Podcasts about Ottoman Empire

Former empire centered about modern Turkey

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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 24, 2023 is: balkanize • BAWL-kuh-nyze • verb Balkanize is an often-capitalized verb meaning "to break up (a region, a group, etc.) into smaller and often hostile units." It can also mean "to divide or compartmentalize." // Opponents argue that the proposed legislation would only serve to Balkanize the country. // Rock is one of many musical genres that has been balkanized into an array of subgenres. See the entry > Examples: "The so-called Clean Networks Initiative used a 'trusted-country-of-origin' requirement to insulate the U.S. from Chinese technology, while pressing American allies to exclude Chinese equipment from their 5G telecom networks. But splitting the digital world in half would balkanize the technical standards that companies and governments use to collaborate across borders, thereby restricting their ability to innovate." — Andy Purdy, Fortune, 9 May 2021 Did you know? The Balkan Peninsula of southeastern Europe is lapped by the Adriatic Sea in the west and the Black Sea in the east. It is named for the Balkan Mountains, a mountain range which extends across Bulgaria from its border with Serbia to the Black Sea. (Balkan comes from the Ottoman Turkish balḳān, meaning "wooded mountain or mountain range.") The Balkan States are commonly characterized as comprising Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, and Slovenia, with mainland portions of Greece and the European portion of Turkey often being included as well. The English word, which is often capitalized, is the lexical offspring of geography and history: the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the 18th century led to a series of revolts that accelerated the fracturing of the region into smaller states whose unstable coexistence led to violence that came to a head in World War I. Since the early 20th century, balkanize and its related noun, balkanization, have come to refer to the kind of divisive action that can weaken countries or groups, among other things.

Empire
29. Sultanas to Slaves: Voices from the Harem

Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 59:58


What was life like for women in the Ottoman Empire? Was the Sultanate of Women the 'golden era? What was the role of the Hareem? Listen as William and Anita are joined by Bettany Hughes to discuss the role of women in the Ottoman Empire. LRB Empire offer: lrb.me/empire Twitter: @Empirepoduk Goalhangerpodcasts.com Producer: Callum Hill Exec Producer: Jack Davenport Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
Mostafa Minawi, "Losing Istanbul: Arab-Ottoman Imperialists and the End of Empire" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 62:55


Mostafa Minawi's Losing Istanbul: Arab-Ottoman Imperialists and the End of Empire (Stanford University Press, 2022) offers an intimate history of empire, following the rise and fall of a generation of Arab-Ottoman imperialists living in Istanbul. Minawi shows how these men and women negotiated their loyalties and guarded their privileges through a microhistorical study of the changing social, political, and cultural currents between 1878 and the First World War. He narrates lives lived in these turbulent times—the joys and fears, triumphs and losses, pride and prejudices—while focusing on the complex dynamics of ethnicity and race in an increasingly Turco-centric imperial capital. Drawing on archival records, newspaper articles, travelogues, personal letters, diaries, photos, and interviews, Minawi shows how the loyalties of these imperialists were questioned and their ethnic identification weaponized. As the once diverse empire comes to an end, they are forced to give up their home in the imperial capital. An alternative history of the last four decades of the Ottoman Empire, Losing Istanbul frames global pivotal events through the experiences of Arab-Ottoman imperial loyalists who called Istanbul home, on the eve of a vanishing imperial world order. Reuben Silverman is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Stockholm University's Institute for Turkish Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Western Civ
Episode 231: Suleiman's Final Years

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 53:50


In our final episode on Suleiman the Magnificent, he nearly completes his conquest of the Mediterranean and Iran. Meanwhile, succession issues threaten to derail the entire Ottoman Empire. Still, when Suleiman dies in 1566 it is officially high tide for the Ottoman State.Website: www.westerncivpodcast.comPatreon: www.patreon.com/westerncivpodcastWestern Civ 2.0: www.glow.fm/westernciv

