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Latest podcast episodes about survived

Beyond the Darkness
TCT: Jane Doe #9: How I Survived R. Kelly with guest Lizzette Martinez

Beyond the Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 68:15


True Crime Tuesday meets Jane Doe #9: How I Survived R. Kelly with guest Lizzette Martinez Dave & Tim open up with special guest Lizzette Martinez.  In January of 1995, 17-year-old Lizzette Martinez met Grammy-winning musician and record producer R. KELLY at Aventura Mall in Florida where he was performing. At first, it seemed that her hopes of becoming a professional singer were about to come true when he offered to help boost her career. However, this mentorship quickly turned into sexual grooming, leading to years of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. In August 2021, Kelly went on trial in New York on racketeering and sex trafficking charges and was found guilty of all charges. Get the book here: https://amzn.to/3jDuZBK See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

History Extra podcast
How a ballerina survived the Gulag

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:55


Christina Ezrahi speaks to Elinor Evans about the story of Nina Anisimova, one of the most famous ballerinas in Stalin's Soviet Union. After being arrested for supposed counter-revolutionary activity, Anisimova was transported to a forced labour camp, only to make a remarkable return to the stage. (Ad) Christina Ezrahi is the author of Dancing for Stalin: A Dancer's Story of Courage and Survival in Soviet Russia (Elliott & Thompson Ltd, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dancing-Stalin-Dancers-Courage-Survival/dp/1783965576#:~:text=Dancing%20for%20Stalin%20is%20a,of%20courage%2C%20resilience%20and%20triumph.&text=of%20Bolshoi%20Confidential-,Nina%20Anisimova%20was%20one%20of%20Russia's%20most%20renowned%20ballerinas%20and,career%20concealed%20a%20dark%20secret./?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

