Podcasts about survived

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  • 2,422PODCASTS
  • 3,126EPISODES
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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about survived

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Latest podcast episodes about survived

Our American Stories
Stalin's Daughter: American Citizen, Wisconsin Cheesehead?!

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 38:16


On this episode of Our American Stories, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and America's Cup winner Bill Koch doesn't like being cheated. Tom Acitelli, author of Pilsner: How The Beer of Kings Changed The World, tells the story of how America's favorite drink came here and stayed here despite a world war and Prohibition. When 85-year-old Lana Peters passed away in 2011 from complications due to colon cancer, the nation seemed to have forgotten the woman who had become a sensation during the Cold War.  The History Guy recalls the extraordinary life of the woman whose defection to the United States represented a seminal moment in history. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)   Time Codes: 00:00 - The Man Who Spent $35MM Fighting A $400k Fake Wine Fraud 10:00 - How The Pilsner Arrived, Survived, and Thrived in America 35:00 - Stalin's Daughter: American Citizen, Wisconsin Cheesehead?!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business Pants
TUESDAY KETCHUP: Amazon is spying on you inside your house, Meta's AI bot is an election-denying, anti-semite, and the democrats' climate bill officially survived the Senate

Business Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:15


Single Malt History with Gareth Russell
The Six Wives of Henry VIII

Single Malt History with Gareth Russell

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 92:17


The extraordinary stories of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Katherine Parr, their marriages to the notorious King Henry VIII, and how they ended up memorialised in the rhyme Divorced, Beheaded, Died, Divorced, Beheaded, Survived. Content warning: This episode contains frequent discussions of miscarriages and fertility struggles, which some listeners may find distressing.

Bright Side
They Survived Titanic and Revealed the True Story

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 13:22


Everyone knows about this tragedy: how RMS Titanic sank in the early morning of 15 April 1912 in the North Atlantic Ocean. We watched the movie, we heard about it. However, many questions still remain without answers. One of them: did the unsinkable ship really hit an iceberg? One of the biggest shipwrecks in human history occupies the minds of many, even 100 years later. The ultra-modern ship equipped with all the best facilities of the time, bearing the proud name of Titanic - how could it have been sunk by a mere iceberg? There were survivors of the tragedy who had other versions. For example, there is some evidence that says there were explosions and fires and that those are what made the ship sink! But if it's true, something must have caused that huge explosion. What could it be? Vaghinak Byurat who was one of the Titanic survivors described what happened on his journey to America on the most famous ship in the world in his memoirs. Let's hear the most amazing stories of Titanic survivors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Justice Podcast
S03E14 - Darryl Howard

American Justice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 65:39


In episode fourteen, season three of the American Justice Podcast, Scott and C. Derick break down the gruesome murders of 29-year-old Doris Wahington and Her 13-year-old daughter Nishonda. They discuss how prosecutorial misconduct and contradictory eyewitness testimonies meant 23+ years for Darryl Howard, even after no DNA or biological evidence connected him to the crime scene. 04:45 The Case of Darryl Howard 09:12 The Death of Doris Washington and Her 13-year-old daughter Nishonda 12:45 The Risky Life of Doris Washington Before the Gruesome Murder 14:30 Darryl Is Questioned By the Police After Getting Shot 5 Times and Survived  17:10 Police Link Darryl's Shooters With Another Unsolved Double Murder 18:40 Darryl Reveals He Believes The New York Gang Killed Doris and Her Daughter 20:23 Witness Statements and The Corced Testimony of Sex Worker 23:55 Darryl is Arrested and Charged with Arson and Murder 24:02 Authorities Test DNA From the Rape Kits  26:10 Several Witnesses Testify Against Darryl 30:22 Contradictory Statements From Witness Recounts 33:50 Main Witness, Angela Oliver, Recants Her Statement in Court 35:40 Lead Detective Testifies Against Darryl  37:30 Darryl's Defence Pokes Holes in The Case to No Avail 41:40 Darryll is Sentenced to 80 Years in Prison For Second Degree Murder and Arson 42:32 The Innocence Project Looks Into Darryl's Case 43:50 DNA to The Rescue, or Maybe Not 46:07 Undisclosed Prosecution Documents Exclude Darryl From the Murder 50:00 Darryl's Hearing is Vacated Without Hearing 51:20 Darryl is Released on Bond After 23 Plus Years in Prison 53:20 The Jury Awards Darryl $6 Million in Damages 55:37 Will Darryl Ever Get Compensated? 59:01 Lawyers Continue to Fight For Darryl's Compensation Money 01:01:00 Doris and Her Daughter Nishonda Deserve Justice 01:04:01 Parting Thoughts  #Darryl #Howard #wrongful #convictions #criminaljusticesystem #compensation #criminaljusticereforms #demandjustice #doublemurdercase #murdermystery #murder #truecrime #truecrimepodcast #police #unsolved #truecrimeobsessed #truecrimefan #unsolvedmysteries  Call to Action Thank you for listening to this season of the American Justice Podcast. Leave us a voicemail, send us a Facebook message, or blog about the show on American Justice Podcast. If you have any tips on the case, please call 972-942-0444. Links and Videos https://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Pages/casedetail.aspx?caseid=4977 https://www.wral.com/fight-continues-for-wrongfully-convicted-durham-man-now-struggling-to-get-his-payout-from-city/20241528/?fbclid=IwAR2YU8ylnkCN7tE00pZhTPuvUc2qNfVVjFGHyskl0_it4AuVxnEXG0hrB_Y https://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/crime/article260159540.html https://www.blackenterprise.com/darryl-howard-who-spent-23-years-in-prison-for-a-crime-he-didnt-commit-has-been-awarded-6-million/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/04/26/darryl-howard-durham-wrongful-conviction/ https://abc11.com/darryl-howard-anthony-durham-doris-washington/10564012/ https://www.wral.com/fight-continues-for-wrongfully-convicted-durham-man-now-struggling-to-get-his-payout-from-city/20241528/ Darryl's complaint against Durham - 1 UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA DURHAM DIVISION File No. 1:17-cv-477 DARRYL HOWARD, Pla After Years Of Wrongful Imprisonment, Darryl Howard Was Sustained By Love, Redeemed By Justice – NCBarBlog https://apnews.com/article/b1e3f541c53548a189c4e30c27f470e6 https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/central-ny/news/2016/08/29/man-back-in-court-after-2-murder-convictions-overturned-2-years-ago YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/AmericanJusticePodcast Where to Listen: Apple - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/american-justice-podcast/id1442874178 Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/american-justice/s1e1-brandon-woodruff-case-overview Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/5y7UVzvchLxJYbrceVTbvX Online - www.AmericanJusticePodcast.com If you would like to get in touch with us, you can do so in any of the following ways: https://www.facebook.com/americanjusticepodcast https://www.instagram.com/americanjusticepodcast/ https://www.twitter.com/ajusticepodcast https://www.americanjusticepodcast.com Voicemail: (972) 942-0444 Email: info@americanjusticepodcast.com You can reach the hosts here - Scott Poggensee Email - Scott@AtuAProductions.com www.facebook.com/scott.poggensee www.twitter.com/moonscare1 C. Derick Miller www.cderickmiller.com https://www.facebook.com/howlgrowlsnarl https://twitter.com/howlgrowlsnarl https://www.instagram.com/howlgrowlsn/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCylWekMVEiop3uAPi1MAQ_w https://howlgrowlsnarl.podbean.com/