Empire
28. The Tudors and the Turks

Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 55:43


Slave raids in Cornwall. Englishmen spying for the venetians. The East India Trading Companies' older brother. Join William and Anita this week as they discuss the relationship between Britain and the Ottoman Empire, all of which centre around the Levant Company. LRB Empire offer: lrb.me/empire Twitter: @Empirepoduk Goalhangerpodcasts.com Producer: Callum Hill Exec Producer: Jack Davenport Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

historicly
Morocco: Islam, Pirates and Science with Elijah Fanon

historicly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 75:03


Today, anthropology scholar Elijah Fanon joins us to discuss the rich history of Morocco. A very special episode where we go through over 3000 years of history of a beautiful country. Show Notes0:01:11 - The Geography of Morocco0:02:00 - First Recorded Human life - 300,000 years ago.0:04:11 - Mitochondrial Eve 0:04:38 - First Sign of Civilization in Morocco0:05:21 - Amazigh Kingdom of Mauretania - During the Roman Times0:07:15 - When did Islam Come to Morocco?0:10:31 - Ibn Khaldoun0:16:00 - The Fall of the Umayyad Empire0:17:59:00 - Almoravid Empire0:20:20- The Red City of Morocco0:23:48 - Almohad Caliphate: The first non-Arab Caliphate0:26:10 - The Islamic Golden Age0:26:29 - The First University - Fatima Al Fihri0:28:15 - The Koran and the Scientific Method0:29:00 - The Alaween Dynasty in Morocco and how they kept power for over 500+ years0:32:00 - The Ottoman Empire 0:34:10 - Sayyida al-Hurra - The Female Pirate of North Africa0:36:10 - Esha approve of Robbing of Colonizers. 0:36:53 - Pirates and the Slavetrade0:38:46 - The First Friendship Treaty with the USA0:41:49 - World War 1 and Morocco0:46:17 - Rebellion in Fez0:47:10 - Rif and the Independence Movement0:48:11 - The Istiqlal Party0:50:56 - From Black to Gray0:55:23 - How the King of Morocco Protected all the Jews During Vichy France0:57:42 - The Birth of the Marxist Leninist Movement in Morocco1:00:10 - Operation Gladio (Morocco Edition)1:06:27 - The Arab Spring in Morocco1:07:04 -Belt and Road Initiative and China in Morocco1:10:54 - Western SaharaOther AnnouncementsJoin our weekly callin today at 12:30 PM Eastern TimeLit with Lenin at 12:00 Pm Eastern on Monday, Jan 16 Get full access to Historic.ly at www.historicly.net/subscribe

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
Introducing Diplomacy: Britain vs America 1838-1846

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 33:13


To get this series and 40+ hours of extra content, make sure you sign up for an annual Patreon membership to get 16% off NOW! I couldn't have got this far in the PhD without the support of you lovely patrons, and this is my way of saying thanksss, so why not nerd out with us?Oh boy, it's finally time! Now you get to see what I've been working on over the Christmas break, an extremely chunky and detailed twelve part series examining Anglo-American relations from 1838-1846. Expect fractious diplomacy, war scares, major tensions, close calls and settlements which dramatically affected how each side saw the other, with consequences that are felt to this day.In this introductory episode, I set the scene and justify my interest in this period, as well as explaining why YOU should care. We look at the British destruction of the Caroline, and question how this incident helped fan the flames of American hostility towards London, while Palmerston...shrugged his shoulders. The British Foreign Secretary, you see, had his hands full with keeping the Ottoman Empire propped up, while he also kept his eye on France. We're just beginning our journey in this fascinating period, and I can't wait to bring you along for the ride! A huge thanksss to all of my lovely patrons for supporting this show for so long. It's now official, I'm in the final stretch, and after this final set of fees, Dr Zack will be coming soon to earbuds near you! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Western Civ
Episode 230: Ottoman High Tide

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 56:08


In this episode, we follow Suleiman as he leads the Ottoman Empire to its territorial height. After teaming up with the intrepid Barbarossa, Suleiman leads the Ottoman navy across the Mediterranean until Ottoman hegemony over the eastern Mediterranean is complete and Charles V is forced into a defensive posture. Then, in 1541, Suleiman formally annexes Hungary, which will remain in Ottoman possession until 1699. Website: www.westerncivpodcast.comPatreon: www.patreon.com/westerncivpodcastWestern Civ 2.0 Free Trial: www.glow.fm/westernciv

Intervals
U.S. Immigrant Inspectors Abroad: Marcus Braun and the Transnational Production of the Bad Migrant