I Survived Theatre School
Ammar Daraiseh

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 88:46


Intro: Gina ordered her theatre school transcriptsLet Me Run This By You: knowing when to let go, moments of clarityInterview: We talk to Ammar Daraiseh about being an MFA, homesickness, Joe Slowik and Bella Itkin, Joe Mantegna, type casting, being a middle eastern actor, Sweet Smell of Success, film noir. www.ammardaraiseh.com - there is where you can watch Ammar's acting reel and my short films he produced www.karenkanas.com - Ammar's wife's website FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina . We went to theater school1 (12s):Together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all1 (21s):Theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (34s):Frog into my, my morning frog out of my throat yet. How you doing? I am. Wow. I have a lot to talk to you about, oh, I1 (45s):Half expected you to have red hair this morning.2 (49s):Oh, do you think I should. I okay. But like, did you see the picture? I put a run Lola run. I mean, that might be a little hard to maintain.1 (59s):It's super hard to make, like you'll, you'll have to be the salon and read six weeks at least, or four weeks for root touch-up. But I mean, I personally think the routes coming in would look cool, but wow. Yeah,2 (1m 13s):The whole rally thing. Well, I'll keep you posted cause I, I definitely want to do something different, much different what's going on. Okay. So first thing I'll just get out of the way is for fun, because we're always trying to remember our classes and who taught and what gear we did, everything I ordered my transcript, which unfortunately does not have the names of your professors. Just, yeah, it just has the name of the class and my grades were fair, not great. Like I had a 3.5 or something like that, which I would have, I thought in my memory that I got really good grades in college, but they were really just pretty average.2 (2m 1s):But guess what my lowest grade was in1 (2m 8s):Was it, was it, well, the easy choice is add Colleen,2 (2m 13s):My C my, my one and only see mine was an intro to psychology. I was talking to my husband about it and he goes, yeah, I got a low grade too. He's like, we were just basically saying, this is all too real. We're not ready yet. I think1 (2m 40s):That's a great observation by him.2 (2m 44s):See my whole areas. It's just hilarious. And then in other classes where I was sure, you know, I was hated like an alcohol use class in that I got A's so my God isn't that it's also subjective, like our, our experiences, something as subjective and then our memory about something totally changing. Only subjective as the years go by. Right.1 (3m 7s):It's not just subjective. It's yeah. It's very like mutating subjects, right? Yeah. That's crazy. Oh my God. So you ordered your transcript. Okay. Now you have a transcript2 (3m 21s):And guess what? Anybody can, it's 25 cents. Like if you have, if you haven't ordered, like you have a certain number, you can get in a certain period of time. And so your first one is 25 cents. You,1 (3m 33s):Anybody else want to have a transcript? You2 (3m 36s):Could relive your, your grades. Oh my gosh. Might find some surprises. Do you think you would find some surprises in your1 (3m 42s):I'm? Sure. I mean, I know for a fact that I, that I, I was supposed to drop a class, a, a non, obviously non theater school class, and I never dropped it. So if you don't drop it, you get an F. So I got an F in, like, I want to say it was like sociology or something like that. And I almost didn't graduate because they thought, yeah. And so you can't, I knew it was like, I remember my last year, my senior year, I had to like, do all kinds of regular role. And the other thing is that I didn't do was one year, one quarter or something you had to like re up your financial aid and I didn't do that.1 (4m 24s):So I didn't pay for like a quarter. And they were like, yeah, you're, I'm so shocked. I graduated. I don't know what was happening. They were like, yeah, you have to pay.2 (4m 35s):I had to do some real tap dancing to my parents graduate.1 (4m 39s):Yeah, I remember that, but I don't. Yeah. I I'm sort of scared to look at the grades. I don't.2 (4m 46s):Yeah. I mean, whatever, it's like a grade and acting school is just kind of funny. It should probably be, and maybe at some schools it is pass, fail. It just should be pass, fail. Like you either got it. Or you didn't get it. You either write forth effort or you didn't. Right. So that's kind of, wow. Okay. And update on surprises. Because last week I was saying like, I'm open to surprise. And it worked, which is to say, I think pretty much not that like some big surprise came falling out of the sky, like is what, the thing that I was really after. But instead I did, I took my own advice and like pursued, doing something differently.2 (5m 27s):And on Saturday we ended up, I just on Friday night when Aaron came home, I said, I want to have fun tomorrow, but I've got to get out of this house. I've got to get out of this town. And so he searched up like fun things to do. And he found something which actually was terrible, but it didn't matter because it was different. And we, it was a car. It was, it, it was promoting itself as some like amazing fall festival with all this kind of stuff. And it was literally a carnival, like the Carney trucks. It's amazing.1 (6m 7s):Like, yeah. Right. Oh, well they had some good marketing.2 (6m 11s):Yeah, they sure did. Cause it was listed as the number one thing to do in my state this weekend, the state and the state and the state. But even, maybe it was a slow weekend and we had fun. Anyway, we had fun. We went to a town we've never been to, we spent time together. You know, it, it was fine. It was good. And more importantly, I feel like it, it just doing something like that and genders like, okay, what else can you do? What else? You know? So I think that, that was the important thing is that it opened me up to1 (6m 43s):Novelty. Did anyone else, did anyone get hurt on a ride?2 (6m 48s):No, but the whole time I was like, I bet this is going to be one of those times where one, we're one of these things just going to go flying off into the, so if you really want to call it,1 (6m 58s):If you really want to go down a crazy dark rabbit hole, like, okay, well I'm obsessed with fail videos fails. You know, if you watch carnival fails. Oh my God. And most of them are deadly. Thank God. But they're just like, where thing flies off. Or like, like a lot of times what you have is cell phones going crazy or birds like birds attacking people on rollercoasters is one of my favorite things to watch. It's not that the bird is attacking. It's at the bird is just trying to fucking fly. And it runs smack into a person on rollercoaster, the best thing you've ever seen.1 (7m 38s):But the sad thing is 90% of the time the bird dies, you know? But like, because the velocity, the force is so great, but it's pretty freaking funny. People are filming themselves usually like right then all of a sudden, a huge pigeon like common. So carnival fails is, is one thing where like someone's standing there like videotaping their friend on the tilt, a whirl or whatever the hell it is and a bolt or something goes with. And they're like, oh, that was a part of the ride. So2 (8m 13s):You're standing there as an adult. I mean, as a kid, you're just like, this is the most amazing thing ever. But as you're sitting there as an adult, you just can see like the hinges where things fold up into the, you know, and you're just like, this is just, we're just all hoping that nothing bad happens, right. Best you can do is cross your fingers and hope for the best. Right.1 (8m 33s):And the other thing is that I I'm obsessed with watching is those Slingshot videos. So some people pass out, pass out or like people's weaves fall, fly off and like, or, well, yeah, like people pass out, but I like when things fly off or when just people say really weird stuff or like, yeah. But those2 (8m 55s):Slingshots are horrible. They look horrible ever. I would never, of course, of course, where I'm sure many people have been slung right off into an alligator pit ever at the museum again. Oh, that's crazy. Okay. So the, the big O thing that changed for me since I last talked to you and I'm fighting the urge since yesterday to call you for the podcast, I haven't heard the podcast. Well, I wrote down the headline is I'm going to do this in a politic way organization on the brink of collapse, ALEKS new leadership to ensure its future spends next two years, undermining their, every effort says leadership.2 (9m 40s):We quit. I have quit the organization organization that I have dedicated a lot of hours to serving. And it happened. Yeah. It happened after a meeting last night that went left and it didn't even honestly, as these things, are, it didn't even go as left as it's gone. There's been times where it's gone so much further skew, but all of us just had it. And actually after our interview today, I have, we have an emergency meeting to talk about it, but my decision is made, I quit.2 (10m 25s):I fully quit. Like I'm, I'm happy to help transition or whatever. And yeah, that happened inside. Like how did you come to the, like what happened in, what have you? Yeah. So this is kind of like a combination, just like what I wanted to talk to you about. And then also what I want to run by you because, you know, I just wrote that blog post about like how I meant examining myself in relationships and how I sometimes in the past have just, you know, one day just up and left. And the first time I did that, that felt the way that actually this thing felt last night was when I broke up with my first boyfriend in high school, it was literally like I was asleep.2 (11m 10s):I shot up out of bed, like in a movie. And I said, I've got to break up with this guy. And I got my clothes on and I got in my car and I drove over to his house and I walked into his house. I didn't knock the door. I walked in the house, he was in the bathroom getting ready. I, I had a little box of his shit. I go here by, I walked, he's following help cheetah. What's the matter, what's the matter. And I left. I mean, we, we did speak after that. And actually I had a couple of really crazy incidents with him even like later in life when I ran into him as an adult. But, and you know, that was terrible of me to do that was terrible.2 (11m 51s):But now I understand that it was because I lacked the ability to say along the way I don't like this. And I don't like that. And just kind of kept putting up with it and putting up with it. And I think my big takeaway from how I conducted myself in this organization is that I put up with stuff and put up with stuff that I really should have found more backbone along the way to say, I don't like the way you're talking to me. I don't like the way you're treating me. And in fact, I had the group of people that I work with. It I'm basically the leader of, you know, they were constantly expressing to me that they felt really abused by this group. And I would validate that and listen to them and agree with them.2 (12m 36s):But then when it came time to going back to the group, I fell short of saying, this will not stand. You know what I mean? I never did that. I never put my foot down and said, this that's enough because I was trying to do it in this way that I feel you're kind of supposed to do as a leader of something you're supposed to keep a level head. And it's really, frankly, it's a lot like being a therapist, you take people's projections and you take their shit and you, and you're able to see, okay, this thing is about me. This thing is not about me. This is just you projecting your shit onto me and you try to like, keep it moving for.2 (13m 17s):Good. Great. And it's not that we never responded with, like, this is not a feedback. Yeah. But it, I mean, obviously it didn't work. It didn't get us to where we needed to go. So we ended the meeting yesterday. I stayed on and talked to my cohort. I said, you guys, I'm, I'm done. And there was seven of us and only four of us were, were talking after cause or five of us. So there was two people who had no idea, but, but four of us said, we're ready to, oh.2 (13m 58s):And I spent three hours last night writing a letter that just basically told the whole history and laid it out. Exactly why, you know? And I wrote it as like, we came to this decision. I don't know if we're coming to this decision because we have to have our meeting later and I just laid it all out. And I just said, you know, basically we're at cross purposes here. Like you asked us to do something that we are doing and you don't like the way we're doing it. So it's fundamentally not going to work out. Wow. I was all revved up. I stayed awake until two 30.2 (14m 38s):Sure. Yeah. I've been there got three hours of sleep. Holy shit. Feeling great. 1 (15m 0s):Good for you. I mean, I think the other thing is like, yeah. I mean, I think that when things, something isn't working, yeah. I've always struggled with knowing when to, when to leave something and like when to, I never knew, okay. Like even stupid shit, like staying home, sick from school. So like, my mom always taught us, like, you never do that unless your like hand is falling off and even then you try to go. But so then in my adult life, when I never knew when was the time to listen to yourself?1 (15m 43s):Yeah. Or to call it quits. Yes. Right, right. To listen to myself or like, was that, and I always second guessed myself for a long time. And even like, like I remember having like a date, you know, with, with a friend or she was really like a mentor, like an authority figure. That's always when it gets really kicked up. And I didn't know, like if I was sick or just wasn't feeling off, should I cancel? Would they be mad at me? Would I, could I take care of myself? What did taking care of myself look like? Because sometimes, and people would say like, people would, I would ask for advice and they say, sometimes taking care of yourself means staying home. Sometimes it means pushed through a little bit.1 (16m 25s):I never knew what, how to do that. So I never had a gauge. So it sounds like you're learning finally to like, or like you're coming to the thing of like this, this is not right. This is not working for me. And, and, and I'm going to make a bold move and then I'm going to stick by that bold move. And also knowing that like, you know, it's, it's a, it's a, it's a move that right. That you can back up that you feel done and that you don't need to ask for reassurance or like try to, but that you're done.1 (17m 9s):I mean, I think that's really great. I mean, I think it's part of being a self-actualized adult to know when something's over and, and why it's over and how to do it. Right. How to end it right by you for you versus like the right thing that people want you to do. Oh,2 (17m 27s):100% that, and that thing that you're describing about the way that we need to be able to differentiate when I'm just feeling avoidant versus when I really need to, that is such a crucial part of a person's development. And I can say, as a parent, it's pretty hard to teach because you're like, I don't know. Do you really feel sick or really just not want to go to school? Like it's, it's tricky.1 (17m 56s):I, I mean, I can't imagine doing that with someone else because I literally am just now learning at 46, how to do it with myself. So like, like I can't imagine being, because the second guessing it's so interesting. It's like, it's like my, my growing up, it was, yeah, it was literally like, you, you didn't ever, you always muscled through, but I guess the, the, the, and it's like, how do you know that muscling through is too much? What is the answer? Like, you're dead. Like, that's going to be how you found out. Like, I remember this and it wasn't just my parents.1 (18m 38s):Like I remember my aunts, my aunts had a cleaning business. Okay. My mom's sister and her and her wife, or at the time her girlfriend, they had a cleaning business. So they cleaned people's houses. And at the end of, I think it was, I don't know which some play I was in at the rescue. And it must have been, I think it had to be it wasn't yellow boat. So it had to be this other search for delicious. Anyway, I was really sick. And, you know, obviously we, we still do performances when we're sick. That's another thing that needs to change. Right. And they're trying to change people's trenches anyway, I'm sick as a dog and I I'm sick as a dog. And I, I had to schlep my shit from the Myrtle Ruskin.1 (19m 19s):And the next day I was supposed to clean houses with my aunt. Like I was helping her. She gave me like a part-time job, but I'm so sick. And the night before I call, I'm literally like, like I'm hacking up blood. It turned out I had pneumonia and I had to go to the, it, it was, it was crazy. But my aunt was so mad at me that I had to bail. She shamed me. She was like, I can't believe you let me down. I literally can't talk. And she's she? And you know, she was the adult and I was a young adult, but she was anyway, the point is it, wasn't just my parents. It's a whole thing of like, how could you leave us?2 (19m 54s):We're going to have to talk about this with Molly Smith, Metzler, who we're going to be talking to in like maybe next week or the week after who's the creator and showrunner of a major television series. That's based on a book because this theme comes up in that series. And it's, it's something related also to, I don't know. I don't really remember if you told me that your mom's family grew up with money or without money, but1 (20m 21s):Without with, with, and then without, so they, they had it in Columbia and they didn't have it here.2 (20m 27s):Yeah. So people without money, I mean, it's, it's true. The, the decision about muscling through it is really, usually one about survival. Like you don't have the option, but for people who are, you know, in our situation now, I mean, I think the only way you really learn that for yourself, whether you should stay in through or not is with experience of, well this time when I didn't feel like doing something, and then I did it, I felt better this time when I didn't feel like something doing something. And I did it, I felt worse. Like, and just trying to build up the data as to say, this is an example of a time, like just, just the ability to be able to at, at our age, we've had enough experience that we can think through almost any set of, you know, like, okay, well, if I go to this thing, like, I think you were talking about you, miles was at the hospital getting checked out for a possible recurrence of his cancer and you were doing a reading.2 (21m 32s):Oh, oh,1 (21m 33s):It was the worst. It was insane. I was in the chapel at the hospital trying to memorize lines for a fucking 10 minute play reading that was supposed to be on book. And then they told me it was off book. And then2 (21m 46s):You weren't getting paid for that. Wasn't going to advance your career in any way. Yeah. That's what I'm talking about. This is, and so the, the thing I really want to run by you is about like moments of clarity and really you can't force a moment of clarity it to me, or maybe you can, I can't, it just comes to you, you know, it just, it just comes to you for me, it comes to me in a moment and it just feels like on ambivalent, there's no question. This is what I have to do. This is what I can't do. This is what I can do. And I think the only way you get there is with time.1 (22m 25s):Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think it's time and I think you're right. I think it's like trying it out. Like I tried this, it went horribly wrong or I tried this and yeah. And also, yeah, I think right there was this thing too, of like, there's also this thing I feel, and maybe this also goes back to the, the working class. I don't know what it is, but it's like people wanting to end things the quote right. Way. So like my, my mom was always big on like, you know, and my dad about like, having a conversation, like having to sit down with people and say, Hey, this is how I feel.1 (23m 11s):And like, it was a cop-out to like send an email or a cop-out to, but that's also kind of, garbagy like, people am things the way they can end them in the moment. And they, I don't know, I don't hold it against people for ending things the way. Look, it, would it be great if we could have closure and like, stuff like that. But like, what if, I don't know, I'm just like all for now, people doing things the way that they feel like in the moment they need to do them. Like, I don't, like I used to get into, like, I remember like leaving a sponsor relationship and she was so she was not well in my view.1 (23m 53s):And she was, and I've sent her an email and she really wanted to have a sit down. And yes, there's two things are true. Like, I was really scared to sit down with her and tell her, like, I think you're fucked up and this isn't working for me or whatever, but I also didn't feel safe enough to do that.2 (24m 10s):Yeah. Yes. That's. The other thing is if we lived in a world where it was a given that everybody was being forthright and honest and was themselves in constant dialogue about their strengths and weaknesses, and was B you know, if we lived in a world where everybody was operating from a basic level of like honesty and good intentions, then this problem would be much easier to these types of problems would be much easier to resolve because you'd say, well, I mean, it just would be a given, like, of course