breakdown on Yair Lapid's inaugural overseas trip as foreign minister and how the new Bennett-Lapid government's foreign policy compares with the approach taken by former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.Support the show (http://support.israelpolicyforum.org/donate)

Cinco continentes
Cinco continentes - Israel-EAU: cooperación, negocios y enemigo común

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 12:52


Con Haizam Amirah Fernández, investigador del Mediterráneo y Mundo Árabe del Real Instituto Elcano, analizamos la relevancia de la visita del ministro de Exteriores de Israel, Yair Lapid, a Emiratos Árabes Unidos, donde ha inaugurado la primera embajada de Israel en un país del golfo Pérsico. Se trata, además, de la primera visita de un alto representante israelí desde que Abu Dabi reconoció el Estado de Israel en agosto de 2020. A juicio del experto, los principales motivos de la normalización de relaciones para EAU son la protección del régimen, la cooperación en materia de seguridad, considerar a Irán un enemigo común y los intercambios económicos. Escuchar audio

Unholy: Two Jews on the news
Old problems, new leaders

Unholy: Two Jews on the news

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 34:34


COVID is hitting back in Israel and Iran is presenting a new challenge to new PM Bennett and new-ish President Biden. In the US, progressive events are starting to shun Israeli participants.  Finally, Yonit and Jonathan grade Quentin Tarantino's Hebrew. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jacobin Radio
Jacobin Radio w/ Suzi Weissman: Yoav Peled on Israel's Election

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 57:09


Suzi talks to Yoav Peled about the outcome of Israel's 4th election in two years, ending Benjamin Netanyahu's long reign--for the time being. Netanyahu unleashed a major shock and awe campaign against Gaza for 11 days last month -- as he did in November 2019, to deflect attention from his own legal problems and his inability to form a governing coalition. This time Hamas rockets and Israeli bombs failed to save Netanyahu's hold on power and prevent a more moderate coalition from upending his rule. Neftali Bennet, far right leader of the tiny Yamina (Rightward) party will be PM for two years, yielding to his secular-centrist coalition partner Yair Lapid for the next two years. Netanyahu, facing criminal corruption charges, warns "he'll be back." Yoav Peled clarifies what this means, and explains the dynamics of nationalism and religion in Israel (his latest book is the timely The Religionization of Israeli Society) among both Muslims and Jews.

Une semaine dans le monde
Sommet Biden-Poutine: reprise de dialogue malgré les tensions

Une semaine dans le monde

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 39:38


Cette semaine dans le monde est marquée par la rencontre entre Joe Biden et Vladimir Poutine à Genève. Cette poignée de main entre les deux chefs de l'Etat dans cette bâtisse du XVII e siècle du parc Lagrange au bord du lac Leman. Dans l'actualité également, Naftali Bennett devient premier ministre d'Israël pendant deux ans avant de confier le pouvoir au centriste Yair Lapid. Cette coalition hétéroclite met fin aux douze ans de règne de Benyamin Netanyahou.

The Tonic Accord
Bibi Got the Boot!

The Tonic Accord

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 12:56


It took four elections over just two years to finally get a coalition to oust Benjamin (Bibi) Netanyahu, Israel's longterm Prime Minister. Finally, 60-59 majority was created that removed Netanyahu from his role. The new ruling coalition is a fragile partnership between the far-right, the left, and even an Arab Party. Naftali Bennett, head of the right-wing Yamina party, will be prime minister for the next two years, then the role will be transferred to Yair Lapid, head of the center-left Yesh Atid party.  In this episode, Drew and Alex wonder if this fragile coalition will last. They discuss how Naftali Bennet is arguably further right than Netanyahu, and has said that he doesn't want to change any of Israel's policies involving Gaza. They also talk about Netanyahu's push that the vote was fraudulent and how he is hoping to sew chaos and division that could lead to him returning to power. This coalition needs to focus on less divisive issues like health care, education, and infrastructure, if they want to stay popular and in power. Will this coalition work? Only time will tell. 