Intervals

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 33:07


Faced with increasing numbers of immigrants in the early 20th century, the United States sent special inspectors abroad to learn more about them. Marcus Braun was one such inspector who visited the Ottoman Empire, China, Mexico, and Eastern Europe during the course of his research. Our guest Dr. Randa Tawil, assistant professor of women and gender studies at Texas Christian University, details Braun's efforts to determine what made some immigrants desirable while others were deemed unfit and how his work and that of other special inspectors influenced U.S. immigration policy.Intervals is hosted by Christopher Brick, editor and principle investigator of the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers project at George Washington University, and Kariann Yokota, associate professor of history at University of Colorado Denver.Contact us at podcast@oah.org.

New Books in History
The Bedouin and the Formation of Iraq's National Borders

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:29


The British occupation of Iraq after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire led to the creation of Iraq's national boundaries, a process with profound and long-lasting implications for the inhabitants of Iraq's border regions. In his dissertation, "The Origins and Development of Iraq's National Boundaries, 1918-1932: Policing and Political Geography in the Iraq-Nejd and Iraq-Syria Borderlands" (University of Chicago, 2018), Dr. Carl Shook examined how Iraq's modern national borders were formed in relation to the Bedouin and to the policing of Bedouin tribes. In this episode he joins me to discuss the history of Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, the role of Bedouin tribespeople within the border formation process, and the effects of transnational borders on nomadic peoples. Follow Dr. Shook on Twitter. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Diplomatic History
The Bedouin and the Formation of Iraq's National Borders

New Books in Diplomatic History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:29


The British occupation of Iraq after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire led to the creation of Iraq's national boundaries, a process with profound and long-lasting implications for the inhabitants of Iraq's border regions. In his dissertation, "The Origins and Development of Iraq's National Boundaries, 1918-1932: Policing and Political Geography in the Iraq-Nejd and Iraq-Syria Borderlands" (University of Chicago, 2018), Dr. Carl Shook examined how Iraq's modern national borders were formed in relation to the Bedouin and to the policing of Bedouin tribes. In this episode he joins me to discuss the history of Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, the role of Bedouin tribespeople within the border formation process, and the effects of transnational borders on nomadic peoples. Follow Dr. Shook on Twitter. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
The Bedouin and the Formation of Iraq's National Borders

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:29


The British occupation of Iraq after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire led to the creation of Iraq's national boundaries, a process with profound and long-lasting implications for the inhabitants of Iraq's border regions. In his dissertation, "The Origins and Development of Iraq's National Boundaries, 1918-1932: Policing and Political Geography in the Iraq-Nejd and Iraq-Syria Borderlands" (University of Chicago, 2018), Dr. Carl Shook examined how Iraq's modern national borders were formed in relation to the Bedouin and to the policing of Bedouin tribes. In this episode he joins me to discuss the history of Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, the role of Bedouin tribespeople within the border formation process, and the effects of transnational borders on nomadic peoples. Follow Dr. Shook on Twitter. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in British Studies
The Bedouin and the Formation of Iraq's National Borders

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:29


The British occupation of Iraq after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire led to the creation of Iraq's national boundaries, a process with profound and long-lasting implications for the inhabitants of Iraq's border regions. In his dissertation, "The Origins and Development of Iraq's National Boundaries, 1918-1932: Policing and Political Geography in the Iraq-Nejd and Iraq-Syria Borderlands" (University of Chicago, 2018), Dr. Carl Shook examined how Iraq's modern national borders were formed in relation to the Bedouin and to the policing of Bedouin tribes. In this episode he joins me to discuss the history of Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, the role of Bedouin tribespeople within the border formation process, and the effects of transnational borders on nomadic peoples. Follow Dr. Shook on Twitter. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
The Bedouin and the Formation of Iraq's National Borders

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:29


The British occupation of Iraq after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire led to the creation of Iraq's national boundaries, a process with profound and long-lasting implications for the inhabitants of Iraq's border regions. In his dissertation, "The Origins and Development of Iraq's National Boundaries, 1918-1932: Policing and Political Geography in the Iraq-Nejd and Iraq-Syria Borderlands" (University of Chicago, 2018), Dr. Carl Shook examined how Iraq's modern national borders were formed in relation to the Bedouin and to the policing of Bedouin tribes. In this episode he joins me to discuss the history of Iraq's southern border with Saudi Arabia, the role of Bedouin tribespeople within the border formation process, and the effects of transnational borders on nomadic peoples. Follow Dr. Shook on Twitter. Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Middle East matters
The Kurds, a nation without a state: A century-long fight for rights and autonomy