nobody would want to see me suffering to do.2 (24m 51s):Of course, they'd rather, you know, but you can't, that's not the situation in most cases. So you literally can only rely on your own understanding of yourself. Right.1 (25m 1s):Different context. Right. And I know that there's, there's the there that looking back, I wish I had ended things differently in a lot of different ways, but I did what I, I did what I could, you know, I did really could, but I just remember it being like my, my dad being like, you know, you should really sit down with them and talk to them and being like, you know, why like, okay, I, I hear what you're saying. So when people, yeah. I think, I think being willing to have conversations and having hard will being willing and open and available to having hard conversations with people is so much more difficult than people make it out to be.1 (25m 41s):Because like you're saying, it takes, it has all it takes. It's all these things come into play. It's not just like, I'm going to be a mature adult and do this the right way. It's like, what am I willing to have? What can I handle? You know,2 (25m 55s):W what can I handle? And, you know, in some cases, if an issue is really contentious, it becomes, you know, if I sit down with this person and really try to, they might actually further harm me. Like, I I've already had that experience with some people in this group that where I've decided, okay, the approach is I have to call this person. Right. I have to say, Hey, we're, you know, not seeing eye to eye. And a couple of times when I did that, it turned out fine. Right. And a couple of times when I did that, I thought,1 (26m 26s):Why did I do that? Yeah.2 (26m 28s):Like, not just, that was bad for me, but that was bad for them. And I feel like, I, I feel like I took us several steps backwards just because this person's mentally unwell and I'm able to have like a reasonable back and forth in a conflict.1 (26m 42s):Right. So it's, it's, it's a lot more complicated, I think, than people people think. And also right when you're done, you're done. And when you're done, it's like, how can I extricate myself and not try to cause further harm to other people, but also not trying to cause further harm to myself.2 (27m 3s):Yeah. Yeah. Which is literally, you're the1 (27m 6s):Only person who can do that. Right. That's nobody else's job. Right. Somebody else's job. Holy shit. Well, congratulations.2 (27m 14s):Thank you. So how are you doing1 (27m 16s):Well, this is, I'm pretty good. I'm on, I'm so weird. I don't even know. I don't think I told you this last Wednesday. I had a zoom look. I haven't had any auditions in a long time. Last Wednesday. I had a zoom audition for a film being shot in Chicago. And of course, and now I'm on, I'm on hold for it. I'm on check avail for films in Chicago. And it's a big film. And it's, I'm like, what2 (27m 43s):If it's going to start filming, like on one, the one-year anniversary of the day you guys went there and then had to stay,1 (27m 50s):Well, the thing is, it starts filming Monday, but I oh yeah. For a month. But I, I, my part is super, super small. So I doubt I I'm thinking it's a one or two days shoot. If I book it and you know, the difference of, I mean, I feel like petrified of getting it because I'm, I'm just, I I'm, we're really, you know, that's my first go-to, but I also felt like it was the first time in an audition where I was like, you know, like, how can we talk about this on here? But like, how willing am I to treat myself? Like, shit, I'm not anymore as much. So like, no matter what happens if I, if I, you know, I'm not even sure I want to be an actor.1 (28m 36s):Right. So, so I, I have to get clear about that. I, so if I'm not really sure that this is my life's path, then, then, then the reason that I'm scared is definitely old stuff of being approved of and making a fool of myself and feeling like all is lost if I screw up, like, so that's what I'm working with. It's not so much that this is my dream. And I want so badly to be in this film that I'm so nervous. It is old stuff, which doesn't mean that it makes it easier, but it's just clear. So I'm getting clear. So I was like, all right, if that's the case, then how can I work with that? And I just, I just had, I was like, you know what?1 (29m 17s):I'm not going to pretend that I don't care because I do, but I'm also not going to, I just put my foot down in terms of beating, being, being cruel to myself, I put my foot down. I said, I am not, I am not willing to berate, belittle and hurt myself if I screw this up. Or if I don't get it, or if I do get it, I am not no longer willing. I'm just going to have to set some boundary with myself about my, my, how far am I willing to go with my, with my weirdness craziness and, and self abuse. And I just, so I didn't go there and now I'm on top of avail.1 (29m 59s):I mean, you know, it's like, it, I'm not saying they're totally related, but I'm just saying like, it makes sense to me.2 (30m 5s):Yeah. It makes sense. Because every time you go further and that's been the case like over the last year or the, we talked about this every time you you're like, I don't, I, you let it go. And all of a sudden,1 (30m 17s):Yeah. And like, no matter, I think the, for me, the freedom lies in no matter how badly I do or think I do, no matter how awful rotten, I may screw this up in my head, or even in real life screwed up because it happened, I am not willing to treat myself like a piece of shit. Like that's where I got to, because I thought that is the only thing I have control over really, really the evidence shows that I have control. And even that is questionable sometimes. But if I'm going to have control or ownership over anything, let it be about how I treat myself as I go through this experience or I'll still do it, or else not stop auditioning because this doesn't, this is not.1 (31m 7s):And so I thought, okay, okay, can I, can I, and I, and I, I really was like, I was like, breathe. You know, it's a zoom audition, it's weird breathe. And it was just me in casting. And then I just went right to check avail, but which is great, but two scenes and w and we'll see, but I think it just, it's all fodder for like, can I put, can I stop treating myself terribly well,2 (31m 32s):Well, you know, one thing for certain, you can never go wrong when that's your guiding principle, you can go wrong when your guiding principle is, will they like me? And is it okay at, am I good enough? You know, but you'll never go wrong with when you're trying to set when you're just trying to do something intentionally. I mean, that's kind of what we're talking about is like being extremely intentional, right. Instead of reactive about right. How do I want to wind my way through the situation? What do I want my, this is just a concept that I really am new to, what do I want out of the situation? How do I want to reflect back on how I conducted myself, forget about what I want them to do.2 (32m 13s):Right. Because that's what I've been focused on my whole life, the other person to do.1 (32m 17s):Right. I, I, how can I make, how can I, how can I yeah. Make this easier for them, better for them read their mind, do what they want me to do. And I'm like, oh my God, that, that, that not only forget, it's not, it can't happen because in my make-believe mind that that, that doesn't come into play, but it, it, it feels terrible. And it, and it increases my anxiety and depression because it's so, it's so unattainable. So at least if I, if, like you said, like, if I'm the, if I'm the problem, right. If I'm the problem, that means that I'm also inside of me is also the, when the solution, the success, you know, that, thank God.2 (33m 7s):Yeah. Yeah. Thank God. Yeah. That's the best news. So I have, I actually was just a couple of days ago thinking about you and your career paths and, and, and like the things that you have described to me, like you, you basically pursued acting because of your relationship with this other person who you wanted to emulate. And then you basically, you know, got the job as the, as the Hollywood assistant when somebody else came. I mean, it was all kind of, you know, not, maybe not that intentional.2 (33m 50s):And I remember having like, kind of a aha thought about it. I should have written it down because it's not occurring to me right now, but it was something about like, maybe it was just that the further she goes in figuring out the basic questions about what she really likes and what she really wants, this is going to be less and less of a thing. Like, you're the thing that you you've said a lot. Like maybe I should work at seven 11. Maybe I should work at this bakery. I don't know. There's something to it that I feel maybe it's that I feel you're really changing for yourself right now.2 (34m 35s):I see you approaching things with a lot more intentionality1 (34m 38s):And you know, what was so crazy is that I think this podcast for us is a way of actually looking at all that stuff. So like, even if the POC, I mean, I hope it goes, goes a global. And, but even if it's just for you and I to look at what the hell am I doing? Who am I, how, how can I make things better for myself? And thus be a better like kinder human probably for everybody else. Then that was all worth it. Because it's like, I could not keep going the way I was going and expect to be happy, or even at peace or even do something fun. Like I had to look at like, wait, wait, wait, what is underneath all this?1 (35m 20s):Like, I should just work at seven 11. And, and I, you know, and we say, this we've said this before, but like, I want to be clear, seven 11 is not the problem. I am the problem. Right? So like you work at seven 11. That's not what I'm saying. What I'm saying is that, like, for me, what using that is as an excuse and our tool to try to figure out like, okay, where do I belong? That's what it is like, where do I belong? Where do I want to belong? Where can I contribute? But also, like you say, like, what do I want, where do I want to belong?2 (35m 54s):It's actually the, are you my mother phenomenon? You know? But in this case regarding like, where's your place in the world instead of wandering around wondering like who's in charge of you or whatever, it's that it's, which actually they're both the same thing. They're both about belonging. Right. But instead of you making it about, I guess that's what it is just like, instead of you making about another person or another institution or another entity, you're figuring out where you're guiding your own self1 (36m 21s):And myself and like, yeah, that's just it. Where do I belong? And I don't know yet, but I I'm pretty sure it's not at the am PM. Do you know what I mean? I just don't know that that's going to do it for me.2 (36m 35s):No matter how good those hot dogs are, future, how,1 (36m 41s):How good the deal is, two for one veggie chips. You know what I mean? Like,2 (36m 48s):So then when I went to that amp, it was so like, it, no, it was like1 (36m 55s):Vibration whole. They it's like a club. It's like a club on the weekend.2 (37m 1s):That's what I felt like. I felt like I walked into a club with no music and the lights were really bright.1 (37m 8s):It's crazy. It's put the same vibe. Like, you're like, this is a whole scene here. There's a lot of back and forth.2 (37m 19s):Yeah. About that all the time at gas stations, by the way, because the people who work at gas stations, I think tend to be people who are in transition. And I just observed so much, like, I love the idea that at any place I am visiting in a transitory fashion, there's a whole entrenched, you know, rich, layered history and culture. And that I just don't have any idea about because how could I, it's fascinating to think about,1 (37m 54s):Well, that's why you're a good writer too. It's like you get in there and you can like observe and like create w like it's a whole world. That's there2 (38m 3s):To be curious. Fun to be1 (38m 4s):Curious about. Yeah.2 (38m 17s):Today on the podcast we talked to Amar derisory Amar is originally from Jordan, grew up in Michigan, got his BFA and his MFA, and is a fan of Shakespeare, has some great Shakespeare series that you can check out through his website. And we enjoy talking with him about what his lasting impressions are of attending theater school. So please enjoy. So Amar, congratulations. You survived theater3 (38m 54s):School. Thank you. Yes, I did. You2 (38m 57s):Survived it twice cause you got your BFA in Michigan, right? And then your MFA at DePaul. That's correct. So you must've been very committed to being an actor from high school or earlier.3 (39m 9s):Yes, that is correct. I think high school is where I got the bug. Some teacher encouraged me to be in the school play and I'm like, ah, no, no, no, you have a great personality. You can do a kid. You can do it. I'm like, all right. And as soon as I got on that stage, it was like, right there. It was2 (39m 30s):The feeling that you had.3 (39m 32s):It's it's, it's, it's it's excitement. And you get these, you know, these vibes like, oh my God, I'm doing something. This is fun. It's like an addiction. It really is. It's like anything else? I just, I just went crazy. I started eating the scenery because it was like, I'm enjoying, this could be another role. At one point I wanted to play like 5, 6, 7 roles, you know, because I just said, I want to do everything. It was that much excitement. So that's when I decided to really pursue this,2 (40m 4s):I think to do with, I don't know something about the way you just said that made me think you were set. You were keying into people are listening to me here. Was that something3 (40m 15s):People were looking at me, people were watching me. People were doing that. Yes. There to a certain degree. Yes. But you know, not to the point where I want attention, you know, like, look at me, look at me. But I wanted, I wanted to make people happy, laugh, cry, you know, do something. That was the thing. I think, I think what got me was when people reacted to your performance, people that then it's like, oh my God, I did that. I did that. And that is something that is just, you can't, you can't describe that feeling is, is, it's just, it's like a forest.1 (40m 52s):Something that you said that really sparked a memory of you for me was like that your you are, and look, this is not everyone. We're not a one-sided, but you are a people person. Like I remember that about you. Like, there are some people who just like people, I'm a people person too. But, and I, so I recognize that. And other people where I feel like from seeing you around in school and in plays, like you really had the ability to connect with a wide variety of different kinds of people. Do you know where that came from? If that's true, if you,3 (41m 31s):I identify with that. I, I make friends with people on the street, just I'll just say hi to anybody. You know, I that's just my nature, my personality. I believe if you say hi to someone, you, it just makes them feel better. I think, hi, how you doing? Oh, hi. Oh, kind of surprises them that, you know, I don't have any money to leave me alone. I think some people get, get pretty weird about it. When somebody like myself says hi, where it comes from. I can't tell you. I think it's just, I've always been an outgoing person since I was a kid. I remember my parents telling me that, you know, this kid is going to be something he likes to talk to people.3 (42m 16s):Just, I would just talk to people. Hi,2 (42m 20s):Do you have artists in your family?3 (42m 23s):No, I am the only artist. My brother, my brother's a doctor. My sister is a, is a teacher and an administrator at a school in Abu Dhabi and the Emirates. So I am the only performance.2 (42m 39s):It's always so interesting to think about. Like, of course, going back throughout your family's lineage, you're not the only artist you may have been. The only one who had the opportunity. Like this is the case for me, had the opportunity to pursue it. You know? Cause what I found after I decided that I really wanted to pursue this. It's like, oh, but then my aunt can kind of paint and this one can kind of write a little bit. It just feels like it's not something that they pursued for their, you know, for their regular career. But there it's a privilege, I guess that we, you know, got a chance in school and after to pursue it. And you had some great, you were in some great plays, Romeo and Juliet landscape of the body during the3 (43m 21s):That's right. Oh my God. I still have that picture of me and the golden matress that John Bridges, I'm going to send it to you. I got a whole bunch of pictures of sent to you today. So I was rummaging through the old photo albums and I found a whole bunch of DePaul pictures, but yeah. Yeah, that was, that was an interesting play. I landscape with the body. It was just a, a fun, a fun play, a fun.1 (43m 45s):Now did you, you said that you got the bug early on because the teacher sort of encouraged you then how did that grow into? Because I'm always interested in like, okay, so when you're in a play and I'm sure that, you know, you were magnificent and they, but how did it people loved you and you loved it, but how did that transform into like, I'm going to go to a conservatory because that place was, you know, DePaul, the conservatories are crazy. So how does,3 (44m 13s):Okay, this is a good story. I'm glad you asked this. No, I was, I was doing a play in Flint, Michigan and the lead actress, her and I were backstage and we were just chit chatting before our next it was, I think it was during intermission, but anyway, it doesn't matter. She actually, she goes, well, are you going to go to grad school? Are you going to continue your journey? And I said, I'm not sure. I thought I'd just stick around. Maybe do some theater around here. She goes, no, no, no, you should really go. There's this place called DePaul university. It's a great school. You should go and check it out. I said, really? I said, where's that Chicago? Okay. Well, you know, sure. I go to my, my professors that my undergrad school and they paid for the application fee.3 (44m 56s):I mailed it in. And I think within, I think within a few weeks I got my appointment to audition for the school. And it was in January, in the dead of winter, in Michigan, Nine feet of snow as we're driving to Chicago, I'm my friend and I, but yeah,2 (45m 20s):You applied. It was the only place you applied for grad school.3 (45m 24s):I applied at Purdue university as well. I got accepted at both, both places. The, and it was Purdue or Chicago, DePaul. But I think with Purdue, you're in the middle of nowhere. It's God's country out there. There's just the school. And that's it. Where you had the theater school in Chicago and a vibrant city. It was very infectious and scary at the same time. But that's when I met the infamous John Bridges. I thought I blew it to be totally honest with you. I thought I blew it. I did a, I did a classical and I did a contemporary, obviously Joe Slovak, John Bridges.3 (46m 4s):And I believe Betsy Hamilton where my, my auditioners, if you will. And I thought I did okay with the classical, the contemporary was kind of thing. I got an, I, you know, green to the business, didn't know how to actually present a monologue or, you know, my teachers back and undergraduate say, look, just put them together. Just stop and blah, blah, blah, or just, you know, they, you know, they told me what, what I had to do, but I just remember saying goodbye and thank you for the time. And Joe slow. It was, you know, okay, you got a good job, good job. You know, you have a great journey back home. And I said, okay. And my friend goes, how did it go?3 (46m 46s):And I'm like, ah, forget it. I'm going to Purdue. I'm going to Purdue. And then, and then shoot, I auditioned on a Saturday in January. I get the letter on a Tuesday. And I remember my friend goes, Hey, you got this letter from DePaul. Why don't you open it? I said, oh, it's BS. They're just telling me they're not going to accept me. Look, I'm going to open it. I was about to rip it. And I said, oh, but it just opened it. And I'm like, oh yeah, let me read it to you. You know, I'm going to decline. You have been formally accepted.2 (47m 20s):Oh my God, that's amazing. That's a side note. Do you guys know that in today's day and age, when kids get their acceptance, it's email obviously. And then a lot of schools or maybe even most schools when they open the email, if they got accepted, it's a confetti graphic. So like they know as soon as they open it, if there's confetti, that is so it's so wild, right? Like the things that they could never imagine having to wait in a letter to come in the mail,3 (47m 52s):But2 (47m 52s):You did BFA. So why, why are you saying you kind of were green? You knew about,3 (48m 0s):I mean, I knew about acting it's I, I didn't know the, the, what we call the business affairs of acting the mechanics of acting, I guess I think, you know, we all experienced this. I'm sure guilty is charged. You know, when you're young or you're an actor, you really don't pay attention to a lot of things. You just want to, you know, you want to act, you want to do a performance. You want to do the best you can, of course. But then you also want to party afterwards and do all the things that young people do. And I, and I think I was talking to one of my fellow actors the other day and he asked me if you were to go back to grad school, what would you change? Or what would you, what would have helped you? And I said, have a class that teaches the business of acting