Israel Daily News Podcast
Israel Daily News Podcast, Wed. June 16, 2021

Israel Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 16:24


Yair Lapid condemns flag marchers who shouted “Death to Arabs,” the IDF hits Gaza after 20 fires erupted in southern Israel from bombastic balloons sent over the border & Shaare Zedek hospital has a special method for birthing babies. What is it? Social Media links, Newsletter sign-up &, Support the show $ here: https://linktr.ee/israeldailynews Music: Work that Bassline, TripL; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKRHVZdBhIg --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/israeldailynews/support

The Caroline glick Show
Episode 10 -- Netanyahu is ousted just as the charges against him disintegrate

The Caroline glick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 65:23


In Episode 10 of the Caroline Glick Mideast News Hour, Caroline and her co-host Gadi Taub analyze the nature of Israel's new government led by Yair Lapid and Naftali Bennett and what its implications are going forward for Israel's core strategic interests vis-à-vis Iran and the Palestinians.As the new government was being sworn in, the principle cause that led to Israel's long-standing political deadlock – the Attorney General's pursuit of corruption charges against Netanyahu – fell apart in Jerusalem's District Courthouse. The prosecution's claim that Netanyahu accepted bribes fell apart as Netanyahu's attorneys cross-examined the prosecution's “star witness.”Gadi and Caroline discussed the earth-shattering developments in the case, and compared them to the Russia-hoax the U.S. Justice Department concocted against Donald Trump and used to paralyze his presidency for his first three years in office.Finally, they discussed the prospects for Netanyahu, now Opposition Leader to make a comeback. Join Caroline and Gadi as they walk you through the maze and misery of Israeli politics with warrior hearts and healthy senses of humor. Subscribe to their YouTube and Rumble channels and podcasts. And share their information – which you won't get on the network news – far and wide! To Watch: https://youtu.be/L_RqF2tg2cY (https://youtu.be/L_RqF2tg2cY)

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 6/15/21: Netanyahu Out, Bennett In

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 19:00


Benjamin Netanyahu's twelve-year run as prime minister of Israel has come to an end as the new coalition government led by Naftali Bennett and Yair Lapid was sworn in Sunday after a narrow 60-59 vote in the Knesset. SkyWatchTV has been banned by YouTube! Please follow SkyWatchTV on Rumble: www.rumble.com/skywatchtv. 5) Bennett takes over as Israeli PM; 4) Warnings over ‘delta' variant of SARS-2; 3) Reporter who broke Clinton-Lynch tarmac story found dead; 2) Nuclear fires still smoldering at Chernobyl; 1) Newly discovered asteroid passes inside Moon's orbit Saturday.

Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón
Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón (14 de junio de 2021)

Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 89:30


Hoy en Día a Día, comenzamos conversando con Rafa de Miguel, corresponsal en Reino Unido e Irlanda de El País, acerca del balance de la Cumbre del G7: “Los líderes de las naciones más avanzadas se reunido con un mensaje claro… Que EE.UU esté de vuelta en la mesa permite avanzar en el multilateralismo que muchos piensan es imprescindible para hacer frente a los desafíos que tiene por delante el mundo”, nos dijo. El periodista y co-editor de Armando.Info, Ewald Shcarfenberg, nos habló sobre la red con la que el chavismo evadió las sanciones de EE UU: “Hemos documentado al menos 30 embargues de petróleo, de los cuales solamente la primera transacción era por $200 millones… Al final, ese petróleo se terminaba comercializando y parte de los fondos iban a PDVSA y otra parte a los intermediarios”, comentó. Acerca del regreso de la edición impresa El Nacional, conversamos con el gerente general del periódico, Jorge Makriniotis: “Cuando nos quitaron el edificio, económicamente nos dieron un impacto muy fuerte, pero así empezó la idea de seguir adelante con el periódico impreso, el cual será por suscripción… Estamos generando alianzas en distribución y en la parte impresa, y generando nuevos puestos de empleo”, nos contó. Desde Madrid nos atendió Ángel Expósito, coordinador de informativo de la Cadena COPE, quien nos habló sobre la situación política española: “El gobierno de Sánchez indulta a los líderes del procés, porque la Constitución permite un indulto especial del gobierno sobre la justicia… Esto es porque Sánchez en el Parlamento de España depende de los votos de esos independentistas”, explicó. También nos atendió el periodista especializado en territorio islámico y Medio Oriente, Gabriel Ben Tasgal, quien nos habló sobre los resultados de las elecciones en Israel: “No se sabe qué va a pasar ahora, porque nos guiaba un primer ministro que llevaba 15 años en el poder con mucha seguridad personal y mucho carisma… Este es un gobierno de unidad nacional, donde dos años va a ser Naftali Bennett el primer ministro y los segundos dos años será Yair Lapid”, comentó. El periodista José María del Pino conversó con nosotros sobre los resultados de las elecciones regionales en Chile: “La participación no ha sido muy alta, pero la gente que ha querido, ha podido participar para intentar cambiar las cosas… Se vienen semanas y meses muy convulsionados electoralmente, pero lo positivo es que se ha desmovilizado la calle, y la sociedad parece estar canalizando sus intereses políticos a través del voto”, nos contó. Y para cerrar, el narrador deportivo y conductor de Expreso Deportivo por nuestra emisora Éxitos 107.1 FM, Fernando Arreaza, nos habló sobre el inicio de la Copa América en Brasil: “Brasil es el clarísimo favorito para ganar el evento de la Copa América”, comentó, y expresó: “Venezuela tuvo que llamar a jugadores de emergencia… Estos muchachos salieron a comerse la cancha, a jugar con entereza y una gran actitud, y aun en el 3-0, dejó un buen sabor de boca”.