Dan Snow's History Hit
Anne Frank's Step Sister: 'How I Survived the Holocaust' Part 2

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 48:15 Very Popular


2/2. Eva Schloss remembers her days as a girl in Amsterdam playing in the street with the other children including Anne Frank who, for a time, took a particular interest in her older brother Heinz. Eva also remembers the day the Dutch resistance worker exposed her family to the Nazis and they were carted off to Auschwitz. She remembers the train pulling up to the platform in Poland and the promise she made her brother to go back to find the paintings he'd done in hiding, if he didn't make it out alive.After being selected to live by Josef Mengele, Eva and her mother entered Auschwitz-Birkenau while her brother and father were sent to a men's camp. There they endured starvation, back-breaking work, blistering summers and freezing winter.In Part 2 of Eva's story, she describes stumbling across Otto Frank, Anne Frank's father while trying to find help after the liberation of the camp left her stranded with no idea what to do next. The story of Otto and her mother falling in love and finding happiness in the years after and how, after many years of nightmares and silence, Eva finally found her voice to tell her astonishing story of survival, which she still does to this day.You can listen to Part 1 first here.Her memoir is called After Auschwitz: A Story of Heartbreak and Survival by the Stepsister of Anne FrankThis episode was produced by Mariana Des Forges, the assistant producer was Hannah Ward and the audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Rock Drive Catchup Podcast
Ian was shot in the head, lost an eye but survived...

The Rock Drive Catchup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:27


Ian blew us away with this one hell of a yarn, surviving the unthinkable...See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dean Blundell Show
Polyamoury and BDSM With Sex Educator Emmalene & Loch Was Left Alone For A Week And Barley Survived

The Dean Blundell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 157:55


We're easing into an intense week of shows by talking Polyamoury and BDSM with Ply/BDSM educator, Emmalene and or boy JB, whos' in 'the lifestyle' - Covering your drink in a sex club - Jealousy - Do's and don't's for first-time BDSMrs - Sex vs Love - Different types of polyamoury (there are a few) - watching your partner get drilled - Entry points (there are a few) Loch's wife is back after leaving him alone for a week. He didn't fare well.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Anne Frank's Step Sister: 'How I Survived the Holocaust' Part 1

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 38:50


1/2. On the morning of the 4th of August 1944, exactly 78 years ago today, the Frank family cowered behind a bookshelf in Amsterdam, listening to heavy boots and German voices on the other side. Anne Frank and her family were discovered and taken to the Nazi concentration camps where they all perished, apart from Otto. Anne's diary stops in the summer of 1944 so it's difficult for us to truly know exactly what her experience was after her arrest, as a teenage girl enduring the horrors of the Nazi death machine.But Eva Schloss, the girl who became her stepsister - does. She was sent to Auschwitz with her parents and older brother Heinz and remembers what that whole experience was like - from the way Austrians slowly turned on their Jewish neighbours, hiding in crawl spaces from Nazis, the cattle truck ride, her encounters with the angel of death Josef Mengele and how the liberation of Auschwitz left her stranded in the abandoned camp for weeks.Eva's is a story of close calls, unexplainable chances and turns of fortune, as well as unimaginable horrors. So, a warning that some parts of this story are distressing.Her memoir is called After Auschwitz: A Story of Heartbreak and Survival by the Stepsister of Anne Frank.This episode was produced by Mariana Des Forges, the assistant producer was Hannah Ward and the audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Todd Herman Show
She survived an abortion by God's Grace? What did she feel when Roe was struck down? What does she see in our world, today? Gianna Jessen joins us.  Episode 240 - Hour 2 She Survived An Abortion-Gianna Jessen

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 58:47


THE THESIS: God saved Gianna Jessen from the abortionist who tried to kill her to speak to us about more than “just” abortion. She is a model of facing demons by drawing strength from Christ.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Psalm 139:14 14 I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;     your works are wonderful,     I know that full well. What Is the Meaning of the Body of Christ? Born for This: How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do THE NEWS & COMMENT:   Hire Gianna to speak! GiannaJessen.com  [VIDEO] - The abortionist failed to kill her, but given what was done to her body during the attempted killing, it's a miracle that Gianna can sing:   My unborn son may not live long, but he still deserves protection from those looking to end his life To the medical staff, our son was already dead, and our choice not to abort him was just an unnecessary headache and expense for everyone involved. The so-called Association of American “Medical” Colleges has released curricula--read: indoctrination struggle sessions--that will force young people to pretend to agree with the dogma Critical Race Theory to work in the field.  Tavistock gender clinic forced to shut over safety fears; Centre accused of rushing vulnerable children into treatmentSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scott and Sadie's 20 Minute Morning Show
I (barely) survived Costco on a Sunday...