and okay, these actors are going into Hollywood.3 (48m 47s):They're going to New York. They're going, whatever, teach them the basics of what the business of acting is. They got to know what a contract looks like. They got to know what business affairs mean. They got to know all this terminology. They got to know all that stuff. If I had known that that would have been a great tool for me coming to LA, coming to LA, I was green as green as a Shamrock, you know, just green. And I had to learn the hard way1 (49m 10s):And we'll get back to the LA part, but I'm not so curious about, okay, so you get into DePaul and then when, and usually being zest this, but I'll ask this, like when you get there, how did it match up to what you were thinking? Were you like, what the hell is going on? Why am I rolling on the floor to music or what?3 (49m 29s):I had no idea what was going on. And that I think scared, you know, on a side note, Chicago scared me. I was homesick for quite a bit of time before school started, I got to, I moved to Chicago, I think three weeks before school started. So there was three weeks where I did not know anybody did not know. I didn't know. Oh, I was in bad shape. And thank God for friends and family. Of course, you know, they call and man, you sound depressed, which is that dude. I'm by myself in Chicago. I don't know anybody. I don't know the city. It's a big city. It's like Flint times 20.3 (50m 9s):It's huge. But, but I think I, to answer your question about the school when the first day of school, wow. What up Betsy Hamilton's class. I'm like buoyancy. And I'm like, what the hell is she doing this buoyancy famously I ever done? And then it clicked it. Then I'm like, okay, I know what she's doing. All right. Okay. Joel, slow acting class. Woo. You can't do that. Okay. You got to do it this way. Okay. This little guy is running around this class and he inspired me.3 (50m 55s):I'm like, this is beautiful. This man in his seventies is running around like his, a guy in his twenties. He loves acting grub. Kowski all that stuff. And he was amazing, but4 (51m 8s):We didn't have him. So he's he was real. Hands-on3 (51m 11s):Like hands-on he was, I mean, I, I won the lottery with Joe slower. N not, not to say anything negative about Jim ocelot or anything like that, but he was just, he was on hands. And he really gave you when he gave you a note, he gave you a note. Okay. You know, he's like Amar, okay. Your legs. I don't know why your feet are doing that on the chair. It's like, it's not, it's not, that's an ism of yours. We gotta, you gotta, yeah. That's kinda like your feet, your feet, your body, your, your, your body is your instrument. And, you know, got to learn all this stuff.3 (51m 52s):And it's just woo. Graduate school. This is graduate school. So, yeah, that was a, a couple of experiences. I'm trying to think.1 (52m 2s):Did you feel like you fit in? Did you, did you, what was your, what was your vibe like there?3 (52m 10s):Unfortunately, my violet started to change in year two. That's when I started to feel, not that things weren't clicking for me or anything like that, but it just seemed like favorites started to appear. Oh, okay. You know, it's like, it happens. It's not something that, you know, it's done intentionally. It just happens. But if I, if you guys remember Eric Hayes, Eric, Michael Hayes,4 (52m 43s):Isabel. I haven't3 (52m 44s):Thought he was in Trojan women. I think he1 (52m 50s):Was like, yes, yes, yes, yes. So3 (52m 52s):He became a seminar. Yeah. Him and I don't know him and I beat we're we're unofficially the outcasts of the graduate class more or less. We weren't, we were not that, not that we were mistreated or anything. I'm not saying that we were mistreated by it just, it just seemed like we were known as the two actors that really didn't take things seriously. And I think that's a fallacy because I think I was taking it very seriously. I was just bored at times. I wanted to act, I didn't want to sit in a classroom all day and just sit. I wanted perform. I think, I think I understand the classroom format where you sit down, you watch your colleagues do their scenes, but I was getting fidgety, fidgeting, bored, bored.3 (53m 39s):And to the point where you dread going to school, it was like, oh, I've got to go to acting class and sit there for two and a half hours. And watch people act, you know, which I get. And again, that didn't sound right coming out. But I mean, it's just, I loved, I loved all my classmates. I loved all my classmates. I think from Derek smart to Eric Hayes, the niece Odom, Heather Ireland to name a few, you know, they, they were fantastic. Pat. Tiedemann Kendra. I mean, and one of my, let me aside. No, one of my favorite, favorite times on DePaul was with you. Gina.3 (54m 19s):Do you remember you? And I started a film. I, I did.2 (54m 23s):Oh, say what3 (54m 27s):You guys remember bill Burnett. The voice in nucleus. Okay. So for our, for my final exam, I wanted to film a short film about quitting smoking. And2 (54m 38s):Coming back to me, wait a minute,3 (54m 40s):You were asking me, I had to, I rented a camera from the video department on the campus and I walked into the lobby of the theater school and you were there and it's like, I need to shoot a scene. It's like, oh, let me be in it. And I said, okay, we'll just improv. We'll just talk about quitting. So we set the camera and you and I sat in the lobby and we filmed it and we did it. I think I still have it. I'll find it for you in 1994.2 (55m 7s):I have to tell you something, because I know you haven't been able to listen to the podcast because our website had a broken link. Okay. But what, what I should tell you is that boss and I have huge memory gaps about our time. There are many things we do not remember.3 (55m 28s):What2 (55m 29s):What's kind of weird is I sort of remembered this film that you really are hearing about it. Yeah. I mean, I believe you, I believe both of you. Okay. How exciting, you know, why I would really love that is because just last week I was saying to boss, wouldn't you like the opera? Because nothing was recorded. Really? Not even our showcase or if it was, it's not something I ever saw. No. Wouldn't you like to go back and just watch yourself? Because now we've spent basically a year and a half fully immersed. We have talked to 55 people about what their theater school experiences.2 (56m 9s):So we, we are getting back on board with what it was and we're slipping, you know, different people fill in like little bit of blanks. But now I like, now I'm just so curious about, you know, what, what, what was the experience of what was I like at that time? And a lot of people don't remember us, so we haven't really gotten this feedback from3 (56m 29s):Yeah. I mean, I remember boss. I remember all you guys. I do remember a lot of, and there's a lot of people I don't remember. I mean, I think when I was on your website the other day, you know, trying to figure out what you're like and it, which is congratulations to the both of you. I think it's awesome. I saw Tate Smith. I saw a picture of Pete Smith and I completely Like that. It was stuff like that. You know, you running into people that wow, amazing. I'm sorry. Go ahead. I interrupted you.1 (56m 59s):No, no, no. I was just going to ask, like, what was your, okay, so, so year two, you started getting itchy and like, but how did you feel? We talk a lot about like casting. How did you feel about your casting in shows? Which most people do? Like, there's been like one person that we've talked to. That was like, I loved my casting, but everyone else is like, I fucking hate it.3 (57m 23s):Nope. I haven't hated it. I hated it. And again, like I said, it happens. I think, I think a lot of the directors, the professors who are directing and all that stuff were just picking their favorites. They're not, if we're going to be in a learning environment, then you, you should take a risk with me, with somebody else with, with Heather. I think nobody was taking any risks. And everyone's like, Hey, I gotta put on a show and it's gotta be the best show I possibly can. And I'm going to use the best actors or that, you know, my opinion, the best actors. And it's like, you know, you know, if you're, you're not preparing us for the real world, you know, if you're going to do this, you know, this blind casting, whatever I thought I thought, Hey, it's a learning. I'm sure. I'm sure one of them, I'm sure Jim Ossoff will cast me.3 (58m 3s):Never did Joe slow cast me, you know, and his journey of the fifth horse. It was a great experience for me. That's when you learn, I didn't want to be the lead role. I want to learn. I want to learn, teach me, teach me what it like to perform on a stage that would typically be a stage from new in New York or a main stage in Chicago. That's where we got to learn. Right? Yeah.2 (58m 29s):That's another thing that we've really uncovered here and it, by the way, it makes perfect sense. I'm really not maligning anybody, but that the professors, you know they, they were also trying to express their own artistic desires through the projects that they were casting. And I'm sure nine times out of 10, they got carried away with their own ego about what they wanted to like, actually, we just heard this story from the episode that's airing today with Stephen Davis.3 (58m 58s):Oh, wow. Yeah.2 (59m 1s):That's a great episode. You listened to it. He re he begged the theater school to do Shakespeare. He begged them to do Romeo and Juliet, which they did. Yep. He, he really wanted to be Romeo. He didn't get cast. And he was told if I had cast you, I would had to gone with my fourth choice for Juliet of the height, because Karen mold is very tall. That's a perfect example of something that should be okay in theater school. I understand you don't want to do it when you're charging $400 a ticket on Broadway.1 (59m 38s):We're in a film where the camera's going to be jacked up, but like, but just cast. And sometimes, and sometimes I would think that, and maybe they do it now. Like sometimes you would say, why not? No. Cause it's obvious when someone wants a rule, right? So whoever wants this rule so badly, for whatever reason, they've never been cast and whatever, give them the role, let them do the role. Like maybe it's, maybe it's not, it's a long shot, but that's what school's about is long shots and learning. Right? It's like, let, let the person do this. You know, they're dying to play Romeo. Just let them play Romeo.1 (1h 0m 19s):Yeah.3 (1h 0m 19s):Yeah. Okay. And excuse me, the, if, if, if you don't mind, you know, now that you guys have you, of course, but I'm just saying the play was set in the middle east.2 (1h 0m 31s):Right. Very3 (1h 0m 32s):Last time I checked I'm Jordanian.2 (1h 0m 35s):Right?3 (1h 0m 36s):The play Romeo Lord Capulet he was Jewish. I'm sorry. He was the Jewish character, but yeah, I get it. I totally get it. I totally get it. And I agree with Steven on this one, because it just seemed like, it seemed like we are in a learning environment and let's learn. And if you're going to, if you're going to just cast people because whatever, then, then what's the point of going to the, to the fricking school and spending, spending $16,000 a year. I don't know what it is today, but1 (1h 1m 10s):It's like 48 or some craziness3 (1h 1m 13s):For paying student loans for three years, three years of, you know, every now and then some BS. Okay. Other than that, you know, the two best teachers that I had over there, arguably as Dr. Bella and Joe slower. And I think because they come from, you know, such interesting backgrounds, you know, Joe slug being Polish, you know, Bella, it can be in a Russian Jewish woman. Oh, I got a lot of stories while her, oh my God.1 (1h 1m 43s):She did she help you? Do you feel like she helped you as a teacher?3 (1h 1m 47s):Oh, she was. She, she, she, I am in her debt, you know, when it comes to acting and stuff like that. I think, I think she finally, I think she was the one that I finally, I realized what it's like to feel the, you know, like with the apple and, you know, I didn't know. It's like the Pandora box thing that she was talking about. And then it just like a light bulb over my head. It's like, oh my God, the feel what it's like to be in winter, you know, even though you're on the stage and it's hot, you gotta like, as if it's 40 below zero, she really, that, that, that, that technique, that acting technique was just incredible.3 (1h 2m 28s):I am forever in her dad and she is awesome. She's an automation rest in peace. And I, a couple of great stories about her is one that when she would like to meet her students before class, so we will walk into her office and talk and I'm sitting there in the office, she's looking at the hair. She goes, okay. Oh yeah, that doesn't sound English. And I said, oh, well, it's, it's Jordanian. I'm from the police. It's Jordanian. She goes, oh, well, you know, I'm Jewish. And I remember talking to my dad, I said, dad, I, I have to talk to this Jewish professor.3 (1h 3m 9s):You just say we're cousins. Okay. Because we are just say that don't rock the boat. Okay. So when she said they're doing, you know, I'm Jewish. And I said, well, well, yeah, I do. I do. But you know, being Jordanian and you being Jewish, you know, we're, we're practically cousins. So, you know, it's great, right. Without a drop of a dime, she goes, well, we might be cousins over, not exactly kissing cousins.2 (1h 3m 38s):Oh, that's hilarious. By the way, in case you don't know, I might have mentioned this on the podcast. Once before there exists on the internet, a Hastick interview with Joseph Loic and Bella it kin, okay. Was it conducted by studs, Terkel? It might've been, or some radio project. And the two of them talking about their approaches to acting and to teaching acting is really, really good. Yeah. You got to check it out. Right. So she really helped me. W we didn't, neither one of us had either one of those teachers, unfortunately, but we love,3 (1h 4m 13s):She, she was great. And I would give her ride home, poor thing. You know, she, you know, her husband, Frank was very ill at the time and she was like, oh, muck. And you're giving me a ride home. And I'm like, yes. Yes. Ma'am. And I was like, oh, you'll cause kind of a mess there. What'd you just get in the car.2 (1h 4m 34s):We know you had a car. That's K that's it wasn't that useful for people in school? Did you, and you messed up, I guess all the MFA's probably lived in apartments or was there any dorm living for MFS?3 (1h 4m 45s):No, no, no. Don't limit for MFA. So we had to live in apartments and my first apartment was a studio. And then I think the second year I moved in with, with Eric, from school and then we had a former student. I don't know if you remember John Soldani by any chance familiar. He was first year grad. And then I think he was cut from the program after the first year, but he came back to Chicago. So we were roomies. And then I met my girlfriend who was also a student at DePaul, Alicia hall. Right. So we, we were together. So we moved in together, I think, mid third year, something like that.3 (1h 5m 29s):I'm not sure, but yeah. And then I stayed in Chicago after graduation. I just decided to stay in Chicago and did get quite a bit of theater in Chicago and then decided to do the LA thing. And,1 (1h 5m 41s):Okay. So, so I just have a question about what was your experience like of the warning system and the cutting system where you weren't?3 (1h 5m 49s):Oh, good question. Good question. Oh, I'm glad you brought that up. I think it's, I think it took the attention away from the program because I think all the students were more concerned about the warning, getting warned and getting caught than anything, and that affected their performance in class and it affected their performance on stage my opinion. I remember some friends of mine who were just scared and I admit I was very, very nervous, but when I didn't get warned, then all of a sudden I was able to concentrate on school. I was like classes where the people that were warned, all they can think about what I can do to not get kicked out of the class.3 (1h 6m 31s):And then next thing you know, it just, it just really, really was detrimental to their performance in my opinion.2 (1h 6m 38s):But it took the focus3 (1h 6m 40s):Away. Oh yeah. Never worn. I was the only, I was the only male that wasn't warrant. All the male actors were warned except for me. And we ended up having eight graduate students, three men and five women, which I mean Derek smart, Eric Hayes and myself, and then the five women, Denise home, Heather Ireland, pat Tiedemann Kendra. I forgot her last name. Thank you. And Alicia, Alicia, Alicia was in the other class. Lisa was in the other, but I remembered you guys remember a teacher named Susan Lee.2 (1h 7m 24s):Her name has come up at times on this podcast. Yes,3 (1h 7m 30s):She was my advisor. She was the one that told me whether I was warned or not, or kicked out or not. And she said the most procurator thing. And I'm not sure if it was from the professors, but she said, well, you're not cut. You're not warned. We just don't know what to do with you. I just looked at her. What do you mean by that? Well, I mean, you're, you're, you know, I don't remember the conversation.1 (1h 7m 55s):Did she say that she raised, she say something about being a, from the middle east or3 (1h 8m 3s):Yeah, something like that. And I said, well, why don't you, why don't you and your professors just ask me and find out what you can do. Right? I mean, just I'm middle Eastern doesn't mean, I don't know how to act girl. You there.1 (1h 8m 23s):Wait a minute. So wait a minute.3 (1h 8m 25s):There's more than one professor that kind of, oh, I'm sure. I'm sure I'm not going to mention any names, but2 (1h 8m 32s):There was quite a few.1 (1h 8m 35s):Yeah. Right? To say that, that, that being from the middle east, my guesses, people were assholes about it. Like right. Like racist, racist, assholes.3 (1h 8m 50s):I mean, and that's what was going to be NASA, regardless of what race you are. So, you know, you're going to be an asshole. You're going to be an asshole. If you are a mean person, you are a mean person. It has nothing to do with your gender, your culture, where you come from, you're you, if you're a mean person, you're a mean person having said that there was quite a few people that said some things to me while I was in school, which was very offensive. But what do you want me to do? Fight every person. That's some kind of, you know, I was called many things. I was called camel jockey. I was called by students. Oh, somebody students. Yeah. Mostly by students. You know, I was called no, no, no. It's okay.3 (1h 9m 31s):Hey, that's you know, you, you grow from it. There was, there was one person that called me a word. I don't think I can say it on this podcast, but it's a, it's like, whoa.2 (1h 9m 42s):Well, well, we've heard so much about from every alum of color that we've talked to, is this thing that you're describing of maybe they even got selected for the program with the idea, oh, you know, we don't have anybody who looks like this in our program, but then it became, we can,1 (1h 10m 2s):We don't have any money.2 (1h 10m 3s):We can only find a role for that person. If it's clearly identified in the text that that person is that ethnicity. Meanwhile, all the white actors could be up for any role. Right. That, that was sort of the default. Like if you're white, then you can play anything. But if you're not white, then you, then you have to play a role that's written for whatever your ethnicity is.3 (1h 10m 27s):I agree with that. And yeah. And I think, I think Christina dare kind of broke the window on that with Romeo and Juliet, by casting Leonard Roberts as Romeo, you know, an African-American man. And he was great in the role. He was great. Absolutely. You know, she passed me as, you know, as a Jewish man, you know, even though I'm there, I like that. I I'm playing against type. This is, these are the rules that I would like to be challenged with. And unfortunately I wasn't challenged with over there. And I think the school to your saying, Gina, I think the school was just kinda like, eh, let's just bring this middle Eastern guy. See what happens. Let's get this African-American person. Let's see what happens. Let's get this Indian person. Let's see what happens. And nothing happened, nothing happened.3 (1h 11m 8s):And, and by the third year, by the third year, I was just, I was done. I was done. After, after Shakespeare, Susan Lee, I was done. I was done. She, she was a hard teacher. She was a hard teacher to deal with both academically. And you know, personally it's just, just was hard. It was hard to deal with her. I'm not, I know Bobby, some students have some harsher words for her, but again, I was going back to what I said earlier, Eric and I were pretty much marked by her that we were not serious about Shakespeare.3 (1h 11m 48s):And I was very serious about it. I just wanted, I remember students coming up to me, they tried to avoid being partners with us. And then I had one partner telling me, Hey, you better not fool around or do this. You know, you gotta be serious. I said, what the hell is wrong with you? And then when they find out the real me, and then it's like, wow, that's totally different than what I'm hearing about you. And I'm like,2 (1h 12m 11s):Yeah, this is serious. Is my lasting impression of you. I would never have said that you were anything but very serious.3 (1h 12m 21s):I appreciate that. I really do. I appreciate that. I