Haaretz Weekly
Ousted Netanyahu goes from savior to saboteur: Listen to Ravit Hecht and Anshel Pfeffer

Haaretz Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 32:31


Host Simon Spungin is joined by Haaretz's Ravit Hecht and Anshel Pfeffer, the day after a coalition headed by Naftali Bennett and Yair Lapid unseated Benjamin Netanyahu and brought his 12-year reign to an end. We discuss Netanyahu's legacy, his farewell speech to the Knesset and his plans for the future – which, he insists, includes bringing down the new government. We also discuss the new coalition, its priorities and its chances of living to a ripe old age. ICYMI: Haaretz Weekend Episode #1 is still available! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mindful Skeptics Podcast
NETANYAHU IS OUT AS ISREAL'S PRIME MINISTER

Mindful Skeptics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 9:38


The new Isreali government actually gets a vote of confidence — a huge if — Bennett will lead a coalition of eight parties ranging from right to left. The real power will be centrist Yair Lapid, who sewed this strange coalition together, who leads the coalition's largest party, Yesh Atid, and who will become prime minister in two years if — a humongous if — the coalition survives. As prime minister, Bennett will at most be first among equals in the cabinet, and perhaps only a figurehead.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Shin Bet head: Inflammatory rhetoric a ticking bomb

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 15:17


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Today's panel comprises ToI editor David Horovitz and diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman, along with host Amanda Borschel-Dan. There is a clear surge in inflammatory rhetoric surrounding the 'change bloc' even as the Yair Lapid-led coalition creeps toward solidifying a new government. In a rare public statement, Shin Bet head Nadav Argaman has warned that there may be blood. In the era of social media, is this incitement unprecedented? In this particularly sensitive period, Defense Minister Benny Gantz has demanded that the far-right flag march that is tentatively scheduled for Thursday be canceled. But wait -- didn't that already happen on Jerusalem Day last month? And finally, Berman explains the background behind IDF decorations that will be issued starting tomorrow for those who served in the southern Lebanon security zone from 1985-2000. Why is this pin so late in coming and what of the Christian SLA soldiers who aided the IDF in this area? Discussed articles include: When Shin Bet warns of political violence, Israel's history requires we listen Shin Bet head in rare warning: Stop violent discourse now, someone will get hurt Yamina MK requests additional security after threats, says she was followed Top rabbis urge followers to ‘do everything' to thwart new government Knesset speaker may hold vote on new government as soon as Wednesday Gantz indicates he'll demand cancellation of Jerusalem right-wing parade Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Jun 04 ’21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 47:00


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Arnold Punaro, the chairman of the National Defense Industrial Association and CEO of the Punaro Group consultancy, Bob Hale, former Pentagon comptroller, Byron Callan of the independent equity research firm Capital Alpha Partners and senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — A look at whether the Biden administration’s 2022 defense spending request aligns with the aim of better deterring China — How the administration is working with Pacific allies and partners to improve collective security — China and the region 32 years after the Tiananmen Square crackdown and massacre — Key takeaways from the $715 billion defense budget request — Whether Congress will step in to change the administration’s plan and support unfunded priorities — The need for better Biden administration messaging regarding national security and the need for change — at home and aboard — Update on what’s next as Naftali Bennett, Yair Lapid and Mansour Abbas work to form a new government to replace Benjamin Netanyahu and his government