Scott and Sadie's 20 Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 20:27


Bright Side
What If Dinosaurs Survived the Asteroid

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 12:29


Many years ago, a huge asteroid found the worst possible angle and place where it could land on Earth. But let's imagine the asteroid falling in another place – somewhere in the middle of the ocean. Huge waves flooded part of the land, but almost all kinds of dinosaurs survived. Or even better – the rock could have fallen somewhere in the desert and left behind a giant crater. Who would dominate the planet today, and would we be able to develop as humans?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Versus History Podcast
Episode 150: The resistance fighter who survived three concentration camps

Versus History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 14:19


In the 150th episode of the Versus History Podcast, we interview author Eva Taylor about her new book, 'Sabine's War'. The book notes are below: Sabine's War is the previously untold story of a remarkable resistance fighter and her incredible story of survival against the odds. When Germany invaded Holland in May 1940, Sabine Zuur joined the resistance movement without a moment's hesitation aged just 22. Helping to hide those avoiding the German authorities, she was soon betrayed and subjected to repeated violent interrogations. Many of her friends were executed but Sabine was instead sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp, via the Amersfoort andRavensbrück camps. Enduring gruelling conditions and backbreaking forced manual labour, she survived through a combination of guile and good fortune. But it was only after Sabine's death that her daughter Eva discovered an archive of letters detailing her extraordinary life, revealing a rich inner world and a past she had discussed little. Amongst them were declarations of love from pilot Taro, shot down in his Spitfire over northern France aged just 26; letters to her mother smuggled out in her prison laundry; and passionate, creepy missives from a German professional criminal named Gebele who would ultimately save Sabine's life. She emerges from this correspondence as a woman with an indefinable aura, somehow in control of her own destiny even when to all intents and purposes she was not. A transfixing story of survival, Sabine's War captures a remarkable life in the words of the young woman who lived it.For terms of use, please visit www.versushistory.com

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos
Outlaw bikie who took a bullet to the penis and survived is shot for a second time in 18 months

The Dragon's Lair Motorcycle Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 66:03


1. Outlaw bikie who took a bullet to the penis and survived is shot for a second time in 18 months.2. Some folks will give everything for an MC. Is it worth it? Join us as we discuss!Get my new Audio Book Prospect's Bible from these links: United States https://adbl.co/3OBsfl5United Kingdom https://adbl.co/3J6tQxTFrance https://bit.ly/3OFWTtfGermany https://adbl.co/3b81syQ Help us get to 10,000 subscribers on www.instagram.com/BlackDragonBikerTV on Instagram. Thank you!Follow us on TikTok www.tiktok.com/@blackdragonbikertv Subscribe to our new discord server https://discord.gg/dshaTSTGet 20% off Gothic biker rings by using my special discount code: blackdragon go to http://gthic.com?aff=147Subscribe to our online news magazine www.bikerliberty.comBuy Black Dragon Merchandise, Mugs, Hats, T-Shirts Books: https://blackdragonsgear.comDonate to our cause with Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BlackDragonNP Donate to our cause with PayPal https://tinyurl.com/yxudso8z Subscribe to our Prepper Channel “Think Tactical”: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-WnkPNJLZ2a1vfis013OAgSUBSCRIBE TO Black Dragon Biker TV YouTube https://tinyurl.com/y2xv69buKEEP UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackdragonbikertvTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/jbunchiiFacebook : https://www.facebook.com/blackdragonbiker

The Journal.
Rent the Runway's CEO on How it Survived the Pandemic

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 17:40 Very Popular


When the pandemic hit, Rent the Runway, a company that rents designer clothing, saw half its customers pause or cancel their monthly subscriptions. Jennifer Hyman, the CEO, talks about how she retooled the business to survive the shock, and the challenges that still remain. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hellblazerbiz
SpEp20 Was I Next? Sean Cribbin with his amazing story of how he survived a serial killer

Hellblazerbiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 38:40


I talk with Sean Cribbin, survivor of serial killer Bruce McArthur, and Sean's partner Steve Sauder, who also provided the music score for the documentary. Was I Next? The Sean Cribbin Story, a multiple-award winning documentary from iCogitate Productions, tells the story of Sean Cribbin, a gay man who lived through a shocking brush with death at the hands of Canada's most brutal serial killer, Bruce McArthur. After years of communicating via online dating apps, in July of 2017 Sean agreed to meet McArthur, but once they were at his apartment, McArthur gave Sean a larger than normal dose of GHB, a known date-rape drug, which made him black out.McArthur photographed Sean's unconscious body in a number of ritualized poses, as he had done before with his 8 other victims before killing them, dismembering them, and hiding the remains in large planters. This time, however, McArthur's roommate unexpectedly returned home, having taken the afternoon off work, unknowingly saving Sean's life. After regaining consciousness, confused and entirely unaware of how closely he had come to dying, Sean returned home and chalked the encounter up to a bad date.Seven months later, in January of 2018, in the days after McArthur was arrested for 2 of the 8 murders he would eventually be charged with, the Toronto Police contacted Sean. They had found the photographs of his unconscious form on McArthur's computer, and asked him to come in for an interview. It is at this interview that he learned the truth about what happened at the hands of a serial killer now charged with multiple counts of murder, of the remarkable coincidences which saved his life, and just how close he had come to his own end.While the extraordinary events above serve as the catalyst for what follows, they are only the starting point for the documentary (in fact, the filmmakers made the conscious decision to avoid saying the killer's name whenever possible in the film), which tells a remarkable tale of trauma, survivor's guilt, cyber-bullying, victim-blaming and eventually healing.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/Hellblazerbiz. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Between Friends - Conversations with Maitri

A Maitri podcast with Rennu Dhillon, an entrepreneur, educator, motivational speaker and author. Rennu suffered domestic violence yet she didn't give up, with her courage, dignity and hard work she has rebuilt her life. Listen to Rennu's unbelievable life journey. www.maitri.org | 1-888-8MAITRI @maitribayarea: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | LinkedIn This project was made possible by funding provided by the County of Santa Clara Office of Gender-Based Violence Prevention. www.sccendviolence.org #Maitri #MaitriPodcast #EndDV #genderbasedviolence #DomesticViolence --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/maitribayarea/message

Story Behind
Homeowner Spots Raccoon On The Roof | Story Of How 3-Year-Old Boy Survived All Alone In Wilderness

Story Behind

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 6:10


A homeowner came home to find a raccoon on the roof in the most hilariously bizarre position.ANDYou'll want to praise God after learning about this miraculous story of how a three-year-old boy survived all alone in the wilderness in Montana for two days.To see videos and photos referenced in this episode, visit GodUpdates!https://www.godupdates.com/raccoon-on-the-roof/https://www.godupdates.com/3-year-old-boy-survived-wilderness-in-montana/

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"Law Can Never Be A Substitute For Politics" - Instructions For Thinking About The Law With Politics In Command with Sophia G and Nathan Y