Class E Podcast
How One Company Survived and Thrived During the Pandemic

Class E Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:50


In the latest episode of the Class E Podcast, we talk with Furman Alum, Reed Brown. He is the Vice President of Brown Packing and shares the benefits of working in a family business, how Brown Packing survived and thrived during the pandemic, and the sustainable steps they take to ensure nothing goes to waste.  Guest: Reed Brown: Brown Packing  Host: Mary Sturgill Producer: Emma Kerr Website: https://www.brownpacking.com/

tbs eFM The Steve Hatherly Show
1021 Mystery Mokyoil (Part 2-Every single person died, so who survived?)

tbs eFM The Steve Hatherly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:38


Win the Day Productions Podcast

I am being punished for my past. You've got a busted story? Me too. Things didn't turn out the way you thought they would? Me too. Survived a broken heart? Me too. Made some serious mistakes in your past? Me too. Hurt those you love? Me too. Wish you could go back and play it out differently? Me too. Consuming, isn't it? To be caught on a loop that plays your mistakes over and over, frozen in a former world that hurts every time you touch it. The original scene plays out and now it's joined with sequel after sequel of the sub stories I've written about my ugly past. Some days I feel so distracted by what happened to me I forget that it also happened for me. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/becky_allen/ SHOW NOTES: https://winthedaypro.com/I-Am-Being-Punished-For-My-Past

Politely Rude With Abby Johnson
FLASHBACK: She Survived an Abortion That Killed Her Twin. Here Is Claire Culwell's Incredible — and Shocking — Story

Politely Rude With Abby Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:25


This week, we revisit one of our most powerful past episodes of "Politely Rude": Claire Culwell survived an abortion that killed her twin — and when she discovered that she was an abortion survivor, it turned her world upside down. Now, she's speaking out about her incredible story of hope, forgiveness and the value of life. Listen to Claire and Abby sit down to talk through the details and to explore a plethora of associated issues.

Real Estate and You w/ Brad Weisman
She Survived 9 OFFERS before GETTING a HOME!!

Real Estate and You w/ Brad Weisman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 15:24


My brave guest, Taylor Patullo, put in more offers on homes than any other client that I've had in my 29 years of being in this business.  The 10th one was a charm!!  If you are a buyer in this market, or even if you're not, you'll want to hear (in her words) what she was thinking, what she was being told by others and how it all ended up working out just fine.  At the end of the day, she got a wonderful home and is living happily ever after with her boyfriend Travis.  Don't lose hope, you will find a home, and you will love the home you find!  If you start to feel depressed, just listen to this podcast and you'll know it's all going to be ok.  :)   If you like what you hear,  please follow Brad Weisman in the following formats:Facebook - Real Estate and YOU!YouTube - Real Estate and YOU!Website - RealEstateandYou.netThanks for listening! :) 

Philly Who?
Eli Kulp: The Chef Who Survived a Train Derailment

Philly Who?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 42:09


Eli Kulp is an award-winning Philly chef and podcaster who has overseen local restaurants such as Fork, and a.kitchen. One night, while he was, was at the top of his game, Eli was in an Amtrak derailment that led them that left him unable to walk, unable to use his hands, and unable to cook. What follows is the story of how, despite his severe injury, Eli fought to recover and was able to revitalize his career as a chef and hospitality industry thought-leader. Want to hear the complete, unedited interview with Kevin and Terrill? Subscribe to Philly Who? on Supercast for access to that, to the Philly Who? Community Discord, for free event tickets, and more!

Military Murder
Ep90. I SURVIVED (Megan Hiatt)

Military Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 131:01


In 2014, 19-year old, Megan Hiatt created an online dating profile. She met a Navy man by the name of Gaiwain “Rush” Wilson. They were smitten and within 2 months, their whirlwind romance resulted in the pair moving in together and a month later, they were pregnant with twin girls. They were over the moon, but soon, Rush would show his true colors – easily agitated, extremely apologetic, and hypercritical of everything Megan did.  But Megan, the product of a broken home, wanted to make things work for the baby girls she was carrying. Megan didn't believe she was the victim of domestic abuse, because Rush never put his hands on her. After the girls were born, Megan had made up her mind to leave for the third and final time…but she made a frightful decision that altered her family and life forever.  She told Rush she was leaving.  Dig in with Margot as she has an extremely candid conversation with Megan. This interview was conducted in 2020. You already heard Margot tell you this story in Ep46, but in this episode – we hear the story from the survivor herself.  ----- If you or someone you know is suffering from domestic abuse – please seek help. Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.799.SAFE (7233) ----- Thanks to Today's Sponsors: EveryPlate! Visit everyplate.com and use code “militarymama199” to get your meals at $1.99 per meal. Talkspace! Visit talkspace.com and use code “militarymama” to get $100 off your first month. ---- Get up to 14 BONUS episodes here! https://Patreon.com/militarymurder ----- Military Murder is a military true crime podcast that focuses on murders committed by military members, veterans, and sometimes their family members. ---- Follow on social: Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/militarymurderpodcast Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/@militarymurder Facebook: https://facebook.com/militarytruecrime Discussion Group: https://facebook.com/groups/militarytruecrime Email: militarymurderpodcast@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1665: How Gyms Survived Shutdowns With Jason Khalipa

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 82:37


In this episode, Sal, Adam & Justin speak with former CrossFit champion and gym owner Jason Khalipa about the challenges of running gyms during shutdowns and ongoing uncertainty.