Unholy: Two Jews on the news
Ch Ch Ch Changes

Unholy: Two Jews on the news

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 37:29


Yonit and Jonathan explain the forces behind the historic coalition formed in Israel, and the forces that might stop it.  What does the new President-elect Herzog mean for world jews? And no need to Google our Chutzpah nominee for this week See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Newshour
A new era for US-Israel relations

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 49:09


We hear from senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment and former State Department Middle East analyst, Aaron David Miller as Israeli opposition parties reach an agreement to form a new government that would end Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister. Yair Lapid, leader of the centrist Yesh Atid party, announced an eight-faction coalition had been formed. Under a rotation arrangement, the head of the right-wing Yamina party, Naftali Bennett, would serve as prime minister first before handing over to Mr Lapid. Also on the programme: Denmark plans to defy EU norms and deport its asylum-seekers to a 'third country' while their claims are processed, we hear the reaction; President Biden agrees that the time has come for more global sharing of Covid vaccines and why Nasa thinks the planet Venus finally deserves closer inspection. (Photo: US Department of Defence Secretary Austin welcomes Israeli Defence Minister Gantz to the Pentagon Credit: European Press photo Agency)

Vox's Worldly
The end of the Netanyahu era?

Vox's Worldly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 50:35


Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the political earthquake happening in Israel that could soon see longtime Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ousted from power by a shaky coalition of far-right, centrist, leftist, and Islamist parties. They explain how this unlikely coalition came together, why it could easily fall apart, and what the possible end of the Netanyahu era means for the future of Israel and its conflict with the Palestinians. References: Zack wrote a piece for Vox in 2020 about the war on Israeli democracy. You can find the Yair Lapid quote Alex read over at Foreign Policy. The Times of Israel has a good (and short!) profile of Naftali Bennett. The Associated Press reports the coalition wants a quick vote to confirm the government. Haaretz has a smart piece on how Netanyahu unwittingly sowed the seeds of his political demise. Politico featured a piece by experts detailing what the new Israeli government could mean for US President Joe Biden. The Jerusalem Post features the comment Jenn mentioned, where Bennett talks about killing Arabs. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow us: Vox.com Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón
Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón (3 de junio de 2021)

Día a Día con César Miguel Rondón

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 85:15


Hoy en Día a Día, comenzamos conversando con Pablo Pardo, corresponsal de El Mundo en EE.UU, sobre la reunión entre Joe Biden y la senadora republicana Shelley Moore Capito: “Ella una de los senadores que estarían dispuestos a votar a favor del plan de infraestructura de Biden”, dijo, por lo que “Biden trata de buscar un tipo de acuerdo con varios senadores republicanos, para que apoyen esa ley”. Pardo señaló: “El programa va a ser mucho menor de lo que inicialmente propuso Biden, es posible que acabe quedando en torno a 1 billón de dólares”. El politólogo, magíster en Ciencias Políticas, y especialista en Análisis de Datos, John Magdaleno, nos habló sobre las próximas negociaciones entre el gobierno y la oposición: “Lo mejor que podría esperarse de este proceso es alcanzar mejoras relativas en algunas condiciones, particularmente las que tocan el próximo evento electoral”, opinó. También destacó que “Pronto puede llegar a plantearse una crisis de sucesión en el 2024, no se sabe si alrededor de Maduro haya consenso para un nuevo período”. De cara a las elecciones del domingo 6 de junio en México, conversamos con el corresponsal de la agencia EFE, Pedro Pablo Cortés, quien nos comentó: “Además de ser las elecciones más grandes en la historia de México porque están en disputa más de 20.000 cargos, también se encaminan a ser las más violentas… De acuerdo a las consultoras especializadas, se han registrado más de 780 agresiones contra políticos y candidatos”. Cortés señaló que “Las encuestas apuntan a que López Obrador conservará la mayoría, pero perdería los votos necesarios para poder hacer reformas constitucionales”. Desde Buenos Aires nos atendió el sociólogo especializado en Medio Oriente, Kevin Ary Levin, con quien conversamos sobre las elecciones en Israel: “Se logró armar una coalición de partidos de tradiciones ideológicas y políticas muy diferentes… La coalición va a tener dos líderes: Naftali Bennett va a gobernar los primeros dos años, y los siguientes dos años asumirá Yair Lapid”, nos explicó. Luz Dary Depablos, corresponsal de TVV y Vivo Play en Táchira, nos habló sobre la situación en la frontera colombo-venezolana: “El régimen venezolano solamente ha permitido el paso humanitario, pero de uno solo de los puentes, que es el Puente Internacional Simón Bolívar”, nos contó, y señaló que “En septiembre del 2018 fue el primer quiebre de esta economía, aunque realmente esto viene del 2015 cuando Nicolás Maduro cerró de manera unilateral la frontera… Desde ese momento se han perdido casi 20.000 puestos de trabajo”. Y para cerrar, el exdiputado opositor y analista político, Eliseo Núñez, nos habló sobre la detención de la aspirante presidencial opositora Cristiana Chamorro: “Ella es la candidata con mayores probabilidades de ser quien se quedara con la nominación en el bloque opositor”, por lo que “La clave es mantenerla incomunicada, para crear la sensación de que no hay decisión por trasladarle la candidatura a alguien”.