Middle East matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 12:14


In this special edition of Middle East Matters, we focus on the Kurds. Spread across four nations, they are the world's largest stateless ethnic group. Indigenous to the Middle East and numbering at least 35 million, the Kurds have sought to establish a homeland of their own since the fall of the Ottoman Empire in the 1920s. They have endured decades of bloodshed in Iraq and also faced state oppression in Turkey, Iran and Syria. We take a closer look at the history and location of the Kurds and speak to researcher and journalist Guney Yildiz.

TNT Radio
Isa Blumi on Perspective with Jesse Zurawell - 3 January 2023

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 55:50


GUEST OVERVIEW: Isa Blumi is an a historian of the Islamic world, the Ottoman Empire, Albania and Yemen. He serves as Associate Professor at the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Stockholm University.

US History Repeated
Woodrow Wilson Part 3

US History Repeated

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 38:50


Jimmy and Jean complete their conversation on Woodrow Wilson and have the three same guests involved with us again.  We would like to thank: Emily Kilgore, Director of Education and Development at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum Andrew Philips, Curator at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum Elizabeth Karcher, President of the Woodrow Wilson House in Washington DC.    We previously covered some of the domestic issues Wilson faced and now cover some of the foreign issues during his presidency.   We delve into the Armenian genocide within the Ottoman Empire, something Turkey still does not acknowledge to this day, as well as other items like the Mexican civil war, the US occupation of Haiti, the Russian Revolution, and the Bolsheviks. We then round out the podcast with his post presidency, failing health, and the role his wife Edith played in supporting him.  Always more to learn, so take a listen!   -Jimmy & Jean

Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast

This podcast covers New Girl Season 3, Episode 18, Sister III, which originally aired on March 4, 2014 and was written by Camilla Blackett and directed by Jay Chandrasekhar. Here's a quick recap of the episode:In our third episode with Abby, Jess gets upset when she thinks that Abby and Schmidt are further along in their relationship than her and Nick, so they move in together. Meanwhile, Cece, and her new best friend Coach, are suspicious of Abby and try to get Schmidt to see it too.We discuss Pop Culture References such as:Garbage Pail Kids - Nick told Winston that Jess makes him put his Garbage Pail Kids in a box.The Little Match Girl - When Nick was wearing his nightshirt, Jess said he looked like the Little Match Girl. Additional Pop Culture References such as:[Nora] Ephron - Schmidt shared he needed a break from “Snora” Ephron. Nora Ephron was an American journalist, writer, and filmmaker who is best known for her romantic comedy films and was nominated three times for the Writers Guild of America Award and the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the movies Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally..., and Sleepless in Seattle. Ephron also directed films including her own screenplays like Sleepless in Seattle and You've Got Mail, both starring Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks.[The Trolley Song by Judy Garland] - Jess sang a portion of this song when she was in the hotel room, singing “Clang, clang, clang went the trolley | Ring, ring, ring went the bell”. "The Trolley Song'' is a song written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane and made famous by Judy Garland in the 1944 film Meet Me in St. Louis. Blane and Martin were nominated for and lost the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 1945 Academy Awards, for "The Trolley Song". The song was ranked #26 by the American Film Institute in 2004 on the AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs list. We also mention a fun fact about this song in our Trivia section in the podcast. Children of Men - Schmidt was concerned they hit a car in a neighborhood where it looked like they filmed Children of Men. Children of Men is a 2006 dystopian action thriller film co-written and directed by Alfonso Cuarón. The screenplay was based on P. D. James's 1992 novel The Children of Men, which takes place in 2027 when two decades of human infertility have left society on the brink of collapse.This episode, we discuss who is most likely to make their own jewelry, move in to prove a point, sleuth to find out what someone is up to, and be ready for rapidfire questions. We also cover the scene between Nick and Schmidt around the Iroquois throat band Abby gifted Schmidt as our “Schmidtism”. For “Not in the 2020s” we talk about Winston's comments to the little boy and Nick pantsing Winston. We also discuss Cece apologizing to Schmidt as our “Yes in the 2020s”. Additionally, we explore the career of Ericka Kreutz (Elevator Woman), the guest star of this episode.Also in this episode were the following guest stars who we do not discuss in the podcast: Stone Eisenmann (Young Nick - Previously Discussed in S2E13), Jordan Fuller (Young Winston - Previously Discussed in S2E13), Linda Cardellini (Abby Day - Previously Discussed in S3E16), and Connie Sawyer (Oldest Woman in the World).We did not find the bear this episode.While not discussed in the podcast, we noted other references in this episode including:Iroquois - Schmidt clarifies that the jewelry that Abby made him is an Iroquois throat band. The Iroquois are of the Iroquoian people who are Indigenous to the Northeastern Woodlands and the Great Lakes of North America. The Iroquois Confederacy was believed to be founded between 1450 and 1660 by bringing together five different nations in the southern Great Lakes area, with each nation having its own language, territory, and function.Byzantine - When Jess is in the hotel, she asks if there are any films in the Byzantine era. The Byzantine Empire was the continuation of the Roman Empire in the East, continuing after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. It existed until the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Ottoman Empire. At the time, it was called the Roman Empire and only became called by the term “Byzantine” after the end of the realm. Approximately this time period covers 395 CE to 1453.Ethel Kennedy - In this episode, Jess tells Abby her insecurities around Nick and mentions that while she went to the hotel by herself, she watched a documentary about Ethel Kennedy. Ethel Kennedy is known for being an American human rights advocate and the widow of the late Robert F. Kennedy. She founded a non-profit charity and in 2014 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.When Jess and Nick are agreeing that they shouldn't live together, they mention both the pilgrims and the Plymouth Rock Massacre.Plymouth Rock - While there wasn't actually a massacre, Plymouth Rock is the site that marked where the Plymouth Colony was founded in December of 1620 when the Mayflower landed in the “New World”.Pilgrim - A pilgrim is used to describe a traveler who goes on a journey to a holy place. In this case, it referred to the Pilgrim Fathers who came to North America on the Mayflower to escape religious persecution in England.This episode got a 7/10 rating from both Kritika and Kelly; Kritika's favorite character was Cece and Kelly's favorite was Coach.Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Episode 19!Music: "Hotshot” by scottholmesmusic.comFollow us on Twitter, Instagram or email us at whosthatgirlpod@gmail.com!Website: https://smallscreenchatter.com/

Western Civ
Episode 227: Sultan of the Faith

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 46:45


Mehmet II's death leads to a brief power struggle between his two sons: Bayezid and Cem. In the end, the Janissaries pick Bayezid and Cem finds himself packed off to Rome. Bayezid enlarges the Ottoman Empire picking up new territory in northern Syria. His death leads to his son, Selim I, taking the throne. Selim I expands the Ottoman Empire even further than his grandfather, ending the Mamluk Empire and extending Ottoman control to the Holy Land.Website: www.westerncivpodcast.comAd-Free Shows: www.patreon.com/westernicivpodcastWestern Civ 2.0 Free Trial: www.glow.fm/westernciv

The Ansari Podcast
World Famous Sultans & The Enslaved Elite?? An Honest History of The Ottoman Empire w. Professor Nabil Al-Tikriti

The Ansari Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 79:50


The Ansari Podcast: Ottoman Empire History Professor Nabil Al Tikriti, breaks down the mind blowing system of the Ottomans enslaving their elites. He narrates extravagant stories of the most Prestigious Ottoman Sultans. And discusses the general history of the Ottoman Empire and how it shaped Islamic thought, philosophy, spirituality and the modern day Sunni - Shia dynamic. 