I Catch Killers with Gary Jubelin
Shot in the neck - how a country cop survived

I Catch Killers with Gary Jubelin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 78:09


In this episode Helen McMurtie talks us through her life as a female uniform cop in the city and the country. She also discusses when she got shot in the neck and thought she was going to die attending a violent domestic. This 2018 crime was the last crime scene Gary attended before his retirement.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

the only one in the room podcast
SUNDAY EDITION: Azita Alavi Is The Only One In The Room Who Survived A Home Invasion

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 34:44


“It was very early and I was still in bed when I heard someone yelling from my backyard. When I pulled the curtain back and saw a bunch of armed men jumping into my backyard, I first thought I was dreaming. But before I could figure out what was going on, they started shooting at my house. I froze by the window and my heart was coming out of my chest but I gathered all my strength and ran into my parent's room. My dad jumped out of bed, he was going in the direction of the shots but I grabbed him and begged him to stay. We all gathered in a small windowless space. We were hearing gunshots, the sound of broken glass, and some vague noises.”  -Azita Alavi Azita Alavi is a Human Potential Coach, who has dedicated herself to helping People Discover their Greatness and Unlimited Potential through Raising Awareness and Mastering their Neuro-Communication. Azita Alavi, MA, Youth Branch Lead and Faculty Member responsable de la branche jeunesse et membre du corps enseignant Certified Transformational Leadership Coach, & Behavioral Consultant/Coach certifié en leadership transformationnel, et consultant en matière de comportement  Visit: Her Sacred Sanctuary Visit: https://thejohnmaxwellteam.fr, https://www.johncmaxwellgroup.com/azitaalavi, https://center4youthleadership.com/ LinkedIn: Azita Alavi YouTube: Azita Alavi Special thanks to our sponsors: Best Fiends: Join us and the millions of Americans who are already playing this game. Download Best Fiends for FREE on The Apple APP store or Google Play. That's friends without the R, Best Fiends. Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Cute Booty Lounge is made by women and for women. There's a cute booty style for everyone! Cute Booty Lounge has you covered...Embrace Your Body, Love Your Booty! Head to Cutebooty.com or click the link here to order yours, but don't forget to enter the code theonlybooty to get 15% off your first order!  Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays and our brand new series On My Nightstand on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Len's Burning Bush
I survived the Facebook and Instagram outage of 2021

Len's Burning Bush

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 37:37


Songwriter connection Podcast Host from Nashville Dave Lenahan joins #lensburningbush @lensburningbush to chat about the Facebook outage, FU money, his golf game, and much more. You can follow all 79 episodes on Itunes, IHeart Radio, Pandora, Podbean, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, and Tune In, and You Tube.  Follow Dave at https://davelenahanmusic.wixsite.com/songwriterconnection

Curious City
Three Buildings That Survived The Great Chicago Fire

Curious City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 16:01


The Great Chicago Fire, which lasted from October 8th to October 10th, 1871, destroyed most of Chicago from what is today Roosevelt Road up to Fullerton and from the Lake west to the Chicago River. Almost 100,000 Chicagoans lost their homes and several hundred lost their lives. And while the Chicago Water Tower has become an important symbol of what survived the destruction of the fire, it's not the only building that made it through. Historian Paul Durica tells us about three other “survivors” and what happened to them decades later.

Productivity Straight Talk - Time Management, Productivity and Business Growth Tips
211 | UPDATE: How My Business Survived In My Absence

Productivity Straight Talk - Time Management, Productivity and Business Growth Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:34


If you're a regular listener of Productivity Straight Talk, you might have noticed that no episodes have been published for a long time. I know from emails, direct messages, and reviews that many of you love listening to this podcast first thing on Monday mornings to start your week off on a productive high note. If you were disappointed by the lack of new episodes showing up in your feed, I'm very sorry and appreciate you tuning in today. I can assure you I am back in action and look forward to consistently bringing you the straight talk on business and productivity once again! ln today's episode, I unpack what has been going on in my life over the past seven weeks that has kept me from publishing new podcasts, showing up for my business, and supporting my awesome clients. This episode is all about my personal story, yes, but believe me, there will be plenty of takeaways to bring back to your business and life. What You'll Discover In This Episode: ✔ Why I've Been MIA From This Podcast (And My Business!) For 7 Weeks ✔ The Fears I Had During That Time ✔ How My Business Survived In My Absence  ✔ 3 Lessons Learned When I Couldn't Show Up For My Business ✔ So Much More! To access resources and links from this episode, click on https://AmberDeLaGarza.com/211

Aww Shift
A. Ruth Proctor - I Survived You Can Too

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:57


In today's episode, our guest is Ruth Proctor, mother, a serial entrepreneur, and the best-selling author behind "I Survived; You Can Too." Placed in Foster care at the age of 6, Ruth forced to make mature life adjustments at a very early age. [6:52] Why should we listen to you? It would help if you listened to me because I have been an entrepreneur for 16 years. I'm the rose that grew from concrete, and I have a story to tell. From a small town in North Carolina, I was in foster care at the age of six. And from that burst, I'm resilient that continues to push; no matter what odds are stacked against me, I continue to move forward and go forward. So I think that alone should be a reason for someone to talk to me. [7:44] How I survive At the age of around five to six years old, my mom is diagnosed with mental illness. While the community was watching us, my mom began to outsmart the system and run. After countless of running, eventually, they do take me from her. My brother and I were placed into multiple foster care programs. I realized my life that I knew it was no more. I was molested in foster care. I was touched by my brother's father, who was supposed to protect me and watch over me. To know that you still could get out no matter what you go through, you can still be successful as an entrepreneur and person. It's been a roller coaster, but I'm grateful. I'm humbled. And I'm here now to help other people know that you can get out. No matter what adversity you face in life, and you know. I want people to know you can be anything you want to be when you're a person.   [10:37] Journey to entrepreneurship At 14, I began to work on my part-time job and really didn't have any weigh-in on me at the time. But now I realized that it is a lot to do with my decisions. I went to college initially thinking that I was going to be a lawyer. I got my bachelor's in political science thinking I was going to be a lawyer. And then when those gears switched, began to work in the mental health field. I went from being a P. P, to being the CEO of the company. And so I began to open up my own agency, and then from there, I just began to open up different agencies in different states. I love giving back and doing things to give back to my nonprofit as well. So it's been a journey.  [13:36] The book I started 10 years ago, I began to journal. Many people told me to write a book about my story, and I just kept hearing it. God kept tugging at me. And I was like, I'm going to write a book. And so eventually, those journals became part of the book. The support and the outpour from people that didn't know my story, didn't know the things that they thought they knew about me. It was just the support has been outstanding. And what they see, this person is an entrepreneur working and as a mom, but you don't know. The book will be released on 20 December 2020, when I finally decided to launch my book for my birthday. [17:38] What was the hardest part for you to write? Childhood was the hardest when you are writing and when you are typing, and you relive those emotions, you relive those feelings again. But when you're writing it, it's coming to life and then producing it and giving it to someone and knowing that they're going to see the same things, yet It's also painful at the same time. It was days I couldn't write. It was days I was like, I'm not typing today. Emotionally, I can't deal with it today. [18:56] Have you finally forgiven these people? Do you still ever find the darkness or the anger floating around? I have my moments. I'm a very forgiving person, but I don't forget. So I will love you. I tend to love people, but I don't have to have a relationship with them. I must put boundaries in place with people that I know love me. I had to learn what limits to put in place because before that, I'll meet with him, and then I will be disappointed, or I will meet with this person, and I'll be upset.   [25:27] What will be the most powerful lesson that you feel people could learn from the book? No matter how many doors are closing your face, you can still make it. You can still do it. If 1000 people tell you no if one person tells you yes is worth it. And no matter how many people tell you that you can't make it, and you can't do it, use that and expound on that and push forward no matter what is in front of you. [26:25] What promise did God make to the world when He created you? No matter what is in front of you that you can get to the other side, we all have a message; we all have something that we survived. I think that's why he created me. I believe my purpose is to show other people, no matter what you go through. Key Quotes [13:22 - 13:24] “Childhood trauma always goes into adulthood trauma.” [19:15 - 19:17] “You can love people, but you can love them from afar.” [22:14 - 22:17] “You can't expect someone to love you if you don't love yourself.” Connect with A Ruth Proctor: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/a.ruthproctor/?hl=en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-s83EXLdpPHscjwSg781Jg Website: https://www.aruthproctor.com/    

Comedy Dynamics Daily
How D.L. Hughley Survived The End Of The World

Comedy Dynamics Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:50


Politically insightful legendary comedian, D.L. Hughley, takes the stage at the Regency Theatre in San Francisco. Hughley riffs on current affairs and reviews everything from legalizing marijuana to the value of having nosey white neighbors. Follow Comedy Dynamics on social media! YouTube: https://bit.ly/3ymp1 to Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ComedyDynamics Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ComedyDynamics TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/J1wucyQ/ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/ComedyDynamics http://www.comedydynamics.com/  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Broads You Should Know
Half-Hanged Mary — The Woman Who Survived Multiple Witch Accusations and a Puritan Lynching Attempt [Caitlin Parrish]

Broads You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:52


This week, special guest Caitlin Parrish tells us the story of "Half-Hanged" Mary Webster. Accused of witchcraft more than once in her lifetime, she does not escape the noose - but you'll have to listen to find out the rest! Her story predates the Salem witch trials by several decades and she is an ancestor of Margaret Atwood's, inspiring her poem "Half-Hanged Mary" and one of the dedicatee's of The Handmaid's Tale. — A Broad is a woman who lives by her own rules. Broads You Should Know is the podcast about the Broads who helped shape our world! 3 Ways you can help support the podcast: Write a review on iTunes Share your favorite episode on social media / tell a friend about the show! Send us an email with a broad suggestion, question, or comment at BroadsYouShouldKnow@gmail.com — Broads You Should Know is hosted by Sara Gorsky. IG: @SaraGorsky Web master / site design: www.BroadsYouShouldKnow.com — Broads You Should Know is produced by Sara Gorsky & edited by Chloe Skye

Clemson Sports Talk
The "Survived" Edition

Clemson Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 85:11


Clemson survives Boston College 19-13 in Death Valley.

Johnjay & Rich On Demand
We survived the great Instagram outage of 2021.

Johnjay & Rich On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 80:33


If you're reading this, we made it. We all made it. TODAY ON THE SHOW: What got Johnjay to turn on DANCING WITH THE STARS?! Payton's bedroom issues! We want to know what YOU were forced to do because Instagram was out? 2nd DATE UPDATE! We're playing a BRAND NEW game and soMUCHmore!!