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 120:56


In this interview we wanted to do a discussion about the law, politics and abolition. We thought that this was an important thing to have some discussion on, in light of all the recent Supreme Court rulings which have rightfully caused a lot of anger, indignation, protest and organizing.  Our guests for this week are Sophia G and Nathan Y. Sophia is a lawyer defending criminalized immigrants and a PIC and border abolitionist. Nathan is an abolitionist lawyer defending criminalized immigrants and defending Cuba from economic imperialism.  In conversation they both work to demystify concepts like the law and rights as neutral concepts or principles. They emphasis the importance of seeing courts as a site of struggle, where any wins or losses made do not come a result of good legal arguments, but as a result of larger social forces and power struggles.  Both emphasize the importance of keeping politics front and center, and of viewing the law as something to be understood, only so that we can disrespect it and overcome it, rather than putting it on a pedestal. And that lawyering like any other skill or trade, needs to be put in service of social movements, which means dispensing with the mythology and decorum of the law, and liberal understandings of it. Along the way they discuss interesting tactics, such as jury nullification (Beyond Criminal Courts Jury Nullification toolkit) in the wake of Dobbs and new anti-abortion laws and mass participatory defense campaigns for people facing criminalization and deportation. They also talk about some of the work of Survived and Punished New York. So also follow them on social media for ways you can support struggles like the ones described by Nathan and Sophia in this episode. This is an important discussion for organizers, activists, people who have been activated by recent Supreme Court decisions, and for attorneys and law students who are trying to understand how they can use their legal skills in ways that frankly are pretty foreign to most folks in the legal profession. One struggle mentioned near the end of the episode:  "Assia's community is calling on folks to sign her pardon petition (https://bit.ly/AssiaPetition) and is inviting folks to a speakout featuring her and other criminalized New Yorkers facing deportation. The speakout will highlight how New York's tools of criminalization facilitate mass deportations—and will call on the governor to grant clemency to the speakers fighting for their right to remain in the US. Details: August 8, 2022, 6:00 PM ET. Tentative Title: "New York's Complicity in the Deportation Machine: Beyond 'Sanctuary' and Other So-Called Protective Laws." Zoom link: https://bit.ly/NYDeportationMachine Meeting ID: 882 5834 8400 / Passcode: 295136 One tap mobile +16468769923,,88258348400# US (New York)" This is our fifth episode of July at Millennials Are Killing Capitalism. Every episode we do requires many hours of research, preparation, recording, editing and production. We operate the show totally independently and without any advertising or financial backing other than the support of our listeners. It's super easy to become a patron of the show and you can do it for as little as $1 a month or $10.80 per year at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism. By doing that you will of course be notified of each new episode as well as every time we start up a new session of our ongoing study groups.

Will & Woody
⚡️MINI: Soap Opera Moment - A Man Survived 2 Days Lost At Sea After A Fishing Boat Accident

Will & Woody

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 3:35


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Yakety Yak
Gardner Francis: Survived his Fathers Suicide with the support of his Mom, siblings and friends. He shares lessons learned from his Dad and his enthusiasm for the future.

Yakety Yak

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 39:45


Gardner was just 14 when he lost his father, Jory Francis to suicide. Gardner has overcome obstacles and challenges that most will never experience in their lifetimes. In this episode, Gardner shares the strength and fortitude of his Mother, Shelley Francis-Winget as she continues to teach her children how to live. At 20, Gardner is an exceptional man. He's leading his family through example; as he lovingly cares for,  and teaches his siblings and cherishes the relationship he has with his girlfriend. Gardner has a promising real estate career and shines as a leader and example. His infectious laugh and sense of humor endear him to everyone he meets. 

Kate Dalley Radio
RERUN Last Friday Special Edition-Gianna Jessen Survived An Abortion

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 53:58


RERUN Last Friday Special Edition-Gianna Jessen Survived An Abortion by Kate Dalley

Peak Performance Life Podcast
EPI 52: Dr. Al Danenberg On The Dangers Of Mercury Tooth Fillings and X-Rays. Plus How He's Survived Cancer When His Doctor Said He Had 3 Months To Live

Peak Performance Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 49:59


We all know that "disease" is something that happens to us outside our control. The disease is an outsider that invades our bodies, and we are helpless to resist. Excellent health, the opposite of disease, is viewed as a blessing bestowed only on a select few. It is precisely this viewpoint that sometimes keeps us from experiencing the optimal level of health.   Today, I am joined by Dr. Al Danenberg as he shares his inspirational health journey of fighting and surviving cancer after being told he only had three months to live. We also talk about the dangers of mercury tooth fillings and X-rays.   Dr. Al, as his patients call him, has been a periodontist for over four decades, during which time he developed an unprecedented approach to gum disease based on evolutionary nutrition.   He also has advanced training in evolutionary nutrition from the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health as well as The Center for Mind-Body Medicine, is a certified functional medicine practitioner by way of Functional Medicine University, and is a Primal Health Coach.   In April 2020, Dr. Al was appointed the Chair of the Periodontal Committee for the International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine (IABDM) and several months later was appointed as a Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Immunity at Daivam Wellness Center in India.   Connect with Dr. Al at: Website: https://drdanenberg.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-al-danenberg/   Resources: 5 Things That Could be Impacting Your Health Right Now https://drdanenberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/5-Things-PDF.pdf 10 Questions to Ask Your Biological Dentist  https://drdanenberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/10-Questions-to-Ask-Your-Biological-Dentist-11.21.21.pdf      What is Balanced Metabolic Coaching https://drdanenberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Balanced-Metabolic-Coaching-Program.pdf 4 Steps to a Healthy Mouth: https://drdanenberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/PDF-4-Steps-To-A-Healthy-Mouth-5.9.22.pdf Shoddy Dentistry & Mouth Splinters https://drdanenberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Shoddy-Dentistry-4.19.21.pdf  Link to my Blog about The State of Our Health As I Know It: https://drdanenberg.com/the-state-of-our-health-as-i-know-it/     Link to my Blog about a Leaky Gut and a Leaky Mouth: https://drdanenberg.com/leaky-gut-leaky-mouth-both-must-be-treated/ “Better Belly Blueprint” on Amazon to download to a Kindle App:  https://www.amazon.com/Better-Belly-Blueprint-strengthen-immune-ebook/dp/B08DX9N9RB “Is Your Gut Killing You?” on Amazon to download to a Kindle App:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08F34ZVGX/  In This Episode:   [1:10] Dr. Al's background and health journey [8:35] Your attitude affects your healing potential [12:14] How did Dr. Al get cancer? [16:44] Mercury tooth filling warnings and protocols [24:30] On dental X-Rays [32:13] EMF and radiation [35:50] Dr. Al's unconventional protocols for fighting his cancer [44:23] How can someone have a healthy gut microbiome? [47:32] Learn more about Dr. Al [49:33] Outro     Links and Resources: Peak Performance Life Peak Performance on Facebook Peak Performance on Instagram

The Mike Wagner Show
Author/disruptive leadership speaker David Moore who survived 4 plane crashes is my special guest!