Newshour
Far-right politician set to become Israeli Prime Minister

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 49:05


Naftali Bennett, the leader of the New Right party in Israel, will lead a proposed new government for two years, before giving way to his coalition partner Yair Lapid - provided the government survives that long. Also in the programme: The Tokyo 2020 chief says the delayed Olympic games will "100%" go ahead in July; and Sri Lanka fears hundreds of tonnes of oil could leak from a stricken cargo ship off the Port of Colombo Photo: Naftali Bennett (L) and his coalition partner Yair Lapid. Credit: Yesh Atid party handout.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Dream team or motley crew? 'Change' bloc (maybe) coalesces

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 16:09


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Today's panel comprises ToI editor David Horovitz and our Hebrew sister-site Zman Yisrael editor Biranit Goren, along with host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Yesh Atid head Yair Lapid announced late Wednesday night that he has managed to herd the "change" bloc into a 61-member coalition. Yamina head Naftali Bennett is set to assume the prime ministerial role until September 2023, after which time Lapid will take up the mantle until November 2025. But will the coalition actually come to pass? We discuss some of the innumerable obstacles facing the (motley) crew of politicians as its leaders continue herding their members until the -- possibly much delayed -- Knesset vote. Who says there's nothing new under the sun? If the Lapid/Bennett coalition comes to pass, there are a full string of firsts to accompany it. It is not, however, the first time an Arab party is part of a Knesset coalition. Goren counts down. Discussed articles include: Lapid informs president he can form government removing Netanyahu from power Lapid and Bennett have a coalition on paper, but Netanyahu will fight to the end Change bloc seeks to replace Knesset speaker; Yamina MK says he won't back move History made as Arab Israeli Ra'am party joins Bennett-Lapid coalition Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Image: Yesh Atid leader Yair Lapid (L), Yamina leader Naftali Bennett (C) and Ra'am leader Mansour Abbas sign a coalition agreement on June 2, 2021 (Courtesy of Ra'am) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Israel Policy Pod
Bye-Bye Bibi?

Israel Policy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 39:48


Hosts Evan Gottesman and Eli Kowaz discuss Benjamin Netanyahu's impending exit after twelve consecutive years as Israel's prime minister, a potential new unity government helmed by Naftali Bennett and Yair Lapid, how Israel got here, and what it all means.Support the show (http://support.israelpolicyforum.org/donate)

Newshour
Israeli opposition says coalition close

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 48:21


Israel's opposition leaders say that after intense negotiations, they're now closer to forming a coalition that would oust the prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. However, the politician at the centre of the effort, Yair Lapid, is yet to finalise a deal with a key figure, the far-right faction leader Naftali Bennett. Also in the programme: US President Joe Biden suspends oil and gas drilling leases in Alaska and allegations of media censorship in Pakistan. (Picture: Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. Credit: Reuters)

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Hailing President Herzog even as change bloc looks for Hail Mary