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in Diplomatic History
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Diplomatic History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in World Affairs
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Political Science
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books Network
Muhammet Koçak, "Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:03


Turkey and Russia are two of the most significant powerhouses in Eurasia. The foreign policies of two countries directly impact the regional dynamics in Black Sea, Central Asia, Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Balkan regions. The changes in the bilateral relations between the two countries go well beyond the Black Sea region. In the past, the Russian Empire played a significant role in the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, and Turkey took part in containing the USSR during the Cold War by joining the NATO in 1952. In the twenty-first century, however, Turkey and Russia invested in bilateral trade and established significant partnerships in the strategic defense and energy sectors. In the same period, the competition between Turkey and Russia heightened, giving way to military confrontation in multiple fronts. Turkey-Russia Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Cooperation and Competition Amid Systemic Turbulence (Lexington, 2022) argues that the changing balance of power in the region has triggered adjustments in the foreign policies of Russia and Turkey in the twenty-first century. The decline of the US influence in the region have brought about increased engagement between Turkey and Russia in the form of partnerships and competition for influence. Muhammet Koçak received his PhD in International Relations from Florida International University. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

TNT Radio
Isa Blumi on Perspective with Jesse Zurawell - 20 December 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 55:45


GUEST OVERVIEW: Isa Blumi is an historian of the Islamic world, the Ottoman Empire, Albania and Yemen, serves as Associate Professor at the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Stockholm University.

gude/laurance podcast
GudeLaurance Podcast – Episode 355

gude/laurance podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022


Today on the show, Paul and Ben talk about why Paul has left the AI art community, ChatGPT and the Ottoman Empire, training AI to do jokes, Doom Patrol, Task Master, British panel shows, The Magic Order, and Count Dante.

Christadelphians Talk
God's Control of the Nations now proved by History. (Mike Jenner)

Christadelphians Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 48:35


Description: This talk demonstrates how ancient Bible prophecies have been fulfilled in relatively recent history. This includes the end of the Ottoman Empire, the return of the Jews to Israel and the development of the European Union. It shows how these prophecies indicate that a further stage of Bible prophecy is the establishment of the kingdom of God on Earth. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/christadelphians-talk/message

Infinite Cities Blaseball
ICB vs Lovers! Do You Just Have Pictures of Swords?

Infinite Cities Blaseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 89:30


The Lovers refuse to be defined by their name or icon. Instead, they've carved their own path, one much cooler and full of way, way more swords than expected. To walk us though how they forged their own fate, Avery (any), Kish aka somsnom (they/them), and Slappy McGee (he/they) have all travelled from the distant land of San Francisco to guide us through Lovers history, from Knight Triumphant all the way up to The Blimp. in this episode: snoms, swords, the call of the sea, the blimp, surprise bonus guests (!?), the madness of late expansion era, the tragic tale of Knight Triumphant, deebos, intentional community building, Joey Pizza knows your uncle. ~shoutouts zone~ Ottoman Empire calligrapher's tools A fantastic selection of polearm ends San Francisco BART train interior noise, that noise in Dead Space, and an article where the developers of legendary horror game Dead Space refer to the sound of the BART as 'the worst sound in the history of man' Parker is having a time 'Double Blimp' meme Clown Box, reactions, and friends Kish's cat, Thomas some fantastic deebos BACo: Acid is a Replacement Level Blood (feat feather!) Guilded. - A BLB Poetry Zine ~~~ Our theme music comes from the wonderful Hokuto. Want to shout about the episode? Join us at the Taco Stand Discord - it's open to everyone, not just Tacos! Each episode is discussed in the #podco-truck channel.. Our twitter is @CitiesPod, and if you want to link to us, you can catch us at blaseball1.com! We are featherwings#3879, WillofChris#6129, KarpskryparN#2963, and Gary#7675, and we are Infinite Cities Blaseball.

TNT Radio
Isa Blumi on Perspective with Jesse Zurawell - 15 December 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 55:11


GUEST OVERVIEW: Isa Blumi is a a historian of the Islamic world, the Ottoman Empire, Albania and Yemen, serves as Associate Professor at the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Stockholm University.

Anytime Now
Roxelana

Anytime Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 19:01


Who do you imagine when you think of people with great power and influence? It's probably not the wife of Ottoman sultan, Süleyman the Magnificent, who was kidnapped from her home in Eastern Europe and taken to Istanbul as a child. Yet, this woman became one of the most powerful and influential women in Ottoman history. Her name was Roxelana and she left her mark on history during the sixteenth century through her involvement with state affairs and charities. Let's travel to modern-day Turkey and learn about this powerful, and often controversial, woman of influence.  About Honest History Honest History creates award-winning books, magazines, and this show for young historians across the world. Our mission is to inspire kids to create a positive impact on history themselves. Learn more at honesthistory.co and @honesthistory. Credits This episode was hosted by Kelly Ryan, written by Heidi Coburn and produced by Randall Lawrence. Original theme music was written and recorded by Luke Messimer.  More Enjoy this episode? Share with your friends and don't forget to rate and review. See you next time!