Your Morning Show On-Demand
That Time We Survived Facebook And Instagram Shutting Down

Your Morning Show On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 88:01


What did you do for almost six hours when Facebook and Instagram shut down yesterday!? Join Intern John, Riley, and Rose as we update you on what happened and also play a new round of "That's It!" Plus an all NEW Asking For A Friend, Ask Riley, and we talk to Dr. Oz about moisturizing! All that and more on Your Morning Show for today!Make sure to also keep up to date with ALL of our podcasts we do below that have new episodes every week:The Thought ShowerReally RileyLet's Get WeirdCrisis on Infinite PodcastsBlake & Erick Podcast

The SportsBros Podcast
Ep #126 We Survived The Facebook Outage

The SportsBros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 97:52


In this episode, the Bros share what they learned after week four of the NFL season and which game will be the game of the week for week 5. Also B. Live is back with another edition of the "B. Live Top 5" and all of the happenings in College Football. It's October and that means it's time for some playoff baseball and the Bros give us a preview and  World Series predictions. On this week's Choices Of The Voices, we ask the listeners which pitcher would they have to take the mound in a winner take all situation. Scottie D. is Happy after his Cowboys get the W, Eddy wonders will Mike Trout ever win a World Series Championship and B. Live Let's Urban Meyer have it. All this and more. Enjoy.  #CollegeFootball #NFL #SportsBrosPodcast  #MLBPlayoffs #ChoicesOfTheVoices Our Instagram Account   https://www.instagram.com/sportsbrospodcast Follow Us on Twitter @SportsBrosPcast @TheRealEddyKool @moneydonnelly @ThsBeYaBoyBLive Our YouTube Channel   https://www.youtube/channel/UCKHEPHTKnu9hkEXh4JCGmgA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thesportsbrospodcast/message

Veterans Corner Radio
Gold Star families are a special group or people to which this nation owes its very being. Listen it to hear what this mom and dad have to say about the loss of their son in combat and how with the help of many caring people they have not only survived bu

Veterans Corner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 17:03


Toni and Craig Gross are remarkable people and hearing about their losing their son Frank in Afghanistan brought tears to my eyes, However, how they have handled one of the greatest losses a parent can have is a story so heartwarming that it has to be told. Tune in to hear how they have committed their lives to help vets much like their son, who did return home but needed help on their return. 

Creepscast
43: Episode 43 | "I Survived The Backrooms, I've Been Looking To Go Back Ever Since" + 5 Other Scary Stories

Creepscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 123:36


In this episode, we dive into a collection of 6 creepypastas from the dark depths of the web. Ranging from "Does Anyone Else Remember The Great Blackout Of 2014?" to "I Saw The Michigan Dogman, It's Real", and many more! Sit back and enjoy today's stories.

The Daily Swole
#1975 - Fat People Survived The Pandemic (Some)

The Daily Swole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 95:12


Still justifying weight gain are we?   Our special offers are now LIVE for FYR!! Check the links down below and join the SwoleFam today!   F YOUR RESOLUTIONS SPECIAL OFFERS! : https://www.swolenormousx.com/memberships APPAREL - Use code "DAILYSWOLE" for 10% off: https://papaswolio.com Free Swolega Class: https://www.swolenormousx.com/swolega Download the 7 Pillars Series HERE: https://www.swolenormousx.com/7-Pillars-Ebook Daily Swole Podcast LIVESTREAM Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/dailyswolepodcast  

RNZ: Checkpoint
Farmer who survived Covid-19 urges all NZers to get vaccinated

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:17


A farmer who contracted Covid-19 last year is encouraging people to get vaccinated, no matter where they live in the country. This comes as rural health experts call for data on how the rollout in rural communities is going, saying they remain concerned coverage is patchy. Rural reporter, Maja Burry, has the story.

RNZ: Checkpoint
King Country family survived weeks in wild on 'bush food' - Tom Phillips' sister

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 4:39


A King Country father and his three children missing in bush for 17 days survived on 'bush food' and rice. Tom Phillips and his children had not been seen for 17 days until they returned home out of the blue yesterday morning. An extensive two week land and sea search was called off last week. Our reporter Nick Truebridge and cameraman Nick Monro have spent the day in Marokopa unravelling the family's disappearance and reappearance. They heard from Tom's sister.

On Deez Hoes
77: BACK IN ATL H@& / RODNEY PERRY BACK ON TOUR, SURVIVED COVID & ACTING IN ‘COMING TO AMERICA 2'

On Deez Hoes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:34


DESCRIPTION: TUNE IN EVERY THURSDAY FOR A NEW EPISODE OF #ODH SPONSORS:  ‘NICKO KITCHEN SHOP'- @nickokitchenshop  nickokitchenshop.com code: ODHTV FOLLOW THE HOSTS: PRECIOUS HALL:  https://instagram.com/precioushallcomedy?igshid=8r8yjlwfd94p KAMIRA WHITE: https://www.instagram.com/kamirawhite/?hl=en       GUEST HOST:       RODNEY PERRY       https://instagram.com/rodneyperrylive? utm_medium=copy_link    GET ODH GEAR:  https://www.seamstresstouch.com/products ODH THEME SONG: Jovan J. Dawkins @jovan_drum_producer  ADVICE LETTERS & PICS: ondeezhoes@gmail.com

Strive Nation Podcast
"That time when... we survived COVID-19."

Strive Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 67:24


Strive Nation Podcast - Season 2, Episode 19"That time when... we survived COVID-19."September 1st, 2021Hosts : Cory Estreen and Taylor HuffDid you miss us? Yes, yes... we finally caught the dastardly COVID-19. But guess what, we didn't die. The world is still turning despite what corporate media propagates. What a brilliant September Monthly Scoop to return to! Afghanistan and covid captured the news by storm this month, but we plan to deliver you a sprinkling of funny and good things as well. I must say, it's good to see you, Strivers!InstagramTwitterFacebookYouTubePlease follow, like, and subscribe on all of our socials and thank you so much for the support! Episodes found everywhere on all platforms!Timestamps :Coming Soon...Affiliates :Going to the grocery store sucks. You know what doesn't suck? Getting your groceries delivered straight to your door without having to get dressed!Instacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour. Free delivery on your first order over $35.Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery with Angie Atkinson
How I Survived a Narcissist and Came Out Better for It (And How You Can Too)

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery with Angie Atkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 7:48


How I Survived a Narcissist and Came Out Better for It (And How You Can Too) - I Survived A Narcissistic Relationship Discover. Understand. Overcome. It's how smart people change their lives! Subscribe to my channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/AuthorAngelaAtkinson?sub_confirmation=1 **NEW!! Become a member of my channel! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBnyC5I55W__RBj1PMybF5g/join **Never miss a live session! Just text "AngieLive" (no spaces) to 33222 and I'll send you a text each time I get ready to go live! Schedule a coaching appointment with me at https://queenbeeing.com/coaching or http://narcissisticabuserecovery.online Start your healing at https://queenbeeing.com. Take your life to the next level at https://shine.buzz Get my books at http://booksangiewrote.com, pick up your free 7-day fear-busting email course (specially designed for narcissistic relationship survivors) at http://narcissismsupportcoach.com. Join SPAN (Support for People Affected by Narcissism in toxic relationships) - AKA "The SPANily" - at http://queenbeeing.com/group-support. Let's Also Connect On: Facebook at https://facebook.com/coachangieatkinson. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coachangieatkinson/ Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@coachangieatkinson/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/angyatkinson/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/angieatkinsonSubscribe to Narcissistic Abuse Recovery with Angie Atkinson on Soundwise

Radio Survivor Podcast
Podcast #317 – How Radio Survived 18 Months of Pandemic (and Keeps Going)

Radio Survivor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:55


A year-and-a-half ago high school, college and community radio stations shut their studio doors in response to safety measures to prevent the spread of COVID. They quickly scrambled to find ways to stay on air, broadcasting archived programming, allowing DJs to pre-record or even broadcast live from home. We’ve dedicated several episodes to learning how […] The post Podcast #317 – How Radio Survived 18 Months of Pandemic (and Keeps Going) appeared first on Radio Survivor.

the only one in the room podcast
Robert Kabera Is The Only One Who Survived A Genocide and Landed On The Forbes 30 under 30 List Episode 101

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 48:11


Picture this, you're five years old and your mom is cooking dinner, like she does every night. Suddenly the air around your home is filled with screams and gunfire. Robert Kabera, Stanford graduate, co-founder, and COO of Sync Energy A.I., survived the 1994 Rwandan Genocide with his family by hiding in tunnels, evading soldiers, and spending six years in refugee camps.  But what would you do if after graduating from one of America's most prestigious universities, you discovered that 90% of Africa is not banked and that many of the people there were living off of the energy grid? Would you decide to ignore the problems of your home continent and focus on the USA? Or would you launch business after business aimed at helping people in various African countries and find yourself on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in the energy sector? More From Robert Kabera: Read his Forbes 30-Under-30 Article Visit: https://robertkabera.com Finding Robert Kabera: Facebook: Robert Kabera Twitter: @rkabera Special thanks to our sponsors: Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Cute Booty Lounge is made by women and for women. There's a cute booty style for everyone! Cute Booty Lounge has you covered...Embrace Your Body, Love Your Booty! Head to Cutebooty.com or click the link here to order yours, but don't forget to enter the code theonlybooty to get 15% off your first order! Be sure not to miss Scott Talks on Wednesdays, our Sunday release called Sunday Edition & our brand new series On My Nightstand releasing on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Health Rants
Post COVID - I Survived

Health Rants

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 28:43


Both my wife and I came down with COVID. In this episode I describe how we got it, what it was like having it, and how we got over it. Although many people have a different experience with this illness, I describe what it was like to have it, and the steps I took to get over it. 

Squared Circle Podcast
Who Survived A Block? | G131 Climax NJPW | 9.18.21

Squared Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 45:18


Welcome to the Squared Circle Podcast! I am your host Marie Shadows! On this episode, I'll be going over night 1 of the G131 Climax A Block from 9.18.21. I finally get to cover it since I've been on other wrestling podcasts talking about my WWE days, Dark Side of the Ring, Booking Wrestling, and more! But for now, I go over these NJPW G131 topics: -Yujiro gets an impressive win! -Loa is a warrior; Great-O-Khan has come into his own even though he's part of The United Empire -Kenta vs Yano -Naito injury and he needs a vacation -Zack Sabre Jr is a dangerous wrestler -Ishii vs Shingo is a must see match Thanks for listening! @Marie_Shadows Patreon: MarieShadows YouTube --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/squaredcirclepodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/squaredcirclepodcast/support

Rapid Fire
Ep 52 | What The Hell Is Going On?! (Also I Survived The Rona)

Rapid Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 55:37


I got COVID for a week and BLM is trying to team up with Trump supporters, the border was overrun with over 15,000 Haitians that have since disappeared, McDonalds is turning away the elderly for not having a “health pass” and the Biden administration is condemning Russia for lack of transparency in their election?! What the hell is going on?!   Please remember to leave a 5 star review on the podcast version of the show as well!!! Links down below!   SPONSOR: MY PATRIOT SUPPLY: Get 25% off your 4-week or 3 month storable food supply with My Patriot Supply: CLICK HERE https://mypatriotsupply.com/pages/rs-...   FOLLOW ME: YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/savsays ODYSEE: https://odysee.com/@SavSays:7?r=7q7r9... GAB: https://gab.com/SavanahHernandez INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/savwith1n/   SUPPORT MY WORK: PAYPAL: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/savsays WEBSITE: https://www.savsaysofficial.com/  

Trumpet Dynamics
How Sławomir Cichor Survived a Culture of Perpetual Fear to Find the Song in His Heart and Blaze a New Trail for Young Polish Trumpeters

Trumpet Dynamics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 37:09


You'll want to tune into this episode. Imagine existing in a professional music environment where fear is the dominating factor in everything you do. You miss a note and immediately get the stink eye from the maestro, fearful that one more misstep and you'll be out on the street, without a job and no hope of ever getting one again. The maestro even goes so far as to describe a performance by the great Phil Smith of the NY Phil as "terrible" because Phil (gasp!!!) missed a note during a performance. One would think that a job performing music in such an environment wouldn't be much fun at all. And one would be correct in thinking so. That was the reality that Sławomir Cichor faced on a daily basis. But then he visited a trumpet seminar hosted by Grand Valley State University circa 2012 and for the first time saw trumpeters performing for the pure love of performing. Music without the jackboot on the throat was suddenly enjoyable, and Sławomir has taken that joy he discovered at that seminar to his home country of Poland and shared it with those following in his footsteps. In this episode, you'll discover: -What does the trumpet scene look like in Poland?...02:02 -How Slawomir got started on trumpet...07:20 -Surviving a culture of perpetual fear...15:06 -A trip to the U.S. opens the eyes to new possibilities...23:21 -How Sławomir is opening new doors for younger players in Poland...27:43 -And much more! Credits: Trumpet Dynamics: The Story of the Trumpet, In the Words of Those Who Play It Host: https://jamesnewcombontrumpet.com (James Newcomb) Guest: Slawomir Cichor Opening and closing music: Serenade to a Bus Seat written and performed by Mike Vax Audio editing by: James Newcomb Show notes prepared by: http://podcastartistry.com (podcastartistry.com)