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 13:58


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Today's panel comprises political correspondent Tal Schneider and senior analyst Haviv Rettig Gur, along with host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Congratulations Mr. President! Former MK Isaac "Bougie" Herzog won a landslide victory over Miriam Peretz, earning an unprecedented 87 votes from Knesset members. The head of the Jewish Agency said he plans “to build bridges” within Israeli society and with the Jewish Diaspora, to encourage entrepreneurship, “fight antisemitism and hatred of Israel,” and “safeguard the foundations of our democracy.” Who is Herzog and what does he represent? As of our taping, the "change" bloc still has not announced a coalition under Yesh Atid head Yair Lapid and Yamina head Naftali Bennett. What are some of the differences of opinion and can they be resolved by midnight? Finally, in the course of these days of negotiations, several members of the change bloc and their families have been threatened -- including Meretz MK Tamar Zandberg's baby. What is going on here? Discussed articles include: Isaac Herzog elected Israel's 11th president, with 87 votes of Knesset's 120 Wednesday's presidential race is a microcosm of Israeli Jews' deeper divides Judicial appointments the only remaining snag as Lapid set to declare government Meretz MK flees her home after right-wing threats to her baby, protests outside Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Image: Presidential candidate Isaac Herzog visits at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest prayer site in the Old City of Jerusalem, June 1, 2021. (Olivier Fitoussi/Flash90) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Newshour
Netanyahu warns coalition is a 'danger' to Israel

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 48:34


Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu warns that a proposed unity government aimed at replacing him would be a danger to the country's security. We profile ultra-nationalist Naftali Bennett who wants to unseat the Prime Minister. Also in the programme: European politicians are angry about reports that the Danish intelligence services helped the US to spy on European allies; and why not many Chinese women will take up a new right to have three children. (Photo: Leader of the Yemina party, Naftali Bennett, delivers a political statement in the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament, announcing he will form a government with Yair Lapid to oust Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Credit: EPA/ Yonatan Sindel/ pool)

The Land of Israel Network
Israel Uncensored: Prime Minister Bennett?

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 33:34


Last night, Yamina party head Naftali Bennett announced that he will be forming a governing coalition with Yesh Atid leader Yair Lapid and other anti-Netanyahu parties in order to unseat the Prime Minister. Unless something dramatic happens over the next few days, it looks like Bennett will become Israel's PM for the next two years, followed by Lapid for the following two. The move angered many right-winger voters who accused Bennett of breaking an election promise that he would not serve under Lapid. Does Prime Minister Netanyahu have any more rabbits under his hat or is this the end of his current 12 year run (15 years in total) as Israel's PM? Photo Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Naftali_Bennett.jpg

Newshour
Israeli right-wing leader plans to oust Benjamin Natanyahu

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 49:04


The former Israeli Defence Minister Naftali Bennett says he will take his far-right Yamina party into a coalition government with opposition leader Yair Lapid, whose centrist party came second to Mr Netanyahu's party in elections in March. Also in the programme: how gangs in Venezuela have taken over neighbourhoods in the capital, Caracas, as the country's president Nicolas Maduro abandons basic government functions; and thousands of government supporters hold rallies in Ethiopia. Photo: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) and his far-right rival Naftali Bennett. Credit: PA Media.

Newshour
Netanyahu opponents in talks to replace him

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 49:06


Coalition talks are underway in Israel, which could see Benjamin Netanyahu ousted as prime minister. But the main opposition leader, Yair Lapid, is running out of time to form a new government with a right-wing party. We will have the latest. Regional leaders in West Africa are meeting to decide how to respond to the military coup in Mali - the second in less than a year - so why is the coup leader invited? Also, the pressure facing opposition activists in Belarus. (Photo: Benjamin Netanyahu has dominated Israeli politics for a generation. Credit: Reuters)

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Could the times really be a changin' as Lapid, Bennet reportedly reach a deal?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 17:19