The Mike Wagner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 38:52


Author/disruptive leadership speaker David Moore talks about his two books “Wake Up and Win” and “Gear Up, Shut Up” and as a decorated Navy/Air Force aviator surviving 4 plane crashes and dedicates his life to help others find their purpose and live their best lives despite tribulations! David also served as flight instructor as a student at Ohio University and his books discuss how to be an effective leader and team member through his experiences! Check out David's amazing books on Amazon and www.mooremotivated.com today! #davidmoore #author #disruptiveleadership #speaker #wakeupandwin #gearupshutup #navy #airforce #aviator #planecrash #survivor #flightinstructor #amazon #audible #iheartradio #spreaker #spotify #itunes #applemusic #youtube #anchorfm #podbean #mikewagner #themikewagnershow #mikewagnerdavidmoore #themikewagnershowdavidmoore

Urban Space Radio
UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED | ep.23 |Occupation of Luhansk region and missile attacks on civilians

Urban Space Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 23:35


Today we have audios from residents of Kremenchuk, Lysychansk and Podilsk in Odesa region. We asked people there how their life (or life war balance) is today. What is it like to continue living, despite the constant danger and pain? You can support Podcast UA: The day that we survived here: https://www.patreon.com/UAThedaythatwesurvived

UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED
UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED | ep.23 |Occupation of Luhansk region and missile attacks on civilians

UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 23:35


Today we have audios from residents of Kremenchuk, Lysychansk and Podilsk in Odesa region. We asked people there how their life (or life war balance) is today. What is it like to continue living, despite the constant danger and pain? You can support Podcast UA: The day that we survived here: https://www.patreon.com/UAThedaythatwesurvived

Two Decorators and a Microphone
I Survived Dulux Academy Open Day Podcast

Two Decorators and a Microphone

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 34:57


I Survived Dulux Academy Open Day Podcast If you missed the Dulux Academy Open Day this year put it in your schedule for next year. A great day out.

Ask Dr. Drew
Cheerleader Attempted Suicide & Survived: Emma Benoit Discusses Depression & Recovery – Ask Dr. Drew – Episode 100

Ask Dr. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 75:03


Emma Benoit was a popular cheerleader with a supportive family and friends, but on the inside she was hiding severe depression and anxiety. In 2017, the summer before her senior year in high school, she attempted suicide – which resulted in a spinal cord injury that left her paralyzed. Now she works to bring awareness to the epidemic of youth suicide through writing and documentaries, including 2021's "My Ascension."  The new 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a US-based, toll-free hotline available 24/7 to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.  Greg Dicharry was introduced to the world of mental health while living in Hollywood pursuing his dream of working in the entertainment industry. In that time, he was hospitalized and diagnosed with co-occurring bipolar and substance use disorders. Now Greg is a youth empowerment expert, mental health advocate, and filmmaker who served as Magellan Health's national youth empowerment director from 2007 - 2022. In 2008, he developed the MY LIFE program, which is one of the nation's leading programs for youth who experience challenged with mental health or substance use. Greg also produces and directs mental health related films including the documentary "My Ascension" with Emma Benoit. Learn more about Emma and Greg's film at https://MyAscension.us Ask Dr. Drew is produced by Kaleb Nation (https://kalebnation.com) and Susan Pinsky (http://twitter.com/firstladyoflove). This show is for entertainment and/or informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. SPONSORED BY • GENUCEL - Using a proprietary base formulated by a pharmacist, Genucel has created skincare that can dramatically improve the appearance of facial redness and under-eye puffiness. Genucel uses clinical levels of botanical extracts in their cruelty-free, natural, made-in-the-USA line of products. Get 10% off with promo code DREW at https://genucel.com/drew GEAR PROVIDED BY • BLUE MICS - After more than 30 years in broadcasting, Dr. Drew's iconic voice has reached pristine clarity through Blue Microphones. But you don't need a fancy studio to sound great with Blue's lineup: ranging from high-quality USB mics like the Yeti, to studio-grade XLR mics like Dr. Drew's Blueberry. Find your best sound at https://drdrew.com/blue • ELGATO - Every week, Dr. Drew broadcasts live shows from his home studio under soft, clean lighting from Elgato's Key Lights. From the control room, the producers manage Dr. Drew's streams with a Stream Deck XL, and ingest HD video with a Camlink 4K. Add a professional touch to your streams or Zoom calls with Elgato. See how Elgato's lights transformed Dr. Drew's set: https://drdrew.com/sponsors/elgato/ For over 30 years, Dr. Drew has answered questions and offered guidance to millions through popular shows like Celebrity Rehab (VH1), Dr. Drew On Call (HLN), Teen Mom OG (MTV), and the iconic radio show Loveline. Now, Dr. Drew is opening his phone lines to the world by streaming LIVE from his home studio. Watch all of Dr. Drew's latest shows at https://drdrew.tv.  

Boones Creek Christian Church
Sermon - "Survived, Now Advance"

Boones Creek Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 32:41


Associate Minister - Ben Cole

Solid Steps Radio
#340 Jeff Ratanapool Survived A Widow Maker Heart Attack And Everything Changed 7/21/22

Solid Steps Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 42:43


A “widow maker”. Those are words no man wants to hear from a doctor as it relates to his physical health. Less than 10% survive one. The majority of those that do survive, have some type of permanent damage afterwards. On this weeks show, Kurt and Chad talk to Jeff Ratanapool who not only survived a “widow maker”, but came out of it with very little physical damage, which is just short of a miracle. Jeff stopped breathing for nearly 3 minutes after collapsing on a basketball court from a heart attack. He tells his story and what he learned during and after that life changing experience, and what he encourages men to do as they get older pertaining to their health, both physically and spiritually.