Empire
22. The First of the Ottomans

Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 39:58


Join William and Anita as they, along with Peter Frankopan, detail the birth of the Ottoman Empire, discuss its founder, Osman I, and set the scene for 1453. To get your free two week trial for Find my past, go to www.findmypast.co.uk and sign up.   LRB Empire offer: lrb.me/xempire   Twitter: @Empirepoduk   Goalhangerpodcasts.com   Producer: Callum Hill Exec Producer: Jack Davenport Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Empire
Series 2 - The Ottoman Empire

Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 7:27


How did an Empire that stretched over thousands of miles and over half a millennium impact the world we live in today? William and Anita explain the focus for the second series of the Empire, which will focus on the Ottoman Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Geography
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books in Anthropology
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in History
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatcă, "Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 42:59


The episode features Anca Parvulescu and Manuela Boatca, co-authors of an extraordinary, field-shifting new book – Creolizing the Modern: Transylvania across Empires (Cornell University Press, 2022). Dr. Boatca is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, where she teaches and publishes widely on world-systems analysis, decolonial perspectives on global inequalities, gender and citizenship in modernity/coloniality, and the geopolitics of knowledge in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parvulescu joins us from St. Louis where she teaches at the Washington University's English Department. A prolific author, she has worked in the fields of literary theory and criticism, visual culture, female labor and migration, and the East-West relations in contemporary European history. The result of their sustained collaboration, Creolizing the Modern develops a comparative, multidisciplinary method for engaging with areas of the world that have inherited multiple, conflicting imperial and anti-imperial histories. Transylvania, one such historical region at the intersection of the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Austria-Hungary, and Russia, has offered Boatca and Parvulescu a platform for a multi-level reading of topics that include the region's capitalist integration into global commercial circuits, antisemitism and slavery, multilingualism, gender relations, and religion. Using Liviu Rebreanu's 1920 modernist novel Ion as an analytical point of departure and a chronicle of Transylvania's modernities, the co-authors provide innovative decolonial perspectives that aim to creolize modernity and the modern world-system. Vladislav Lilic is a doctoral candidate in Modern European History at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

Empire
21. Byzantium and the Rise of the Turks

Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 46:58


The lights are dimmed. A hush has fallen. The curtain is rising.    Season two of Empire is here. Our topic? The Ottoman Empire. In the opening episode, Anita and William are joined by Peter Frankopan to discuss Byzantium and the rise of the Seljuk Turks. To get your free two week trial for Find my past, go to www.findmypast.co.uk and sign up.   LRB Empire offer: lrb.me/xempire   Twitter: @Empirepoduk   Goalhangerpodcasts.com   Producer: Callum Hill Exec Producer: Jack Davenport Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Turkey Book Talk
Ryan Gingeras on the last days of the Ottoman Empire, 1918-1922

Turkey Book Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 44:38


Ryan Gingeras on “The Last Days of the Ottoman Empire 1918-1922” (Allen Lane). The conversation addresses events between the end of the First World War and the declaration of the Turkish Republic, while also touching on how these years are remembered in today's Turkey. Become a member to support Turkey Book Talk. Members get a 35% discount on all Turkey/Ottoman History books published by IB Tauris/Bloomsbury, transcripts of every interview, transcripts of the whole archive, and over 200 reviews covering Turkish and international fiction, history and politics.

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Gabriel Polley, "Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land" (I. B. Tauris, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 67:22


In this episode I have interviewed Gabriel Polley, winner of the Ibrahim Dakkak Award for the best essay published in 2021 by the Jerusalem Quarterly. Narratives of the modern history of Palestine/Israel often begin with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and Britain's arrival in 1917. However, this work argues that the contest over Palestine has its roots deep in the 19th century, with Victorians who first cast the Holy Land as an area to be possessed by empire, then began to devise schemes for its settler colonization. The product of historical research among almost forgotten guidebooks, archives and newspaper clippings, this book presents a previously unwritten chapter of Britain's colonial desire, and reveals how indigenous Palestinians began to react against, or accommodate themselves to, the West's fascination with their ancestral land. From the travellers who tried to overturn Jerusalem's holiest sites, to an uprising sparked by a church bell and a missionary's tragic actions, to one Palestinian's eventful visit to the heart of the British Empire, Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land (I. B. Tauris, 2022) reveals how the events of the nineteenth century have cast a long shadow over the politics of Palestine/Israel ever since. Roberto Mazza is currently an independent scholar. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in History
Gabriel Polley, "Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land" (I. B. Tauris, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 67:22


In this episode I have interviewed Gabriel Polley, winner of the Ibrahim Dakkak Award for the best essay published in 2021 by the Jerusalem Quarterly. Narratives of the modern history of Palestine/Israel often begin with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and Britain's arrival in 1917. However, this work argues that the contest over Palestine has its roots deep in the 19th century, with Victorians who first cast the Holy Land as an area to be possessed by empire, then began to devise schemes for its settler colonization. The product of historical research among almost forgotten guidebooks, archives and newspaper clippings, this book presents a previously unwritten chapter of Britain's colonial desire, and reveals how indigenous Palestinians began to react against, or accommodate themselves to, the West's fascination with their ancestral land. From the travellers who tried to overturn Jerusalem's holiest sites, to an uprising sparked by a church bell and a missionary's tragic actions, to one Palestinian's eventful visit to the heart of the British Empire, Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land (I. B. Tauris, 2022) reveals how the events of the nineteenth century have cast a long shadow over the politics of Palestine/Israel ever since. Roberto Mazza is currently an independent scholar. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Gabriel Polley, "Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land" (I. B. Tauris, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 67:22


In this episode I have interviewed Gabriel Polley, winner of the Ibrahim Dakkak Award for the best essay published in 2021 by the Jerusalem Quarterly. Narratives of the modern history of Palestine/Israel often begin with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and Britain's arrival in 1917. However, this work argues that the contest over Palestine has its roots deep in the 19th century, with Victorians who first cast the Holy Land as an area to be possessed by empire, then began to devise schemes for its settler colonization. The product of historical research among almost forgotten guidebooks, archives and newspaper clippings, this book presents a previously unwritten chapter of Britain's colonial desire, and reveals how indigenous Palestinians began to react against, or accommodate themselves to, the West's fascination with their ancestral land. From the travellers who tried to overturn Jerusalem's holiest sites, to an uprising sparked by a church bell and a missionary's tragic actions, to one Palestinian's eventful visit to the heart of the British Empire, Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land (I. B. Tauris, 2022) reveals how the events of the nineteenth century have cast a long shadow over the politics of Palestine/Israel ever since. Roberto Mazza is currently an independent scholar. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Islamic Studies
Gabriel Polley, "Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land" (I. B. Tauris, 2022)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 67:22


In this episode I have interviewed Gabriel Polley, winner of the Ibrahim Dakkak Award for the best essay published in 2021 by the Jerusalem Quarterly. Narratives of the modern history of Palestine/Israel often begin with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and Britain's arrival in 1917. However, this work argues that the contest over Palestine has its roots deep in the 19th century, with Victorians who first cast the Holy Land as an area to be possessed by empire, then began to devise schemes for its settler colonization. The product of historical research among almost forgotten guidebooks, archives and newspaper clippings, this book presents a previously unwritten chapter of Britain's colonial desire, and reveals how indigenous Palestinians began to react against, or accommodate themselves to, the West's fascination with their ancestral land. From the travellers who tried to overturn Jerusalem's holiest sites, to an uprising sparked by a church bell and a missionary's tragic actions, to one Palestinian's eventful visit to the heart of the British Empire, Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land (I. B. Tauris, 2022) reveals how the events of the nineteenth century have cast a long shadow over the politics of Palestine/Israel ever since. Roberto Mazza is currently an independent scholar. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books Network
Gabriel Polley, "Palestine in the Victorian Age: Colonial Encounters in the Holy Land" (I. B. Tauris, 2022)

New Books Network