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Today's panel comprises editor David Horovitz and senior analyst, along with host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Nothing is finalized as the clock winds down on Yesh Atid head Yair Lapid's chance to form a coalition. As the June 2 date looms, will Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new offers to Yamina head Naftali Bennett and New Hope head Gideon Sa'ar be enough to torpedo the nascent "change" government? The shloshim or month of formal mourning for the 45 victims of the disaster at Mount Meron is observed today. Why is there still no formal state inquiry -- and why are the ultra-Orthodox parties the ones who are most vehemently objecting to one? Danielle Wolfson, 43, was the first Israeli woman to summit Mount Everest last week. She used her platform to call for coexistence while reminding the world that anything is possible. Discussed articles include: Last-ditch offer: Netanyahu says Sa'ar can be PM 1st in 3-way deal with Bennett Bennett to meet with Yamina MKs to coax them into government with Lapid Forty-five people died at Meron. Why are Haredi parties blocking a probe? Danielle Wolfson becomes 1st Israeli woman to reach Mount Everest summit Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: MKs Yair Lapid and Naftali Bennett during an event inaugurating a new monument in memory of Emannuel Morano, in the Netiv Avot neighborhood in Gush Etzion, on July 23, 2017. (Gershon Elinson/Flash90) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
5/20/21 Kalmen Barkin on Israel’s Fraught Past and Uncertain Political Future

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 28:06


Kalmen Barkin is back for an update on Israeli politics. In the last two weeks, Knesset opposition leader Yair Lapid got the opportunity to form a coalition government, and possibly oust Prime Minister Netanyahu for the first time since 2009. But just afterward, as Barkin explains, violence erupted at the al-Aqsa mosque, in response to Palestinian protests about settlements in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood. These events have thrown Israeli politics into turmoil, and it's not at all clear what will happen going forward. If Netanyahu can hold onto power, it wouldn't be the first time he's done so by leveraging uncertain circumstances and supposedly temporary powers. Barkin also explains much of the history that has led the Israelis and Palestinians to this point of conflict. Discussed on the show: "Israeli Party Leader: Hamas is a Strategic Asset" (Antiwar.com) This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljc31Xr351k

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
5/20/21 Kalmen Barkin on Israel’s Fraught Past and Uncertain Political Future

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 28:06


Kalmen Barkin is back for an update on Israeli politics. In the last two weeks, Knesset opposition leader Yair Lapid got the opportunity to form a coalition government, and possibly oust Prime Minister Netanyahu for the first time since 2009. But just afterward, as Barkin explains, violence erupted at the al-Aqsa mosque, in response to Palestinian protests about settlements in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood. These events have thrown Israeli politics into turmoil, and it's not at all clear what will happen going forward. If Netanyahu can hold onto power, it wouldn't be the first time he's done so by leveraging uncertain circumstances and supposedly temporary powers. Barkin also explains much of the history that has led the Israelis and Palestinians to this point of conflict. Discussed on the show: "Israeli Party Leader: Hamas is a Strategic Asset" (Antiwar.com) This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; Photo IQ; Green Mill Supercritical; Zippix Toothpicks; and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljc31Xr351k

Unholy: Two Jews on the news

Yair Lapid and Naftali Bennett are busy crafting a coalition that defies all rules of math, on their way to topple incumbent PM Netanyahu. The disaster at Mount Meron unearths big questions regarding the Israeli establishment's dealings with the Haredi community. In Chutzpah and Mensch, Yonit and Jonathan discuss the latest UK-France standoff, and offer some TV bingeing recommendations. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Promised Podcast
The “Unity is the Thing We Seek” Edition

The Promised Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 84:53


Don Futterman, Noah Efron and Times of Israel Ops & Blogs Editor Miriam Herschlag discuss three topics of incomparable importance and end with an anecdote about something in Israel that made them smile this week. Listen to the Extra-Special, Special Extra Segment on Patreon   —“Unity is the Thing We Seek”— Opposition leader Yair Lapid says he wants a right-left-and-center “National Unity Government.” The fact that it won’t be able to do anything about the occupation is a feature, he says, not a bug. Does he have a point? —How Do You Solve a Problem Like Ben Gvir?— Kahanist MK Itamar Ben Gvir represents an outlook that most Israelis find loathsome. Is it better to fight him, or just ignore him? —Hip Like Us— Does what we Israelis wear tell us something about who we are? —Mask-Free and Prosper— For our most unreasonably generous Patreon supporters, in our extra-special, special extra discussion, we talk about this strange pandemical moment, after the mask mandate was rescinded this week, when things seem to be opening up both higgledy and piggledy, which moment feels both like a resurrection – We hath risen! — and also maybe like a prologue to a setback down the road. It’s weird, so we talk about it. All that and the great first record of Minus Efes!