WhatCulture Wrestling
AEW Dynamite FYTER FEST WEEK 2 Review - Who Survived Barbed Wire Everywhere? Jungle Boy RETURNS! Brody King DESTROYS Darby Allin! Kris Statlander's Simon Miller Tribute?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 91:16 Very Popular


Adam and the Dadley Boyz review last night's episode of AEW Dynamite and discuss...Who survived Barbed Wire Everywhere?Jungle Boy RETURNS!Brody King DESTROYS Darby Allin!FTW Championship match!Kris Statlander's Simon Miller tribute?!ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@AdamWilbourn@MichaelHamflett@MSidgwick@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

This Is Monsters
Jerry Jenkins & Ronald Kennedy : She Survived, But She Didn't Live

This Is Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 44:23


Jerry Jenkins and Ronald Kennedy were just bad people who believed they could take whatever they wanted. Cars, booze, and even human life. For more stories of the worst people on earth, visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/thisisMONSTERS You can check out our new merch at: https://this-is-monsters.creator-spring.com/ To support the show, donate a few bucks through Buy Me A Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/monsters You can find more information about ways to support us plus contact info at our website: https://www.thisismonsters.com/

Chuck and Buck
H1: 7-21 We survived a night without sports! Baseball is back and so is Mitch Haniger & and emotional speech from Dick Vitale

Chuck and Buck

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 47:14


We made it through the slowest day in sports and we don't have to go through that again until next July! Mitch Haniger is being sent to Everett to began his rehab assignment, what food with the Aqua Sox players get for his arrival? The ESPY's were last night and Dick Vitale game an emotional speech.

Security Squawk
Russian Hackers use File Applications To Evade Detection- Microsoft: Phishing bypassed MFA in attacks-How One Company Survived a Ransomware Attack Without Paying the Ransom-Risk & Repeat: Ransomware in 2022-Travelers Want Out of Contract

Security Squawk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 65:41


In this week's episode the cybersecurity experts Bryan Hornung, Reginald Andre, Randy Bryan, and Ryan O'Hara discuss how Russian hackers are using some of your favorite online file sharing applications to ruin your day. Next, the crew looks into a report by Microsoft were they detected that cybercriminals have figured out a method for your MFA. Also, the team jumps into one company that survived a ransomware attack and how they didn't have to pay the ransom. Then, the experts update everyone on the statistics for ransomwares in 2022. At the end of the show, the team shows an example of a company who didn't get paid by their insurance company and why? Tune into this week's episode! Like and Subscribe!

Red to Green - Food Tech | Sustainability | Food Innovation | Future of Food | Cultured Meat

come in pretty handy, even if they aren't particularly exciting. I know I have plenty gathering dust in the back of a cupboard [myself]. But if you stop to think about it, the humble tin can is [actually] a bit of a modern miracle. The problem of food preservation is at least as old as agriculture. Humans have been very creative at finding ways to salt, dry, smoke, pickle, freeze, and ferment foods to keep them edible after the harvest ends – many of these traditions date back millennia and remain alive today. On the other hand, canning is remarkably new in comparison – its 200th birthday was only in 2010. But it works almost unbelievably well. In 1974 some canned goods were retrieved from the wreck of a steamboat that sank in the Missouri River. When they were opened, the oysters, peaches, and tomatoes were analyzed and found to be safe to eat, even after 100 years underwater in tin cans. (Though none of the scientists seems to have been brave enough or hungry enough [actually] to try any.) Red to Green is a podcast focused on the future of food and food sustainability. We cover topics like cellular agriculture, cultured meat, food waste, food packaging, and more. More info and links to resources on https://redtogreen.solutions/ For sponsorships, collaborations, volunteering, or feedback write Marina at change@redtogreen.solutions Please leave a review on iTunes https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/red-to-green-food-sustainability/id1511303510 Connect with Marina Schmidt https://www.linkedin.com/in/schmidt-marina/

Ukraine: The Latest
"I survived Bucha": an interview with Katya Savchenko

Ukraine: The Latest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 36:52 Very Popular


Today, we break from the normal programme to interview Bucha survivor, Katya Savchenko.Before the 24th February, the town of Bucha was known as, an attractive suburb, north west of Kyiv. During the early part of the invasion, it was the scene of heavy fighting as Ukrainian and Russian forces battled for control. For weeks, the town was under Russian occupation and, soon after they were pushed back, horrendous stories of murder, rape and torture emerged from civilians who had stayed in the town. Katya Savchenko stayed in Bucha. She survived, many of the people she met, didn't.Email: podcasts@telegraph.co.uk.Read our ongoing coverage of Ukraine: www.telegraph.co.uk/ukraineSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio
Full Show: Booker survived Sea World during record heat...his Mom, not so much!!!

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 31:35


Booker survived Sea World during record heat...his Mom, not so much!!! ----- If you haven't flown in a while you NEED to hear this ----- What's Trending: We can't believe these two mega stars FINALLY tied the knot AND could you sleep in a "Nap Box"? ----- Did we REALLY need ne emojis??? ----- Can't Beat Booker with Anna Belle in Georgetown, Texas ----- Waiting By the Phone: Could it be his style that's holding him back???

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio
Booker survived Sea World during record heat...his Mom, not so much!!!

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 4:49


The kids had a great time and that's all that matters!!!

The Lawfare Podcast
Live From Ukraine: Katya Savchenko Survived Bucha—and Wrote About It

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 58:39 Very Popular


#LiveFromUkraine is an experimental project hosted on Twitter Spaces by Ben Wittes, with the goal of interviewing a diverse lineup of guests to educate and engage directly with people on the ground in Ukraine during Russia's ongoing invasion. In this episode, Ben talks with Katya Savchencko (@shanovna_s), who grew up in the Donbas region of Ukraine and moved to Bucha following the Russian invasion of that region in 2014. This year, following the full-scale invasion, she survived several days of the brutal and murderous Russian occupation of Bucha before escaping by train with her sister. She kept a diary of her days in Bucha, which she recently published on Medium in English translation. Savchhencko joined Benjamin Wittes on #LiveFromUkraine. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everyone Loves Guitar
Kenny Neal, “I BURIED 3 family members & SURVIVED STAGE 4 Cancer…”

Everyone Loves Guitar

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 75:39 Very Popular


On this Kenny Neal interview: “Maybe I'M HERE for a REASON…” Using his integrity & incredible work ethic early on, to reach his goals… Most important life lesson he learned… taking time off from music to become a Broadway actor, and the one thing he took back to his music career from this experience… dealing with a horrible family tragedy & loss, and surviving cancer all in the same year… stories about working with Buddy Guy, Lucky Peterson, Muddy Waters, Albert Collins, Big Mama Thornton, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson, Big Mama Thornton… Best childhood memories, love, passion, being “a man to your word” and more. Positive, pure and good vibes on this one, a must see/listen! Cool Guitar & Music T-Shirts!: http://www.GuitarMerch.com   Kenny Neal is a blues artist who's an outstanding guitarist, singer & songwriter from New Orleans. Kenny's a member of the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame and has won more blues awards for songs, performances and albums... than I could even fit on this page. Kenny's dad, Raful was a successful harp player working with artists like Buddy Guy and Slim Harpo. When he was 13, Kenny started playing out on the road with his dad's band and eventually was playing bass with Buddy Guy. Kenny's had a prolific career releasing 22 albums since 1987, including his latest album, Straight From The Heart. Subscribe & Website:  https://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/subscribe Support this show: http://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/support

The BS Filter
BFTN 108 – We Survived COVID

The BS Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 95:03


Bolton says it out loud; Ukraine's pro-fascist Ambassador; banning abortion to produce more white babies; Colombia's new President; Christmas comes early for the military industrial complex. The post BFTN 108 – We Survived COVID appeared first on The BS Filter.