Jill Scott Presents: J.ill the Podcast
They Survived So You Could Thrive

Jill Scott Presents: J.ill the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 65:24


On this episode of J.ill your resident aunties discuss this new generation, generation z! Listen up, because the ladies have some wisdom to share today. Call 866-HEY-JILL and leave us a message with your comments on this episode! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Ask a House Cleaner
I Did Not Go Shopping for 1 Year | How I Survived and What I Learned

Ask a House Cleaner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:50


I did not go shopping for 1 year. Crazy right? Here's how I survived without shopping, what I ate, and what I learned from the challenge. I didn't stock up on anything beforehand, I just went cold turkey and it wasn't even about decluttering or minimalizing my stuff. I don't have a compulsive shopping disorder but I did swing by the store almost every day to buy last-minute cleaning supplies and treats for myself. Staying at home gave me a new perspective on the stuff I own and helped me form better habits around my purchases. Today's Ask a House Cleaner sponsor is Savvy Cleaner Training and certification for house cleaners and maids. (https://savvycleaner.com/join) *** I DID NOT GO SHOPPING FOR ONE YEAR CHAPTERS *** 0:00 - I did not go shopping for one year - here's what happened 0:06 - Meet #AngelaBrown the House Cleaning Guru 0:20 - Join us at #HoardingWorld 0:35 - Covid issues stay at home mandates 1:03 - Can I go a year without shopping? 1:31 - Why not use what we have instead of buying more? 1:55 - The psychology that made it okay to stop shopping 2:26 - Why I wasn't tempted to go into stores 2:53 - What I did when I had the urge to buy something new 3:11 - Why I started #decluttering things I owned 3:40 - Intentional space - keeping stuff with purpose 3:58 - What happened to me when I stopped shopping for 1 year 4:34 - How I survived and what I learned about myself *** PROMISED LINKS AND GOOD KARMA RESOURCES *** Habit Stacking: 97 Small Life Changes That Take Five Minutes or Less - https://amzn.to/2VXWcGv Mini Habits for Weight Loss: Stop Dieting. Form New Habits. Change Your Lifestyle Without Suffering - https://amzn.to/3hU5bAn Habit Stacking: 107 Successful Habits to Drastically Improve Your Life - https://amzn.to/3zvTWUy Power Of Habit: Building One Good Habit At A Time - https://amzn.to/3AvveVS Discipline = Power: How to Master Self Control, Build Better Habits, and Achieve Your Goals - https://amzn.to/3CxwwjF These good karma links connect you to affiliated sites that offer products or services that relate to today's show. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Your support pays our production costs to bring you these free daily tips. THANK YOU. *** RATE THIS SHOW *** https://sotellus.com/r/savvy-cleaner *** RATE THIS PODCAST *** https://ratethispodcast.com/askahousecleaner *** TRAINING & CLEANING CERTIFICATION*** https://savvycleaner.com/join *** MOST REQUESTED LIST OF CLEANING STUFF I USE *** https://www.Amazon.com/shop/AngelaBrown ***FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – THANK YOU GIFTS FOR MAIDS*** Daily Giveaway - https://funnycleaningshirts.com *** CONNECT WITH ANGELA ON SOCIAL MEDIA *** LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/savvycleaner/ Facebook: https://Facebook.com/SavvyCleaner Twitter: https://Twitter.com/SavvyCleaner Instagram: https://Instagram.com/SavvyCleaner Pinterest: https://Pinterest.com/SavvyCleaner *** GOT A QUESTION FOR A SHOW? *** Email it to Angela[at]AskaHouseCleaner.com Voice Mail: Click on the blue button at https://askahousecleaner.com *** FREE EBOOK – HOW TO START YOUR OWN HOUSE CLEANING COMPANY *** http://amzn.to/2xUAF3Z *** PROFESSIONAL HOUSE CLEANERS PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProfessionalHouseCleaners/ *** VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRBO.Airbnb.Cleaning/ *** LOOKING FOR A WAY TO GET MORE CLEANING LEADS *** https://housecleaning360.com *** SPONSORSHIPS & BRANDS *** We do work with sponsors and brands. If you are interested in working with us and you have a product or service that is cohesive to the cleaning industry read this: https://savvycleaner.com/product-review *** THIS SHOW WAS SPONSORED BY *** SAVVY CLEANER - House Cleaner Training and Certification – https://savvycleaner.com MY CLEANING CONNECTION – Your hub for all things cleaning – https://mycleaningconnection.com SAVVY PERKS – Employee Benefits for Small Business Owners – https://savvyperks.com VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING – Cleaning tips and strategies for your short-term rental https://TurnoverCleaningTips.com FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – Incentive and thank you gifts for house cleaners and maids. https://FunnyCleaningShirts.com *** VIDEO CREDITS *** VIDEO/AUDIO EDITING: Kristin O https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/kristin-o HOST: Angela Brown https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/angela-brown PRODUCER: Savvy Cleaner https://savvycleaner.com

Texas Oil and Gas Podcast
219 - Josh and Ryan survived COVID & are back

Texas Oil and Gas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 30:04


whybuyminerals.comwww.ryanraysr.com/fivewidehttps://www.reuters.com/business/energy/soaring-gas-prices-colder-winter-could-boost-oil-prices-says-goldman-2021-09-20/https://energyfrontierng.com/global-oil-demand-will-continue-to-grow-even-after-2050-experts/• General News Storieshttps://www.reuters.com/business/energy/exclusive-us-shale-oil-firm-pioneer-natural-launches-land-sale-sources-2021-09-17/• https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/20/oil-and-gas-inside-the-diplomatic-alliance-to-keep-fossil-fuels-in-the-ground.html • https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/los-angeles-county-votes-phase-oil-gas-drilling-80044089• https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/04/bitcoin-miners-oil-and-gas-execs-talk-about-natural-gas-mining.html• https://www.mrt.com/business/oil/article/Producer-Rig-activity-growth-is-not-what-would-16468402.php

2 Girls Talking
She Survived Trauma. Now Lorilee is Thriving and Helping Others

2 Girls Talking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 31:36


At first glance Lorilee Binstock had a perfect life. She is a successful media professional, has a great husband, beautiful kids. But she harbored a secret, one so traumatic that she kept it a secret even from herself, for decades. Lorilee was sexually abused as a child, and she pushed that trauma so far down in her subconscious that one day she forgot about it and built a life. Until one day she didn't want to live anymore. This is her story in her words of how this trauma suddenly made itself known and how she survived that realization. Today, Lorilee is thriving. With help from her husband, she received the help she needed to begin healing.  And she is here to help other survivors get to a better place. If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts the Crisis Lifeline is here to help. Text HELLO to 741741 or call the Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

John Solomon Reports
Firefighter who survived 9/11: Afghan withdrawal a ‘betrayal' to all warriors in War on Terror

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 46:34


Niels Jorgensen, survivor of 9/11 and ‘ground zero' related cancer, discusses the legacy of 9/11 and the epidemic of first responders dying of 9/11 related illnesses and cancer, revealing that, ‘2 people a-day die' are dying from 9/11 related illnesses. Jorgensen goes on to talk about the ‘warrior class' of the War on Terror, describing the feelings of ‘betrayal' over the Afghanistan Withdrawal, saying that, these men feel like ‘the backs of our government have been turned on' them.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pod Like a Raven
At Least the Boys Survived Las Vegas?

Pod Like a Raven

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 80:52


The boys recount (some) of their respective Vegas trip as well as the team's brutal loss on Monday night. Then we overreact to some of week 1 before previewing another tough test against the Chiefs.You can find Pod Like A Raven on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play and iHeartRadio! Like, rate and subscribe on your favorite podcast network, and let us know what you think on Twitter and Instagram at PodLikeARaven or at podlikearaven@gmail.com! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intuitionology Podcast Series
Survived A Tumultuous Life And Brought Healing To Others | Sandi Boucher

The Intuitionology Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 43:17


Today's podcast guest is with Sandi Boucher who is a master at creating space and has used intuition to survive a very tumultuous life so that she could help bring healing to others. In this podcast interview, Sandi and I talk about the influence her parents had on her life, the trials and tribulations she had to endure after losing her parents, thoughts around indigenous reconciliation, and trusting intuition that led her to what she is doing now. Website: https://sandiboucher.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sandi.boucher/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandiboucher/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SandiBoucher Free 7-day challenge!

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK
Ben Survived Hurricane Ida

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 36:17


This week, Ben recounts the story of his trip to New York that ended with outrunning and outliving a giant weather event, Hurricane Ida. Ben ignores an emergency message to stay inside and hunker down and orders Uber Eats, forcing a delivery driver to risk his life to deliver a few dumplings. Plus, Ben rejects his mother's phone calls on air. If you're ready to save money on your Doordash orders, DoorDash is offering a FREE MONTH for DashPass right now! Tweet your crazy near-death experiences to @benoftheweek using #IAlmostDiedPodcast! Follow Ben on YouTube Follow Ben on Instagram  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Jim Puplava: How I Survived Covid at Age 70

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 29:44


Sep 13 – You may have noticed that our main host, Jim Puplava, was missing from our podcast for multiple weeks in a row. Well, in today's show, Jim shares his experience with Covid and what he did to... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

JEFF FM
HOW MY MOM BARELY SURVIVED 9/11 | Jeff FM | Ep 16

JEFF FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 59:14


Download the DraftKings app and use code JEFFFM to get a free shot at the $1,000,000 prize! Go to http://buyraycon.com/jefffm to save 15% off on Raycons! Jeff Wittek's mother comes on and tells us her 9/11 survival story from working on the 44th floor when the plane crashed into the building.

Spillin' the Tea with Kelly G
We Survived Our 20s and We Learned the Lessons (with Alexa Re) | S2E5

Spillin' the Tea with Kelly G

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 92:46


On this week's episode, we talk about turning 30, what we wish we knew when we were in our early 20s, living alone, budgeting, and more!  Follow Kelly on IG: @spillintheteawithkellyg OR @thesandiegoscout Follow Alexa on IG: @alexaregarcia Recommendations from the Episode: Bike Desk  Laptop Riser  5 Minute Journal  How to do the Work  Forgiving What you Can't Forget (both of us have it but can't recommend since we haven't finished it) Kelly's Amazon recs 

Philly Who?
Jeannine A. Cook: How Harriett's Bookshop Survived Prejudice, Protests and a Pandemic

Philly Who?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 44:19


Jeannine A. Cook is the Founder and Shopkeeper at Harriett's Bookshop, named after Harriett Tubman. In February 2020, Harriett's was born to celebrate women authors, artists, and activists. The space was immediately beloved, but when the Coronavirus pandemic hit in March 2020, everything Jeannine had worked for was in jeopardy. What follows is the story of how her incredible grit and intuition helped Harriett's survive and thrive during one of the most tumultuous years our country has ever seen. Want to hear the complete, unedited interview with Kevin and Jeannine? Subscribe to Philly Who? on Supercast for access to that, to the Philly Who? Community Discord, for free event tickets, and more!

The Daily
How Has the Texas Abortion Law Survived the Courts?

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 21:38


In a way, the new Texas law that has effectively banned abortions after six weeks is typical — many other Republican-led states have sought to ban abortions after six, 10 or 15 weeks. But where federal courts have routinely struck down other anti-abortion laws, the Texas legislation has gone into effect with the Supreme Court's blessing. How has this law survived so far, and where does it leave abortion providers in the state?Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: A Texas law that prohibits most abortions after six weeks was drafted with the goal of frustrating efforts to challenge it in federal court.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.