Inside the Aluminum Tube with Shanon Baker
31. Poster Boy in Tenerife - KLM 4805 & Pan Am 1736

Inside the Aluminum Tube with Shanon Baker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 121:57


A Pan Am 747 and a KLM 747 find themselves at a tiny island, where neither was supposed to be. As the circumstances become increasingly difficult, the crews have a tough time figuring out where they are, where they are supposed to be...or what they are supposed to be doing.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast
S6E56: It's A Miracle He Survived, Shot 6 Times In The Line of Duty and Died 3 Times During Surgery.

Law Enforcement Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 41:14


It's A Miracle He Survived, was Shot 6 Times In The Line of Duty, and Died 3 Times During Surgery. Mario Olivera tells his story and details the unique path that led to writing and publishing the book “Gunrunner”.  Sometimes the Helpers Need Help. Saving and rebuilding the lives of First Responders. For 24/7 Confidential Free Information call 833-776-1420. Shatterproof for First Responders at FHE Health. Do you believe in miracles? His story can only be described as a miracle. Mario Olivera, a retired Police Officer makes a return appearance as our guest. While assigned to the ATF he was shot by a suspect 6 times. Medical reports state that he died three times during treatment. Mario talks about the shooting, and the out-of-body experiences he had during his medical treatment, that coincided with the reported clinical deaths. He also talks about his long physical and mental recovery, and the impacts it had on him and his family, from the extreme physical wounds and PTSD. Mario also discusses his difficulty getting retirement and the amazing conversation he had with another retired Law Enforcement Officer that led to the writing of the book "Gunrunner The Mario Olivera Story".  Interested in being a guest, sponsorship or advertising opportunities send an email to the host and producer of the show jay@lawenforcementtoday.com.  Be sure to Like and Follow us on Facebook. If you enjoy the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast, please tell a friend or two, or three about it.  Background song Hurricane is used with permission from the band Dark Horse Flyer. Never miss out on an episode of the Law Enforcement Today Podcast, AND be automatically entered in all future contests. Simply subscribe to our free email newsletter, never more than 2 issues a week sent out. Click here and scroll down about halfway. Check out the Clubhouse: Drop In Audio Chat App for free. It is social audio, think of truly interactive talk radio. Be sure to become a member of our club for free, LET Radio and Podcast.  Follow us on MeWe, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook.  In the Clubhouse app look for and follow @LetRadioShow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Strokecast
Life Coach Survived 2 Strokes and a TBI

Strokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 82:09


Julie Kuch had her first stroke in 2009 when she was 30. No one believed her at the time, and she had to convince a neurologist to order an MRI before the medical system began to take her seriously. And once they did take her seriously, the system still didn't offer Julie rehab or even education about how to live life as a stroke survivor. Several years later, Julie had a do-over -- her second stroke. Oh, and she through in a TBI in between. Between her strokes, Julie created the services she wished she had for her own stroke. She became a life coach for brain injury survivors. To learn just what a life coach does, how their services help, and how Julie built this life, listen to this episode. If you don't see the audio player below, visit http://Strokecast.com/Julie to listen to the conversation.   Click here for a machine-generated transcript Who is Julie Kuch? Julie is a concussion and stroke survivor. She is a Life Coach for people who have had a brain injury. She has helped 100's of people find joy and purpose in life again. Julie has survived to strokes and a TBI. Her second stroke was in January 2022. She is currently recovering (very well) from this, her third brain injury. The experience has Julie feeling more passionate than ever that part of her mission in this life is to help as many people as possible recover and feel better than before their brain injury. Julie is grateful for her brain injuries and the valuable lessons they have given her. Julie wants everyone that has experienced a TBI to feel the same, and she know they can. Julie says, "So much of the suffering we go through recovering from brain injuries is not necessary. I teach my clients how to transform from feeling resentful, frustrated, angry, shameful and depressed about the state of their life to feeling accepting, loving, and at peace about themselves and their capacity after a brain injury." Julie certified as a Life Coach through The Life Coach School. A Go Getter Gets Depression Depression is a topic we don't talk about often enough. It's a common stroke deficit, like hemiparesis and aphasia. It interferes with recovery and exercise routines. And it's not just feeling sad or mourning the end of your previous life. It's a genuine problem that burns energy and can make it even harder to get out of bed and do PT. Or do the basics of taking care of ourselves. Last year, I talked with Dr. Laura Stein from Mount Sanai in New York. She talked about new research showing that stroke itself causes major depression, and not just the impacts of stroke. In 2009, no one told Julie she might encounter depression. We also had less overall public awareness about depression. And when it did hit Julie, she was not prepared to deal with it. She had to deal with her own limiting beliefs about antidepressant medication and about people with depression. Julie talks about the shame and embarrassment she had around her treatment. By 2022, she was better prepared to deal with it. Depression, like stroke, can happen to anyone. It can be a deadly condition. And like any other stroke deficit, it's nothing to be ashamed of. We can know that, but that doesn't guarantee we'll believe that. Why drive during a stroke? Julie had her stroke while she was driving to the doctor's office. But she didn't pull over and call an ambulance. Jo Ann Glim had her stroke in a deli while trying to fix an office sandwich crisis. Misha Montana drove back to Reno while having a stroke. James Horton drove home while having a stroke, Driving while experiencing a stroke is a terrible idea. It's dangerous. It's difficult. The problem is that we rely on our brains to evaluate every situation of every minute of every day. In a stroke, though, the brain is under attack. Millions of brain cells are dying every minute. Various parts are scrambling in panic mode to figure out what is happening, what no longer works, and what to do next. The part that should tell us what common sense is has become the part that is broken. So, what can we do? We talk about neuroplasticity as how we recover after stroke. The core principle is, "Cells that fire together, wire together."  It's not just recovery, though. Neuroplasticity governs how we learn. We say things like "Practice makes perfect" because doing something repeatedly is often how we learn it. Practice IS the firing together of neuroplasticity. The more we repeat a thing, the more resilient the connections in our brains become. The bigger they become. The more permanent they become. If you grew up in the US and I say, "I pledge allegiance…" you probably immediately want to say, "to the flag." If you grew up Catholic and I say, "In the name of the father," you probably felt the urge to touch your forehead. These are patterns we developed over years of repetition. Here's how this impacts driving. By repeating BE FAST early and often, we internalize not only the most common symptoms of stroke, but also the action. T = Time to call an ambulance. B – a sudden loss of or change in balance E – a sudden change in or loss of eyesight or vision F – single side face droop A – in ability to hold both arms up S – loss of or change in speech, vocabulary, or ability to process language T – Any of this means it is time to call an ambulance BE FAST = Balance, Eyes, Face, Arms, Speech, Time to call an ambulance. Repeat it until "Time to call an ambulance" is as ingrained as the sign of the cross or the pledge of allegiance. In a crisis, that may then be the course of action the dying brain grabs on to. Helmets Save Lives Julie told the story of her concussion during the conversation. This is a picture of the helmet she was wearing at the time. Yes, she still suffered a traumatic brain injury in the accident, but the helmet took the brunt of it. When you look at the dent in that image, it might not look too dramatic, but if you take another look and then imagine what that would look like on someone's head. Now that's terrifying. What is a Life coach? Julie is a Life Coach for brain injury survivors. But what does that mean? As Julie describes it, she helps live their best life. In some respects, it's similar to what a mental health professional does, but to a lesser degree. A life coach helps a client develop practical skills for life within the context of the coach's expertise. A big part of Julies work is helping folks understand the difference between facts and thoughts. Often, we assume that our thoughts are facts, and that causes problems. Saying it's 73 degrees is a fact. Saying it's too warm to do PT is an opinion or a thought. When we act on thoughts like that, we can limit our recovery. Many of us have limiting beliefs about our abilities, relationships, money, and more. Those limiting beliefs are things that we have convinced ourselves are facts when in reality they are not. And yet they have become part of the way our brain interprets the world due to neuro plasticity. A life coach like Julie helps clients unpack those limiting beliefs and jettison the ones that don't work. Freeing yourself from your limiting beliefs allows you to achieve more. While a life coach is not a replacement for a psychologist, they can still help people live better lives. Hack of the Week There are three tools that helped Julie with the mindset of recovery that she uses with her clients, First, mourn the life that could have been. After a brain injury, life will be different. We are different. Some disabilities may be short term while others are long term. It's okay to be sad and disappointed. Getting stuck in sadness and disappointment won't undo the injury, though. It will only delay your entry in a new and possibly amazing life. Taking time to mourn the life that could have been can help you move on to the life yet to be. Second, receive the gift of rest. Rest and sleep are important, yet many of us flee from them (myself included too many times). That's where much of the work of healing happens though. A brain focused on just getting to the next big thing isn't taking the time it needs to prepare for the next big thing. Take the time to rest and recover. Third, manage your thoughts. The key principle behind Julie's coaching is that thoughts and opinions direct our actions and beliefs. We think they are immutable, but they are not. We can change them. We can decide which ones to dwell on. The core idea of neuroplasticity is that "nerves that fire together, wire together." PT, OT, and Speech Therapy are governed by this theory. It's why we have to do thousands of repetitions to rediscover our limbs and build new pathways in our brains. And it's why dwelling and revisiting unhelpful thoughts is not helpful. The more often we think something or repeat a belief, the more the nerves will wire that thought or belief, giving the brain a shortcut to that thought or belief. Make sure you leverage the power of neuroplasticity to bring good things into your life. Better year for Geek Movies: 1982 or 1989? I was just on the Caffeinated Comics Podcast where we discussed this question along with the trends that transformed movies through the 80s. From Bladerunner to Batman, and Tron to the Little Mermaid, a lot of amazing movies came out in those years. You can hear us discuss it on the podcast here: https://radiomisfits.com/cc286/ Or you can listen and watch on YouTube right here: https://youtu.be/b4gY3KD17i4 Links Where do we go from here? To learn more about Julie's coaching programs visit http://JulieKuchCoaching.com. Follow Julie on Instagram to stay on top of her recovery and see her videos. Share this episode with someone you know by giving them the link http://Strokecast.com/Julie Subscribe to the Strokecast newsletter at http://Strokecast.com/news Don't get best…get better

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
A True Story of Twins Who Survived Auschwitz

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 29:05


Danica Davidson is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate "I Will Protect You, A True Story of Twins Who Survived Auschwitz" Danica wrote this book with Eva Mozes Kor, who, with her sister Miriam, was one of only 160 twins to have survived the unimaginable cruelty of the Nazi regime, while also eventually finding healing and the capacity to forgive. Click here to visit Danica's website - https://danicadavidson.com/ Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

The Pete Kaliner Show
We survived the apocalypse!

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 30:17


Apparently the weird 'American Stonehenge' in Georgia that were meant to withstand the apocalypse were blown up. So, I guess we survived it! Also, hackers are publishing more scandalous content from Hunter Biden's abandoned laptop. Get exclusive content here!: https://thepetekalinershow.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Is Jericho
How I Survived A Pulmonary Embolism

Talk Is Jericho

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 55:06 Very Popular


Chris Jericho tells the whole story behind his health issue last December that resulted not only in Fozzy cancelling shows for the first time ever, but also the formation of the Jericho Appreciation Society in AEW! Chris details the symptoms that started during Fozzy's UK Tour that led to his hospitalization and pulmonary embolism diagnosis in London. He speaks candidly about the harrowing days having trouble breathing, watching his oxygen levels drop, and seeing specialists to help turn his condition around. He discusses his extended hospital stay, being stuck in London unable to fly before the holidays, and the hard work he put in once he was able to return home to Tampa. He talks about his physical transformation, and how that directly contributed to his heel turn in AEW, teaming up with 2.0 and Danny Garcia, and launching the Jericho Appreciation Society.

Optimal Finance Daily
1946: [Part 2] How I Survived Medical Debt by Andrea Joy

Optimal Finance Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 13:16


Andrea Joy of Saving Joyfully talks about how she survived medical debt. This is part 2 of 2. Episode 1946: [Part 2] How I Survived Medical Debt by Andrea Joy of Saving Joyfully on Preparing For Healthcare Crises Andrea Joy is the creator of Saving Joyfully, a personal finance and frugality blog emphasizing joyful living. On her website, savingjoyfully.com, she offers inspiration and resources for your journey to financial freedom. The original post is located here: https://savingjoyfully.com/blog/how-i-survived-medical-debt   Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalFinanceDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices